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August 14, 2014

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THE SALINE
INDEX
OBITUARIES .............................. 3
EDITORIAL ................................. 4
SPORTS .................................. 6,7
CLASSIFIEDS .......................... 10
COMICS ................................... 11
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SALINE COUNTY’S NEWS SOURCE SINCE 1876
THURSDAY
August 14, 2014
Volume 137
Number 226
1 Section 12 Pages
50¢
Home of Cheri Montalvo
and Captola Henry
‘One Last Tow’
Unique send-off planned for Jones
If there’s a name instantly
recognizable by a whole stra-
ta of folks in Saline County
— particularly those of a
certain age — it’s the name
Gene Jones.
Mr. Jones, who owned and
operated a wrecker service
in this community for more
than 30
years, died
Sunday at
the age of
83.
He retired
in 1993 and
is to be bur-
ied today at
Pinecrest Memorial Park.
During the three decades
when he was a familiar fig-
ure in the community, he
connected with a goodly por-
tion of the population by pull-
ing their cars out of ditches
and towing their wrecked
vehicles to his business.
Known for his salty tongue
and his humor, Mr. Jones
also made a name for himself
with his acts of kindness.
Though the towing service
By Lynda Hollenbeck
lyndahol@yahoo.com
WORKING OUT THE KINKS
JOSH BRIGGS/The Saline Courier
Aaron Weatherford, sophomore quarterback at Glen Rose, looks at the defense as he prepares to say “hut” during sum-
mer drills. The Beavers graduated 13 starters from a season ago, making room for younger talent in 2014. Weatherford
and senior Chase Haynes are set to split time at quarterback this season.

“My dad meant a lot
to a lot of people ... he
touched a lot of lives.
This was unexpected, but
it’s really appreciated.”
— Robert Jones
Son of Gene Jones
Jones
JONES, page 12
Filings continue as Friday deadline approaches
A single-engine plane carry-
ing three people crashed at the
Saline County Regional Airport
around 5:30 p.m. Tuesday
The Federal Aviation
Administration is investigating
the incident.
According to a report from
the FAA, a Piper PA-28 was
practicing takeoffs and land-
ings as a part of an instruction-
al flight with a two-man flight
crew and one passenger.
During one of the touch-and-
go landings, the aircraft experi-
enced a hard landing, causing
the subsequent collapse of the
left main landing gear, FAA
officials said.
The aircraft sustained
unspecified damage, according
to the FAA report.
No injuries were reported by
the crew or the passenger, who
were not identified.
No injuries
reported in
plane crash
By Bobbye Pyke
bpyke@bentoncourier.com
Candidates are continu-
ing to file for municipal
positions to be determined
in the November general
election.
The recent filing period
opened at noon July 25 and
closes at noon Aug. 15.
As of early morning
today, the following individu-
als had filed as candidates.
The candidates listed
here also include those who
previously filed for county
positions before the prefer-
ential primary election, but
will be included on the Nov.
4 general election ballot.
Alexander
•Mayor, Farren Wadley;
Corliss Jerry Ball.
•Alderman, Ward 1,
Position 1, no filings to date.
•Alderman, Ward 1,
Position 2, Jean Cummings
Fisher; Jeffery S. Watson.
•Alderman, Ward 2,
Position 1, no filings to date.
•Alderman, Ward 2,
Position 2, Andy Mullins.
•Alderman, Ward 3,
Position 1, Andrea Bearden.
•Alderman, Ward 3,
Position 2, Harvey C.
Howard.
•Alderman, Ward 4,
Position 1, Monroe Cates.
•Alderman, Ward 4,
Position 2, Alderman Lonny
Chapman, incumbent.
Bauxite
•Mayor, Eddie Jones;
Debbie Purifoy.
•Alderman, Position 1, no
filings to date.
•Alderman, Position 2, no
filings to date.
•Alderman, Position 3,
Mae Clark.
•Alderman, Position 4,
Michael Collins.
•Alderman, Position 5,
Mona Struble, incumbent.
Benton
(All races are nonparti-
san.)
•Mayor, Mayor David J.
Mattingly, incumbent.
•City Clerk, Cindy
Stracener, incumbent.
•City Attorney, Brent
Houston, incumbent.
•Alderman, Ward 1,
Position 1, Alderman Frank
Baptist, incumbent; Ron
James.
•Alderman, Ward 1,
Position 2, Alderman Kerry
Murphy, incumbent.
•Alderman, Ward
2, Position 1, Charles
Cunningham, incumbent.
•Alderman, Ward 2,
Position 2, Evelyn Calvin
Reed, incumbent..
•Alderman, Ward 3,
Position 1, Alderman Bill
Donnor, incumbent.
•Alderman, Ward 3,
Position 2, Alderman Jerry
Ponder, incumbent; Freddy
Burton; Rick Holland.
•Alderman, Ward 4,
Position 1, Brad Moore,
incumbent; Jim Gardner
•Alderman, Ward
4, Position 2, James A.
Herzfeld, incumbent.
•Alderman, Ward 5,
Position 1, Steve Lee, incum-
bent.
•Alderman, Ward 5,
Position 2, Alderman Lori
Beaty Terrell, incumbent.
Bryant
(All races are nonparti-
san.)
•Mayor, Randy Cox;
Alderman Adrian Henley;
Mayor Jill Dabbs, incum-
bent.
•City Clerk, Clerk
Heather McKim, incumbent;
Sue Ashcraft.
•City Attorney, Doug
Mays; Josh Farmer.
•Alderman, Ward 1,
Position 1, Lorne Gladden.
•Alderman, Ward 1,
Position 2, Wade Permenter.
•Alderman, Ward 2,
Position 1, Alderman Mike
Chandler, incumbent.
•Alderman, Ward 2,
Position 2, Rae Ann Fields;
Jerry Henson.
•Alderman, Ward 3,
By Lynda Hollenbeck
lyndahol@yahoo.com
FILINGS, page 12
Prosecuting
attorney
looking into
Bryant audit
The 2012 legislative audit findings
for the city of Bryant were released to
the public Wednesday and two find-
ings have been referred to Ken Casady,
Saline County
Prosecuting
Attorney.
These
two findings
involve lack
of docu-
mentation
or no docu-
mentation for
travel expense,
said state Rep.
Kim Hammer, who serves
on the state legislative audit committee.
These expenses total $5,573, according
to the audit report.
“When I spoke to legislative audit
(committee members) yesterday, they
said that they have some items that will
be given to the prosecuting attorney for
By Sarah Perry
sperry@bentoncourier.com
AUDIT, page 9
SALINE COUNTY
WEATHER FORECAST
THURSDAY NIGHT: Lows in the
mid 60s.
FRIDAY: Sunny with highs in the
lower 90s.
FRIDAY NIGHT: Lows in the
upper 60s.
SATURDAY: Mostly sunny with
highs in the lower 90s.
SATURDAY NIGHT: Lows in the
lower 70s.
SUNDAY: Chance of rain with
highs in the lower 90s.
SUNDAY NIGHT: Lows in the
upper 70s.
2 The Saline Courier
Thursday, August 14, 2014
1703 Military Rd • Benton 778-5111 5997 Hwy 67 • Haskell 860-7111
SALINE COURIER SCRAPBOOK 1989
Courier photo
TAKING A WELL DESERVED BREAK. In a rare moment of relaxation, Harmony Grove science teacher
Judith Bean takes time out with her dog, Ginger, and a good book. A dedicated scholar, Bean dis-
cusses her active summer schedule in today’s Focus on Friday feature.
Ross, Hutchinson offer different way to Delta jobs
PINE BLUFF —
Gubernatorial candidates
Asa Hutchinson and Mike
Ross each expressed a desire
to improve the quality of
the Arkansas workforce
Wednesday but differed on
how to do it.
The pair spoke separately
to business, education and
political leaders at a Delta
Regional Authority confer-
ence about efforts to improve
the number and quality of
jobs available in the impover-
ished region.
“The Delta economy is
constantly changing and our
workforce training needs
to change with it,” said
Chris Masingill, the federal
co-chairman of the Delta
Regional Authority. The
agency’s daylong seminar
focused on efforts to develop
new skills among the work-
force and improve the profi-
ciency of those who already
have jobswith the hope of
attracting new and high-tech
businesses.
Ross said Arkansas need-
ed to find a way to begin a
child’s education at an earlier
age, reiterating his previous
plan to expand pre-kindergar-
ten programs for 4-year-olds.
“I think we need to start
sooner and finish stronger,”
the Democratic candidate
told the seminar at the
University of Arkansas at
Pine Bluff.
Hutchinson, a Republican,
targeted older students, say-
ing two-year colleges needed
to work with high schools to
develop laborers.
“We can’t wait 10 years to
develop a skilled workforce,”
Hutchinson said. He said he
also supported pre-kindergar-
ten programs, but believed
high school students should
be able to enter a two-year
college program and learn a
trade.
He repeated a previous
suggestion that training be
developed regionally — in
high-tourism areas, schools
should offer hospitality class-
es. Industrial areas should
train machinists and welders.
Ross said it was important
to reach Arkansas children
at a younger age, because
fewer than half of 4-year-olds
have access to programs that
could boost their reading
skills before a critical point in
their education. Districts that
do offer programs often have
a waiting list.
Until fourth grade, he said,
“you’re learning to read. After
fourth grade, you’re reading
to learn,” Ross said.
The Delta Regional
Authority has called for
merging programs that
combine education and job
skills and finding new ways
to learn and improve living
conditions in the region.
Annette Kline of Strong
Manufacturing, a former
member of the Southeast
Arkansas (SEARK) college
board of trustees, said that
after years of telling chil-
dren they need to have a
college education, the truth
is Arkansascould also use
skilled workers, too.
“We need welders,” she
said.
A theme emerged during
the course of the seminar:
If Arkansas hopes to attract
high-quality jobs, it has to
have people who can do the
work.
University of Arkansas
at Pine Bluff Chancellor
Laurence Alexander said his
school is seeking to merge
with businesses and indus-
tries to produce a “highly
skilled and professional
workforce” that perhaps
could draw jobback to the
region.
“We are preparing stu-
dents for jobs in the 21st cen-
tury,” Alexander said. “That
takes great care. It takes
planning. It takes partners.”
Delta counties often have
the higher unemployment
rates in the state, as many
manufacturers have left the
area over several decades.
Pine Bluff is the seat of
Jefferson County, which in
June had an unemployment
rate of 9 percent. Nearby
Pulaski County, which
includes Little Rock, was at 6
percent. Washington County
in northwest Arkansas had a
rate of 4.8 percent. Figures
were even worse a year ago
— 11.1 percent in Jefferson
County.
Associated Press
Benton Police
Department
Wednesday
•A woman on Gattin Road
reported she was involved
in a verbal disturbance with
her boyfriend.
•Halima Tahiri, 28,
of Benton was arrested
on Rosewood Drive and
charged with battery on a
household or family mem-
ber.
•An unnamed man was
arrested at Rivendell and
charged with breaking or
entering, criminal trespass-
ing, criminal mischief,
obstruction of government
operations and fleeing on
foot.
Saline County
Sheriff’s Office
Wednesday
•A man on Russwood
West Lane reported rings
were stolen.
•A man on Chicot Road
reported his girlfriend
assaulted him.
•A woman on Arch Street
Pike reported her purse was
stolen from her vehicle.
•A man on Cathcart Road
reported the license plate
was stolen from his vehicle.
Benton Fire
Department
Wednesday
Benton firefighters
responded to seven rescue
calls, a gas leak and a con-
trolled burn.
Bryant Fire
Department
Wednesday
Bryant firefighters
responded to two medical
calls and a vehicle fire.
Daily Dispatch is published daily in The Saline Courier as
reports are received from local law enforcement agencies. Daily
Dispatch articles are edited for brevity and relevancy, and con-
tain only information provided by law enforcement. Content
written by Sarah Perry, a reporter for The Saline Courier.
DAILY DISPATCH
Gay couples oppose delaying Arkansas lawsuit
LITTLE ROCK —
Lawyers for gay couples
challenging Arkansas’ ban
on same-sex marriages
said Wednesday they won’t
agree to delay a pair of
lawsuits while the U.S.
Supreme Court considers
taking up the matter.
The couples sued
Arkansas in state and feder-
al courts last year, claiming
that a constitutional amend-
ment passed overwhelm-
ingly by Arkansas voters in
2004 made them second-
class citizens.
State lawyers last week
asked the local courts to
suspend proceedings in
the cases while a similar
one from Utah goes to the
U.S. Supreme Court. The
couples argued Wednesday
they should be allowed to
proceed.
“Plaintiffs are harmed
every day that they are
denied the right to marry,”
the lawyers wrote in a fed-
eral court filing. They said
a similar response oppos-
ing the state’s request for
a delay would ultimately be
filed with Arkansas’ highest
court.
A Pulaski County judge
ruled for the couples
this year allowed clerks
statewide to issue mar-
riage licenses to same-sex
couples. The state Supreme
Court put the judge’s deci-
sion on hold, pending its
review, after a week. More
than 540 licenses to marry
were granted to same-sex
couples.
A federal judge and the
10th U.S. Circuit Court of
Appeals in Denver ruled
against Utah’s gay-marriage
ban, which was similar
to Arkansas’. Utah offi-
cials have asked the U.S.
Supreme Court to take up
the case — a move that
prompted Arkansas officials
to seek a delay.
They said last week that
waiting for justices to rule
could save all the parties
the “hardship of unnec-
essary and unwarranted
litigation” and that the pre-
vailing party could quickly
see its victory reversed or
modified.
The lawyers for the gay
couples said the state’s
request was based on
speculation that courts
have rarely taken into con-
sideration.
“The Supreme Court
has held that granting a
stay in one case pending
the outcome of another is
permissible ‘only in rare
circumstances,” lawyer
Angela Mann wrote for
the plaintiffs, who are also
challenging a separate
Arkansas law that outlaws
gay marriage.
If the Supreme Court
denies taking up the case,
Arkansas wouldn’t be cov-
ered by the 10th Circuit’s
ruling because it is in a dif-
ferent part of the country.
The lawyers said the Utah
case also explores different
issues.
Seeking a delay, they
said, “is simply an attempt
to prolong the state’s ongo-
ing deprivation of plaintiffs’
constitutional rights.”
Associated Press
LITTLE ROCK — Two
Arkansas legislative commit-
tees approved a non-binding
resolution opposing a pro-
posed federal rule to lessen
carbon dioxide emissions from
power plants.
Both the House and Senate
Insurance and Commerce
Committees passed the
resolution with no members
opposed, the media reported.
Witnesses told lawmakers
the proposed Environmental
Protection Agency rule would
lead to increased energy bills,
hurt the Arkansas economy
and probably force a couple of
the state’s five coal-powered
plants to close.
Democratic Rep. Joe Jett of
Success said it’s a bipartisan
way of telling the agency that
committee members think it
has overreached its authority
with the new rule.
Randy Zook, president and
chief executive officer for the
Arkansas State Chamber of
Commerce, said the proposed
rule “is a plan for economic
disarmament.” He told law-
makers that the agency offer-
ing four possible ways for
states to reduce emissions is
“like giving you four knives
to choose from to slit your
wrists. Take your pick. I’d pick
the sharpest.”
The four options are
increasing efficiency in exist-
ing coal-fired power plants,
increasing usage of natural
gas at the natural gas-fired
power plants, increasing use
of energy sources that don’t
generate carbon dioxide and
increasing energy efficiency
programs or other methods
that would offset emissions.
John Bethel, director of
Arkansas Public Service
Commission, said the
Environmental Protection
Agency hopes to reduce car-
bon dioxide emissions by 26
percent in the next six years
and by 30 percent in the next
16 years.
Teresa Marks, director
of the state Department of
Environmental Quality, said
the federal agency has made
clear that the state can use any
of the four available methods
to reach a 44 percent reduc-
tion of emissions by 2030.
Marks said nearly 44 per-
cent of the state’s energy is
generated by coal. She said
the rest is provided by about
26 percent natural gas, 24
percent nuclear and 6 percent
renewable energy.
“We need to know where
we can get emissions reduc-
tions in a way that won’t cause
economic harm to the state,”
Marks said.
Glen Hooks, chapter direc-
tor for the Arkansas Sierra
Club, said the proposed rule
would be a step in the right
direction to improve the state’s
environmental, public and eco-
nomic health.
“This rule is a good oppor-
tunity for us to start looking at
ways to generate our energy
more cleanly and in ways that
can produce a lot of jobs for
Arkansas,” he said.
Ark. lawmakers oppose
federal emissions rule
Associated Press
Arkansas
police charge
school teacher
with rape
SILOAM SPRINGS —
Siloam Springs police have
charged a 32-year-old teacher
in the rape of a 13-year-old
boy.
KHOG-TV reports
police arrested Mary Faith
McCormick on Wednesday
evening. She’s listed as
a teacher on the Siloam
Springs Intermediate School
website.
Police say she started the
relationship with a former
student between June and
July using the smartphone
application Snapchat. They
say she sent the teenager a
picture of her breasts.
The teenager told police
he had consensual sex with
McCormick.
Superintendent Ken
Ramey says McCormick is
suspended pending the out-
come of an investigation.
Online jail records didn’t
indicate an attorney for
McCormick.
Associated Press
Thursday, August 14, 2014
The Saline Courier 3
LAURA STILWELL
& ompany
C
Training Dancers in Saline County since 1986
2618 Congo Road in Bent on • 501-860-8277
Fall Registration
August 19, 20, 21
Drill Team Skills • Competition Teams
Preschool • Tap • Ballet • Jazz
in the Studio
3:30 - 7:00 pm
Register by Phone 860-8277 or online
www.dancelaurastilwell.com
Benton
1300 Military Rd
776-1314
Bryant
5900 Hwy 5 N.
653-0143
S
u
m
m
e
r
S
a
l
e
Savings
up to
80
%
off
HUGE
TODAY
WATERCOLOR: Instructor
Carolyn Voss will teach a free
watercolor class for adults 18
and older at 6 p.m. Thursday,
Aug. 14 at Herzfeld Library. The
theme is “Venice Canal.” Space is
limited and on a first-come, first-
served basis. Call 847-2166 or
778-4766 for more information.
CROCHET FOR BEGINNERS: Ages
18 and older (younger partici-
pants are allowed if accompa-
nied by an adult) are invited to
learn how to crochet at 6 p.m.
Thursday, Aug. 14 at Boswell
Library in Bryant. Crochet hooks
are provided for the first 15 par-
ticipants, but attendees should
bring their own #4 yarn (cot-
ton; any style). No registration
required. Call 778-4766 for more
information.
SATURDAY, AUGUST 16
YOGA @ the Library Ages 18
and older are invited to a free
beginning yoga class at 10 a.m.
Saturday, Aug. 16 at Herzfeld
Library in Benton. The class will
be taught by an instructor of
McClure’s Fitness. No registra-
tion required. Mat and water are
recommended. Call 778-4766 for
more information.
MONDAY, AUGUST 18
CIVIL WAR PRESENTATION:
August 18, Monday, at 6:30
p.m. Josh Williams and a civil
war dance group from Old
Washington Historic State Park
in Washington, Ark. will present
“Civil War Dances of the time
period” at Herzfeld Library, 1800
Smithers Drive in Benton. Call
the library at 778-4766 for more
information.
