Skip to main content

E-Edition, August 1, 2013

August 1, 2013

To view the E-Edition of the newspaper, please login. If you have not subscribed to the E-Edition, you can do so by subscribing here.

The rates for the E-Edition are:

1 day 99¢
3 months $18 for 90 days
6 months $36 for 180 days
12 months $72 for 360 days

Embedded Scribd iPaper - Requires Javascript and Flash Player

Courier
Volume 136
Number 213
1 Section 12 Pages
50¢
Home of Joe Hardin
and Carol Permenter
The Saline
www. bent oncouri er. com
Thursday, August 1, 2013
Join us on Facebook and Twitter
Saline County’S newS SourCe SinCe 1876
Petition requesting officials remove
Pennington from office goes viral
A letter drive to remove
Sheriff Bruce Pennington from
office has shifted to an online
petition.
The original letter was
contained in an email asking
for recipients to send it to the
Saline County circuit judges,
County Judge Lanny Fite,
Arkansas Attorney General
Dustin McDaniel and Special
Prosecutor Cody Hiland of
Faulkner County.
The letter requests “a full
investigation be initiated into
Bruce Pennington’s behavior
during his time as Saline County
sheriff.”
However, copies of the letter
have not been received by the
designated recipients.
Fite said he has not received
a letter, but is aware of it. He is
also familiar with the online peti-
tion that was created in July. He
said the “petition should have
no bearing on the court case”
and that it would be inappropri-
ate for him to comment about
the case.
“This is a matter pending in
court and that is where it will be
resolved,” Fite said.
Circuit Judge Robert Herzfeld
also said he could not comment
on pending cases, referring all
questions to the special prosecu-
tor.
By Brent Davis
bdavis@bentoncourier.com
PETITION, page 12
WIL CHANDLER/The Saline Courier
Employees of restaurants from around Benton and Bryant crowded into The Center at Bishop Park for the annual
Taste of Bryant on Tuesday evening. The event, sponsored by the Bryant Area Chamber of Commerce, gave resi-
dents an opportunity to sample a smorgasbord of food from 32 vendors.
COME ONE. COME ALL.
Drug could
help save
meningitis
patient
Recent reports are positive about Kali
Hardig, the 12-year-old Benton girl who has
been battling amoebic parasitic meningitis
for nearly two weeks.
Kali, daughter of Traci and Joseph Hardig,
continues to fight for her life at
Arkansas Children’s Hospital,
but the latest tests reportedly
show there’s no trace of the bac-
teria in her spinal fluid.
Doctors who are treating her
report that she’s slowly showing
improvement and they say they
are optimistic about her recovery.
For a time Kali was placed in a medically
induced coma and her body temperature
reduced to 93 degrees. Late Tuesday, her
mother said her temperature has been raised
to normal and she had opened her eyes
briefly.
The warming process began Tuesday,
Traci Hardig said, while noting that there is
a delicate balance between that process and
her daughter’s brain pressure.
By Lynda Hollenbeck
lyndahol@yahoo.com
HARDIG, page 3
Officials: Removal of the
sheriff from post unlikely
The June 29 arrest of
Sheriff Bruce Pennington for
misdemeanor public intoxica-
tion and resisting arrest has
caused a stir in Saline County.
While some residents have
brushed off the incident as a
mistake that should be for-
given, others have expressed
outrage and say he should be
removed from office.
A revelation of police
reports earlier this month
that indicated Pennington told
police he intended to drive
home and was so impaired
he fell out of his chair at the
police station further ignited
the controversy.
However, officials say it is
WIL CHANDLER/The Saline Courier
Saline County Sheriff Bruce Pennington apologizes to the residents of Saline
County during a news conference July 1 at the county detention center.
Pennington was arrested June 29 on charges of public intoxication and
resisting arrest.
By Jennifer Joyner
jjoyner@bentoncourier.com
PENNINGTON, page 12
Hardig
Benton School Board
OKs number of
personnel matters
Kacie Davis has been hired as the new
cheer coach at Benton High School.
Davis is succeeding veteran coach Karen
Hilborn, who recently resigned from the
post to become an assistant principal at the
high school.
Davis, like Hilborn, also will teach busi-
ness courses at the school.
Hilborn led the cheer squad to win
numerous honors including two national
championships.
Davis was among several individuals
hired by the Benton School Board in a spe-
cial meeting Tuesday night.
Other new employees of the districts
Benton spruces up
School Resource
Program, adds car
School will be starting again on Aug.
19 and the Benton Police Department has
a new lesson plan. An additional school
resource officer, Sgt. Lisa Stuart, has been
added to the current lineup this school
year along with a totally redesigned patrol
vehicle and uniform.
During the spring it was decided that
the Benton School District and the Benton
Police Department would enter into an
agreement to split the cost of adding an
additional school resource officer to the
program.
This was done to further enhance the
By Kevin Russell
Special to The Saline Courier
BENTON, page 8
By Lynda Hollenbeck
lyndahol@yahoo.com
Man killed Tuesday involved in previous chase
Benton police
have confirmed the
suspect who died
on Tuesday after a
pursuit with author-
ities was the same
suspect involved in
a chase the previ-
ous week.
Clifford Jones, 29, died on the
scene after a pursuit that ended
on Interstate 30 and resulted
in shots being fired from both
sides.
According to authorities,
Jones on July 23 fled from offi-
cers in a vehicle and then ran
from police on foot in the area of
Pine Circle and Alcoa Road —
close to where the chase began
on Tuesday.
Phyllis Edgin, a resident in
the neighborhood of the first
pursuit, witnessed part of the
action after the suspect drove
through her yard. Edgin said
she and her husband heard
sirens and a loud noise that
sounded like a flat tire grinding
on concrete.
Edgin said the noises contin-
ued to get louder.
“It sounded like a stampede
of horses,” she said.
The two went outside and saw
the taillights of the car leaving
their front yard, with two police
cars chasing it.
Detectives were seeking
Jones as part of an illegal narcot-
ics investigation.
