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Could a form of sugar treat deadly disease?

CNN - Wed, 11/26/2014 - 04:39
Big wooden planters full of ripe tomatoes. Homemade pickles. Over good wine and grilled steak at the home of Chris and Hugh Hempel, in the hills around Reno, Nevada, the conversation turns to biomedical research and genetics.
Categories: National News

Mike Rowe: coffee pro

CNN - Wed, 11/26/2014 - 04:38
Mike is introduced to coffee cupping, a taste evaluation based on the bean's region, country, farm and crop. See 12/3 9p
Categories: National News

'Sad' Christmas tree will stay put

CNN - Wed, 11/26/2014 - 04:37
The 50-foot Christmas tree decorating downtown Reading, Pennsylvania, was supposed to spread holiday cheer, but instead it made some residents unhappy.
Categories: National News

One Chinese company makes one-third of the world's cigarettes

Business News - Wed, 11/26/2014 - 04:37
When it comes to the tobacco business, bigger has long been considered better in China.

UVA case shows colleges' tolerance for rape culture

CNN - Wed, 11/26/2014 - 04:34
John Foubert says suspending fraternities after Rolling Stone article alleging gang rape is not enough. Colleges must create a culture that reliably prevents rape and punishes rapists.
Categories: National News

Two Minnesota men charged accused of supporting ISIS

CNN - Wed, 11/26/2014 - 04:29
Two Minnesota men face criminal charges in connection with terrorist activities by the Syrian group ISIL, according to a federal criminal complaint filed in Minneapolis.
Categories: National News

No. 25 Bulldogs Roll Past ULM 80-46

Bulldog Beat - Tue, 11/25/2014 - 23:17
STARKVILLE, Miss. – Following a grueling four-game run to the WNIT championship, No. 25 Mississippi State returned to the court and won its first game this season as a ranked team.

'Black lives matter,' protesters insist in fresh round of Ferguson demos

CNN - Tue, 11/25/2014 - 22:59
Hours after protests over the grand jury decision in Michael Brown's death rocked Ferguson, Missouri, people across the country took to the streets to voice their anger again Tuesday.
Categories: National News

Suze Orman leaving CNBC, developing new show

Business News - Tue, 11/25/2014 - 21:57
"The Suze Orman Show" is ending on CNBC, and its host has her sights set on a new television home.

Streets of Ferguson smolder

CNN - Tue, 11/25/2014 - 20:50
This is what Ferguson looked like Tuesday morning.
Categories: National News

Prescott and Beckwith Named Finalists For National Awards

Bulldog Beat - Tue, 11/25/2014 - 18:31
STARKVILLE, Miss. – Mississippi State junior quarterback Dak Prescott was named a finalist for the 78th Maxwell Award as well as the Davey O'Brien National Quarterback Award, ESPNU announced Tuesday.

Prisoners got $70 million from fake tax refund claims

Business News - Tue, 11/25/2014 - 18:15
Prisoners are filing bogus tax refund claims from jail, and some are actually getting away with it.

With $1 million saved, should we hire a financial adviser?

Business News - Tue, 11/25/2014 - 18:07
Read full story for latest details.

These professional Christmas light displays can cost thousands

Business News - Tue, 11/25/2014 - 17:41
Read full story for latest details.

Paris police foil Cartier jewelry heist

CNN World - Tue, 11/25/2014 - 17:22
A jewelry heist on one the world's most prestigious jewelry stores has been foiled, and both would-be thieves are in police custody after an attempted escape amidst a flurry of security forces, according to police, eyewitnesses and French media.
Categories: International News

Smith focused, ready for the NFR

Twisted Rodeo - Tue, 11/25/2014 - 17:20

REXBURG, Idaho – When Wyatt Smith looks back at 2014, he points to a certain moment as the turning point and a key reason as to why he qualified for the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo.

“San Antonio was a huge boost for me,” said Smith, who won the steer wrestling title in San Antonio this past February. “I got a lot of confidence from that, and I was able to stay very consistent through the year.”

It paid off. Smith pocketed $57,188 through the regular season, which ran through the end of September. He heads to Las Vegas next week as the 13th ranked bulldogger – only the top 15 contestants in each event earn the right to compete for the biggest pay in the game. Go-round winners will earn $19,000 each night for 10 nights.

Wyatt Smith

Wyatt Smith

“It still hasn’t really set in; all I’m doing is living out a dream,” said Smith, 26, of Rexburg, Idaho.