TUESDAY, AUGUST 19
HASKELL HISTORICAL SOCIETY
will meet Tuesday, Aug. 19 at
Haskell City Hall at 3:30 p.m. The
program will be presented by
Marlo Krueger on “Shoppach
Family Heritage.”  For more
information, call Emaline Stroud
at 1-501-303-0384 or Darlene
Emmons at 1-501-315-2913. The
Haskell Museum will be closed
for a number of weeks due to
renovations.
SALINE CROSSING REGIONAL
PARK & RECREATION AREA,
INC will meet Tuesday, Aug 19
at 5:30 p.m. in the Gene Moss
building at Tyndall Park. All
meetings are open to the pub-
lic. Plans are being made for the
bicentennial celebration of the
county’s first pioneer settlement
(Saline Crossing.) Also, there will
be a review recent improve-
ments to the riverside property.
Come help Save Our Bridge
(ca.1891).
GENEALOGY/LOCAL HISTORY
HELP: Steve Perdue, head of
genealogy/local history at the
Saline County Library, will be
available to answer your geneal-
ogy and local history questions
from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday,
Aug. 19 at Boswell Library in
Bryant. Call 778-4766 to make an
appointment.
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 20
USING EBAY TO BUY AND SELL:
Ages 18 and older are invited to
learn the basics of using eBay
to buy and sell items at 1 p.m.
Wednesday, Aug. 20 at Boswell
Library in Bryant. No registration
required. Call 778-4766 for more
information.
THURSDAY, AUGUST 21
CROCHET FOR BEGINNERS: Ages
18 and older (younger partici-
pants are allowed if accompa-
nied by an adult) are invited to
learn how to crochet at 6 p.m.
Thursday, Aug. 21 at Herzfeld
Library in Benton. Crochet hooks
are provided for the first 15 par-
ticipants, but attendees should
bring their own #4 yarn (cot-
ton; any style). No registration
required. Call 778-4766 for more
information.
SHARON EXTENSION CLUB
will meet at 10 a.m. Thursday,
Aug 21 at the Saline County
Fairgrounds for its annual picnic. 
Wednesday, Aug. 13 at 9 a.m. all
clubs are invited to meet at the
Saline County Fairgrounds to
cook chickens for the fair. 
SALINE COUNTY DEMOCRATIC
COMMITTEE will meet Thursday,
Aug. 21, at 7 p.m. The meet-
ing will be at the headquarters
located at 101 South Market St.
in Benton.
BRYANT YOUTH FOOTBALL
SIGNUPS will be held at Bishop
Park on Thursday, Aug. 21 from
6 to 9 p.m. and Saturday, Aug.
23 from 9 to noon. First- through
sixth-grade students are encour-
aged to signup. For more infor-
mation, visit Bryantfootball.org  
SATURDAY, AUGUST 23
BRYANT YOUTH FOOTBALL
SIGNUPS will be held at Bishop
Park on Thursday, Aug. 21 from
6 to 9 p.m. and Saturday, Aug.
23 from 9 to noon. First- through
sixth-grade students are encour-
aged to signup. For more infor-
mation, visit Bryantfootball.org  
MONDAY, AUGUST 25
CELEBRITY WAITER EVENT: Relay
For Life of Saline County will
host its fifth annual Celebrity
Waiter fundraiser from 5-8 p.m.
Monday, Aug. 25 at Larry’s Pizza,
located off Highway 5 in Bryant.
Donations and tips given to
waiters throughout the evening
will benefit the 2014 Relay For
Life event, the American Cancer
Society’s largest annual fund-
raiser. Table sponsors are also
being sought for $25 each mini-
mum donation (tax deductible)
and can be purchased by busi-
nesses or individuals by emailing
relay4lifesalinecounty@gmail.
com. Call 501-412-4239 for more
information.
TUESDAY, AUGUST 26
THEOS, A SUPPORT GROUP
FOR WIDOWS AND WIDOWERS:
will meet for dinner, 4:30 p.m.
Tuesday, August 26 at Larry’s
Pizza.
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY,
SEPTEMBER 19-20
ARKANSAS GENEALOGICAL
SOCIETY’S 2014 Fall Conference
is set for September 19-20 at the
Benton Event Center, 17322 I-30
North. Speakers will be Russell
Baker on Friday evening and
nationally known genealogist
Cyndi Ingle of Cyndi’s List, the
largest genealogical website on
the internet, will speak Saturday.
Cost is $20 Friday night only,
$40 Saturday only, $55 Friday &
Saturday. A $10 charge extra for
a box lunch from Dinner’s Ready
of Benton. Visit www.agsgeneal-
ogy.org for a registration form
and schedule.
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9
THEOS, A SUPPORT GROUP
FOR WIDOWS AND WIDOWERS:
5 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 9 for
its regular monthly meet-
ing. Entertainment by Tanner
Oglesby. 
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 13
MABELVALE HIGH SCHOOL
ALUMNI REUNION will be
Saturday, Sept. 13 from 10 a.m.
to 2 p.m.  at Mabelvale Untied
Methodist Chruch located at
Mabelvale Main and Woodman
Streets. Please bring finger
foods or can drinks. Bring pho-
tos with your name on them
to share. Class photos will be
taken from 11 to noon. For more
information, call Billie at 501-316-
2876.
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 25
THEOS, A SUPPORT GROUP
FOR WIDOWS AND WIDOWERS
will meet for dinner at 4:30 a.m.
Thursday, Sept. 25 at Colton’s
Steakhouse in Benton.
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 21
BENTON CHAMBER OF
COMMERCE presents the inau-
gural Saline County Business
Expo to be held on Tuesday,
Oct. 21 at the Benton Event
Center. We believe this will be a
great marketing and networking
opportunity for your business.
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23
HOME IS WHERE THE HEART IS,
4th Annual Art Auction, 5:30 - 8
p.m., Thursday, October 23, at
Benton Event Center. This is the
Habitat for Humanity Annual Art
Auction with featured Artist Matt
Coburn. All Proceeds will go to
end poverty housing in Saline
County. Tables $375, Tickets $40.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 25
SALINE COUNTY RAZORBACK
CLUB is sponsoring a bus trip to
watch the Razorbacks play UAB
in Fayetteville Saturday, Oct 25. 
Cost per person is $100. Price
includes round-trip bus ride,
game tickets and a box lunch.
Please contact Phillip Montalvo
at 501-353-6357 or Dan Yoakum
at 501-317-5155 for more infor-
mation.
ONGOING EVENTS
ATTENTION MOTHERS AND
DAUGHTERS, please join to learn
about starting a new Chapter
of National Charity League, Inc.
in the Benton area. NCL is the
largest mother-daughter (non-
for-profit) volunteer organization
in the nation, giving mothers
and daughters unique opportu-
nities to strengthen their bond
while growing together, sharing
of themselves and improving
their communities. Daughters
will become involved in leader-
ship, cultural, and educational
activities while having fun and
meeting new friends. To be
eligible for membership in the
new NCL Chapter, daughters
must be in the 7th-12th grades.
Informational Meetings are
scheduled on Wednesdays
7:15pm, room 206 at First Baptist
Church. (NCL is not affiliated with
FBC) For more information: 501-
326-7745 www.nationalcharity-
league.org.
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT Fish Fry at
Congo Masonic Lodge located
at the corner of Steel Bridge and
Thompson Dairy Road. The fry
will take place the last Saturday
of the month for April-October
from 3 to 7 p.m. All proceeds go
toward area charities.
TAX PREPARATION SERVICES:
Central Arkansas Development
Council is seeking volunteers for
its VITA/EITC free tax preparation
services in Saline County. The
service offers free electronic filing
of federal and state tax returns.
The service will be available at
Herzfeld Library and the Benton
Senior Wellness and Activities
Center. Volunteers must be certi-
fied. CADC provides training. To
volunteer contact Susan Willis at
501-778-1133.
BRYANT HISTORICAL SOCIETY
meets at 6:30 p.m. every third
Tuesday in the Heritage Room
at Boswell Library in Bryant on
Prickett Road. Students and oth-
ers are invited to join the group
in preserving the history and
heritage of Bryant. Annual dues
are $25 for adults and $15 for
students.
TOPS: 5:45 p.m. Every Monday
at the Benton Main Fire
Department. Come join TOPS
Chapter 57. the group meets
every Monday. For more infor-
mation email tops0057@yahoo.
com
BENTON ALZHEIMER’s
CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP
MEETING: 7 p.m. every third
Tuesday of the month at First
Baptist Church, 211 South
Market in Benton. The meeting
is open to everyone who has a
loved one living with Alzheimer’s
or other related dementia.  The
group offers a safe environment
where discussions are kept con-
fidential. For more information,
please contact Sam Sellers at
(501) 663-3900 or samuel.sell-
ers@sbcglobal.net. 
STARTING POINT SUPPORT
GROUP MEETING: 1 p.m. every
Sunday at Christ Is The Answer
Fellowship Church, Traskwood.
This is a Christian-based recovery
program. Call Vince for details
722-3110
POOL TOURNAMENT: First and
third Fridays of every month at
7:30 p.m., Saline County Moose
Lodge, Highway. 67, Benton.
Must be 21 to enter lodge,
but membership in lodge not
required to participate.
SALINE COUNTY HISTORY AND
HERITAGE SOCIETY MEETING: 7
p.m., the third Thursday of each
month at 123 N. Market St. in
Benton.
BRYANT HISTORICAL SOCIETY
MEETING: 6:30 p.m., the third
Tuesday of each month in the
Heritage Room of the Mabel
Boswell Memorial Library on
Prickett Road in Bryant.
BLESSED HOPE ADDICTIONS
RECOVERY PROGRAM: 7 p.m.
every Friday at 212 W. South
St. in Benton. Call 315-5005 for
more information or for trans-
portation to the meeting.
SADDLES AND SPIRITS HORSE
CLUB MEETING: 6:30 p.m. the
second Thursday of each month
at East End Elementary School.
For more information, contact
Melinda Steele at 501-580-8356.
SALINE COUNTY REPUBLICAN
COMMITTEE MEETING: 6:30 p.m.
the first Thursday of each month
at Republican Headquarters, 125
North Market Street, in down-
town Benton. Visitors welcome
BINGO: 6:30 p.m. every Thursday
evening and every Saturday at
1 p.m. at VFW Post  2256.  5323
Sleepy Village Road ( off Alcoa ). 
Members and guests welcome,
must be 21 years of age.  No
admission charge, kitchen will be
open serving burgers, fries, taco
salads and other items.
SALINE COUNTY DEMOCRATIC
WOMEN’S MEETING: 6:30
p.m. the third Thursday of
every month, followed by the
Democratic Central Committee
meeting at 7 p.m., at Democratic
Headquarters, 101 S. Market St.
in downtown Benton.
STARTING POINT SUPPORT
GROUP MEETING: 1 p.m. every
Sunday at Christ Is The Answer
Fellowship Church, Traskwood.
This is a Christian based recovery
program. Call Vince for details
722-3110
SALINE COUNTY EVENTS
Email calendar items to news@bentoncourier.com or call 501-315-8228 ext. 236.
Calendar items are intended for nonprofit organizations.
OBITUARIES
Earl Leonard Wagner
Earl Leonard Wagner, 96, of Benton, formerly of Hope,
died Sunday, Aug. 10, 2014, at Saline Memorial Hospice
House.
Earl was born May 26, 1918, in Lafayette, Ind., to the late
Edgar and Grace Wagner.
Earl was a Master Electrician, a Navy veteran of World
War II, past president of Golden K’s in Hope and a past
board member of the Hope HUD Board. He was also an
active member of the Hempstead County Republican Party
and a member of Hope First United Methodist Church.
Earl was preceded in death by his parents; his wife,
Dorothy Wagner; a son, Warren Wagner; and two sisters,
Peggy and Beverly.
Earl is survived by his wife, Elaine Wagner, of Benton;
a son, Wayne Wagner and wife Faye of Newton, Kan.; his
grandsons, Bryan Wagner and wife Melissa, Jordan Wagner
and wife Becky, and James Wagner of Colorado; a grand-
daughter, Stephanie Levitt of New York; three great-grand-
children, all of Kansas; and other family member and friends
who loved Earl and will miss him always.
Arrangements are by Smith-Benton Funeral Home, 322 N.
Market St., Benton, AR 72015. For information, call 501-778-
7100.
Online guestbook: www.SmithFamilyCares.com.
Lena Wells Vaughn
Lena Wells Vaughn, 91, of Benton went to be with the
Lord on Aug. 8, 2014. She was born in Alexander to Leslie
and Wreathy McClain on Aug. 15, 1922.
Lena was a member of Holland Chapel Baptist Church
in Benton. She loved to cook and prepared many wonderful
meals for her family and friends. During the 1950s she was
employed by the Benton School District as a cook at Benton
High School and volunteered countless hours at Saline
Memorial Hospital.
Lena and her late husband, Wylie, were avid
campers and enjoyed singing and entertaining
fellow campers at the Shouse Ford Campground
on Lake DeGray in Arkadelphia. She and Wylie
were active members of the Benton Senior
Wellness and Activity Center and won many tro-
phies in dance competitions.
She was preceded in death by her parents as
well as husbands Edward M. Wells and Wylie Vaughn Sr.;
her son, Daryl L. Wells; and a stepson. Wylie Vaughn, Jr., all
of Benton.
She is survived by her daughter, Donna J. Wells Kitchens
(Herbert); a stepdaughter, Darlene Vaughn Bridges (Sonny);
and grandchildren Lance Kitchens, Michael Kitchens, Karen
Kitchens, Julie Howe, Allison Davis and Lindsey Kindy; two
step-grandchildren, Vaughn Bridges and Mark Bridges; five
great-grandchildren and three step-great-grandchildren.
Funeral service is scheduled for 11 a.m. Monday, Aug.
18, at Roller-Ballard Funeral Home in Benton (501-315-
4047). Brother Jason Tallent and Brother Kim Hammer will
officiate. Burial will follow at New Rosemont Cemetery in
Benton.
Visitation will be held at 10 a.m. Monday, Aug. 18, before
the service.
Donations may be made to Saline Memorial Hospital
Hospice House in Bryant.
Online guestbook: www.rollerfuneralhomes.com/ballard
Family comments: The family would like to offer a special
thanks to the staff and caregivers at Fox Ridge Retirement
Home and Saline Memorial Hospice House.
Vaughn
PAID OBITUARIES
Funeral set for driver hit
by Tony Stewart’s car
TURIN, N.Y. — Kevin
Ward Jr.’s father and fellow
racers want him remem-
bered as a talented and
aggressive driver who had
a bright future in the sport
rather than as a victim
in an accident involving
NASCAR champion Tony
Stewart.
The accident sparked
controversy among racing
fans and brought recrimina-
tions from Ward’s family.
A funeral for the 20-year-
old Ward is scheduled for
11 a.m. Thursday at South
Lewis Senior High School
in Turin, 55 miles north-
east of Syracuse. Ward,
a 2012 graduate of the
school, lived in nearby Port
Leyden.
Ward was killed Saturday
night at a dirt track 140
miles away in Canandaigua,
where NASCAR champion
Stewart was racing a day
before the Sprint Cup event
at Watkins Glen. After a
bump from Stewart sent
Ward’s winged car spinning
into the wall, the young
driver climbed out and
walked onto the track in
his black firesuit, gesturing
angrily. Stewart’s No. 14
car seemed to fishtail, and
Ward was thrown through
the air as his parents and
fans watched in horror.
The accident touched off
angry debates as video of
the crash circulated online,
with fans questioning
whether Stewart, known
for his hot temper, tried to
send his own message by
buzzing Ward, or whether
Ward recklessly stepped
onto a dark track clad in
black.
Kevin Ward Sr., who was
at the track with his wife
Pamela, told The Syracuse
Post-Standard this week
that Stewart was the best
driver on the track that
night, and there was no
reason for him to hit the
young driver after other
cars avoided him.
“The one person that
knows what happened that
night is possibly facing 10
years in prison,” Ward said.
“Is he going to say what he
done?”
No charges have been
filed, but Ontario County
Sheriff’s deputies are still
investigating.
Ward, who grew up in a
racing family and started
racing go-carts at age 4,
had moved on to sprint
cars and was Empire Super
Sprint racing rookie of the
year in 2012. He was one of
a small, tight group of driv-
ers who traveled to various
races around New York
state, parts of Canada and
Pennsylvania.
Racing and working on
cars in his father’s shop,
Westward Painting Co. of
Lyons Falls, were his “dou-
ble love,” Ward’s father
told the Post-Standard.
“His goal was the race
in the World of Outlaws,”
the top level for sprint cars,
Ward said.
Associated Press
State Sen. Jeremy Hutchinson, District 33,
201 E. North St., Benton, AR 72015, (501) 773-
3760, jeremy.hutchinson@senate.ar.gov.
State Sen. David Sanders, District 27 Room
320 State Capitol, Little Rock, AR 72201, (501)
682-6107, davidjamessanders@gmail.com.
State Sen. Alan Clark, District 13 P.O. Box
211, Lonsdale, AR 72087, (501) 262-3360, alan.
clark@senate.ar.gov.
State Rep. Ann Clemmer, District 23, 7415
Camille Drive, Benton, AR 72015, (501) 316-
0364, avclemmer@sbcglobal.net.
State Rep. Andy Davis, District 31 P.O. Box
30248, Little Rock, AR 72260, (501) 837-5109,
andy.davis@arkansashouse.org.
State Rep. Andy Mayberry, District 27 3022
E. Woodson Lateral Road, Hensley, AR 72065,
(501) 888-3522, andymayberry@windstream.net.
State Rep. Kim Hammer, District 28, 1411
Edgehill Dr., Benton, AR 72015, (501) 840-3841,
kimdhammer@yahoo.com.
Circuit Judge Bobby McCallister, 22nd
Judicial District, Division 1, Saline County
Courthouse, 200 N. Main St., Benton, AR 72015,
(501) 303-5635.
Circuit Judge Gary Arnold, 22nd Judicial
District, Division 2, Saline County Courthouse,
200 N. Main St., Benton, AR 72015, (501) 303-
5664.
Circuit Judge Grisham Phillips, 22nd
Judicial District, Division 3, Saline County
Courthouse, 200 N. Main St., Benton, AR 72015,
(501) 303-5628.
Circuit Judge Robert Herzfeld, 22nd
Judicial District, Division 4, Saline County Annex,
321 N. Main St., Benton, AR 72015, (501) 303-
1584.
District Judge Michael Robinson, Benton
District, 1605 Edison Ave., Benton, AR 72019,
(501) 303-5670.
District Judge Stephanie Casady, Bryant
District (Bryant, Alexander, Bauxite, Haskell,
Shannon Hills), Boswell Municipal Complex, 210
SW Third St., Bryant, AR 72022, (501) 847-5223.
Saline County Judge Lanny Fite,
Courthouse 200 N. Main St., Benton, AR 72015,
(501) 303-5640.
Prosecuting Attorney Ken Casady, 22nd
Juicial District, 102 S. Main St., Benton, AR
72015, (501) 315-7767.
Saline County Sheriff Cleve Barfield, Saline
County Detention Center, 735 S. Neeley St.,
Benton, AR 72015; (501) 303-5609.
news@bentoncourier.com
HOW TO REACH YOUR ELECTED OFFICIALS
“Congress shall make no law ... abridging the freedom
of speech, or of the press ... .”