By Jennifer Joyner
jjoyner@bentoncourier.com
Jones
SCHOOL BOARD, page 12
MISSED PAPERS
CALL
(501) 317-6013
DURING THESE HOURS
5-7 p.m. Monday-Friday
7-9 a.m. Saturday-Sunday
CONTACT US
Phone: (501) 315-8228
Fax: (501) 315-1920
E-mail: news@bentoncourier.com
Write: P.O. Box 207,
Benton, AR 72018
INDEX
OBITUARIES .............................. 3
EDITORIAL ................................. 4
SPORTS .................................. 6,7
CLASSIFIEDS ...................... 9,.10
COMICS ................................... 11
PLACE PET # PET NAME TOTAL VOTES
1 3 ANNIE 2124
2 13 BUD 1501
3 11 BOOTS 1437
4 41 RAINE 1307
5 21 DON KEE 1163
6 40 PRECIOUS 1148
7 36 MR. DOODLES 1100
8 28 HAZEL LAVERNE 877
9 34 MASAI 860
10 22 ELVIS 720
11 16 CHA CHA 683
12 35 MESSI 661
13 30 HOMER 612
14 10 BOOTS 597
15 64 ZOYIE 589
16 17 CHRISSY 564
17 56 SUNNIE 556
18 47 SACHIMO 521
19 23 EVA 479
20 32 LU LU 382
21 43 ROSCOE 269
22 19 COPPER 256
23 39 PAISLEY 209
24 59 TONKA 200
25 25 GEORGE 184
26 42 RIPLEY 160
27 51 SCOUT 154
28 6 BENTLEY 141
29 5 BELLE STAR 118
30 2 ANNABELLE 104
31 45 RUSTY 101
32 44 ROWDY 100
33 65 BUSTER 100
34 15 CAYNE 84
35 48 SADIE 80
36 14 BUDDY 77
37 37 OAKLEY 66
38 58 TEXAS T 62
39 29 HEIDI 52
40 8 BOCEPHUS 45
41 62 WINSOR 44
42 52 SHADOW 42
43 49 SALLEY SUE 41
44 31 JACK JACK 33
45 46 RUTHIE 25
46 63 WINSTON 24
47 20 DIESEL 22
48 33 MAICIE 22
49 1 ANGEL 20
50 4 BABYGIRL 20
51 7 BLADE 12
52 9 BOO BOO 12
53 12 BUBBA 12
54 18 CHUMLEE 12
55 24 FRECKLES 12
56 26 GIGGET 12
57 27 GWEN 12
58 38 OLIVE 12
59 50 SAMMY 12
60 53 SHASTA 12
61 54 SHORTY 12
62 55 SPIKE 12
63 57 TAZ 12
64 60 TRAMP 12
65 61 TRUMAN 12
Pet Calendar
CONTEST
VOTE
NOW
!
T
h
e
V
o
t
in
g
s
o
f
a
r
...
Tally as of
5 pm
Wed., July 31, 2013
2 The Saline Courier
Thursday, August 1, 2013
SALINE COUNTY
FAIR & RODEO
Pageant
Saturday,
August 24
For Details Call:
Morgana Campbell
(479)518-4782
APPLICATION
DEADLINE
Friday, August 23, Noon
Check out our daily menu on facebook
We Cater
794-0329
Open Mon-Fri
5:30am-9:00pm
Sat & Sun
6:00am - 9:00 pm
4444 Hwy 5 So.
Benton
3pc. Catfish Dinner
with choice of 3 veggies (fried potatoes,
baked beans, pinto beans,
cole slaw or corn on the cob)
plus hushpuppies, for only
$
9.99
Saturday, Aug 3
rd
• 4 to 8 pm.
All You Can Eat Catfsh, Chicken Strips,
Fried Shrimp, French Fries, Hushpuppies,
Baked Beans, Cole Slaw, Fried Apple Pies & drink
for only
$
15
00
per plate
All proceeds go to Easter Seals,” Rollin on the River.”
Motorplexx
Quality Pre-Owned Affordable Prices!
501-315-2277 6623 Alcoa Road
www.msmoterplexx.com
C
a
r
o
f
t
h
e
W
e
e
k
!!
2008 Honda Fit Sport
0-Down
169
00
mo.
W.A.C.
Call today!
35 MPG!
Perfect Back to School Car!
LITTLE ROCK —
Arkansas Republican
Rep. Tom Cotton plans
to announce his bid next
week to challenge two-term
incumbent Democratic
Sen. Mark Pryor in next
year’s elections, according
to a person familiar with
the congressman’s plans.
The person who spoke
to The Associated Press
on Wednesday was not
authorized to speak pub-
licly about the planned
announcement and spoke
on a condition of anonym-
ity. But the freshman con-
gressman has scheduled
an event Tuesday with sup-
porters in his hometown of
Dardanelle.
Cotton’s entry will set
up a heated and expensive
fight for a U.S. Senate seat
that Republicans believe
is prime for a pickup in
2014, with groups on the
right and left already wag-
ing a television ad fight in
Arkansas. It also creates a
domino effect, with several
Republicans now eyeing
Cotton’s seat in the U. S.
House.
Cotton was elected to
the U.S. House in 2012,
to the open seat formerly
held by Democrat Mike
Ross. Ross is now running
for Arkansas governor.
Cotton, 36, is a former
management consultant
who served in the Army
in Iraq and Afghanistan.
He was elected to the 4th
District in November, after
racking up endorsements
during his primary bid
from national Republican
leaders including U.S. Sen.
John McCain of Arizona
and conservative groups
such as the Club for
Growth.
The Club for Growth in
February launched the first
television ad against Pryor,
seen by many as a signal
that the group would back
Cotton’s potential candi-
dacy. Other conservative
groups said they’re pre-
pared to back Cotton’s bid.
“Representative Cotton
is a conservative leader
and rock star candidate.
Arkansas is now one of the
very top pickup opportuni-
ties for Republicans this
cycle and we are excited
to get engaged in the race
on behalf of Rep. Tom
Cotton,” said Steven J.
Law, president and CEO
of American Crossroads,
a GOP group tied to
Republican strategist Karl
Rove.
Pryor is viewed by many
Republicans as the most
vulnerable Senate incum-
bent next year, especially
after recent GOP gains
in Arkansas. Republicans
in November took over
the state Legislature
for the first time since
Reconstruction and swept
all four of the state’s U.S.
House seats.
Republicans are try-
ing to unseat Pryor and
three other Democratic
incumbents who represent
states that Republican Mitt
Romney won in last year’s
presidential race: Mark
Begich of Alaska, Kay
Hagan of North Carolina
and Mary Landrieu of
Louisiana.
Democrats need to
defend 21 seats, includ-
ing seven in largely rural
states that Obama lost in
2012.
Republicans need to
pick up six seats to regain
Senate control.
On Wednesday, Pryor’s
campaign wasted no time
in hitting back, accusing
Cotton of alienating con-
stituents on issues ranging
from farming to Social
Security.
“Instead of putting
Arkansas first, he has put
his own political career
ahead of the people of
Arkansas and sided with
Washington insiders and
special interests,” Pryor’s
campaign manager, Jeff
Weaver, said in a state-
ment. “When the people
of our state review Tom
Cotton’s record, they won’t
like what they see.”
Pryor reported in July
that he ended the second
quarter with nearly $4 mil-
lion in the bank for his re-
election bid. Cotton has $1
million on hand.
Groups on the right and
left have already been air-
ing ads throughout the
state targeting Pryor. A
gun control group founded
by New York Mayor
Michael Bloomberg has
aired spots criticizing the
Democratic lawmaker for
voting against expanded
background checks. Pryor
used his first TV spot to
defend his vote against the
criticism.
Since taking office
in January, Cotton has
enjoyed a high profile with
multiple appearances on
national programs such as
Meet the Press. Cotton in
July wrote a column for the
Wall Street Journal oppos-
ing Senate immigration
legislation.
He’s also been targeted
by Democrats who viewed
him as a likely challenger
to Pryor. Two Democratic
political action commit-
tees, Patriot Majority
USA and Senate Majority
PAC, launched a $270,000
television ad buy in June
attacking Cotton for alleg-
edly seeking the national
spotlight at the expense of
his district.