The dream started two decades ago as a youngster in a rodeo family. His father, Lynn, and mother, Valorie, provided the tools for Wyatt and his younger brother, Garrett.

“Rodeo is a lifestyle,” Wyatt Smith said. “My family is the big boost in every way that they can, from helping me take care of horses all the time to helping take care of everything when I’m gone. Everything we do is rodeo, rodeo, rodeo.

“My mom helps me a lot with goal-setting. It would help me keep my focus and drive and take care of practice and everything else. When school was out, I was saddling horses, and we were practicing. My dad had everything ready for us when we needed.”

That type of support means everything to Smith, who also won event titles in Evanston, Wyo., and Salt Lake City.

“There’s never a negative moment in our house,” he said. “We were just a little small family from Rexburg, Idaho. I’ve always had that positive influence and the push and drive.”

That influence and a true passion has been a guiding force for Smith, who won both the National High School Rodeo Association and the National Intercollegiate Rodeo Association championships in the all-around and steer wrestling. A big part of that was the dedication he had to getting better.

“When I was younger, my idol was Ty Murray,” Smith said of the nine-time world champion. “He did lots of gymnastics, learning to use his body and control his body. He was one of the greatest and a legend. If he was doing it, I wanted to learn.

“It was just a way to stay in shape and keep the flexibility and control in my body.”

It seems to have worked well for Smith, who began competing in ProRodeo in 2008. He has finished among the top 55 cowboys in the world standings each of the previous three years, but his run in 2014 is his best so far.

Through all the greatness that came his way over the last 12 months, there was one major challenge. In mid-May, he lost his main partner, a 14-year-old gelding he called Short Bus.

“It was dang sure tough,” Smith said, his voice cracking. “When we travel around, it’s just just the traveling partners that become our family; our horses are, too. It’s how we make money and how we survive. Losing a good horse is tragic to a lot of things. I was just fortunate to have other horses to get on this year.”

Short Bus suffered a brain aneurism while Smith was at the rodeo in Ramona, Calif. The horse died just before Smith was to compete.

“That made it awful tough for the night,” he said. “I held it together to bulldog and haze a few steers, then I handed the horses off and headed to the truck. I was done for the night.”

That painful moment could have derailed everything Smith had worked for, but he viewed it more as a challenge to overcome. He knew there still was business ahead of him, so he tended to it, all while traveling with a team of steer wrestlers called “The Recking Crew”: Smith, Tom Lewis, Sean Santucci and Christin Radabaugh.

“What I like most about rodeo is the lifestyle,” he said. “We get to travel around the country and see different places. We get to go anywhere we want and get to do what we love. You set yourself up to be around great people all the time.”

Now he has the opportunity to ply his trade on rodeo’s grandest stage, the NFR.

“There are a lot of guys who could be at the finals right now that just didn’t have the luck,” Smith said. “There are so many bulldoggers out there that bulldog outstanding. It’s such a privilege to be one of the top 15 in the world and get to go to the finals.

“I’d love to win a round buckle. I want to go at it like I do at every rodeo I go to, and that’s to win as much money as I can.”

When the dust settles on the final night of the 2014 season, the contestants who have earned the most money in each event will earn the gold buckle awarded to the world champion.

“That would be outstanding and would be a lifelong achievement,” he said. “It is dang sure a possibility and is within reach if everything goes right. You’re always reaching for that, but in the back of your mind, you’re going to take each pen of steers one at a time.

“I don’t have to beat all the greats. I have to throw my steers down and let them play out the rest.”

Categories: Twisted Rodeo

New York Times names an innovation editor

Business News - Tue, 11/25/2014 - 17:18
The 163-year-old New York Times now has an editor for innovation and strategy.

Bulldogs Close Out 2014 Home Slate Against Texas A&M

Bulldog Beat - Tue, 11/25/2014 - 17:13
STARKVILLE, Miss. – Play at the Newell-Grissom Building for the 2014 season will officially conclude on Wednesday, Nov. 26, when the Mississippi State volleyball Bulldogs (7-24, 2-14 SEC) host the Texas A&M Aggies (19-8, 11-5 SEC).

Champions League: Lionel Messi breaks goalscoring record

CNN World - Tue, 11/25/2014 - 17:12
Lionel Messi scores a hat-trick to become the most successful goalscorer in European Champions League history as Barcelona thrashes Apoel Nicosia 4-0.
Categories: International News

‘Good Ol’ Gals Tell All’ about cowboys

Twisted Rodeo - Tue, 11/25/2014 - 16:44

LAS VEGAS – Terri Powers thinks there are more pertinent story lines about the Western lifestyle than most books written on the subject portray.