— From the First Amendment to Constitution
T
he world was rocked this week with the
news of Robin Williams’ suicide. Many were
shocked to hear that one of America’s favor-
ite funny men took his own life. Many are currently
mourning his loss and sharing stories about how this
incredible individual impacted their lives. Many more
are questioning how this prominent figure, how this
famous comedian, how this well respected, beloved
man could take his own life.
Depression is a horrible monster. It takes over
its victims in such a way that it consumes them.
Depression does not discriminate. It does not care if
you are rich or poor, if you are suc-
cessful or not, if you come from a
good family or a broken one.
Depression does not care if you are
loved or hated. It does not care about
how great your life is. Depression is
all-consuming and takes over until
the person suffering from it can see
no way out. It is a mental illness,
not simply a state of being sad and
no amount of positive thinking will
undo it. Depression is an illness that
requires real treatment and reducing
it to the simple emotion of “sad” and then telling an
individual to get over it is like telling someone with
cancer to just “get over it”.
Many of the funniest people suffer from depres-
sion and we have lost countless comics to that beast.
Web-comic artist Allie Brosh who runs a popular blog
called Hyperbole and a Half wrote an insightful comic
about her own battles with depression which I would
encourage anyone to read.
In the comic, Brosh notes, “It’s weird for people
who still have feelings to be around depressed
people. They try to help you have feelings again so
things can go back to normal, and it’s frustrating for
them when that doesn’t happen. From their perspec-
tive, it seems like there has got to be some untapped
source of happiness within you that you’ve simply
lost track of, and it you could just see how beautiful
things are...”
Brosh goes on to say, “That’s the most frustrating
thing about depression. It isn’t always something you
can fight back against with hope. It isn’t even some-
thing – it’s nothing. And you can’t combat nothing.
You can’t fill it up. You can’t cover it. It’s just there,
pulling the meaning out of everything. That being
the case, all the hopeful, proactive solutions start to
sound completely insane in contrast to the scope of
the problem. It would be like having a bunch of dead
fish, but no one around you will acknowledge that the
fish are dead. Instead, they offer to help you look for
the fish or try to help you figure out why they disap-
peared.”
Depression is not something you can wish away
or get rid of through the power of positive thinking.
What someone with depression needs is help, real
help from a medical professional trained to deal with
mental illnesses. Because that is what depression is:
a mental illness.
If you or someone you know is suffering from
depression, seek help. This is not a monster that can
and should be fought alone. Many suffering from
depression feel like a burden to their friends and
family. I don’t know about them, but I would rather
stay up every night on the phone with someone to
talk about their depression than have to attend their
funeral.
Reach out to somebody. Anybody.
And if someone reaches out to you, remember that
depression is a disease and the sheer power of posi-
tive thinking won’t do it in. No matter how irrational
their depression may seem, remember that diseases
are irrational and they don’t only pick unhealthy
people to infect.
In Robin Williams’ own words from the movie
“Jack”, “Please, don’t worry so much. Because in the
end, none of us have very long on this Earth. Life is
fleeting. And if you’re ever distressed, cast your eyes
to the summer sky when the stars are strung across
the velvety night. And when a shooting star streaks
through the blackness, turning night into day, make
a wish and think of me. Make your life spectacular.”
And to Robin Williams, I am so sorry that the pain
you were in became so unbearable. I am so sorry you
felt you had no other option. I hope you are now at
peace. In the words of Aladdin, “Genie, you’re free.”
A
t long last, after all these
years, we have a defining
question to We The People on
our rule of law from libertarian Jacob
G. Hornberger, founder and president
of The Future of Freedom Foundation:
“Why Not Simply Abolish the CIA?”
(fff.org, Aug. 1).
He asks: “Did
any CIA agent get
indicted for torturing
people? No.
“Did any CIA
agent get indicted for
destroying the vid-
eotapes that showed
the torture? No.
“Did any CIA
agent get indicted for
murdering prisoners
in Abu Ghraib prison
in Iraq? No.”
As I’ve often reported, the list of
the agency’s wrongdoings is long,
continuous and deeply documented
in such books as “Legacy of Ashes:
The History of the CIA” by Tim
Weiner, and “Globalizing Torture: CIA
Secret Detention And Extraordinary
Rendition” by Amrit Singh and
published by The Open Society
Foundations.
And right now, many Americans
are waiting for the public release of an
extensive, carefully validated four-year
report from the Senate Intelligence
Committee on the history of CIA tor-
ture and its other crimes against our
rule of law and the international rule of
law.
But I was not surprised to see that
the release of this report had been
delayed indefinitely. How come? Susan
Crabtree of the Washington Examiner
explains:
“Senate Democrats engaged in a
tug-of-war with the White House over
heavy redactions to its long-delayed
torture report remain furious that
President Obama allowed the CIA to
censor the document” (“Democrats
steamed that White House let the CIA
censor a torture report,” Crabtree,
Washington Examiner, Aug. 7).
Who asked the most secretive
president in our history to exercise
that authority?
Crabtree writes: “In a letter dated
April 7, Sen. Dianne Feinstein, chair-
woman of the Senate Intelligence
Committee, asked Obama to allow
the White House to ‘take the lead’ in
determining what would be redacted
from a declassified study it planned to
publicly release.”
The champion of the Senate’s tor-
ture report expected sudden candor
from Obama of all people? Feinstein
got a curveball.
“We tortured some folks,” the presi-
dent said in an Aug. 1 White House
press conference.
But, according to The Guardian,
“he believed intelligence officials
responsible for torturing detain-
ees were working during a period
of extraordinary stress and fear”
(“Obama admits CIA ‘tortured some
folks’ but stands by Brennan over spy-
ing,” Paul Lewis, The Guardian, Aug.
1).
Have pity on the CIA?
Feinstein finally realized that allow-
ing the White House and the CIA to
look over the report before it reached
the public had caused her to receive “a
heavily redacted executive summary of
the report.”
Furthermore, she “warned that she
would need additional time to under-
stand the justification for the obscured
passages. Reviewing the redac-
tions could take days, if not weeks”
(“Senate’s torture report delayed indef-
initely,” Susan Crabtree, Washington
Examiner, Aug. 5).
“Obscured” is a euphemism for
censored.
Crabtree also notes significantly
that “Republicans on the Intelligence
Committee refused to participate in
the investigation,” which illuminated
much of the torture of the George W.
Bush-Dick Cheney years.
And, revealingly, before deciding to
delay the report indefinitely once the
CIA had edited it, Feinstein “indicated
the CIA was most sensitive about two
categories of information in files relat-
ed to the interrogation program: ‘the
true names of non-supervisory CIA
personnel and the names of specific
countries in which the CIA operated
detention sites’” (“U.S. braces for tor-
ture report blowback,” Josh Gerstein,
politico.com, May 15).
Aren’t We The People also entitled
to know the true names of high-level
CIA personnel who tortured at will, as
well as the presidents and members
of the Judiciary Committee who gave
them the authority to?
Nonetheless, a number of dogged
reporters have been digging into the
classified report to tell us some of
what’s being held back so that we’ll
know why.
Here’s one from Alex Kane
of AlterNet: “CIA went beyond
legal memo. In 2002, the Justice
Department’s Office of Legal Counsel
drafted a report authorizing CIA
torture, saying that the use of water-
boarding, sleep deprivation and stress
positions were perfectly legal. It was
written by Deputy Assistant Attorney
General John Yoo” (who is still a
University of California law school pro-
fessor and frequent writer-lecturer) ...
“But even that memo attempting to
legalize torture wasn’t enough for the
CIA ... McClatchy reported that the
CIA went beyond what it was autho-
rized to do by the Bush administration.
Where in Constitution is
CIA absolved of all its
multitude of crimes?
EDITORIAL CARTOON
G
rade deflation is dead. Long live
grade inflation!
Starting around the mid-20th
century, a pandemic of meaninglessly
high grades swept the nation. Steadily,
the Gentleman’s C was replaced by the
Gentleman’s B-pluses. Soon even B-pluses’
grew ungentlemanly, with more and more
grades compressed into the narrow band
spanning from A-minus
to A-plus. College admin-
istrators and educators
saw this as a problem, but
each school feared the
blowback that would come
from being the first to rein
it in.
Then, brave Princeton,
my beloved alma mater,
announced that it would
lead the charge. In 2004,
it imposed nonbinding
targets for the percentage of A’s that should
be awarded in each department, because
“students deserve clear signals from their
teachers about the difference between their
ordinarily good work and their very best
work.”
Students, not surprisingly, were less
keen on clarifying these noisy signals. They
groused about the targets, saying they would
foster cutthroat competitiveness, undermine
student collaboration and hurt Tigers’ chanc-
es on the job market because their counter-
parts at other elite schools would still have
inflated transcripts. At Yale, for example, 62
percent of undergraduate grades are A’s and
A-minuses; Princeton aimed for 35 percent.
Princeton’s administration assured uneasy
undergrads that other schools would follow.
Alas, almost no others did. (Wellesley,
which had among the worst grade inflation,
implemented a slightly different experiment
around the same time.) Now, 10 years later,
Princeton appears ready to throw in the
towel. In a 35-page report released last week,
a committee recommended that the school
abandon its efforts.
The committee actually found no evidence
that the grade targets were hurting students’
job or grad school prospects (with one pos-
sible exception: ROTC, since grade-point
averages factor into an officer’s first assign-
ment), which may mean that Princeton’s
grading standards are still not all that tough;
in 2013, about 43 percent of grades were A’s
or A-minuses, well above the target. That’s
stingier than Yale and Harvard, but about in
line with U.S. colleges overall. So for a few
years Princeton students may have had the
best of both worlds: a reputation for tough
grading but a grade distribution that was
actually relatively lenient.
Instead, the main arguments Princeton’s
committee presented for ending “grade
deflation” involved concerns about under-
graduate stress and recruiting.
To fully understand why Princeton caved,
though, you have to appreciate why high
grades have been awarded at schools across
the country in the first place.
Some have suggested that affirmative
action and the Vietnam War were respon-
sible; in those cases, the theory goes, profes-
sors went easy on students who either were
less well-prepared for college or needed
decent grades to avoid the draft. Neither
explanation really lines up with the data.
Students likewise have argued that they’ve
just gotten smarter over the years. While
the top-ranked schools have indeed become
more selective, this theory wouldn’t explain
why middle-tier schools also inflated grades.
(Two-year colleges and the least selective
four-year publics do not seem to have inflat-
ed their grades much, if at all, which makes
sense from a strategic perspective; lower-
ranked schools need to clearly signal which
students are true standouts to help them
get jobs.) And of course even if you believe
modern students are uniformly smarter than
their parents were, you still might argue that
today’s grades are supposed to reflect the
distribution of talent today, not yesterday.
In my view, the most convincing theory
comes from Stuart Rojstaczer, a retired
Duke geophysicist who has collected oodles
of grading data. He blames the “emergence
of a consumer-based culture in higher educa-
tion.” As students are forced to pay more and
more for a degree, they feel more entitled to
high grades. They then pressure professors
to weaken standards. Supporting this thesis
is the fact that GPA’s tend to be more inflat-
ed at private schools, where tuition is higher,
even after controlling for selectivity.
Sites such as RateMyProfessors.com may
also play a role, as easier grading tends to
encourage better student feedback. Adjuncts
in particular need favorable student evalua-
tions to get rehired, making them especially
susceptible to inflationary pressures.
Plus, academic departments have learned
that lenient grading can attract more majors,
and thereby earn them more faculty hiring
slots. This competitive edge afforded by
awarding more A’s extends to entire schools,
too: “The committee was surprised to learn
that students at other schools (e.g., Harvard,
Stanford, and Yale) use our grading policy to
recruit against us,” Princeton’s report says.
In other words, A’s have become a more
valuable currency in higher ed, even as,
paradoxically, their value on a transcript has
been inflated away.
Catherine Rampell’s email address
is crampell@washpost.com. Follow her on
Twitter, @crampell.
A’s for
everyone
Genie, you’re free
• The Saline Courier (USPS 050-660) is published daily by Horizon Publishing Co., 321
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©Copyright 2006 Horizon Publishing Co.
Columns and cartoons on the opinion page do not necessarily reflect
opinions of The Saline Courier. Weekend delivery times are no later than
7 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. The circulation department has re-delivery
scheduled from 5 to 7 p.m. Monday-Friday and from 7 to 9 a.m. Saturday
and Sunday. Call 501-317-6013 or 501-315-8228 during business hours.
THE SALINE COURIER
Founded in 1876
Phone: (501) 315-8228 • Fax: (501) 315-1230 • Email: news@bentoncourier.com
ALLEN BRAGG
CIRCULATION DIRECTOR
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COMPOSING DIRECTOR
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JULIE ALLBRITTON
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATOR
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RICKY WALTERS
PRESS FOREMAN
rwalters@bentoncourier.com
TONY COOPER • Publisher
tcooper@bentoncourier.com
BRENT DAVIS • editor
bdavis@bentoncourier.com
NAT
HENTOFF
Page 4 – The Saline Courier
news@bentoncourier.com Thursday, August 14, 2014
OPINION
CATHERINE
RAMPELL
BOBBYE
PYKE
Thursday, August 14, 2014
The Saline Courier 5
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agent will be there.
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Laura Hackney, CIC
Mail your “Extraordinary People” nomination form to:
THE SALINE COURIER, P.O. Box 207, Benton, AR 72018
or email us at news@bentoncourier.com / fax 501-315-1920
HURRY! Nominations must be received no later than Sept. 5, 2014
I Nominate _____________________________________ as one of
Saline County’s Extraordinary People. The reason(s) why include:
SALINE COUNTY’S NEWS SOURCE SINCE 1876
COURIER
THE SALINE
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A U T U MN 2 0 1 2 I S S U E
They are the backbone to any community –
the next-door neighbor, your friend at church.
They are the people that give of themselves
selflessly.
MORE INSIDE ON:
Honorable Mentions
Shoe Tree
Lake Norrell
Saline River
Haunted Highway
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Nominate
Extraordinary People
16 • Extraordinary People • Autumn 2012
They are the backbone to any
community – the next-door neighbor,
your friend at church. They are the
volunteers that give of themselves
selflessly. Their only reward...
the belief they did something good.
Now is your chance to give back. This September the Courier will
honor a dozen people from Saline County that you nominate as
Extraordinary People
The rules: Nominations should be for everyday heroes, not people
who accomplish good through their job. They must be people who
are accomplished outside the public spotlight. A politician cannot
be nominated for assisting the citizenry, that’s their job.
Examples: Maybe someone looks after ailing neighbors, drives people
to the doctor or assists in their church. Maybe someone gives up nights
and weekends to coach children, even when they don’t have any. Maybe
someone brightens your day with a smile, a laugh or an act of kindness.
They are:
Extraordinary People
The Saline Courier will publish a magazine with stories about the
individual nominees, and honor these extraordinary people with
an awards banquet September 26.
Please include your name and phone number.
Use a separate piece of paper if you need more room.
Extraordinary People • Autumn 2012 • 17
Extraordinary!
ary Kay Mooney embraces many
causes, but underlying them all is a love for
Benton.
“She has a heart for giving back to
her community,” said the friend who
nominated Mooney for the Saline Courier’s
Extraordinary People honor.
Her frst foray into community service
came about when she was 19 and chaired
the local March of Dimes campaign.
“I got addicted then and have been doing
something like this ever since,” she said.
“One of the most fun things I was
ever involved in was the Saline County
Bicentennial celebration in 1976,” Mooney
said. “I helped Alice Hogue (now deceased)
write and produce the patriotic production
held at the rodeo arena at the county
fairgrounds.” Hundreds of area residents attended
the event that was held in conjunction with
celebrations throughout the country.
For many years the lifetime Benton
resident has counseled breast cancer
patients and survivors. She does so not
with knowledge gleaned from a brochure or
a lecture, but from personal experience.
As a breast cancer survivor, in past
years she worked through Reach to
Recovery, an affliate of the American
Cancer Society. “I have been involved with New Outlook
through St. Vincent Infrmary Medical
Center,” she added. “This group provides
free wigs, prostheses, bras — anything a
breast cancer patient might need.”
“Everything at New Outlook is free to
patients. They would call me and tell me
when I had a breast cancer lady who was
ready to go home from the hospital, and I
have friends that call me and ask me to do
it.
“It’s a continuing thing,” she said. “I’m
willing to counsel women or talk to them
at any time. Someone reached out to me
when I was sick, and it meant so much to
me. If you go through something like this
and you don’t reach out to help others, then
you’ve wasted an opportunity.”
Among her past successes is a
fundraising campaign she and her husband
led to reopen the Boys & Girls Club of
Saline County. “Mooney (husband Dick Mooney) and
I helped restore the Boys & Girls Club,
which had closed in the midst of fnancial
diffculties in the 1990s. We got started on
that after Mike Duke called and said ‘we
need help.’ “What is over there now is what
developed from that grassroots effort,” she
said. “I’m very proud of that.”
She also played an instrumental role
in the development of Saline Memorial
Hospice House. “We raised a major portion
of the funds through a gala held at the
Bauxite Community Center.
“Of all the events that I have seen in this
county in my whole life, this was one of
the nicest,” she said. “It was like trying to
decorate a barn, but we transformed it into
something spectacular and raised lots of
money.”
A member of the Benton High School
Class of 1964, Mooney is an active alum
and regularly oversees reunions and other
events involving her classmates. “My class
is very important to me. We’ve stayed
close friends and get together for monthly
luncheons.” She recently accepted a request from
BHS Principal John Dedman to serve on
the steering committee for the Panther
Challenge, which involves raising funds to
erect a bronze panther sculpture on the
grounds of the high school.
“In my class alone, within one day of
announcing the challenge, we received
pledges totaling a thousand dollars, and
we’re just getting started,” she said.
She noted that the statue is expected to
cost between $20,000 and $30,000.
Mooney is a charter member of the
Benton Athletic Memorial Museum and
serves on the museum’s board of directors.
“The museum got started when Coach
(Tom) Hardin called and said, ‘I’ve got
something I need you to help with. You
didn’t question Coach. I was on board
immediately when he asked me to help.
“The museum started with an idea
and it has grown to what it is today,” she
said. “The building was constructed with
donations and in-kind services, including
$50,000 in state improvement funds we
received through the leadership of Doug
Kidd, who was our state representative at
the time.
“We were pretty much able to build
it debt-free. We gave the building to the
Benton School District, and it is self-
sustaining. “I ramrod the museum’s annual Wall of
Fame banquet every year and have done
this for some time. The museum preserves
the history of the school. We have given
numerous scholarships, and we’re up to
three $1,000 scholarships each year now.”
Mooney is the daughter of the late
Herman and Kay Watts of Benton, “who
were both service-oriented and always
helping others. Daddy really got me into
this. He also gave me my love for old-time
gospel music — the Blackwood Brothers,
George Beverly Shea and others.
“I was a member of the frst organized
youth choir at Benton’s First Baptist
Church, and there are still some of us from
that choir in the church’s sanctuary choir
now.
“The frst place I was ever taken in my
life was to church at First Baptist,” she said.