Cotton has faced criti-
cism from Democrats for
initially opposing the farm
bill over objections to
the food stamp program.
Cotton later voted for a
version of the farm bill that
did not include funding for
food stamps.
Cotton’s also come
under fire for a recent
proposal that would have
extended sanctions on
Iranian human rights
violators to their families
— an idea that has been
criticized as eliminating
due process. Cotton, who
withdrew the proposal, has
defended the idea and said
it would only apply to sanc-
tions on Iranians, not any
American citizens.
Cotton’s appeal to con-
servative activists stems
from his resume as a
Harvard-educated veteran
who’s known for his rhe-
torical flourishes.
When he joined with
House Republicans to vote
for the federal health over-
haul’s repeal, he compared
the unsuccessful effort to
defeat the law to an ancient
Roman senator’s ongoing
call to destroy Carthage.
When Venezuelan
President Hugo Chavez
died in March, Cotton
responded with “Sic sem-
per tyrannis,” or Latin for
“thus always to tyrants.”
John Wilkes Booth uttered
the same after assassinat-
ing President Lincoln.
Cotton’s candidacy will
likely have a domino effect
on other races in Arkansas.
House Majority Leader
Bruce Westerman plans to
seek the Republican nomi-
nation for Cotton’s seat
and will formally launch
his campaign in August,
a person who had spoken
to the lawmaker told the
AP. The person spoke on
condition of anonymity
because Cotton had not
yet formally launched his
Senate campaign.
Lt. Gov. Mark Darr has
said he’d likely run for
Cotton’s seat if the con-
gressman ran for Senate.
Beth Anne Rankin, who
was the party’s nominee
for the seat in 2010 and
lost the primary to Cotton
last year, said Wednesday
she’d consider running
again if Cotton challenges
Pryor.
Janis Percefull, a com-
munity college teacher, is
the only Democrat running
for the 4th District seat.
State Rep. Jeff Wardlaw
said Wednesday he’s con-
sidering running for the
Democratic nomination.
TODAY
BENTON HIGH SCHOOL
REGISTRATION FOR NEW
STUDENTS: Benton High
School will begin registering
new students by appointment
beginning Thursday, August
1. For more information, or
to make an appointment, call
Joan Hunter at 501-776-5762.
MONDAY, AUGUST 5
MONDAY AFTERNOON BOOK
CLUB - The Monday Afternoon
Book Club will meet at 1 p.m.
Monday, Aug. 5 at Boswell
Library to discuss its chosen
title. The group is open to
adults 18 and older. Call 847-
2166 for more information.
THURSDAY, AUGUST 8
AMERICAN LEGION: Post
263 American Legion, Sons
of the American Legion and
American Legion Auxiliary
will meet Thursday, August
8 at Traskwood City Hall. The
Auxiliary will meet at 5 p.m.,
followed by the Sons of the
American Legion at 6. The
American Legion meets
at 7. We are requesting all
members and anyone inter-
ested in joining to make an
effort to attend. For informa-
tion or questions call Linda
Hankins at 939-9823 or email
lhankins@ymail.com  for the
auxiliary meeting or Sonny
Hankins at 501-326-2882 or
email sonny_72087@yahoo.
com or David Brewer at 501-
860-2854 or email benton-
foursquare@att.net. 
SATURDAY, AUGUST 10
STOMP D.A.T.: Back to School
Stomp with be held at Tyndall
Park on Saturday, August 10
from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. There
will be free live entertain-
ment, a bouncy house, water,
popcorn, tours of fire trucks
and ambulances and approxi-
mately 20 booths with activi-
ties. For more information call
776-5970.
USED BOOK SALE at Herzfeld
Library in Benton Saturday,
August 10 from 9 a.m. - 3
p.m. It will be a one-day sale
instead of the normal two-day
event, and special pricing will
be in effect.
SUNDAY, AUGUST 11
6TH ANNUAL HOOK-A-HEART
Bass Fishing Tournament,
held in conjunction with
Civitan Services, will be
Sunday, August 11 on the
Arkansas River at the North
River Landing in North Little
Rock beginning at 5:30 a.m.
The tournament is open to
all amateur anglers ages 16
and older and there should be
two fisherman per boat. Entry
fee is $100 for early registra-
tion and $125 the day of. First
place is guaranteed $1,000 in
cash.
MONDAY, AUGUST 12
HISTORY OF CRATER OF
DIAMONDS: Monday, August
12 The History of the Crater
of Diamonds State Park will
be presented at Herzfeld
Library, 1800 Smithers Drive
in Benton.  The program will
begin at 6:30 p.m. and Park
Ranger Mr. Waymon Cox will
present the program. The
program is open to the public.
Please call the library at 778-
4766 for more information.
BENTON BOOK CLUB: The
Benton Book Club will meet
at 5 p.m. Monday, Aug. 12 at
Herzfeld Library to discuss
its chosen title. The group is
open to adults 18 and older.
Call 778-4766 for more infor-
mation.
SALEM FIRE DISTRICT Board
of Commissioners will meet
Monday, August 12 at 7 p.m.
at Station no. 1, located at
1785 Salem Road.
TUESDAY, AUGUST 13
BENTON PARKINSON’S
SUPPORT GROUP will meet on
Tuesday, August 13 at 2 p.m.
in the hospitality room of First
Baptist Church in Benton. The
guest speaker will be Christy
Wells, Registered Dietitian,
LD. For more information call
Karen Garner at 778-1682 or
visit www.arparkinson.org .
THURSDAY, AUGUST 15
HABITAT HOMEOWNERSHIP
application meeting is set for
Thursday, August 15 at 6 p.m.
at Herzfeld Library in Benton.
Anyone interested in owing a
home is encouraged to attend
the meeting.
MONDAY, AUGUST 19
HANDS OF HOPE cancer sup-
port group of Saline county
will meet Monday, August
19 at 6:30 p.m. at Western
Sizzlin in Benton. The pro-
gram this month will consist
of group discussions. If cancer
has become part of your life
whether as a patient, survivor,
caregiver, or family member
we invite and encourage you
to come to the meeting.  For
information call Linda Hankins
at 501-939-9823 or email
lhankins@ymail.com or
Libby Aldridge at 501-412-
5337.
FRIDAY, AUGUST 23
HORNET FAN FARE: The third
annual Hornet Fan Fare will
take place on Friday, August
23 at the Bryant High School
Field House and Stadium.The
event will begin at 4:45 p.m.
and last until 9 p.m. It will be
a great opportunity to meet
the Hornet players and coach-
es, get autographs, shop,
eat and enjoy a few scrim-
mages. Booths will be set up
inside and outside of the field
house showcasing all kinds
of Hornet gear and tailgating
items.  Plus there will be food
vendors and miscellaneous
other booths to
check out.  Booth spaces are
still available. The following
teams will be scrimmaging:
4:45 7th grade Scrimmage
(Bryant/Bethel)
5:15  8th grade Scrimmage
5:45 9th grade Scrimmage
6:15 Junior Varsity Scrimmage
6:45 Varsity Scrimmage
SATURDAY, AUGUST 31
ALL YOU CAN EAT FISH FRY:
3 to 7 p.m. Saturday, August
31, at Congo Masonic Lodge.