“When I decided to write books for the rodeo crowd, I saw that most cowboy books out there are either historical, old-timey stuff or Western romance novels,” said Powers, an author from Albuquerque, N.M. “Instead, I want to do entertaining books that are more relevant to today’s cowboy.”

She’s done it so far. Powers wrote Gold Buckles Don’t Lie, the Untold Tale of Fred Whitfield, which was released in 2013. It’s been quite a success, especially among rodeo fans that have followed the career of Whitfield, an eight-time world champion calf roper and pro rodeo’s most decorated African-American cowboy.

This December, Powers releases “Cowboy Tails, Good Ol’ Gals Tell All,” a collection of short stories from women who have loved cowboys “to varying degrees of success.” She will be in Las Vegas from Dec. 5-14 for signings and appearances during the upcoming National Finals Rodeo.

“The book is based on my decision at 8 years old to never marry a cowboy,” Powers said. “I remember being quite certain, even as a little kid, that I didn’t want to end up with a cowboy.”

It’s something she never thought about again until writing Whitfield’s story.

“It was then that I realized there are some really awesome women out there who would not have anything but a cowboy,” she said. “I wondered what they knew that I didn’t, and Cowboy Tails was born. Regardless of the specifics, I figured the women’s stories would be a good time, and they are.”

Rodeo life is nothing new to Powers, whose father designed and built rodeo equipment during the 1960s. Her older brother was a tie-down roper, and her son is a team roper. Having seen the heartbreak rodeo can bring, she was never interested in it herself.

“I have always loved horses and still do,” she said.

Though she wanted to remain tied to cowboys and the rodeo way of life, Powers wanted her second book to be as far removed from her first as she could get.

“Gold Buckles was about somebody; Cowboy Tails is about everybody,” Powers said. “I started with my friends, women that I knew had been with cowboys. Very early, I knew I was on to something, so I next took it to the cyber crowd and talked to woman all over the country. I listened to them tell of the perks and perils of life with a cowboy, then, at the end, I analyzed my decision based on their stories.”

And, oh, what stories.

“There are 43 chapters,” Powers said. “The majority of them are one woman telling one story in one chapter, however, there are three or four women with stories throughout the book, which is structured to follow the course of a woman’s life: The first ones, the last ones and all the ones in between.”

Powers interviewed every woman, most of whom remain anonymous.

“The only common thread among the woman was that they had loved a cowboy, so their stories are all over the map,” she said. “I heard stories about stereotypical ornery, rotten rodeo cowboys, as well as stories of men who made me proud to me an American. They were very funny, but also very heart-warming.”

There are stories from women through the generations.

“One of my favorite stories is from a woman whose father was a cowboy, but her mother was a city girl from San Diego who fell for all of his outlandish stories,” Powers said. “He once told her that cockleburs were porcupine embryos, and if you put them into the oven, they would hatch. She believed him.”

Bull riders really took a hit in this book, and Powers said there were some wild stories about them. While she wasn’t too surprised about the bull riders, Powers said she was surprised to hear about another side of often chauvinist cowboys.

“Many women talked about how their cowboys pushed them to do more than they ever thought they could,” she said. “I found that paradox interesting. These supposed chauvinists often had more faith in their women’s abilities than the women themselves had, and pushed them far beyond their comfort zone.”

Updated information on Las Vegas signings and appearances will be made on the book’s website, www.CowboyTails.com. Some of the storytellers will be with her periodically during the NFR.

So why is this the best time to release the book?

“I wanted to get the biggest start I could,” she said. “I think it will make an awesome Christmas gift. This book is angled toward women, but in the end, I think it appeals to everybody.”

She also will begin investigating her next book while in Las Vegas.

“The women have had their turn, but I think my next book will allow the cowboys to have their say,” Powers said. “I’ll be talking to as many cowboys as I can during this year’s NFR and have Cowboy Tails II ready to release at next year’s NFR.”

When the National Finals Rodeo heads to Las Vegas every December, 119 contestants will battle for the top prize money in the game. They bring with them hundreds of thousands of fans to the Nevada desert looking for stories of cowboys, cowgirls and the Western lifestyle.

Terri Powers has found a perfect niche with rodeo fans and plans to stay there for years to come.

Categories: Twisted Rodeo
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