“I was enrolled on the cradle roll before my
mother left the hospital.” In addition to husband Dick, Mooney’s
family includes a daughter, Amber; and a
brother, Richard Watts and wife Lynn of
Little Rock.
n
lo
vin
g s
e
rv
ic
e By Lynda Hollenbeck
M
Mary Kay Mooney Place of birth: Benton How long have you lived in Saline County?
All my life.
Favorite place in Saline County: Everywhere
in Downtown Benton. Every store, every
business, C.W. Lewis Stadium; every place
holds a special memory. Favorite movie: “The Big Chill” Hobbies: Collecting cookbooks; decorat-
ing; flower arranging; making jewelry; and
theme parties. “I’m known as the ‘queen of
theme,’”
Something about you that would surprise
others: “I’m a serious Bible scholar.”
through
FERGUSON, Mo. — Police
used tear gas and smoke
bombs to repel crowds who
threw Molotov cocktails during
another violent night on the
streets of a St. Louis suburb in
the wake of the shooting of the
unarmed 18-year old Michael
Brown.
Hours earlier, the police
chief had said race relations
were the top priority in the
town, where a white police
officer fatally shot the black
teen. Authorities have vowed
to reach across the racial, eco-
nomic and generational divide
in a community in search of
answers.
In the streets of Ferguson,
though, the polite dialogue
heard at community forums
and news conferences is
nowhere to be found.
Instead, officers from mul-
tiple departments in riot gear
and in military equipment have
clashed nightly with protest-
ers, who chant, “Hands up,
don’t shoot.” Wednesday saw
more tense confrontations and
further volleys of tear gas from
police — this time paired with
smoke bombs in response
to flaming projectiles and
other objects lobbed from the
crowd. Protesters faced heav-
ily armed police who at times
trained weapons on them from
armored trucks.
Two reporters said they
were detained by police for not
clearing out quickly enough
from a McDonald’s where they
were working, near the pro-
tests but away from the more
volatile areas. The two, who
work for The Washington Post
and The Huffington Post, were
released without any charges.
Both say they were assaulted
but not seriously hurt.
The St. Louis Post-Dispatch
reported that about 10 people
had been arrested, including
St. Louis Alderman Antonio
French, who has been
chronicling the protests on
social media. Police had said
earlier they would not have
arrest information until early
Thursday.
The White House said
President Barack Obama
— who is on vacation on
the Massachusetts island of
Martha’s Vineyard — was
briefed late Wednesday on
the situation in Ferguson
by Attorney General Eric
Holder and senior adviser
Valerie Jarrett. Obama has
another briefing scheduled for
Thursday morning.
Residents in Ferguson have
complained about what they
called a heavy-handed police
presence that began with the
use of dogs for crowd control
soon after Brown’s shooting —
a tactic that for some invoked
the specter of civil rights pro-
tests a half-century ago. The
county police force took over
leading both the investigation
of Brown’s shooting and the
subsequent attempts to keep
the peace at the smaller city’s
request.
County Police Chief Jon
Belmar, though, said his offi-
cers have responded with “an
incredible amount of restraint,”
as they’ve been the targets of
rocks, bottles and gunshots,
with two dozen patrol vehicles
being destroyed.
Police had also asked ear-
lier that people assemble in
“an organized and respectful”
manner and disperse before
evening.
The city and county are also
under criticism for refusing to
release the name of the officer
involved in Brown’s shooting,
citing threats against that offi-
cer and others.
Ferguson Police Chief
Thomas Jackson called improv-
ing race relations “the top
priority right now” but also
said he won’t be pressured into
publicly identifying the officer
— despite, he said, mounting
demands from clergy, comput-
er hackers and protesters.
“We have the right to know,
and the family has the right
to know who murdered their
son,” said Sahari Gutierrez,
a 27-year-old Ferguson legal
assistant.
Jackson said he welcomes
Justice Department training on
racial relations in the suburb,
where two-thirds of the 21,000
residents are black while all
but three of the police force’s
53 officers are white.
Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon
cited the “worsening situation”
in Ferguson in saying he would
be in the area Thursday. He
asked community members
to be patient and calm while
the investigation proceeds and
urged law enforcement agen-
cies to “keep the peace and
respect the rights of residents
and the press.”
Jackson said the investiga-
tion remains weeks away from
completion.
Police have said Brown was
shot after an officer encoun-
tered him and another man on
the street. They say one of the
men pushed the officer into
his squad car, then physically
assaulted him in the vehicle
and struggled with the officer
over the officer’s weapon. At
least one shot was fired inside
the car.
The struggle then spilled
onto the street, where Brown
was shot multiple times. In
their initial news conference
about the shooting, police
didn’t specify whether Brown
was the person who scuffled
with the officer in the car and
have refused to clarify their
account.
Jackson said Wednesday
that the officer involved sus-
tained swelling facial injuries.
Dorian Johnson, who says
he was with Brown when the
shooting happened, has told a
much different story. He has
told media outlets that the
officer ordered them out of the
street, then tried to open his
door so close to the men that it
“ricocheted” back, apparently
upsetting the officer.
Johnson says the officer
grabbed his friend’s neck, then
tried to pull him into the car
before brandishing his weapon
and firing. He says Brown
started to run and the officer
pursued him, firing multiple
times. Johnson and another
witness both say Brown was on
the street with his hands raised
when the officer fired at him
repeatedly.
Among the protesters
critical of the police response
has been state Sen. Maria
Chapelle-Nadal, a Democrat
from nearby University City
“I just want to know if I’m
going to be gassed again, like
I was on Monday night?” she
asked Jackson at a press con-
ference. “And I was peaceful.
And I’m your state senator.”
“I hope not,” he replied.
Protests turn violent in St. Louis suburb
Associated Press
Air Force coaches told to help curb assaults
AIR FORCE ACADEMY,
Colo. — The superinten-
dent of the U.S. Air Force
Academy said Wednesday
that she has told athletic
coaches to take a bigger
role in preventing sexual
assaults, pulling them into
the yearslong campaign at
the school to stem abuse.
Lt. Gen. Michelle
Johnson, who took charge of
the school a year ago, said
coaches had not been fully
involved in what she called
the broader conversation
about school standards.
Johnson said she has
spoken with them twice
about her expectations and
told them to talk to athletes
about sexual assault.
“I was frank about the
need for them to help the
institution enforce our
standards,” she said in an
interview. “I was frank about
what happens, the complex-
ity of sexual-assault preven-
tion.”
Congress and the
Pentagon are closely moni-
toring sexual assaults at the
Air Force, Army and Navy
academies. A Department of
Defense report in January
said a culture of disrespect
permeates the schools and
contributes to sexual harass-
ment and assaults. The
report identified sports and
club teams as an area where
the academies needed to
expand training.
The Air Force Academy
took the unusual step of
offering back-to-back inter-
views with Johnson and
other leaders and cadets
on Wednesday after recent
news reports about allega-
tions of sexual abuse and
other misconduct by ath-
letes and lax oversight of
sports there.
Academy officials have
said the allegations were
investigated, and where war-
ranted, cadets were court-
martialed, expelled or given
other punishments.
The academy’s inspector
general is about to launch a
review of the athletic depart-
ment, which will include
its culture — a term the
Air Force often uses when
discussing whether the
atmosphere is conducive to
sexual assaults and other
misconduct.
The inspector general,
Col. David Kuenzli, said the
review is administrative,
not criminal. If evidence
of crime is uncovered, it
would be turned over to
the superintendent or the
Air Force Office of Special
Investigations, he said.
The review will look at
how well the department
uses its personnel and
funds, whether it is improv-
ing and whether it is fulfill-
ing its mission.
Kuenzli said he expects it
will determine whether the
athletic department has a
“negative culture.”
He said Johnson ordered
the review in July as part of
an Air Force-wide mandate
for inspections of smaller
units. It was not publicly
announced until this month,
when the Colorado Springs
Gazette reported on accusa-
tions that athletes had taken
drugs, cheated and commit-
ted sexual assaults.
The review is expected
to be completed by late
September or early October.
Kuenzli said other units at
the school will undergo simi-
lar reviews.
Cadet Kimberly Davis,
captain of the academy wom-
en’s swimming team, said
she and others have been
thoroughly trained in sexual-
assault awareness and how
to help other people.
“For every one person
that could be bad or could
do something wrong, I know
20 other people that would
be right there to help me
and have my back,” she
said.
The academy outside
Colorado Springs has about
4,000 students who are com-
missioned as second lieuten-
ants upon graduation.
Johnson is the first female
superintendent of the acad-
emy and was a basketball
star when she was a student
there.
Associated Press
FAYETTEVILLE —
Officials say students with
the University of Arkansas
for Medical Sciences will
provide free treatment to
residents in the state’s only
veterans home.
The media reports
Arkansas Gov. Mike Beebe
made the announcement
Wednesday. The free servic-
es are part of an effort to cut
expenses and improve care
at the Fayetteville Veterans
Home.
That facility has been
the state’s only veterans
home since 2012 after the
Little Rock Veterans Home
closed. A site for a new state
veterans home has been
selected in North Little
Rock.
An official with the
medical school’s northwest
branch says the partnership
will be beneficial for both
parties. Students can prac-
tice long-term care and the
Fayetteville facility won’t be
charged for the services.
Students to give Arkansas vets free care
Associated Press
Page 6 – The Saline Courier
sports@bentoncourier.com Thursday, August 14, 2014
SPORTS
Racers take 3rd overall; 7 state champions
FORT SMITH – The
CASC Racers, a local year-
round swim team, claimed
third place overall in the
State Championship July
25-27 in Fort Smith. The
Racers Women claimed the
third spot overall as well,
just missing second place by
seven points, while the men
claimed fifth place. There
were 52 Racers competing at
the state level. The Racers
had 16 state champion
swims, including four indi-
vidual champions and three
relay teams. There were 60
top three swims, and 180 top
eight swims. The Racers
had many AA, AAA, and
AAAA swims.
State Champions Relay
Teams for the Racers
were as follows:
200-meter free relay
team of Zoe Goss, Kristina
Games, Ava Word, and
Shelby Bratton
200m free relay team
of Lee Smothers, Charlie
Taylor, Josh Sorvillo, and
Garrett Sullivan
200m medley relay team
of Garrett Sullivan, Nolan
Games, Lee Smothers, and
Josh Sorvillo
Individual State
Champions:
Delaney Haralson – 200m
breaststroke
Virginia Carr – 100m
breast
Hope Ernhart – 50m free-
style
Spencer Hazen – 50m free
Girls 10 and Under
The 10-and-under girls
won the 200 meter free relay
with the Racers’ Relay team
consisting of Zoe Goss,
Kristina Games, Ava Word,
and Shelby Bratton, and
came in second in the girls
200-meter medley relay.
Zoe Goss came in sec-
ond in the 50m breast with
a AA time of 45.50, and
second in the 200m free
with a AA time of 2:45.08;
Shelby Bratton had a third-
place finish in the 50m free
with a AA time of 33.97;
and Kristina Games had a
third-place finish in the 50m
breast with a time of 47.33.
Girls 11-12
Rylie Discenza had a
second-place finish in the
50m back with a AA time of
35.36 and a third-place finish
in the 100m back with a AA
time of 1:17.61.
Girls 13-14
The 13-14 year old girls
relay team of Katie Games,
Brooke Smothers, Lydia
Huthmaker, and Jessica
Butler took second place in
the 200m medley relay.
Katie Games had a
second-place finish in the
100m back with a AA time
of 1:12.59 and in the 200m
back with a AA time of
2:36.91. Lydia Huthmaker
had a second-place finish in
the 100m fly with a AA time
of 1:11.30.
Girls 15-18
The 15-18 year old girls
took second place across
the board in the 200m free,
By Beverly Brister
Special to the Courier
The CASC
Racers pose
after taking
third place
overall in
the State
Championship
meet this past
weekend in
Fort Smith. The
Racers netted
seven state
champions dur-
ing the meet.
BEVERLY BRISTER/Special
to The Saline Courier
RACERS, page 7
Date Opponent Course Boy/Girl
Aug. 19 Open
Aug. 21 @Episcopal First Tee B&G
Aug. 25 @Sheridan Sheridan B&G
Aug. 26 @Mt. St. Mary First Tee G
Aug. 28 @L. Hamilton Glenwood B&G
Sept. 2 Open
Sept. 4 @Lakeside Hot Springs CC B&G
Sept. 9 Jesseville Hot Springs Vil B&G
Sept. 11 Open
Sept. 16 Ben, Bry, Sher. Hurricane CC B&G
Sept. 18 @Vilonia Greystone CC B&G
Sept. 22 @Mt. St. Mary Little Rock CC G
Sept. 23 @Bry., Ben. Hurricane CC B&G
Sept. 25 Open
Sept. 29 Girls State TBA G
Oct. 6 Boys State Jonesboro B
Oct. 16 Pleasant Valley (Overall) B&G
2014 BENTON HIGH GOLF SCHEDULE 2014 BRYANT HIGH GOLF SCHEDULE
Shuttleworth honored, receives scholarship
Bryant pediatric
cancer survivor
Ian Shuttleworth
received the
Optimist Club
of Greater Little
Rock Fellowship
Award, as well
as a CARTI Kids
Dennis Jungmeyer
Scholarship val-
ued at $2,500
during a special
ceremony at
the Arkansas
Governor’s
Mansion.
Pictured, from
left: Arkansas
First Lady Ginger
Beebe; Ian
Shuttleworth;
Optimist Club
president Steve
Jones; and Dennis
Jungmeyer.
Special to The Saline Courier
Aussie punter
on right track
FAYETTEVILLE
- Sam Irwin-Hill arrived at
Arkansas last year putting
his best feet forward as he
has since instructed as a lad
by his dad Down Under.
The Ray Guy Award pre-
season watch list punter,
after averaging 44.3 yards
per Razorbacks punt last
season, including an SEC
leading 20 downed inside
the 20 with a career long
79 yards punt, Irwin-Hill
kicked ambidextrously for
the Hogs like he did the
previous two junior college
years at City College of San
Francisco, and practically
all his life growing up in
Bendingo, Australia.
“It came from Australian
Rules Football,” Irwin-Hill
said of kicking with either
foot. “When I was four or
five my dad took me out to
a field and said ‘Kick with
both feet’ or else he would
take me home. So it was a
big deal.”
A big deal that quickly
became bigger.
“I had a lot of inspira-
tion,” Irwin-Hill said. “There
were a lot of superstars in
Australia who kicked with
the left and right foot. So
HOGS, page 7
Date Opponent Course Boy/Girl
Aug. 13 Jonesboro Ridge Point CC B&G
Aug. 20 Conway Conway CC B&G
Aug. 26 Little Rock First Tee G
Sept. 2 Sheridan Sheridan CC B
Sept. 3 Little Rock First Tee B&G
Sept. 6 Conway Centennial Valley B&G
Sept. 9 Hot Springs Diamond Head B
Sept. 16 Bryant Hurricane B&G
Sept. 22 Little Rock Country Club of LR G
Sept. 23 Benton Hurricane B&G
Sept. 29 State Tourney W. Memphis G
Meadowbrook CC
Oct. 7 State Tourney Sherwood B
The Greens @ North Hill
Oct. 16 Pleasant Valley (Overall) B&G
By Nate Allen
Razorback Report
Thursday, August 14, 2014
The Saline Courier 7
the 400m free, and the 200m
medley relays. The relay
team consisting of Lindsey
Butler, Virginia Carr,
Ploy Freebairn, and Hope
Ernhart took second in the
200m free relay, missing
the first place slot by only
.04 seconds. The relay team
of Lindsey Butler, Virginia
Carr, Andrea Bond, and
Hope Ernhart took second
in the 400m free relay, and
the relay team of Lindsey
Butler, Virginia Carr,
Delaney Haralson, and Hope
Ernhart took second in the
200m medley relay.
Hope Ernhart won the
50m freestyle with a AAAA
time of 27.18 and came in
second in the 100m free
with a AAAA time of 59.69.
Delaney Haralson won the
200m breast with a AA time
of 2:51.96, and placed sec-
ond in the 400m IM with
a AA time of 5:24.49, and
Virginia Carr won the 100m
breast with a AAA time of
1:17.17. Lindsey Butler came
in second in the 100m back
with a AAA time of 1:08.12
and second in the 200m
back with a AAA time of
2:27.97.
Boys 10 & Under
Cade Cobb came in third
in the 50m breast with a
time of 47.74.
Boys 11-12
The boys relay teams
took two third-place and one
fourth-place medals. The
relay team consisting of
Kayde Cross, Bryan Byrd,
Roe Webb, and Joshua
McClain took third in the
200m free relay, third in the
400m free relay, and fourth
in the 200m medley relay,
missing third by only .59 of
a second.
Kayde Cross came in sec-
ond in the 100m back with a
AA time of 1:15.66, third in
the 50m freestyle with a AA
time of 30.22, and third in
the 50m back with a AA time
of 34.75.
Boys 13-14
Spencer Hazen won the
50m freestyle championship
with a AAAA time of 25.72.
Boys 15-18
The Boys had two state
champion relay teams. The
relay team consisting of Lee
Smothers, Charlie Taylor,
Josh Sorvillo, and Garrett
Sullivan won the 200m
free relay, and the team
of Garrett Sullivan, Nolan
Games, Lee Smothers, and
Josh Sorvillo won the 200m
medley relay.
Garrett Sullivan placed
third in the 100m back with
a AA time of 2:17.40.
Racers
From page 6
Cards top sloppy Marlins
MIAMI — When Casey
McGehee was ruled out on
strikes to end the game,
he protested the call and
pursued the umpire toward
the locker room for several
steps, angrily waving his
arm and tossing aside his
helmet and bat.
Thus ended a night of
frustration for the Miami
Marlins. They gave up two
unearned runs, walked in
a run, didn’t reach second
base until the ninth inning
and lost Wednesday to the
St. Louis Cardinals 5-2.
The Marlins were going
for their first three-game
sweep of the Cardinals
since 1996. But they
couldn’t muster much of
a challenge against Justin
Masterson, who pitched
seven scoreless innings in
his best outing since joining
St. Louis.
“Absolutely we wanted to
get greedy and try to go for
the sweep,” McGehee said.
“But Masterson threw the
ball well.”
A pair of errors by
second baseman Jordany
Valdespin led to the
unearned runs. Nathan
Eovaldi (6-7) allowed four
runs, two earned, in six
innings.
“We didn’t help ourselves
out defensively,” manager
Mike Redmond said. “We
gave them a few extra outs
there and they took advan-
tage of them. That’s what
good teams do, and we
know that’s not us. We need
to make those plays and
help our pitchers. You start
talking about playing mean-
ingful games, you’ve got to
make plays.”
Jeff Baker had a two-run
homer in the ninth for the
Marlins, but they totaled
only five hits. NL home run
and RBI leader Giancarlo
Stanton went 0 for 4 with
two strikeouts.
Masterson earned his
first career RBI in the sixth
with a two-out single. He
was more excited about
pitching seven scoreless
innings in his best outing
since being acquired in a
trade with Cleveland on July
30.
“I pray to the good lord
that this is on the right
path,” said Masterson, who
has struggled for much
of the season. “I felt very
comfortable. The ball was
coming out well and it was
heavy. And it was going at
guys; that’s nice too.”
The 6-foot-6 sinkerballer
recorded 12 outs on ground-
balls. He also bounced
a grounder through the
Miami infield for his RBI,
and when asked if he got
the ball as a souvenir, he
laughed.