Corner of Steel Bridge and
Thompson Dairy Road.
American raised catfish,
homemade hushpuppies,
beans with ham, river bank
fried taters and more. $12
for adults, $5 for children 9
to 12, 8 and under free. Last
Saturday of the month, April
through October, 3 - 7 pm.
Money raised goes to area
charities. Public invited.
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 9
HUNTER EDUCATION CLASSES
will be given September 9-10,
12, 23-24, 26, October 7-8,
10, and November 4-6 at the
Gene Moss Building in Tyndall
Park located at 913 East Sevier
Street in Benton. All classes
start at 6:30 p.m. and end at
10 p.m. No preregistration
required. Student must attend
all three nights.
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 14
APOSTLES BUILD: Habitat
for Humanity and local
churches across Saline
County will break ground on
the 8th Apostle Build home
September 14-20. Please join
Habitat and local churches
on the construction site. Visit
www.habitatsalinecountyar.
org for more information. 
news across
-Associated Press
Saline county eventS
Cotton to run for US Senate
Email calendar items to news@bentoncourier.com or call 501-315-8228 ext. 234.
Calendar items are intended for nonprofit organizations.
Saline Courier photo
Bryant senior pitcher Mike Burgess loads up for a pitch during a game in which he baffled
Lakeside.
Saline courier ScraPBook 1987
Thursday, August 1, 2013
The Saline Courier 3
CITY OF BENTON PARKS & RECREATION
913 E. Sevier Street • Benton, AR 72015 • 776-5970
2013
SATURDAY, AUGUST 10
TH
4:00 P.M. TO 7:00 P.M. • TYNDALL PARK
Bouncy House
Live Entertainment – Dance, Music, Martial Arts, Wrestling
Water & Popcorn • Tours of Firetruck and Ambulance
20 Booths With Activities
Booths sponsored by: Department of Health, Benton Police Dept, Children’s Hospital,
Counseling Clinic/Family Services Agency, Benton Fire Dept, Operation Life Saver, Mayor’s
Youth Council, Saline Memorial Hospital and State Farm - Dennia Beard & Keith Brooks
F
r
e
e F
r
e
e
OBITUARIES
Elizabeth Joann Goad
Elizabeth Joann Goad, 73, of Bryant passed away Sunday,
July 28, 2013, at Illinois Valley Community Hospital in
Peru, Ill. Elizabeth was born Aug. 24, 1939, in Clinton, Ill.,
to Martin and Edna Jewell (Poland) Sprague. She married
Lester Eugene Goad on March 23, 1958, at State Street
Baptist Church in Lincoln, Ill.
Elizabeth was a member of Victory Baptist Church in
Benton. She was a dedicated Christian, faithful wife and lov-
ing mother and grandmother.
She was preceded in death by her parents; two sisters,
Audrey Cox and Wilma Smith; and her brother, Lester
Sprague.
She is survived by her husband, Lester, of Bryant; two
daughters, Pam Graham and husband Ken of Benton and
Paula McMurtry and husband Tom of LaSalle, Ill.; 13 grand-
children; and her sister, Marge Campbell and husband
Gordon of Washington, Ill.
A funeral service will be held at 11 a.m. on Friday, Aug. 2,
at Victory Baptist Church in Benton, with Dr. Ken Graham
officiating. Burial will be at Mt. Harmony Cemetery.
Visitation will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. today, Aug. 1, at
the church. Memorials may be made to Victory Baptist
Church.
Online guest book: www.arkansasfuneralcare.com.
PAID OBITUARY
Benton Animal Control
Pet of the Week
Special to The Saline Courier
This week’s featured pet is Shortie, an adorable female kitten.
Shortie is ready for a safe, loving home today. Adoption fees are
$81 for female pets and $61 for male pets. Visit benton.petfinder.
com to view all of the great pets currently available for adoption, or
come by the shelter and meet all of the wonderful pets today. Hours
of operation are noon to 4:30 p.m. Monday-Saturday. The shelter
is located at the intersection of South Market and Willow streets
(less than a mile south of the courthouse square and C.W. Lewis
Stadium). For more information, call 501-776-5972. Also, the city
of Benton has partnered with Arkansans for Animals to offer the
residents of Benton a cost-effective way to have their pets spayed
or neutered and vaccinated against rabies. With the help of the city,
the price of a cat spay/neuter and rabies vaccination is only $20 and
a dog spay/neuter and rabies vaccination is only $35. Those who
wish to take advantage of the low price must show proof of Benton
residency, such as a water bill or utility bill, along with photo iden-
tification.
Arkansas Democratic party
chairman stepping down
LITTLE ROCK —
The chairman of the
Arkansas Democratic Party
on Wednesday announced
he was stepping down after
two and a half years at the
helm as he considers a
potential run for public office
next year.
The state party announced
that Will Bond would serve
until Sept. 14, when the
party’s state committee
elects a new chairman. Gov.
Mike Beebe, a Democrat,
announced he’s backing
Vincent Insalaco as Bond’s
replacement.
Bond, a former state
legislator and attorney who
lives in Little Rock, said he’ll
decide over the next couple
weeks whether to run for
office but would not specify
which race he was consider-
ing. Bond last year ruled
out running for a central
Arkansas congressional seat.
“In a couple weeks I think
I’ll know whether I want to
continue to serve in some
capacity and put my name
on the ballot,” Bond said.
Bond was elected party
chairman in February 2011
and headed the party as
it suffered major setbacks
in the state. Republicans
won control of the state
Legislature for the first time
since Reconstruction in the
November election, and
swept all four of the state’s
U.S. House seats.
Bond said those losses
didn’t factor into his decision
to step down and noted that
Republicans only hold 51 of
the 100 seats in the House.
“Obviously it was not a
perfect election cycle for us
in 2012, but we did outper-
form most of the pundits
and the polling that was
out there particularly in the
House,” Bond said.
Beebe thanked Bond
for his service and said he
believed Insalaco would be a
strong replacement for him.
“The progress our state
has made can only continue
by electing responsible lead-
ers, and Vincent Insalaco
will work to elect strong
leaders who will continue
an agenda focused on jobs
and education,” Beebe said
in a statement issued by the
party.
Associated Press
Sentencing under way for Cleveland kidnapper
CLEVELAND — A sen-
tencing hearing is under
way for a man convicted of
imprisoning three women
in his Cleveland house for
years and repeatedly raping
and beating them.
The hearing for Ariel
Castro began with his
attorneys objecting to
prosecutors’ plans to pres-
ent details of the women’s
ordeal.
Defense attorney Craig
Weintraub says those facts
were appropriate for a trial,
which Castro agreed to
avoid by pleading guilty.
Weintraub says the goal
now should be to protect
the privacy of the three
women.
Assistant Cuyahoga
(ky-uh-HOH’-guh) County
Prosecutor Blaise Thomas
says it’s appropriate to
show the world what
Castro did.
Castro pleaded guilty
last week to 937 counts
including aggravated mur-
der, kidnapping, rape and
assault in a deal that could
bring a life sentence plus
1,000 years.
THIS IS A BREAKING
NEWS UPDATE. Check
back soon for further infor-
mation. AP’s earlier story is
below.
Three months after an
Ohio woman kicked out
part of a door to end nearly
a decade of captivity, a
onetime school bus driver
faces sentencing for kid-
napping three women and
subjecting them to years of
sexual and physical abuse.
Prosecutors are expected
to detail Ariel Castro’s daily
assaults on the women,
recounted in diaries that
compared the women’s
experience to that of pris-
oners of war. With the
possibility of the death
penalty for a forced miscar-
riage taken off the table,
Castro stands to get life in
prison plus 1,000 years on
Thursday.
Cuyahoga County pros-
ecutor Tim McGinty said
in a sentencing memoran-
dum filed Wednesday that
Castro, who chained his
captives and fed them only
one meal a day, “admits
his disgusting and inhu-
man conduct” but “remains
remorseless for his
actions.”
The memorandum says
many of the specific charg-
es in Castro’s indictment
reflect conduct document-
ed by one of the women in
her diary.
“The entries speak of
forced sexual conduct,
of being locked in a dark
room, of anticipating the
next session of abuse, of
the dreams of someday
escaping and being reunit-
ed with family, of being
chained to a wall, of being
held like a prisoner of war
... of being treated like an
animal,” it says.
The sentencing could
take up to four hours, court
officials said, with Castro,
his attorneys, his victims
and prosecutors getting a
chance to speak. The legal
team representing the
women’s interests declined
to comment on whether
they would testify or send
statements to the court.
Prosecutors brought a
model of the house where
Castro, 53, imprisoned the
women into the courtroom
Thursday ahead of the sen-
tencing.
In the court filing,
McGinty offered new
details of Castro’s treat-
ment of the women, who he
said were kept “in a state
of powerlessness” through
physical, sexual and psy-
chological violence.
“He made them believe
that their physical survival
depended on him, and he
threatened to end their
lives if they did not comply
with his every demand,”
McGinty said.
Castro lured one of the
women into his Cleveland
home with the promise of
a puppy for her son and
tricked another by saying
she could see his daughter,
McGinty said.
He chained his captives
by their ankles, fed them
only one meal a day and
provided plastic toilets in
their bedrooms that were
infrequently emptied, the
filing said.
He menaced them with
a gun, threatened them
with tales of other cap-
tives, some of whom hadn’t
made it home, and at one
point locked all of them in
a vehicle in his garage for
three days while he had a
visitor.
Castro claimed he didn’t
have an exit strategy from
his complicated double life
and finally gave the women
a chance to escape by leav-
ing a door unlocked, the
court filing said.
The women, each kid-
napped separately when
they accepted a ride from
Castro on Cleveland’s blue-
collar west side, quickly
escaped after Amanda
Berry kicked out the door
panel on May 6 and Castro
was arrested within hours.
The women disappeared
separately between 2002
and 2004, when they were
14, 16 and 20 years old.
There was no comment
from Castro’s defense team
on the eve of sentencing.
Other horrific details of
the women’s ordeal had
already emerged, including
tales of being chained to
poles in the basement or a
bedroom heater or inside
a van, with one woman
forced to wear a motorcycle
helmet while chained in
the basement and, after
she tried to escape, having
a vacuum cord wrapped
around her neck.
Castro repeatedly
starved and beat one of the
victims each time she was
pregnant, forcing her to
miscarry five times.
He forced the same
woman on threat of death
to safely deliver the child
he fathered with another
victim on Christmas Day
2006. The same day, pros-
ecutors say, Castro raped
the woman who helped
deliver his daughter.
Prosecutors will ask the
judge to prohibit Castro
from ever seeing his
daughter, now 6.
McGinty says experts
will also discuss how
Castro was able to keep the
women captive for so long.
Berry, 27, made a sur-
prise onstage appearance at
a rap concert last weekend,
and a second victim, Gina
DeJesus, 23, made a few
televised comments as a
privacy fence was being
erected around her house.
Knight, 32, appeared with
Berry and DeJesus in a
video in early July thank-
ing the community for its
support.
Knight, the first of three
to disappear, also sent
police a handwritten letter
thanking them for their
help collecting cards and
gifts for the women.
In the note, Knight told
Second District Cmdr.
Keith Sulzer, “Life is tough,
but I’m tougher!”
Associated Press
Optimism of whites in US
lags blacks by big margin
WASHINGTON —
Americans’ attitudes about
their economic future are
sharply divided by race, with
whites significantly less like-
ly than blacks or Hispanics
to think they can improve
their own standard of living.
Indeed, optimism among
minorities now outpaces that
of whites by the widest mar-
gin since at least 1987, a new
analysis shows.
The Associated Press-
NORC Center for Public
Affairs Research analysis
shows that after years of
economic attitudes among
whites, blacks and Hispanics
following similar patterns,
whites’ confidence in their
economic future has plum-
meted in the last decade.
Blacks and Hispanics, mean-
while, have sustained high
levels of optimism despite
being hit hard in the recent
recession.
The findings come as
President Barack Obama
seeks to promote a broader
message of economic oppor-
tunity amid a rising gap
between rich and poor. The
AP reported this week that
4 out of 5 U.S. adults have
struggled with joblessness,
near poverty or reliance on
welfare for at least part of
their lives, with white pes-
simism about their economic
future at a 25-year high.
More than 40 percent of the
poor are white.
The AP-NORC analysis
of data from the General
Social Survey, a long-running
biannual survey conducted
by NORC at the University
of Chicago, found just 46
percent of whites say their
family has a good chance of
improving their living stan-
dard given the way things
are in America, the lowest
level in surveys conducted
since 1987. In contrast, 71
percent of blacks and 73
percent of Hispanics express
optimism of an improved
life — the biggest gap with
whites since the survey
began asking.
Blacks and Hispanics
diverged sharply from
whites on this question fol-
lowing Obama’s election
as the nation’s first black
president in 2008. Economic
optimism among non-whites
rose, while whites’ optimism
declined.
Blacks’ hopefulness isn’t
limited to the future; they
also express a positive out-
look on their current finan-
cial standing.
For the first time since
1972, the share of blacks
who reported that their
financial situation had
improved in the last few
years surpassed that of
whites. The tip occurred
in 2010, when the percent-
age of whites reporting
an improvement to their
financial situation fell to 24
percent vs. 30 percent for
blacks.
“In the minority commu-
nity, as perceptions of dis-
crimination lessen a bit with
the election of an African-
American president, people
see a greater ability to suc-
ceed,” said Mark Mellman, a
veteran Democratic consul-
tant who closely tracks voter
sentiment. “Many working-
class whites, on the other
hand, see dwindling opportu-
nities as manufacturing and
other jobs that once enabled
them to get ahead just aren’t
available.”
The hopeful include John
Harris III, 23, of Washington,
D.C., a recent graduate of
historically black Howard
University who now works
to reduce homelessness
through the AmeriCorps
program. Part of the first
generation of college stu-
dents who saw Obama get
elected, Harris says he and
many fellow black graduates
in their 20s and 30s are now
motivated to excel and help
people of all races who are
in need.