“I got a ‘W,’” he said. “It’s
much better for the team
than the ball.”
Masterson improved to
2-1 with St. Louis and 5-6
overall. He allowed three
hits — all singles — and
no walks and threw only 91
pitches before departing for
a pinch hitter.
After recording only six
outs in his previous start,
he lowered his ERA to 6.00
in three outings with the
Cardinals, and 5.14 overall
this year.
FORMER CATCHER
Redmond caught
Masterson in 2010 when
both were with the Indians.
“He’s a totally differ-
ent guy than I caught,”
Redmond said. “He definite-
ly relies on his location and
changes speeds, but he still
gets a ton of groundballs.
We never got anything
going against him.”
Redmond also caught the
Marlins’ starter Thursday,
Brad Penny, when both
played for Florida.
TRAINER’S ROOM
Cardinals LF Matt
Holliday left the game in
the seventh inning when his
chronic knee trouble flared
up, but he said the problem
wasn’t serious.
Marlins LHP Dan
Jennings, who suffered a
concussion when he was hit
in the head by a line drive
on Aug. 7, has been free of
symptoms the past two days
and played catch before the
game. There’s no timetable
yet for his return.
Redmond said he
anticipates that RHP Carter
Capps (elbow) and INF
Derek Dietrich (wrist) will
rejoin the team next month.
UP NEXT
The Cardinals open
a homestand Thursday
against the Padres when
John Lackey pitches against
Eric Stults. Lackey has an
8.25 ERA in two starts since
joining St. Louis.
Penny pitches Thursday
against Arizona and Chase
Anderson. Penny has a 1.93
ERA in 23 games against
the Diamondbacks.
that’s where it came from
and I thought it would be
a big deal to introduce it
to the American style of
football and it has definitely
played that way.”
Punt returners and the
coaches designing schemes
for them are bound to have
some uncertainty from
which foot an Irwin-Hill
punt will be delivered even
knowing they can guess
“right” 75 percent of the
time and probably will be
correct guessing a higher
right percentage this sea-
son.
“Last year it was probably
75/25 right foot,” Irwin-Hill
said. “The dominant foot is
the right foot. That’s where
the strength comes from
and I want to focus on the
NFL traditional style. I prac-
ticed a lot more this sumer
on the more traditional style
so I am really looking for-
ward to put that more in the
game this year.”
But not entirely. The
unexpected angles from a
surprise left-footed punt can
“definitely” be more difficult
to field, Irwin-Hill said and
enhance the chances of pin-
ning an opponent deep.
It also expands Coach
Bret Bielema’s trick play
options. A 6-3, 209 fine all-
round athlete, Irwin-Hill off
a fake punt completed a
24-yard pass for a first down
last year and dashed 12
yards for a first down off a
fake against Alabama and
he’s ambidextrously adept
at rugby-style punting.
“If we have that gap
and there’s a little wind
behind my back, Coach B
has that confidence in me,”
Irwin-Hill said of punting
left-footed. “Or if there is a
space open on that left side
we could run the football.
There are a lot of different
things we can do and to
have that versatility is really
good.”
It’s more punter versatil-
ity than new special teams
coach Rory Segrest has
coached before.
“I can say I have not,”
Segrest said of coaching an
ambidextrous punter. “To
me it’s a great talking piece,
but I just want him kicking
where they fair-catch. If it’s
right-footed or left-footed
or whatever it is just make
sure to hang it up there in
the right spot where they
can’t return it.”
Most times last year
that’s what Irwin-Hill
achieved.
Just how did Arkansas,
and a San Francisco junior
college before Arkansas,
and an Australian kicker get
together?
“I did an academy in
Australia called Pro Kick
Australia,” Irwin-Hill said.
“That was designed spe-
cifically to coach poten-
tial kickers and punters
from Australian Rules to
American football. I prac-
ticed in that academy for
12 months and sent over a
video. I got a lot of atten-
tion from the videos but in
terms of grades I had to
go to a junior college and
that’s where I ended up in
San Francisco and I was
more than happy to start my
career there.”
And even happier to end
up Arkansas.
“Arkansas responded
to the videos,” Irwin-Hill
said. “I looked at Arkansas
and I never looked back. I
came straight here and I
committed straightaway.
It’s a great place.”
This week’s every other
day, two-a-day sessions
continued Wednesday with
a closed morning regular
practice and a night session
announced as mostly devot-
ed to the kicking game.
After the morning prac-
tice, Bielema announced
that fourth-year junior
walk-on offensive guard and
Little Rock Christian alum
Adam Deacon now is on
scholarship.
Deacon, whose older
brother Tyler also originally
was a Razorbacks walk-on
placed on scholarship and
lettered his final seasons
of 2011 and 2012, had just
addressed team during the
ALS Bucket Challenge on
the ALS illness that claimed
his mother’s life.
Regarding the scholar-
ship, Deacon was quoted
by the UA: “I honestly
didn’t see it coming. “I’ve
been working my butt off
and I Coach told me how
well I am doing but he
didn’t say anything about
a scholarship. Then at the
team meeting he brought
it up and it honestly
brought tears to my eyes.
I told my dad and he was
screaming for like a minute
straight on the phone. It
means the world to all of
us.”
Hogs
From page 6
By Steven Wine
AP Writer
NL Central
W L PCT GB WCGB
Brewers 66 55 .545 - -
Pirates 64 56 .533 1.5 +0.5
Cardinals 63 56 .529 2.0 -
Reds 60 60 .500 5.5 3.5
Cubs 52 67 .437 13.0 11.0
Raiders, Cowboys
conclude joint practices
OXNARD, Calif. — The
Oakland Raiders and
Dallas Cowboys concluded
their two days of joint
practices Wednesday with
another intense session
that included a number of
small scrums and had both
teams excited to possibly
repeat this again next sea-
son.
While the first ses-
sion Tuesday was marred
by a brawl that nearly
spilled into the stands
and featured a Raiders fan
swinging a replica helmet
at a Cowboys player and
cornerback B.W. Webb
swinging back at the fan,
the action on day two was
all between the lines.
There were a handful of
smaller fights with play-
ers from both sides taking
offense to hard hits and
trash talk but nothing got
out of hand.
“Today we handled it
a little bit better than we
did yesterday,” Cowboys
receiver Dez Bryant said.
“I think the intensity level
was sky high yesterday,
that’s why a lot of fights
broke out. But I think today
a lot of the veteran guys on
both sides of the ball did a
great job of handling all the
potential fights. We did a
good job today.”
Cowboys coach Jason
Garrett called the first day
of the practices the most
electric atmosphere he had
ever seen on a practice
field. He said the two days
of work were invaluable
because of the chance to
try different schemes and
different techniques that
will likely come up again
during the season.
Raiders coach Dennis
Allen said he believes the
intensity from these past
two days will translate to
the field on Friday night
when Oakland hosts
Detroit in an exhibition
game.
“Anytime you get into
this competitive environ-
ment, it creates a sense of
urgency with your football
team,” Allen said. “We
got better over these last
couple days.”
There was an
increased police presence
Wednesday, with extra offi-
cers near the sideline with
Raiders fans where the inci-
dent with Webb happened
the previous day.
Garrett said he talked
with Webb about how he
handled the situation and
said no punishment would
be needed.
“At some point you have
to as a player defend your
teammate, get yourself in
there and make sure he’s
going to be OK,” Garrett
said. “Always have your
guy’s back. That’s an
important part of building a
football team. At the same
time poise in that situa-
tion is important. I felt we
demonstrated both and you
kind of move on.”
Former Raiders line-
backer Rolando McClain
almost got into it with his
former teammates after
tackling Darren McFadden.
McClain, Oakland’s first-
round pick in 2010, never
lived up to expectations
with the Raiders. He
clashed with Allen and was
suspended for two games
for conduct detrimental
to the team in 2012. The
Raiders released him in
April 2013 and he stepped
away from football for a
season before joining the
Cowboys this offseason.
McClain said there
was no ill will toward the
Raiders and he had pleas-
ant exchanges with some
former teammates, Allen
and defensive coordinator
Jason Tarver.
“I had three years there,
it is what it is,” McClain
said. “I made some great
relationships, I still have
those relationships, and I’m
proud of it. That’s what you
do. You live and learn. I
wish them nothing but the
best.”
The one big negative
from the two days of prac-
tice for the Raiders was
a serious left knee injury
to tight end Nick Kasa.
Kasa got hurt during a drill
Tuesday and the initial
diagnosis is a torn ACL,
which would end his sea-
son.
Kasa is the second
Oakland tight end with
an injured left knee, join-
ing David Ausberry. That
leaves Mychal Rivera as
the only healthy tight end
on the roster who has
ever played in the NFL.
Ausberry was walking
around this week with a
wrap on his left knee after
having surgery. His return
date is undetermined.
NOTES: Raiders CB
Chimdi Chekwa (knee)
returned after missing
practice Tuesday but was
unable to make it through
the whole session. ...
Oakland WR Juron Criner
sat out with a lower-body
injury.
By Josh Dubow
AP Writer
8 The Saline Courier
Thursday, August 14, 2014
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BENTONVILLE — Wal-
Mart Stores Inc. cut its annual
profit outlook on Thursday
amid sluggish sales, higher-
than-expected health care costs
and the need to invest more in
its e-commerce operations.
The world’s largest retailer
eked out a 0.6 percent increase
in second-quarter profit,
dragged down by a weak U.S.
business. A key revenue mea-
sure was flat in its U.S. discount
stores, though it reversed five
straight quarters of declines.
Meanwhile, the number of
customers has now fallen seven
quarters in a row.
The results show the con-
tinued challenges facing Wal-
Mart’s new management team.
Doug McMillon, who was head
of the company’s international
division, took over the company
as CEO on Feb. 1.
Last month, he named Greg
Foran, who was the CEO of
Wal-Mart’s China business as
the head of Wal-Mart’s U.S. dis-
count business, which accounts
for 60 percent of the company’s
revenue. Foran, who started
his new job earlier this month,
replaced Bill Simon, who had
held the position since 2010.
The Bentonville, Arkansas-
based company is facing chal-
lenges from a slowly recovering
economy and fierce competi-
tion from the likes of online
king Amazon.com, dollar stores
and grocers. It’s also dealing
with a shift among shoppers
seeking the convenience of
small stores or buying on their
mobile devices and PCs.
Wal-Mart’s low-income shop-
pers, who on average make
$45,000 a year, were squeezed
by the recession that began
at the end of 2007 and have
struggled to recover since
it ended in 2009. While the
job and housing markets are
rebounding, Wal-Mart’s low-
income shoppers have not ben-
efited and continue to struggle
to stretch their money between
paychecks.
Wal-Mart also said Thursday
that the Nov. 1, 2013, expiration
of a temporary boost in food
stamps is still hurting its shop-
pers’ ability to spend.
Analysts believe that com-
petition could get even more
intense heading into the final
months of the year. Amazon.
com is beefing up its services,
like recently expanding its
same-day delivery. A big-
ger Dollar Tree also could
put more pressure on Wal-
Mart. The dollar-store chain
announced last month that it’s
buying rival Family Dollar for
$8.5 billion, significantly broad-
ening its reach.
In February, Wal-Mart
announced that it will more
than double its expansion plans
for its Neighborhood Markets
and Wal-Mart Express smaller
stores that cater to shoppers
looking for more convenience
with fresh produce, meat and
household and beauty prod-
ucts.
In fact, revenue at its
Neighborhood Markets rose
5.6 percent during the second
quarter, and customer traffic
rose 4.1 percent.
Wal-Mart has also vowed
it will be move more quickly
to bring e-commerce together
with physical stores to better
serve shoppers. That means
rebuilding its e-commerce
operation to further personalize
the online shopping experience
of each customer and making
other enhancements.
Wal-Mart reported its global
e-commerce sales rose 24
percent on a constant currency
basis during the second quar-
ter, with double-digit growth
in the U.S., United Kingdom,
China and Brazil. However,
that’s below its annual forecast
of 30 percent.
Wal-Mart has also been
sharpening its focus on every-
day low prices and bringing
that strategy abroad.
The challenges played out in
the company’s financial results.
The company reported net
income of $4.09 billion, or $1.26
per share, compared with $4.07
billion, or $1.24 per share, in
the same quarter a year ago.
Earnings, adjusted to
account for discontinued
operations, were $1.21 per
share. The average estimate
of analysts surveyed by Zacks
Investment Research was for
earnings of $1.21 per share.
The company said revenue
rose roughly 3 percent to
$119.34 billion from $116.1
billion in the same quarter a
year earlier. Analysts expected
$119.06 billion, according to
Zacks.
In the U.S., revenue at
stores open at least a year was
unchanged from a year ago,
including flat sales at Sam’s
Clubs.
Sam’s Club, which is facing
fierce competition from rival
Costco, has been trying to rev
up its business with trendier
home and fashion assortments
and offering more incentives in
its membership program.
“Stronger sales in the U.S.
businesses would’ve helped
our profit performance in the
quarter,” said McMillon in a
transcript of a prerecorded call
Thursday. “We can get better
operationally ... and we will.”
Net sales increased 2.7
percent at the Wal-Mart U.S.
discount business, while rising
3.1 percent in its international
business and 2.3 percent at
Sam’s Clubs.
Wal-Mart said it now expects
earnings per share for the year
to be in the range of $4.90 to
$5.15 per share. That’s down
from its previous guidance of
$5.10 to $5.45 per share.
Wal-Mart said that the
reduction in full-year profit pro-
jections assumes a continued
challenging global economy.
But Wal-Mart also said that
far more U.S. employees and
their families are enrolling
in its health care plan than it
expected.
As a result, it now expects
the impact to be about $500 mil-
lion for the fiscal year, which
is about $170 million higher
than the original estimate of
about $330 million provided in
February.
Associated Press
Walmart cuts profit outlook
VINEYARD HAVEN,
Mass. — In yet another twist
in their complex and heav-
ily scrutinized relationship,
Hillary Rodham Clinton and
President Barack Obama did
their best to shrug off their
differences Wednesday as
they gathered together on
Martha’s Vineyard following
a foreign policy split.
Obama’s spokesman said
the White House “is look-
ing onwards and upwards,”
while Clinton joked she was
planning on hugging it off
with her former boss at a
birthday party for a mutual
friend on the island getaway
where Obama is vacationing.
“We have disagreements
as any partners and friends,
as we are, might very well
have,” Clinton told reporters
crowded into a bookstore
signing of her memoir “Hard
Choices.” ‘’But I’m proud
that I served with him and
for him, and I’m looking for-
ward to seeing him tonight.”
Clinton, Obama and their
spouses sat together later
in the evening for a surf and
turf dinner celebration for
150 people at the Farm Neck
Golf Club. The White House
said the Obamas were
happy to have time with the
Clintons, and noted that
Obama and Clinton were
among those who delivered
80th birthday toasts to guest
of honor Ann Jordan, wife of
Democratic adviser Vernon
Jordan.
“The Obamas danced
nearly every song. A good
time was had by all,” White
House spokesman Eric
Schultz told reporters after
Obama departed shortly
after 10 p.m.
The media was not
allowed in to see whether
Clinton delivered her prom-
ised makeup hug after an
interview with The Atlantic
magazine in which she
seemed to try to set herself
apart from the unpopular
Obama as she heads toward
a possible 2016 White House
bid.
“Great nations need orga-
nizing principles, and ‘don’t
do stupid stuff’ is not an
organizing principle,” she
had said in the interview,
referring to a version of
the phrase Obama and his
advisers have used privately
to describe his approach to
foreign policy.
Her critiques came at
a particularly challenging
time for Obama, with bombs
falling on Iraq and disputes
raging in Syria, the Mideast,
Ukraine and elsewhere. A
former top Obama adviser,
David Axelrod, took to
Twitter to write: “Just to
clarify: ‘Don’t do stupid stuff’
means stuff like occupying
Iraq in the first place, which
was a tragically bad deci-
sion.” Clinton voted in favor
of the Iraq War in 2002,
while Obama voiced opposi-
tion.
It was Clinton’s biggest
split with Obama since their
2008 presidential primary
campaign when she ques-
tioned whether her younger
Senate colleague was quali-
fied to take a 3 a.m. phone
call on a foreign policy emer-
gency. Clinton took a more
hawkish stance than Obama
in that campaign, particu-
larly on the Iraq War, but
Obama put their bitter con-
test behind them by naming
her his top diplomat.
Clinton loyally carried
out Obama’s foreign policy
agenda for four years as
secretary of state, but
described some objections
she raised internally in her
new book, which focused on
her time in the administra-
tion. She expanded on those
objections in her interview,
saying Obama’s “failure”
to fully support the rebels
in Syria fueled the rise of
Islamic State militants now
the object of U.S. airstrikes
in Iraq.
Reporters who crowded
in front of a table set up
for Clinton’s signing at the
Bunch of Grapes bookstore
asked her whether she dis-
agreed with Obama’s Iraq
policy.
“I’m excited about signing
books,” she said, turning
to a line of hundreds that
snaked through the rainy
streets near the ferry dock
that brings summer visitors
to the island. About 1,000
copies of the book were
bought in advance, and the
store was open only for
those who had made the
purchases.
Schultz declined to say
whether the president was
upset over her critique of his
performance as he juggles
several crises overseas,
although he acknowledged
“an honest policy difference”
on the Syrian rebels. Schultz
said Obama appreciated that
Clinton called the president
Tuesday to say she was not
trying to attack him.
“They have a close and
resilient relationship,”
Schultz said.
Martha’s Vineyard
native Dana Jacobs, a ris-
ing sophomore at Boston’s
Northeastern University,
said she was a supporter
of Obama but a bigger fan
of Clinton after reading in
her book how she handled
foreign policy challenges.
She said Obama was dealt
“a really difficult hand of
cards.”
“I think something more
dramatic would have been
good, a little more change,”
Jacobs said, as she left
clutching a signed copy of
the book in which Clinton
described her world view.
Clinton and White House try to shrug off split
Associated Press
Thursday, August 14, 2014
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SALINE COUNTY’S NEWS SOURCE SINCE 1876
COURIER
THE SALINE
Have a legal that you need
to have published? WE CAN HELP YOU!