Associated Press
“They’re trying to see if
her brain pressure can take
the warmer temperatures,”
she said.
She noted that she and
other family members are
encouraged, but emphasized
that Kali’s condition is still
still fragile.
Sedating drugs have been
discontinued, she said.
An experimental anti-
amoeba drug is part of her
treatment and it appears to
be working, physicians have
said.
Kali became ill after
swimming at Willow
Springs Water Park in
Little Rock. Owners of the
park voluntarily closed it
for the season after state
Health Department officials
informed them of Kali’s
condition and the increased
risks posed by that situation.
An epidemiologist at
Health Department said the
park could reopen if a con-
crete base could be installed.
The water’s sandy bottom
reportedly is conducive to
the bacteria’s growth, Dr.
Dirk Haselow said.
Haselow noted that the
fact that a case of meningitis
was traced to the park in
2010 and now the one involv-
ing Kali increase the risk of
others contracting the dis-
ease, though the chances of
anyone doing so at any time
remain at one in 33 million,
he said.
Donations to assist the
family with medical-related
expenses may be made at
any branch of Arvest Bank,
where an account has been
established in Kali’s name.
Traci Hardig continues
to ask for prayers for her
daughter.
Hardig
From page 1
State Sen. Jeremy Hutchinson, District 33,
201 E. North St., Benton, AR 72015, (501) 773-
3760, jeremy.hutchinson@senate.ar.gov.
State Sen. David Sanders, District 27 Room
320 State Capitol, Little Rock, AR 72201, (501)
682-6107, davidjamessanders@gmail.com.
State Sen. Alan Clark, District 13 P.O. Box
211, Lonsdale, AR 72087, (501) 262-3360, alan.
clark@senate.ar.gov.
State Rep. Ann Clemmer, District 23, 7415
Camille Drive, Benton, AR 72015, (501) 316-
0364, avclemmer@sbcglobal.net.
State Rep. Andy Davis, District 31 P.O. Box
30248, Little Rock, AR 72260, (501) 837-5109,
andy.davis@arkansashouse.org.
State Rep. Andy Mayberry, District 27 3022
E. Woodson Lateral Road, Hensley, AR 72065,
(501) 888-3522, andymayberry@windstream.net.
State Rep. Kim Hammer, District 28, 1411
Edgehill Dr., Benton, AR 72015, (501) 840-3841,
kimdhammer@yahoo.com.
Circuit Judge Bobby McCallister, 22nd
Judicial District, Division 1, Saline County
Courthouse, 200 N. Main St., Benton, AR 72015,
(501) 303-5635.
Circuit Judge Gary Arnold, 22nd Judicial
District, Division 2, Saline County Courthouse,
200 N. Main St., Benton, AR 72015, (501) 303-
5664.
Circuit Judge Grisham Phillips, 22nd
Judicial District, Division 3, Saline County
Courthouse, 200 N. Main St., Benton, AR 72015,
(501) 303-5628.
Circuit Judge Robert Herzfeld, 22nd
Judicial District, Division 4, Saline County Annex,
321 N. Main St., Benton, AR 72015, (501) 303-
1584.
District Judge Michael Robinson, Benton
District, 1605 Edison Ave., Benton, AR 72019,
(501) 303-5670.
District Judge Stephanie Casady, Bryant
District (Bryant, Alexander, Bauxite, Haskell,
Shannon Hills), Boswell Municipal Complex, 210
SW Third St., Bryant, AR 72022, (501) 847-5223.
Saline County Judge Lanny Fite,
Courthouse 200 N. Main St., Benton, AR 72015,
(501) 303-5640.
Prosecuting Attorney Ken Casady, 22nd
Juicial District, 102 S. Main St., Benton, AR
72015, (501) 315-7767.
Saline County Sheriff Bruce Pennington,
Saline County Detention Center, 735 S. Neeley
St., Benton, AR 72015; (501) 303-5609.
news@bentoncourier.com
HOW TO REACH YOUR ELECTED OFFICIALS
“Congress shall make no law ... abridging the freedom
of speech, or of the press ... .”
— From the First Amendment to Constitution
W
al-Mart is the largest private employer in
the world. More people receive a paycheck
from the company than live in Latvia,
Qatar, Slovenia or 96 other countries.
Wal-Mart has gotten as big as it has -- it will likely
do half a trillion in sales this year -- because it’s very
efficient at what it does. Part of that efficiency means
keeping wages low. According to market research
group IBISWorld, the average Wal-Mart sales associ-
ate earns $8.81 per hour.
The heat over Wal-Mart’s low wages turned up this
month when Washington D.C.’s city council passed a
bill requiring all new stores of at least
75,000 square feet and $1 billion in
annual revenue to pay a “supermini-
mum” wage of $12.50 per hour, up
from the city’s standard $8.25 per-hour
minimum wage. Existing employers
are exempt for four years. Wal-Mart
currently has no stores within D.C.
city limits, so the bill effectively forces
any D.C.-based Wal-Mart stores built
in the next four years to pay a mini-
mum wage 50 percent above its com-
petitors.
Wal-Mart, which had plans to
open six stores in D.C., balked. “We will not pursue
Skyland, Capitol Gateway and New York Avenue and
will start to review the financial and legal implica-
tions on the three stores already under construction,”
spokesman Steven Restivo said. “This was a difficult
decision for us -- and unfortunate news for most D.C.
residents -- but the Council has forced our hand.”
Now the awkward moment: D.C.’s city council
proposed the bill to help provide its residents with a
living wage. But Wal-Mart -- which said its six planned
D.C. stores could have created 1,800 jobs -- will now
be providing no wages to D.C. residents.
The winner: nobody. Minimum wage, maximum
frustration.
We still don’t know how this story will end. Wal-
Mart could change its mind, or Mayor Vincent Gray
could veto the bill. But this seems like a good time to
discuss the merits of the minimum wage.
There are two sides to the minimum-wage debate.
One says it prices low-skill workers out of the jobs
market. That’s what Econ 101 tells us should happen,
and it explains Wal-Mart’s experience in D.C.
The other side says these stories are anecdotal,
that there’s little evidence of employment falling when
minimum wages are increased. Wal-Mart very likely
can pay a $12.50 minimum wage while covering its
cost of capital, and retailers like Costco have shown
that marginally higher wages can pay for themselves
through lower employee turnover.
Each side has evidence to back up its arguments.
Economists Alan Krueger of Princeton and David
Card of the University of California, Berkeley looked
at minimum-wage hikes in California in 1988 and New
Jersey in 1992, and compared them to regions that
didn’t raise wages. The pair found that “increases in
the minimum wage lead to increases in pay, but no
loss in jobs.”
Two economists from the London School of
Economics looked at different data and used a differ-
ent statistical technique to show that, indeed, raising
the minimum wage does reduce employment, particu-
larly among teenagers.
Arindrajit Dube, then at Berkeley, looked at yet
another set of data and found “strong earnings effects
and no employment effects of minimum wage increas-
es.”