Fax your information to: 501.315.1920
or you can email it to:
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If you have any questions,
feel free to speak to us: 501.315.8228
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Benton, AR 72015
CLASSIFIEDS
Employment THE SALINE COURIER has an immediate opening for a part-time page designer/reporter. Experience with In-Design a must. This position will assist our primary page designer on Thursday, Friday and Saturday and will also cover a limited beat. Send resume and clips to Steve Boggs, publisher, at 321 N. Market Street, Benton, AR. 72015 or email to publisher@bentoncourier.com SALINE COUNTY’S NEWS SOURCE SINCE 1876 COURIER THE SALINE
Legal Notices SALINE COUNTY PROPERTY OWNERS' MULTIPURPOSE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT NO. 72 – STONEHILL SUBDIVISION PROJECT, PHASE 7 NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE BOARD OF COMMISSION- ERS FOR SALINE COUNTY PROPERTY OWNERS! MULTIPUR- POSE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT NO. 72 – STONEHILL SUBDIVI- SION PROJECT, PHASE 7, HAS ENTERED INTO ITS RECORDS THE FOLLOWING ORDER LEVYING UPON THE REAL PROP- ERTY OF THE DISTRICT A SUFFICIENT TAX TO PAY THE ESTI- MATED COST OF THE IMPROVEMENTS WITH TEN (10%) PER- CENT ADDED FOR UNFORESEEN CONTINGENCIES. ALL PER- SONS AFFECTED BY THE ORDER ARE HEREBY WARNED THAT THE ORDER SHALL BECOME FINAL UNLESS SUIT IS BROUGHT TO CONTEST THE ORDER WITHIN THIRTY (30) DAYS OF THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. AN ORDER ASSESSING THE VALUE OF BENEFITS TO BE RE- CEIVED BY THE OWNERS OF EACH OF THE SEVERAL BLOCKS, LOTS AND PARCELS OF LAND WITHIN SALINE COUNTY PROP- ERTY OWNERS' MULTIPURPOSE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT NO. 72 – STONEHILL SUBDIVISION PROJECT, PHASE 7; ASSESSING TAXES THEREON, AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES WHEREAS, all of the property holders owning property situated in Saline County Property Owners' Multipurpose Improvement District No. 72 – Stonehill Subdivision Project, Phase 7 (the "District"), have petitioned the Saline County County Court to form a property owners' improvement district to be organized for the purpose of constructing within the district waterworks, recreation, drainage, gas pipelines, underground trenches and excavations necessary for the installation of electric and telephone distribution systems, sanitary sewers, streets including curbs and gutters and sidewalks, together with facili- ties related to any of the foregoing within said District, to serve the inhabitants of the District; said purposes to be accomplished in the manner and of the materials that the Commissioners of the District shall deem to be in the best interest of the District, and the cost thereon to be assessed upon the real property of the District accord- ing to the benefits received; and WHEREAS, the County Court of Saline County, Arkansas has estab- lished the District to accomplish the above purposes by passing an Order on October 5, 2006; and WHEREAS, the assessments have been duly made by the Assessor of the District, who was appointed by the Board of Commissioners of the District, and filed in the office of the County Clerk pursuant to law, and notice of such filing was duly published in the Saline Courier, a newspaper published in and of general circulation in Saline County, Arkansas, on July 26, 2013 and August 2, 2013; and WHEREAS, on August 5, 2013, the Commissioners and Assessor for the District met at the place and at the time named in said notice as a board of equalization and heard all complaints against the assess- ments filed with the County Clerk, and equalized the same; and WHEREAS, no protest of the assessments was received; and WHEREAS, the benefit received by each and every block, lot and parcel of real estate situated in the District equal or exceed the local assessments thereon; and WHEREAS, the estimated cost of the improvements to Phase 7 of the District is $275,000 exclusive of capitalized interest and costs of financing; and WHEREAS, the assessed benefits (the "Assessed Benefits") amount to $565,156. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDERED by the Board of Commission- ers of Saline County Property Owners' Multipurpose Improvement District No. 72 – Stonehill Subdivision Project, Phase 7: Section 1. That each of the blocks, lots and parcels of real property in the District be assessed according to the assessment list of the District, as equalized, as the same now is of record in the office of the County Clerk as reflected on Exhibit "A" attached hereto, and the As- sessment of Benefits on each of the blocks, lots and parcels shall be collected by the County Collector with general taxes becoming due in the year 2014 and annually thereafter at the rate per annum of 5.435% until the whole of the local assessment, with interest thereon at a rate equal to the lesser of the maximum rate permitted by law or the rate of 10% per annum, shall be paid. Section 2. This Order shall have all the force of a judgment to be paid by the real property in the District in proportion to the amount of the Assessed Benefits as established herein and to be paid in annual installments as set forth in Section 1 hereof and the taxes so levied shall be a lien upon the real property in the District from the time of the date of this Order and shall be entitled to preference over all de- mands, executions, encumbrances or liens whatsoever created, and continue until all such assessments, with any penalty or cost that may accrue thereon, shall have been paid. Section 3. This Order shall be in full force and effect from and after its entry.IT IS SO ORDERED this 5th day of August, 2013. SALINE COUNTY PROPERTY OWNERS' MULTIPURPOSE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT NO. 72 /s/ Travis P. Bull • Commissioner /s/ Mickey D. Cunningham • Commissioner /s/ Jerry Cunningham • Commissioner
Legal Notices IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF SALINE COUNTY, ARKANSAS SUMMIT BANK PLAINTIFF v. NO. 63CV-12-591 JOHN BEDWELL AND SANDRA L. BEDWELL, THE ARKANSAS DEPT. OF FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION AND PAULINE W. MYERS DEFENDANTS NOTICE OF COMMISSIONER'S SALE Notice is hereby given that the undersigned Commissioner, pursu- ant to the Decree and Order of the Circuit Court of Saline County, Ar- kansas, which was rendered on the 25th day of July, 2013 in a case in which Summit Bank is Plaintiff and John Bedwell, Sandra L. Bedwell. The Arkansas Dept. of Finance & Administration and Pauline W. Myers are the Defendant will on the 20th day of August, 2013 offer for sale on a credit of three (3) months at public auction at the front door of the County Courthouse in Benton, Saline County, Arkansas to the highest and best bidder the following land situated in the County of Saline, State of Arkansas, to wit: ALL THAT PART OF THE NW 1/4 OF THE NW 1/4 OF SECTION 19, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 13 WEST; THAT PART OF THE NE1/4 OF THE NE1/4 OF SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 14 WEST; ALSO PART OF THE SE 1/4 OF THE SE 1/4 OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 14 WEST, MORE FULLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: Commenc- ing at the Northeast corner of said Section 24 and run thence S45˚37!15”W for 466.34 feet to the point of beginning of land herein described; run thence N45˚37!15”E for 205.14 feet; thence S44˚54!E for 559.87 feet to the Northwest right of way line of Arkansas State Highway No. 111; thence S40˚44!W along Highway Line for 313.31 feet; thence S24˚48!W along highway line for 111.12 feet; thence N69˚37!W for 10.55 feet to the intersection with the East line of Section 24 at a point that is 405.65 feet North of the Southeast corner of the NE1/4 of NE 1/4 of said Section; thence N69˚37!W for 687.8 feet; thence N22˚43!E for 132 feet; thence N45˚08!W for 602.2 feet to the Southeast line of the Union Pacific Railroad; run thence N45˚34!E along railroad right of way for 239 feet to a point that is N54˚17!24”W of the point of beginning; run thence S54˚17!24”E for 671.04 feet to the point of beginning Said sale will be held at 11:00 A.M. on the date stated. The purchaser at said sale will be required to give bond with approved security to secure the payment of the purchase price together with interest from the date of sale at the highest rate allowable by law, and a lien will be retained on said land to secure further said purchase price. WITNESS my hand this 17th day of June, 2013. Dennis Milligan, Commissioner, by Lana Davis, D.C. Prepared by:Donald M. Spears, Attorney at Law 113 So. Market Street, Benton, Arkansas 72015 501-315-0092 fax 888-748-5786
Legal Notices NOTICE OF SALE Of an amount not to exceed $2,840,000 BAUXITE SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 14 SALINE COUNTY, ARKANSAS CONSTRUCTION BONDS DATED SEPTEMBER 1, 2013 Sealed bids will be received until 10:00 a.m. local time on August 20, 2013 For the above bonds, which mature serially on February 1 of each of the years 2014 through 2040 inclusive. All bids must be on the Official Bid Form or through PARITY. Copies of the Preliminary Official Statement, Official Notice of Sale and Official Bid Form may be obtained from Stephens Inc., 111 Center Street, Suite 2300, Little Rock, Ar- kansas 72201, Telephone No. (501) 377-6315, the District!s fiscal agent. Mr. Jerrod Williams, Superintendent
Garage Sales EARLY BIRD SANITATION Once a week pick up + Rolloff Dumpsters 332-7202 • 840-6758 • 778-3969 I BUY JUNK CARS Announcements 28TH BOOK & PA- PER SHOW – Aug. 10th & 11th, Sat 9 to 5 & Sun 10 to 4, Col- lectible Books - Books of Interest and.or Value/ Rare, Collecti- ble Ephemera, Jack- sonville Community Center, 5 Municipal DrJacksonville, AR Free Parking, Car- peted & Air Condi- tioned $5 Admission Adoption ADOPT HOPING to share our hearts and home with a newborn baby. Loving, nurtur- ing home for your baby. Expenses paid. Mar r i ed coupl e, Walt/Gina 1-800-315-6957. Happily Married Couple yearning to love a child in a secure home. Expenses paid-private Legal. Kim & Werner 1-888-416-5056 Classifieds Work!
Adoption UNPLANNED PREG- NANCY? THINKING OF ADOPTI ON? Open or closed adop- tion. YOU choose the family LIVING EX- PENSES PAID. Ab- by!s One True Gift Adoptions Call 24/7. 1-866-459-3371 Personal MEET SINGLES right now! No paid opera- tors, just real people l i ke you. Browse greetings, exchange messages and con- nect live. Try it free. C a l l n o w 1-877-939-9299 Health Services CANADA DRUG CENTER Safe and af- fordable medications. Save up to 75% on your medi cat i on n e e d s C a l l 1-800-304-6217 $10.00 off first pre- scription and FREE Shipping Employment A KID!S Place Pre- school /Daycare i s now hiring. Apply at 825 N. Main, Benton. Classifieds Work!
Employment CLASS A CDL Driv- ers Great Home Ti me! Benefi ts & Safety Bonus Avail- able. Must have 1 year OTR in the last 3 years. Call Dancor T r a n s i t I n c . @866-677-4333 www.dancortransit.com DIETARY COOK with experience needed at Mt. Carmel Commu- ni ty Center. Cal l 501-315-1555 DRI VERS New Trucks Arriving Exp Pays up to 50 cpm, Full Benefits + Quality Homet i me CDL-A Req 877-258-8782 www.ad-drivers.com ENTERPRISE LANES Hiring Part-Time weekend help, me- chanical ability a plus. Starts at $8/hr. Apply at 1515 Military Rd. EXPERIENCED COOK/WAITSTAFF CALL HOME PLATE DINER ASK FOR RICK 813-4423 THE BAUXITE Police Department in cooperation with the Bauxite School Sys- tem is accepting applications for a full time School Re- source Officer for the 2013-2014 school year. Applications will be accepted until Thursday, August 8, 2013. Download an application at: www.bauxiteminers.org click on: District, Human Resources, Employment Opportunities or bit.ly/applybauxite TRUCK DRIVERS Wanted Best Pay and Home Time! Apply Online Today over 750 Companies! One Application, Hundreds of Offers! www.HammerLaneJobs.com
Employment Grams House Now Hiring TEACHERS Health & Life Insurance, Retirement Call Melba 501-794-4726 HELP WANTED! Make up to $1000 a week mailing brochures from home! Genuine Opportunity! NO experience Required. Start Immediately! www.BrochureWorkers.com HELP WANTED!!! Make $1000 weekly mai l i ng brochures from HOME! NO ex- perience required- Start Immediately! www.TheMailingHub.com PART TIME Ground- skeeper/Handyman for 30 acre property $10 per hour Call 501-607-0179 EARLY CHILDHOOD Education Parapro- fessional The Dawson Education Coopera- tive Early Childhood Speci al Educati on Paraprofessional. The application process is open until the position is filled. Interested ap- plicants should send a resume to Sandra Francis, Early Child- hood Speical Educa- tion Coordinator, 711 Clinton Street, Ar- kadelphia, AR. 71923, An Equal Opportunity Employer. R.N. – Direct patient care w/sleep clinic. NO LPN!s, APN!s, MA! s. 7:15am to 5-6pm generally, 9am to 1pm sometimes. Ov er t i me av ai l In-state travel 2 - 3 times per mo. requ.. Full benefits. Hrly rate DOE. NO weekends, holidays, or on-call. Fax resumes t o 501-661-1991 Cleo’s Furniture SALES ASSOCIATE Arkansas’ fastest growing furniture company with over 25 years in the business is looking to fi ll a sales position in our Benton location. LIFTING AND MOVING FURNITURE IS REQUIRED Health and Life Insurance, Retirement, Vacations, No Sundays, Excellent Pay, Advancement Available Must apply in person Monday thru Friday 10:00 am to 6:00pm 201 N. Main St. Benton, AR SUBSTITUTE BUS DRIVERS The Bauxite Public School District is seeking qualified applicants for substi- tute bus driving positions for the 2013 - 2014 school year. Applicants must have a CDL and experi- ence as a school bus driver. If interested, please apply for future bus driver positions at: bit.ly/applybauxite WANTED FULLTIME Dental Asst. for practice in Benton, Exp. required. Send Resume to Blind Box 600, Saline Courier P.O. Box 207, Benton, AR. 72018
Instruction AIRLINE CAREERS begin here - Become an Aviation Mainte- nance Tech. FAA ap- proved training. Fi- nancial aid if qualified Housing available. Job placement assis- t ance. Cal l AI M 877-424-4177. CAN YOU DIG IT? – Heavy Equipment Op- erator Career! 3wk Hands On Training School. Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excava- tors. National Certifi- cations. Lifetime Job Pl acement Assi s- tance. VA Benefits Eligible 866-362-6497 Child Care IN-HOME DAYCARE Spotless - Non-smoking Drop-ins Welcome! 778-2920 LICENSED CHILDCARE Infants to 8 B •L• S Vouchers • Drop-Ins 562-0691 • 951-2923 Services *REDUCE YOUR CA- BLE BILL! Get a 4-Room Al l -Di gi tal Satellite system in- stalled FREE Pro- gramming starting at $24.99/mo. FREE HD/DVR Upgrade to new callers, SO CALL NOW (800) 799-4935 *REDUCE YOUR CA- BLE BILL! * Get a whole-home Satellite system installed at NO COST and pro- gramming starting at $19.99/mo. FREE HD/DVR Upgrade. C A L L N O W 1-800-474-0423. DISH TV Retailer - SAVE! St ar t i ng $19.99/month (for 12 months.) FREE Pre- mium Movie Chan- nels. FREE Equip- ment, Installation & Act i vat i on. CALL, COMPARE LOCAL DEALS! 1-800-278-8081 Apartments Unfurnished 2 BR Apts, kit. appl., W&D conn., $500 & up. Handicap access. 317-5190 / 317-5192 2 BR, 1 BA, $500 mo., No Pets, 6 mo. l ease @ 204 N. Fourth St. Benton, Call 501-778-3324 2 BR, 1 BA, kitch. appl., W/D conn., $500 mo., $250 dep. Call between 9am- 8pm, (501)315-9337
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Apartments Unfurnished
CAMRY COURT Now Open in Bryant New Construction 2 BR, 2 BA or 2.5 BA off Wilkerson Rd. on Sadie Dr. (By Hill Farm Elem.) Call Terri the on-site manager for appt. 501-804-0125 Bldg. 1225 #2 or call Dale King 501-539-1935 Visit our web-site www.arkansas apartments.net Want to Downsize Your Gas Guzzler? Sell it in the Courier Classifieds. Call to place your ad today! 315-8228
Apartments Unfurnished NOTICE: All real es- tate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it il- legal to advertise any preference, limitation or di scr i mi nat i on based on race, color, religion, sex, handi- cap, familial status or national origin, or in- tention to make any such preference. We will not knowingly ac- cept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings adver- tised in this newspa- per are available on an equal opportunity basis. Houses for Rent 3 & 4 BEDROOM $825 -$1400 mo., Haskell, Benton & Bryant. 315-9370 3 BR, 2 BA, Bryant Schools, $1250 mo., $1,000 dep.. Avail August 1st Please Call 501-840-7626 3BR 1.5 BA Newly Remodeled Bryant School Di st r i ct $900mo + $900 Dep Call 501-317-0422 3BR 1BA House, $595 mo., 6mo. lease No Pet s, Cal l 501-778-3324 Eagle Properties LLC 315–2075 Nice 2 & 3 BR Homes from $500 to $925 Apartments 1 BR’s from $415 2 BR’s from $475 *based on availability Deposit & References Required eaglepropsaline.com FOR LEASE/SALE New 3 & 4 BR, 2 BA, brick, FP, ceiling fans, carpet, 2 car garage, patio. Go to: www. catalyst-residential.com or 501-697-6342 Low Rents GINGLES RENTALS 501-778-2516 unfurnished 2 BR Duplex Apts $280 per mth. 2 BR Homes from $400 per mth for qualified renters References & Deposit Required HASKELL 204 GLENN OAK 3BR, 2 BA, 2 car garage. Nice. $790 mo. $600 dep. 501-847-5377 LRG. 3 BR, 1 BA in Bauxite, on 1 acre, absolutely no pets, $800 mo., $600 dep., (501)332-4073 NEW 4BR 2Ba 2 Car garage Fenced yard 1750sq.ft. $1200mo Benton Schools Call 326-8000 Business Property For Rent BUSINESS PROP- ERTY For Lease 608 S. East Street Office with large parking area Call 315-9337 between 9a&8p Musical Merchandise Cushing Piano Service Tune • Repair Player Pianos & Pump Organs 778-6584 Pets & Supplies BENTON ANIMAL Control & Adoption 501-776-5972 benton.petfinder.com Looking for a good deal? Search the Courier Classifieds!!
Pets & Supplies BRYANT ANIMAL Control & Adoption www.bryant.petfinder.com www.1-800-save-a-pet.com www.1888pets911.org Produce Produce 840-4076 Home Grown Tomatoes, Purple hull Peas shelled & unshelled, AR Peaches, Squash, & Okra TOMATOES Peaches,Watermelons, Cantaloupes 501-672-2248 Heavy Equip- SURPLUS EQUIP- MENT. Online auc- tions HUGE selection. BIG savi ngs. NO Buyer fees Low Seller f ees BARGAI NS! Register FREE Use Promo Code cnhi313. LIVE support. www.SurplusOnThe.NET 334-215-3019 Autos For Sale 80 CJ7 Jeep Hard Top Doors & Bikini Top $3500 OBO Call 501-454-0551 Autos Wanted DONATE A CAR Humane Society of the United States FREE Next-DAY TOWING! Running or Not. Tax Deductible. Call Before Tax Year Ends! 1-800-418-1562 I Buy Junk Cars free pick-up & Haul all types of scrap metal Call Jerry Toland 332-7202 • 840-6756 Motorcycles
2007 HONDA VTX 1300C Cruiser Like new! Only 10K miles, Removable Windshield, Sissy Bar w/rack $4,600 Pics Available Call 501-993-6284 Houses For Sale NEWER home for lease or lease option. 4 BR, 2 BA, open floor plan. $1,200 mo. Cal l t o s ee. 501-804-4400 Mobile Homes For Sale $$$ 0 DOWN $$$ with your Land! Call 501-653-3201 14X50 3BR 2BA $3500 Down Owner Financed No Credit Needed $600mo Lot Rent Included Newly Remodeled Must Stay in Sherwood Park Call 501-541-6855 FORECLOSED DOUBLEWIDE on Private Lot. Great Schools, Great Location, must sell! 501-653-3201 NEW 4 BR 2 BA Home $39K includes delivery to your prop- erty. Call for Quick Approval 653-3202 Ready to take the Real Estate Plunge? Check out the Homes for Sale in the Classi- fieds daily. Classifieds Work!