Three separate economists asked fast-food restau-
rants in Georgia and Alabama how they would react
to minimum-wage increases implemented between
2007 and 2009. Fifty-three percent said increasing
employee performance standards was very important
to deal with the wage hikes. Twenty-nine percent said
they’d cut weekly hours of some employees. Eight
percent said they’d reduce headcounts.
Bottom line: It’s a more complicated issue than we
make it out to be.
Here’s what we do know. Adjusted for inflation, the
federal minimum wage (currently $7.25 per hour) has
declined sharply over the last forty years.
In the end, the problem with economists looking at
the minimum-wage debate is that the issue is far more
political than it is economic. And alas, politics being
what they are, there are few agreements, and the only
constants are frustration and disagreement.
Morgan Housel is a writer for The Motley Fool
Investor and has no position in any stocks mentioned.
The Motley Fool recommends Costco Wholesale. The
Motley Fool owns shares of Costco Wholesale.
W
ould that Anthony Weiner
were old news. But no.
He won’t quit. Only a man
who distributed online photos of His
Own Self could imagine denial as
virtue.
Weiner’s stubbornness is likely
based on two probabilities: First is
that he can outlast the electorate’s
attention span, which gnats regard
with envy. A second pertains to
Daniel Patrick Moynihan’s observa-
tion that our nation was defining
deviancy down
-- normalizing the
deviant to accom-
modate our moral
decay.
If you can’t fix
it, in other words,
make it “normal.”
Divorce, pornogra-
phy, unwed parent-
hood, “sexting,”
whatever. If every-
one’s doing it, then
it can’t be wrong. Right?
Moynihan, the great New York
senator, was prescient by any stan-
dard and politically incorrect by
today’s. He spoke truth in ways
that would earn him exile from our
current silly state. If only we could
figure out how to swap him with this
other New Yorker, whose fixation on
his Johnny Rocket puts one in mind
not of a statesman but of a baby on
the changing table.
Indeed, Weiner’s concerns are so
little removed from a kindergartner’s
(allowing a slight chronological pro-
gression out of respect for the recent-
ly born), that his persistent campaign
is incomprehensible. Equally so is
the complicity of his steadfast, obvi-
ously ambitious (if well-liked, as all
Washington is required to concede)
wife.
There is a third operative probabil-
ity -- that The People, who once for-
gave Weiner in the spirit of second
chances, would forgive him again.
But this time, it isn’t only that Weiner
was tweeting shots of his barely
concealed appendage. It is that, pos-
ing online as “Carlos Danger” (not
“Peligroso”?), he continued to send
similar tweets to much-younger
female strangers, inviting them to
comment on his assets while playing
up his political power.
“I’m huge,” he said, while doubt-
less winking at himself in a mirror.
Specifically, Weiner sought the
approval of one “Sydney Leathers,”
23, who now is featured in a two-
piece swimsuit spread on the New
York Post’s website -- cavorting,
splashing and telegraphing non-
verbal come-hithers of a sort that
must have kept Weiner riveted to his
palm pilot.
What a perfect pair.
The exhibitionist compulsion,
now a viral plague thanks to the
mixed blessing of social media, was
once considered not de rigueur but
repugnant. In Moynihan’s time, the
well-bred kept their private concerns
(including politics and religion) pri-
vate, not only because it was no one’s
business but because it was other-
wise boorish.
Showing one’s schnitzel to a ran-
dom collection of “friends” and “fol-
lowers” was, needless to say, incon-
ceivable to any but the occasional
pervert, who was recognized as
such. What is Anthony Weiner but a
flasher who, in a saner world, would
be arrested for indecent exposure?
But for the missing rumpled raincoat,
what’s the difference between a man
tweeting his shenanigan to strang-
ers online and exposing himself to a
stranger on the street?
Not much except for our
acceptance of deviant behavior.
Community standards are impossible
to impose on a global horde and so
there are no standards. The liberated
id -- uninhibited, impulsive and self-
gratifying -- thrives without restraint,
tyrannizing the culture under the
banner of freedom. As a result,
we have erased the line between
adult behavior (as in grown-up, not
X-rated) and childish expression.
Technology, ironically, seems
to have produced an inverse effect
on behavior. The more advanced
our ability to express ourselves, the
more primitive our expressions.
Pornography is the perfect vehicle
for the animal tendency toward exhi-
bitionism so perfectly mastered by
our baboon brethren. To make the
obscene more palatable, we have
cutesified the language, inventing
new words that make the serious
seem silly and inconsequential.
Weiner was only “sexting,” sending
out explicit “selfies” to the virtual
world.
Besides, say Weiner’s few remain-
ing defenders, he’s still smart!
Really? How smart can a man be who
tweets his parts to countless “follow-
ers,” tries to blame a hacker, then
continues to pursue online fantasies
with strangers well after he allegedly
stopped -- and still thinks he should
be mayor of New York City?
Who follows such a man?
Apparently, Rome does, at least in
the news sense. Cardinal Timothy
Dolan, archbishop of New York,
recently said he won’t judge Weiner
and cited both the compassion of
Pope Francis and God’s redemptive
preference.
So noted.
But for those whose immediate
concerns are more secular than
divine, the voting booth provides a
parallel confessional. To forgive may
be divine, but to reward obscene
behavior is deviancy of a lower order.
Kathleen Parker is a columnist
for the Washington Post. Her email
address is kathleenparker@washpost.
com.
Weiner’s schnitzel
EDITORIAL CARTOON
D
r. Tom Delbanco, a professor of
general medicine and primary
care at Harvard Medical School,
approves of certain sections of Obamacare,
but raises a critical matter that has been
largely unreported about primary care
doctors, whom he describes as “the pedia-
tricians, family doctors and internists who
constitute the foundation of our medical
system” (“Will Obamacare help primary
care?” Delbanco, cnn.com, July 23).
He worries that “as the new health
care exchanges offer affordable insurance
to more and more Americans, there is
risk that a flood of new
patients may overwhelm
the already-besieged pri-
mary care workforce.”
Since Obamacare’s
health care cost-cutting
rules do not focus on the
differences among individ-
ual patients, Dr. Delbanco
makes a point that We
The People must keep in
mind as Obamacare takes
over many of our lives:
“Numbers such as blood pressures,
sugar or lipid levels tell only part of the
story for individuals whose genes, cultural
habits, psyches and social circumstances
vary widely.”
Gathering this information will be a
waste of time and costs in the Obamacare
system.
But as I can demonstrate from my own
experience with my longtime primary care
physician, his focus on the individuality of
his patients keeps strengthening the qual-
ity of my life.
So I was not surprised to see this report
from Tom Howell Jr. in The Washington
Times: “The United States needs 16,000
more primary care physicians to meet its
current health needs, a problem that will
only get worse if nothing is done to accom-
modate millions of newly insured residents
under President Obama’s health care
law in the coming decade, according to a
Senate report ...
“Sen. Bernie Sanders, Vermont
Democrat and chairman of the
Subcommittee on Primary Health and
Aging that released the findings, said one
in five sick Americans visits an emergency
room for care that should have been
rendered by a primary care physician, an
unfortunate trend that results in higher
health care costs and poorer outcomes
for patients” (“U.S. facing shortage of
16,000 doctors as health care act kicks in,”
Howell, The Washington Times, Jan. 29).