Mobile Homes For Sale RENT TO OWN REMODEL/RECONDTION CLEAN/GOOD SHAPE ‘00 16x80 3BR $570-6yrs ‘97 16x80 3BR $570-6yrs ‘95 16x72 2BR $550-6yrs ‘99 16x80 3BR $550-6yrs Includes lot Rent & Ins Lake • Fish • Walk Trail Sunset Lake • 951-2842 Lots & Acreage 20 ACRES FREE! Buy 40 – Get 60 Acr es. $0- Down $198/ mo. Money Back Guarantee, NO CREDIT CHECKS. Beaut i f ul Vi ews. Roads/Surveyed. Near El Paso, Texas. 1-800-843-7537 www.Texaslandbuys. com 33.5 WOODED Acres 5 minutes North of Lake Degray on Hwy 347 Pl ease cal l 501-580-0358 for de- tails Priced for Quick Sale Business Property For Sale
Turn Key ready restaurant business in Downtown Benton includes like new equipment motivated seller leaveittoliz@aol.com, Real Estate CANCEL YOUR TI MESHARE. NO Risk Program STOP Mortgage & Mainte- nance Payments To- day. 100% Money Back Guarant ee. FREE Consultation. Call Us NOW. We C a n H e l p 1-888-356-5248 Professional Services STOP MORTGAGE & Mai ntenance Pay- ments TODAY! CAN- CEL YOUR TIME- SHARE. NO Risk Pr ogr am 100% Money Back Guaran- tee. FREE Consulta- tion. Call Us NOW. We Can Hel p! 1-800-282-3206 Legal Notices THE OWNERS of the following vehicles must bring proof of ownership to Jones Wrecker Service, Inc., 4315 Alcoa Rd, Benton, AR 72015, (501) 778-1440, No later than 45 days, Sept. 20, 2013, or ownership will be forfeited. 1994 Ford Probe VIN# 1ZVLT22B6R5122101 NOTICE OF SALE On August 15, 2013 at Jones Wrecker Service, Inc., 4315 Alcoa Road, Benton, A R 7 2 0 1 5 , 501-778-1440 at 9 AM, the following vehicle(s): 1995 Dodge 1500 VIN# 1B7HF16Y5SS195525 1999 Chev Cavalier VIN# 1G1JC5247X7142316 2000 Chev Cavalier VIN# 1G1JC1246Y7383391
Give them a little bit of home... Have your hometown newspaper mailed to your favorite student. Call Today to fnd out how, 315-8228
Page 8 – The Saline Courier class@bentoncourier.com Tuesday, August 6, 2013
possible charges.
In my six years as alder-
man, this is the first time I
have heard of this happening
for Bryant,” said Alderman
Adrian Henley.
Casady confirmed that
the findings were sent to his
office, but this is “normal
business”, he said.
It is too early to say if
charges will be filed or are
even warranted, he said.
The high turnover rate in
the finance department may
have caused the missing
documentation, said Bryant
Mayor Jill Dabbs.
During the Bryant Finance
and Personnel Committee
meeting, Dabbs said only
minor issues were revealed
and she said she is happy
with the results.
According to the report,
other findings include some
accounting errors in the
finance department and in
the district court.
The police department
also could not locate 19 cita-
tions books and 92 manual
citation books were not filed
with the District Court Clerk.
The errors found in the
finance department were only
misclassifications, Dabbs
said.
“I am confident errors of
this nature will not occur
in the future,” Dabbs said.
“None of these errors are
an indicator of malfeasance,
misappropriation of funds or
unaccounted for monies.”
These errors have been
corrected and the members
of the finance department
have changed software and
completed new training so
the errors won’t occur again.
The problem with the
police department’s citation
books were corrected when
the department switched
to electronic tickets, Dabbs
said.
“This is due to past
employees that are no longer
employed,” said Chief Mark
Kizer.
Now only four citations
books are missing.
“It is my hope with the
release of this audit report
some if not all of the concern
created by political motives
can be put to rest and the
citizens of Bryant have a
renewed confidence in their
local government to conduct
business ethically, morally
and efficiently,” Dabbs said.
Some aldermen have stat-
ed they are still not comfort-
able with the city’s finances.
Alderman Brenda Miller
said she will not feel secure
in the city’s finances until the
2013 audit is completed.
Henley, said he found seri-
ous errors in the audit.
“I believe the audit speaks
for itself and according to
the audit, we have issues
that are in the past and pres-
ent. These issues need to be
corrected immediately and
transparently,” he said.
The findings in the police
department and district court
concern him, he said.
“I believe that these items
need to be investigated to the
fullest extent to prove that
there was no wrongdoing
and clear our police depart-
ment of any such wrong
accusations,” he said.
Audit
From page 1
Robin Williams’ public joy, private pain
LOS ANGELES — In pub-
lic, Robin Williams shared
only the joy he found in life,
never the sorrow. He was the
same man in private, shield-
ing even longtime friends
from the darkness of depres-
sion that finally enveloped
him.
“I can honestly say I
never saw him in the down
times,” said comedian David
Steinberg, who was friends
with Williams for more than
30 years and toured with
him for six months last year
in a two-man show. “I read
about it, heard about it, but
that down time he kept to
himself.”
When the endlessly
inventive, explosively manic
comedian and actor was
found dead in his Northern
California home Monday,
an apparent suicide, the
brutal shock was felt by fans,
friends and colleagues alike.
Williams, 63, who had
been so breezily open about
seeking therapy — “I went
to rehab in wine country to
keep my options open,” he
joked in 2006 — minimized
or hid the immensity of his
pain from perhaps all but a
handful of people.
Steve Martin, a pal who
worked with Williams,
tweeted that he was “stunned
by the loss.” Chevy Chase,
in a statement, said he and
friend Williams both suffered
from depression but added,
“I never could have expected
this ending to his life.”
Last month, the star of
“Mrs. Doubtfire,” ‘’Good
Will Hunting” and “Good
Morning, Vietnam” said he
was re-entering a 12-step
program after months of
nonstop work. After he died,
his publicist confirmed he
had suffered in recent weeks
from depression.
It was one of several
efforts over the years to
overcome substance abuse.
Solace from those close to
him was a different matter
— even as Williams faced
self-described financial pres-
sures.
Comedy club impresario
Jamie Masada said he nick-
named Williams the “Doctor
of Soul” because his irre-
sistible humor could make
people forget their problems.
How Williams coped with
his own woes, or that he had
any, remained a mystery,
Masada said.
“Robin always had this
mask on. I could never tell
that he was depressed.
He had such high energy,
always,” said the owner of
the famed Laugh Factory
clubs.
Williams was in fine form
last year during his U.S.
concert tour with Steinberg,
in which Steinberg served as
interviewer and partner-in-
laughs for his friend. Their
venture stemmed from a ben-
efit the pair had done for the
Cleveland Clinic.
“He seemed a little mel-
lower,” said Steinberg, add-
ing that there was never
any drug or alcohol use by
Williams during the tour
which, while grueling, was a
success.
Cinematographer John
Bailey, who worked with
Williams on the independent
film “The Angriest Man
in Brooklyn” in 2012, said
the role he played, of a dif-
ficult, terminally ill man, was
revealing.
It “gets to that sort of
really dark humor that he
had, which is just below the
surface. In this film it’s right
there. People didn’t really
understand it. They didn’t
want to accept that part.
It’s a significant part of his
genius.”
Whatever distress he was
feeling, Williams was invari-
ably charming and profes-
sional, whether working for
pay or charity, others said.
On the set of his 2013-14
CBS comedy, “The Crazy
Ones,” Williams’ favorite
word was “wonderful!”
said series executive pro-
ducer Dean Lorey, who also
recalled his kindness toward
Lorey’s 16-year-old son on
set.
“I remember seeing
the two of them chatting
together and thought, ‘Gotta
remember this moment,’”
Lorey said in an email
exchange. “Robin would talk
to anyone, in a very genuine
way, and he always made
them feel special.”
In a September 2013 inter-
view with Parade magazine,
Williams said money was
part of the reason for his rare
return to a TV sitcom.
“There are bills to pay.
My life has downsized, in
a good way. I’m selling the
ranch up in Napa. I just can’t
afford it anymore,” Williams
told Parade, adding that his
two divorces hadn’t cost him
everything but that he’d “lost
enough. Divorce is expen-
sive.”
Mara Buxbaum, Williams’
publicist, said Wednesday he
had “zero” financial difficul-
ties.
The series’ fate hung
over Williams when he and
Steinberg last spoke a couple
months ago. Williams was
waiting anxiously to hear
whether the freshman show
would be renewed for the
2014-15 season. It was can-
celed.
“It mattered to him,”
Steinberg said.
But Williams thought of
others first. He gave and
gave, of his immense talent,
his friendship and more, and
in ways both big and small. It
wasn’t just high-profile gener-
osity, such as his efforts for
Comic Relief and U.S. mili-
tary and veterans, his friends
said.
Associated Press
U.S. indexes move higher;
Amazon gains, Macy’s drops
NEW YORK — A modest
gain for the stock market on
Wednesday tugged the Dow
Jones industrial average
back into the black for the
year as investors set aside
concerns about Ukraine,
Iraq and earnings, at least
for a day.
Amazon led the gains
in light trading, despite a
mixed batch of economic
and corporate news. The
gains were broad but thin.
Three companies rose for
every one that fell on the
New York Stock Exchange,
and all 10 sectors in the S&P
500 ended higher.
“This is a very resil-
ient market,” said Uri
Landesman, president of
Platinum Partners, a hedge
fund in New York.
Markets have turned
choppy in recent weeks as
investors have weighed a
host of concerns. At times,
worries over global conflicts
and Europe’s economy
have overshadowed signs
of steady growth in the U.S.
economy and rising cor-
porate profits. Landesman
pointed to plenty of reasons
for traders to ditch stocks
this summer, including high
prices.
Associated Press
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YARD SALES
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WHAT IT COSTS
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Extra lines available
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Extra lines available
Cost includes ad and yard
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To get your ad in the Courier, call 501-315-8228
Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m., online at
bentoncourier.com, come by the office at 321
N. Market St. in Benton or mail to: PO Box 207,
Benton,AR 72018. We accept Visa, MasterCard,
Discover, and American Express.
WHEN TO CALL
FOR ADS APPEARING | CALL BEFORE
Tuesday –––––––––––– Mon Noon
Wednesday –––––––––– Tues. Noon
Thursday ––––––––––– Weds. Noon
Friday –––––––––––––– Thurs. Noon
Saturday –––––––––––– Thurs. Noon
Sunday ––––––––––––– Fri. 11:00am
Monday –––––––––––– Fri. Noon
GET ONLINE WHAT IT COSTS
4 lines – 3 days – $18.68
4 lines – 7 days – $29.28
4 lines – 14 days – $ 45.44
4 lines – 2 days – $15.64
4 lines – 3 days – $18.48
Cost includes ad and yard
sale packet including signs.
GET ONLINE
Find today’s classifieds at
bentoncourier.com: click on the classified
icon then on desired category. To view
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directory icon.
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COURIER CLA$$IFIEDS
Page 10 – The Saline Courier
Thursday, August 14, 2014
Phone 501-315-8228
Fax 501-315-1920
AD
v
a
n
t
a
g
e
results that make a
cash register ring!
SALINE COUNTY’S NEWS SOURCE SINCE 1876 COURIER
THE SALINE
ornets
H
S
T
IN
G
GO
PANTHERS
S m a c k t h e
H O R N E T S
take this poster to the game and fire up the Panther Den!
GO
HORNETS
P e l t t h e
P A N T H E R S
take this poster to the game and fire up the Hornets nest!
Sm
ack the Hornets
G
O
PA
N
TH
E
R
S
Pelt the Panthers
G
O
H
O
R
N
E
T
S
Hurry!
Limited Supply and Sizes
Great Opportunity!
We’re putting together special spirit pages
commemorating the Salt Bowl -
Saline County’s Annual Rivalry
CALL 315-8228
They will be inserted in the Courier
(Panthers), Tues., Sept. 2
and (Hornets), Wed., Sept. 3
and available at the game!
Hurry! Deadline is
Friday, Aug. 29 at 3pm
Place your ad (1x2)
in the
Spirit Pages
for the Salt Bowl
1 Page
$
40 (Either Benton or Bryant)
Both Pages Only
$
75
and receive
Specially Designed
Spirit Tee Shirt
Free
Garage Sales
1004 STAMFORD
Fri. 7a-? (Hartford
Hills Subd.) Clths,
HH, & misc.
1721 RIVER St. Fri.
7a-? & Sat. 7a-12p
Toys, Furn, & 2
Toddler Beds
2704 DENISE Dr. Fri.
7-7 & Sat. 6-12 Man
stuff, men/womens
clths, books, & HH
3420 MILITARY Rd. Inside
Sale Calvary A/G Fri. &
Sat. 7a-12p Arts & Crafts,
Furn, decor, toys, shoes &
clths, lots of everything!
3495 HILLTOP Rd.
Fri.7a-? & Sat. 7a-11a
Take Springhill Rd. to
Hilltop Turn Right 3rd
house on right
836 SALEM Heights Dr.
Fri. & Sat. 8a-12p Boys
Clths, Wmns Plus, toys,
HH, dishes, comforters,
Leapster Ex. Star Wars
ANNUAL CLEARANCE
SALE
50% OFF
Entire Stock
Now Thru 8/16
Finer Things Resale
17916 B I-30
778-1993
Garage Sale 7a -11a,
SAT, 2208 Charles
Place off Hwy 5, Girl
toys, HHG, bed, misc.
I BUY Junk Cars
Call Jerry Toland
332-7202 • 840-6756
MUTI FAMILY 1130 War
Eagle Dr. Fri. & Sat.
Furn, baby items, name
brand and designer clths
and much more!
Sat 7:30am & Sun 12pm,
309 Watson Lane, Next To
Parsons Tire on Military,
HH, Women’s Clothing,
Shoes & More
Benton
329 MADISON Place
Circle, Benton Sat.
8a-1p El ectroni cs,
boating items, tube,
skis, books, etc.,
Bryant
MULTI FAM, 1607
Prickett Rd, Fri 8a-?,
Sat 8a-12p, Hunting
gear, HH, & more.
Wanted
WANTED 10 Homes
in your county
needing SIDING,
WINDOWS or
ROOFS. We are
opening a branch
office and will use
these homes for our
new brochure. If se-
lected you can save
hundreds of dollars.
Call now to see if you
qualify. 100 %
Financing. Home
Owners Only.
1-866-668-8681
Freebies
FREE PUPPIES
to good homes
approx. 8 weeks old
Great with kids
501-580-1072
Announcements
DIVORCE IS tough
enough already! Don't
let it hurt your wallet
too! DIVORCE with or
wi t hout chi l dr en
$150.00 Guaranteed.
I nc l udes name
change and property
settl ement agree-
m e n t . C a l l
1.888.247.5150 24/7
Adoption
ADOPT- LOVING 1st
time Mom & Dad
promise your baby a
happy secure life.
Hol l y & George,
1-800-943-7780
ADOPTING YOUR
newborn is a gift
to treasure. Life-
time of love and
security awaits.
Allison & Joe
1-800-748-9554
Exp.pd.
Personal
MAKE A Connection.
Real People, Flirty
Chat. Meet singles
right now! Call Live-
Links. Try it FREE.
C a l l N O W :
1-877-939-9299, 18+.
Employment
25 DRIVER TRAIN-
EES NEEDED NOW!
Become a driver for
TMC Transportation!
Earn $700 per week!
No CDL? No Prob-
lem! Training is avail-
able! 1-888-248-1948
Employment
15 TRUCK DRIVER
TRAINEES NEEDED
NOW! Become a
driver for Empire
Express. NO EXPE-
RIENCE NEEDED!
New Drivers can earn
$800+ per week!
Call for details!
1-888-778-0465.
CASHIERS & TECH-
NOLOGY Sal es
needed. Part-time.
Flexible hours. Apply
in person: Office De-
pot. 1621 Military Rd.
CLASS A DRIVER
needed to load/unload
and deliver goods to
WELSCO facilities. Must
be 21 with clean driving
record. Will need Hazmat
endorsement. Apply at
WELSCO 9006 Crystal
Hill Rd, North Little Rock.
COMMERCIAL/RES
EDENTIAL Over-
head Door Installer
needed. MUST have
exp., clean driving
record & a valid
drivers license
501-315-9800
DENTAL ASSISTANT
Full Time, M-Th, RDA,
mail or drop resume to
325 Short St. or e-mail
haysdental@sbcglobal.net
or fax 501-776-3898
DRIVERS- CDL
DRIVERS - NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Schneider
National is the best
place to begin your
career. NO EXPERI-
ENCE NEEDED! We
can get you trained!
1-888-528- 5548
EXP. FURNITURE
Delivery Driver, Send
resume to P.O. Box
791 Benton, AR.
72018, call 315-7482.
EXPERIENCED COOK
/ WAITSTAFF &
DISHWASHER
CALL HOME PLATE
DINER ASK FOR
RICK 813-4423
Part Time & Full Time
housekeeping jobs
available IMMEDIATLEY
in Saline County. Must
pass drug screen and
background check.
Apply online at
emsarkansas.com or call
Barrett at 901-827-7733
Employment
EXPERIENCED SERVICE
Writer/ Salesman
needed. Salary based
on experience plus
bonuses. Must be ca-
pable of multi-tasking,
have outgoing per-
sonality and be de-
pendable. Apply in
person at Ramsey
Tire & Auto; 3120 N.
Reynolds Road;
Bryant, AR 72022
FLEX-TIME? GOOD SA-
MARITAN SERVICES @HOME
has openings for compas-
sionate adults that would
like to meet new people,
enhance a senior’s life,
provide companionship &
light housekeeping. Our
schedule allows for 12 to
29 hours for all caregiv-
ers. In-Home assistant
certification or Personal
Care attendant certifica-
tion preferred but not re-
quired. Computer literacy
required. Good Samaritan
Society Services @Home
is an EEO Employer.
Please apply on-line at:
Good-Sam.com, Careers
Arkansas 71909 or
call 501-776-1777
Grams House
Now Hiring
TEACHERS
CDA PREFERRED
Life Insurance,
Call Melba or Jessica
501-794-4726
INDUSTRIAL SPRAY
PAINTERS
Must have two years
prior experience with
spray painting. Pay
package includes a
competitive starting
wage & benefits. Ap-
ply in person at DLM,
10912 Highway 270
East, Malvern.
SCHILLI CORP FLEET
MANAGER - LITTLE
ROCK, AR.
Requirements include
previous dispatch/ fleet
management
experience and dry bulk
experience preferred.
To apply, please forward
resume to John at
JKish@schillicorp.com
or for more info call
866-461-4279
Want to Downsize
Your Gas Guzzler?
Sell it in the Courier
Classifieds. Call to
place your ad today!
315-8228
Employment
L.P.N.’s
(Wknd. Option Sat. &
Sun. 7-3 & 3-11)
& (PRN Avail. All
Shifts)
C.N.A.’s
(7-3, 3-11, & 11-7)
Apply in Person at:
Alcoa Pines Health
& Rehab
3300 Alcoa Rd
EOE Employer
LPN & CNA needed
Come join fun,
energetic, caring
team. 12 hour shifts.
Must be able to
work weekends.
Benefits offered.
Apply in person
Four Seasons
2408 Military Road
MIG WELDERS
Must have a minimum
2 years MIG welding
experience with refer-
ences and be able to
pass a welding test.
Pay package i n-
cludes: competitive
starting wage, 401-K,
health & dental insur-
ance, paid vacation.
Apply in person at
DLM, 10912 Highway
270 East, Malvern.
Take exit 99 off I-30
right to our door. DLM
is an EOE.
NOW HIRING- De-
partment Manager,,
Mig & Tig Welders,,
Painter & Painter!s
Helper. Salary DOE.
Full Time positions in-
clude benefits. Call
870-367-5317. Apply
at 728 W. Patton St.
Monticello, AR
OTR DRI VERS!
There!s a new truck in
town! Starting Pay
.39CPM. Major Medi-
cal Health Insurance.
All new trucks & trail-
ers. Plenty Miles,
Home often. Small
company, Headquar-
ter /dispatched out of
Little Rock. Dee Gar-
rison, 501-492-2306
PT GENERAL
CLEANERS
wanted for 2nd shift -
in Bryant, Arkansas
School District. Clean
backgrounds required.
1-800-246-3221 x504
leave your name and
phone number.
Employment
TRI-NATIONAL
INC. Is Now Hiring
Teams & Solo
Class A Drivers
Sign on Bonus!!!
Teams/$10,000
Solos/$4,000
$1,000 Driver Referral
Bonus/+.02CPM
Benefits Include:
Weekly Pay, Bonus Pro-
grams, Exc. Home Time,
Health Insurance, Paid
Vacations, Passenger
Program, Relative Team
Drivers, & Much More
•Must Have Class A CDL,
30 months OTR Exp. and
Must be 24 years of age
•No West Coast-No
Northeast
•90% Drop & Hook
•100% No Touch Freight
•Practical Miles Paid
Weekly
•10 cents per mile bonus
for Ontario, Canada runs
• 2013-2015 Volvo trucks
and 53 foot dry van
Call Our Recruiting Hot
Line 1-866-378-5071
or visit us at
www.tri-nat.com
WEEKEND RN
SUPERVISOR
8 HR. SHIFT, FLEX.
HRS., FRIENDLY
WORKING
ATMOSPHERE
Apply in Person at:
Alcoa Pines Health
& Rehab
3300 Alcoa Rd
EOE Employer
Instruction
MEDI CAL BI LLI NG
Trainees Needed! Be-
come a Medical Office
Assistant Now at Ayers
Career College! Online
job training gets you
ready HS Diploma/GED
& Internet Required.
1-888-734-6717,
Ayers.edu/disclosures.
Licensed by ASBPCE.
8820 Jewella, Shv., LA
71108.
Child Care
In Home DayCare
Infants to 5,
Summer Care Avail.,
Drop-Ins Welcome,
Openings Now,
Learning Activities
562-0691 or 951-2923
Looking for a good
deal? Search the
Courier Classifieds!!
Child Care
IN-HOME DAYCARE
Spotless • Non-smoking
Drop-ins Welcome!
501-778-2920
Services
BUNDLE & S av e on
y our T V , I nt ernet ,
P hone! Call B undle
Deals NOW Compare
all Companies
P ac k ages and P ric es !
Call 855-419-5096
DISH TV Retailer.
S t a r t i n g a t
$19.99/month (for 12
mos.) & High Speed
Internet starting at
$14.95/month (where
available.) SAVE! Ask
About SAME DAY In-
stallation! CALL Now!
1-800-393-5829
REDUCE YOUR CABLE
BILL! Ge t a
whole-home Satellite
system installed at
NO COST and pro-
gramming starting at
$19.99/mo. FREE
HD/DVR Upgrade to
new callers. CALL
NOW 1-800-474-0423
Apartments
Unfurnished
2 BR Apts, kit. appl.,
W&D conn., $500 &
up. Handicap access.
317-5190 / 317-5192
HURRY, ONLY A FEW LEFT!
1/2 Month Rent
FREE
To New Qualified
Move-Ins Only
1 BR starting at
$
400
2 BR starting at
$
500
Call
Connie Smith
501-626-4596
2014
Best of
the Best
Let the
Courier Classifieds
work for you.
Call Cathy or Kim
to place your
Classified Ad.
Mon.-Fri. 8am-5pm
315-8228
or come by
321 N. Market St.
Need to publish a
Legal Notice in
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can help...published
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The Saline Courier
501-315-8228
Apartments
Unfurnished
NOTICE: All real es-
tate advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to the Fair Housing
Act which makes it il-
legal to advertise any
preference, limitation
or di scr i mi nat i on
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or in-
tention to make any
such preference. We
will not knowingly ac-
cept any advertising
for real estate which
is in violation of the
law. All persons are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis.
Houses for Rent
3 & 4 BEDROOM
$825 -$1400 mo.,
Haskell, Benton &
Bryant. 315-9370
3 BR 1 BA carport,
stove, dishwasher, re-
fri g. new carpet.
CH/A, fenced yard, no
pets, good location,
$675mo & $675dep.
Please call 562-0691
or 951-2919
3 BR nice brick
homes, CH/A, W/D hk
Benton/ Bryant
501-672-0407.
3 BR, 2 BA, 1022 E.
Sevier. $700 mo.,
$650 dep. (will negoti-
ate deposit) HUD ac-
cepted. 501-317-7053
3BR 1BA, CH/A
Benton, $650mo
2BR 1BACH/A
Bryant $550mo
749-2121 CBRPM
3BR/1BA, extra lg liv-
ing area dbl carport
convenient location,
nice yard, $650mo +
dep, 501-909-2922
Eagle Properties
LLC
315–2075
Nice 2 & 3 BR Homes
from $500 to $925
Apartments
1 BR’s from $415
2 BR’s from $475
*based on availability
Deposit & References
Required
eaglepropsaline.com
HASKELL: 209
Glenn Oak, 3BR, 2
BA, 2 car garage.
Nice. $790 mo. $600
dep. 501-847-5377
HOUSE FOR
Lease/Rent Just reno-
vated 2Br 1Ba Large
Fenced Yard CH/A
$650mo & $400dep.
Includes lawn care
and trash pickup De-
posit, gas, electrical &
water must be paid
prior to moving in.
Rental subject to ap-
proved application
and references. Call
Del Roberson, owner
501-315-8011 or
501-317-5944
NEW 4BR 2BA
Fenced yard Vaulted
Ceilings 1800sq.ft.
$1150mo - $1250mo
Bent on School s
Please call 326-8000
Mobile Homes
For Rent
1 2BR & 1 3Br
Please Call 317-7095
or 776-0292
2 BR, 1 BA, Quiet
park, Benton Schools.
No Pets! Call any-
time. 501-315-1281
RENT TO OWN
16X80 3br2ba $590 mo
inc lot rent & insurance
‘84 14x80 3b2b needs
some work $3,995 CASH!
Lake • Fish • Walk Trail
Sunset Lake • 951-2842
Business Property
For Rent
Downtown Benton
Office space for
lease, 501-680-3727
WAREHOUSE FOR
LEASE in Benton.
Call 501-580-0358
Ready to take the
Real Estate Plunge?
Check out the HomesFOR
FOR SALE in the
CLASSIFIEDS
ieds daily.
Classifieds Work!
Furniture &
Household Goods
ELEGANT DINING
set w/ 6 chairs &
lighted hutch, lg. cus-
tom cabinet, washer/
dryer, 501-317-9078
MATTRESS,
BOXSPRINGS,
Headboard & Frame
(Half-Bed) $400
Please Call 778-3756
Appliances
MAYTAG FRENCH
Door Refri gerator
White 25 cu ft. $875
OBO Call 519-7575
Pets & Supplies
BENTON ANIMAL
Control & Adoption
501-776-5972
benton.petfinder.com
BRYANT ANIMAL
Control & Adoption
www.bryant.petfinder.com
www.1-800-save-a-pet.com
www.1888pets911.org
Hay For Sale
ROUND & SQAURE
BALES of Hay for
Sale Benton, AR
501-317-5192
Produce
PURPLE HULL Peas
$23 a Bushel
501-557-5655
Recreational
Vehicles
NEW 2015 FLAGSTAFF
MICRO LITE 21FBRS
T.T. All aluminum frame
with fiberglass exterior,
Slide out. Power awning
& tongue jack, 22” LCD
TV, stereo/CD/DVD
players, speakers inside
& out. Outside gas grill,
outside shower, Queen
island bed & more.
Weighs 3,755 lbs. On sale
right now for only $17,689
RV City - Benton
800-578-2489
www.rvcity.biz
Open Sundays 12-5
Resort &
Vacation Property
LAKEHOUSE
NORTHSHORE Lake
Ouachita 1600sq. ft.
3Br 2Ba Den w/gas
fireplace, Kitchen
appl., W/D, CH/A,
Rock & Siding, Metal
Roof, 30x40 Shop on
1.6 acres $89,500
Call 501-351-6296 or
501-602-2025
Legal Notices
The Saline County
Planning Board will
be meeting August
14, 2014 at 5:30 in
Courtroom 1; on the
agenda is Cross-
roads Village Phase
2, Pinewood Estates
Phase 3, Meadows
at Centennial Valley
Phase 2 Replat, Riv-
erside Hills Replat.
If you have any
questions, please
call Audrey Curtis at
501-303-5701.
NOTICE OF Sale
9 am August 25,
2014 Pratt Auto
8522 Laura St, Ma-
belvale AR 72103
(501) 888-1754
BMW
WBAGN63493DS43057
Check out the
Garage Sales
this week!
Moderately Confused Herman
Crossword Challenge
Kit ‘n’ Carlyle
Celebrity Cipher
Here’s How It Works:
Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken
down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the
numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and
box. Each number can appear only once in each row,
column and box. You can figure out the order in which
the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues
already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you
name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!
Astro•graph
BERNICE BEDE OSOL
www.bernice4u.com.
Alley Oop
Big Nate
Born Loser
Thatababy
Frank and Ernest
Grizzwells
Monty
Arlo and Janis
Soup to Nutz
THURSDAY, AUGUST 14,
2014
Finagle your way into ben-
eficial situations. You will make
the best gains if you connect
with people who are willing
to share their ideas as well as
promote yours. Reaching your
goals will be dependent on the
people you surround yourself
with this year.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) --
Love is in the stars. You can
make a good impression with-
out spending a lot of money.
A commitment to someone
you have a long history with is
apparent. Let your feelings be
known.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
-- Fix up your surroundings. An
organized home life will clear
your mind. A family member
will help you find a way to
make extra cash. Put your plans
on paper.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
-- Indulge your generous spirit
by offering your time, not your
money. Participate in local
activities in order to make new
friends. Don’t wait for things to
happen; initiate change.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
-- Put in extra effort on a profes-
sional venture that interests you.
Go with the flow, because fight-
ing change will wear you out.
Flexibility will help you excel.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
23-Dec. 21) -- You have a
knack for spotting trends.
Knowing what to expect will
help you make a profit. Don’t
be deterred by criticism. Do
your thing and don’t look back.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) -- You should make time for
personal matters that need to be
resolved. If you are feeling rest-
less, consult with family mem-
bers and discuss changes that
could help improve your current
living conditions.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) -- Be honest and do what-
ever is necessary to sort out
pending problems. Love and
commitment are highlighted. A
current relationship will advance
to the next level if you reveal
your intentions.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20)
-- If you seem to be caught on a
treadmill, do something to take
your mind off of your worries.
Take a short trip or study some-
thing that has always fascinated
you.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
-- You have the edge over the
competition. Don’t be afraid to
face a challenge. You have the
ability to turn situations in your
favor if you are aggressive.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
-- Relax and make plans. Do
your own thing and refrain from
trying to influence or manipu-
late people around you. Map out
a game plan that leads to fun
and entertainment.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
-- Spend your day doing things
that you enjoy. Decorating, get-
ting together with friends or
indulging in your favorite hobby
will ease your stress and help
you rejuvenate.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
-- Don’t try to be the center of
attention. You can learn a lot by
being a spectator. A situation
that you thought you’d assessed
properly will be vastly different
than you imagined.
Thursday, August 14, 2014
news@bentoncourier.com The Saline Courier Page 11
COMICS
12 The Saline Courier
Thursday, August 14, 2014
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Store Hours: Mon-Fri 9-6 • Sat 9-5 • Closed Sundays
johnstonshomecenter.com
FARMER’S MARKET
TUESDAY • THURSDAY • SATURDAY
7:00 AM - 2:00 PM
SALINE COUNTY COURTHOUSE
(CORNER OF N. MARKET & SEVIER)
was his livelihood, he would
assist drivers whenever
and wherever they were in
trouble, regardless of their
ability to pay.
As local residents were
remembering him this
week, many “Gene Jones
stories” dominated conver-
sations, including accounts
like “Gene pulled me out of
a ditch when I was (descrip-
tion of incident) and he
didn’t charge me a penny.”
In the early 1990s, Jones
made an unsuccessful run
for Saline County sheriff.
He was one of several
Democratic candidates who
sought the position won by
Judy Pridgen.
After the election, he
made this comment to a
candidate for another office:
“I’ll tell you one thing,
Saline County has a bunch
of d--n liars. Everyone I
talked to told me they were
gonna vote for me.”
“He was a colorful charac-
ter,” Pridgen said in recall-
ing that race.
She also noted that as
she campaigned she would
occasionally hear someone
decline to offer support to
her by saying, “I have to
vote for Gene because he
pulled me out of a ditch for
free.”
She also was told, “Gene’s
a good guy. He may not
know anything about being
a sheriff, but he towed my
car lots of times and I’ve got
to vote for him.”
Clint Newcomb, owner of
Newcomb Towing, said he
and other wrecker operators
had a great deal of respect
for Jones.
As a final tribute to the
man who many in the area
equate to being a symbol
of the wrecker business,
drivers from several towing
services in the area plan to
participate in the procession
from Ashby Funeral Home
to the cemetery.
“About 20 of us so far
are planning to take part in
a final send-off for Gene,”
Newcomb said. “We’re
going to start lining up on
the street in front of the
funeral home and then at
the old Harvest Foods build-
ing and then we’ll be lead-
ing the funeral procession
to the grave.
“We’ve got wrecker driv-
ers coming from all around
— Benton, Hot Springs,
Malvern, Little Rock,
Sheridan, other places,”
Newcomb said.
“Anybody who’s ever
worked for that man or
wants to remember him
is invited to take part,” he
added.
“He was a good man —
he liked giving stuff away. If
you were over 45, you prob-
ably remember that he gave
you something.
“We’re just trying to pay
our respects,” Newcomb
said, “and give him one final
tow.”
Robert Jones, Jones’ son,
expressed appreciation for
the tribute.
“I appreciate the time and
effort they’re putting into
this,” the younger Jones
said. “The information got
sent out to the newsletter
for the association of wreck-
er businesses. I didn’t know
it was happening until then,
and I can’t say how much
we appreciate it.
“My dad meant a lot to a
lot of people,” he said. “He
touched a lot of lives. This
was unexpected, but it’s
really appreciated.”
Jones
From page 1
Position 1, Jo Anna Brown;
R.E. Higginbotham.
•Alderman, Ward 3,
Position 2, Alderman Rob
Roedel, incumbent.
•Alderman, Ward 4,
Position 1, Brenda White
Miller, incumbent.
•Alderman, Ward 4,
Position 2, Gary Hollis.
Haskell
(All races are nonparti-
san.)
•Mayor, Jayme Watson-
Bruton; Jerry D. Tittle; Janie
Lyman.
•Alderman, Ward 1,
Position 1, Rose Marie
Wilkinson, incumbent.
•Alderman, Ward 1,
Position 2, Dallas Wright.
•Alderman, Ward 2,
Position 1, no filings to date.
•Alderman, Ward 2,
Position 2, Raymond Lobbs,
incumbent.
•Alderman, Ward 3,
Position 1, Jennifer Hill.
•Alderman, Ward 3,
Position 2, Roy H. Carman.
•Alderman, Ward 4,
Position 1, Warren Kuhn;
Edwin Simmons.
•Alderman, Ward 4,
Position 2, Halbert E. “Hal”
Baker, incumbent; Robert L.
Swaim.
Shannon Hills
•Mayor, Mayor Mike
Kemp, incumbent; Kenney
Petty.
•Alderman, Ward 1,
Position 1, James M. Frala,
incumbent.
•Alderman, Ward 1,
Position 2, Sue Skipper,
incumbent; Vicki Anderson.
•Alderman, Ward 2,
Position 1, no filings to date.
•Alderman, Ward 2,
Position 2, Alderman Jill
Hatcher, incumbent.
•Alderman, Ward 3,
Position 1, Alderman Scott
Bennett, incumbent.
•Alderman, Ward 3,
Position 2, no filings to date.
Traskwood
•Mayor, no filings to date.
•Alderman, Ward 1,
Position 1, Mary E. Berryhill;
Lloyd F. Lewis.
•Alderman, Ward 1,
Position 2, no filings to date.
•Alderman, Ward 2,
Position 1, Shirley Phillips.
•Alderman, Ward 2,
Position 2, Billy Sharp,
incumbent.
•Alderman, Ward 3,
Position 1, no filings to date.
•Alderman, Ward 3,
Position 2, no filings to date.
Saline County
(All races are partisan.)
•County Judge, Mayor
Jeff Arey, Republican; Shawn
Hipskind, Libertarian.
•County Clerk, incumbent
Doug Curtis, Republican.
•Sheriff, Rodney Goshien
Sr., Democrat; Rodney
Wright, Republican.
•Assessor, Bob Ramsey,
Republican.
•Collector, Collector Joy
Ballard, Republican.
•Circuit Clerk, Myka
Bono Sample, Republican.
•Treasurer, Treasurer
Larry C. Davis, Republican.
•Surveyor, County
Surveyor Aaron Rasburry,
Republican.
•Coroner, Kevin
Cleghorn, Republican; Sam
Ballard, Independent.
•Justice of the Peace,
District 1, Justice of
the Peace Pat Bisbee,
Republican.
•Justice of the Peace,
District 2, Everette Hatcher,
Republican; Mel Kirby,
Independent.
•Justice of the Peace,
District 3, Steve Gladden,
Republican.
•Justice of the Peace,
District 4, Justice of the
Peace Barbara Howell,
Republican.
•Justice of the Peace,
District 5, John Kimbrough,
Republican.
•Justice of the Peace,
District 6, Justice of the
Peace Tammy Schmidt.
•Justice of the Peace,
District 7, Justice of
the Peace Josh Curtis,
Republican.
•Justice of the Peace,
District 8, Edward A. Albares,
Republican.
•Justice of the Peace,
District 9, incumbent Greg
Thomas, Democrat; David
Gibson, Republican.
•Justice of the Peace,
District 10, Justice of
the Peace Jim Whitley,
Republican.
•Justice of the Peace,
District 11, Mike Creekmore,
Republican.
•Justice of the Peace,
District 12, Justice of
the Peace J.R. Walters,
Republican.
•Justice of the Peace,
District 13, Justice of
the Peace James Zahnd,
Republican.
•Constable, District
1, Constable Paul Viner,
Republican; Glenn A
Thompson, Democrat.
•Constable, District 2,
Constable Bobby Hahn,
Republican.
Filings
From page 1 Robin Williams’ public joy, private pain
This document is © 2014 by editor - all rights reserved.
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