Sanders added that “the lack of pri-
mary care offices hits rural regions and
low-income urban areas the hardest, and
will turn into a crisis if lawmakers and
the industry do not address the prob-
lem before the Patient Protection and
Affordable Care Act expands coverage to
30 million more Americans.”
This health care expense problem and
the vanishing of primary care doctors do
not, of course, affect President Barack
Obama personally. He and his family are
very well protected on health matters by
our taxpayer funds.
But he sure has limited the availability
of health care -- and actual survival pros-
pects for many of us -- while changing the
future professional careers of a growing
number of doctors.
Dig these numbers from a recent health
care survey conducted by the Deloitte
Center for Health Solutions:
“Six in 10 physicians say that it is likely
that many physicians will retire earlier
than planned in the next one to three
years. This perception is fairly uniform
among all physicians, irrespective of age,
gender or medical specialty.”
And furthermore: “Nearly three-quarters
of physicians (higher among surgical spe-
cialists at 81 percent) think the best and
brightest (students) may not consider a
career in medicine ... while more than half
believe that physicians will retire (62 per-
cent) or scale back practice hours (55 per-
cent) based on how the future of medicine
is changing.”
That is understandable. In an interview
with World Net Daily, “a spokeswoman for
the Association of American Physicians
and Surgeons, Dr. Jane Orient ... told
WND that doctors already have started
leaving the profession through early retire-
ment.
“Among those who remain, some will
seek alternatives to what they see coming
in the federal government’s takeover of
health care” (“Obamacare Has Doctors
Planning Exit,” Bob Unruh, wnd.com, July
19).
Dr. Orient told WND’s Unruh: “I think
it’s a disaster for patients. They may lose
the doctor they relied on all their lives.”
Any of you who voted twice for Obama
have any regrets?
According to the Deloitte survey:
“Physicians recognize ‘the new normal’
will necessitate major changes in the pro-
fession that require them to practice in dif-
ferent settings as part of a larger organiza-
tion that uses technologies and team-based
models for consumer (patient) care.”
Nat Hentoff is a senior fellow of the
CATO Institute.
What Obamacare
can do to you —
not for you
Minimum wage,
maximum frustration
• The Saline Courier (USPS 050-660) is published daily by Horizon Publishing Co., 321
N. Market St., Benton, AR. Periodical mailing privileges paid in Benton, AR.
• Subscription rates: $7 to $9 per month home delivery (depends on payment plan); $95
per year home delivery; $150 per year by mail within the state or out-of-state.
• POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Saline Courier, P.O. Box 207, Benton,
AR 72018.
• Publishing company reserves the right to reject, edit or cancel any advertising at any time
without liability. Publisher’s liability for error is limited to amount paid for advertising.
©Copyright 2006 Horizon Publishing Co.
Columns and cartoons on the opinion page do not necessarily reflect
opinions of The Saline Courier. Weekend delivery times are no later than
7 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. The circulation department has re-delivery
scheduled from 5 to 7 p.m. Monday-Friday and from 7 to 9 a.m. Saturday
and Sunday. Call 501-317-6013 or 501-315-8228 during business hours.
The Saline Courier
Founded in 1876
Phone: (501) 315-8228 • Fax: (501) 315-1230 • Email: news@bentoncourier.com
Vicki J. Dorsch
Business Manager
vdorsch@bentoncourier.com
DaViD Wills
advertising director
dwills@bentoncourier.com
anDreW stoVall
circulation director
astovall@bentoncourier.com
Patricia stuckey
coMposing director
composing@bentoncourier.com
ricky Walters
press ForeMan
rwalters@bentoncourier.com
steVe Boggs • Publisher
publisher@bentoncourier.com
Brent DaVis • editor
bdavis@bentoncourier.com
Nat
HeNtoff
Page 4 – The Saline Courier
news@bentoncourier.com Thursday, August 1, 2013
OpiniOn
MorgaN
Housel
KatHleeN
ParKer
Thursday, August 1, 2013
The Saline Courier 5
SLICKS1984
Visit your local showroom
Offers end 9/18/13. Restrictions apply. Ask for details. After 12-month promotional period,
then-current regular monthly price applies and is subject to change.
act Now aND also GEt:
Offer subject to change based on premium channel availability.
All offers require 24-month commitment and credit qualifcation.
FrEE premium channels
for 3 months
GEt morE
For lEss
Johnston’s Home Center
1423 Military Rd. • Benton (Next to Hastings) • 501-315-6697
Store Hours: Mon-Fri 9-6 • Sat 9-5 • Closed Sundays
johnstonshomecenter.com
WIL CHANDLER/The Saline Courier
Samuel Sledge, 2, munches on a slice from U.S. Pizza Company at the annual Taste of Bryant on
Tuesday evening. The event, held at Bishop Park, allowed attendees to sample a smorgasbord of food
from more than 30 vendors.
WIL CHANDLER/The Saline Courier
Mascots from Taco Bell and Sonic fight with noise sticks designed to resemble Sonic’s chili-cheese
coneys at the annual Taste of Bryant.
WIL CHANDLER/The Saline Courier
David Hanscon serves boneless hot wings from Harps deli at Taste of Bryant. A variety of foods was
available to those attending the annual event sponsored by the Bryant Area Chamber of Commerce..
WIL CHANDLER/The Saline Courier
Trevor Delaney from Eat My Catfish serves hushpuppies at Taste of Bryant. The fundraiser has been a
successful fundraiser for the Bryant Area Chamber of Commerce for several years.
Taste of Bryant 2013
Mail your “Extraordinary People” nomination form to:
The Saline Courier, P.O. Box 207, Benton, AR 72018
or email us at news@bentoncourier.com / fax 501-315-1920
Nominations must be received no later than Sept. 6, 2013
I Nominate _____________________________________ as one of
Saline County’s Extraordinary People. The reason(s) why include:
Saline County’S newS SourCe SinCe 1876
Courier
The Saline
S
e
e
S
a
l
i
n
e
M
A
G
A
Z
I
N
E
A U T U MN 2 0 1 2 I S S U E
They are the backbone to any community –
the next-door neighbor, your friend at church.
They are the people that give of themselves
selflessly.
MORE INSIDE ON:
Honorable Mentions
Shoe Tree
Lake Norrell
Saline River
Haunted Highway
E
x
t
r
a
o
r
d
i
n
a
r
y
P
e
o
p
l
e
Nominate
Extraordinary People
Reflections • Summer 2009 • 1 36 • Extraordinary People • Autumn 2012
They are the backbone to any
community – the next-door neighbor,
your friend at church. They are the
volunteers that give of themselves
selflessly. Their only reward...
the belief they did something good.
Now is your chance to give back. This September the Courier will
honor a dozen people from Saline County that you nominate as
Extraordinary People
The rules: Nominations should be for everyday heroes, not people
who accomplish good through their job. They must be people who
are accomplished outside the public spotlight. A politician cannot
be nominated for assisting the citizenry, that’s their job.
Examples: Maybe someone looks after ailing neighbors, drives people
to the doctor or assists in their church. Maybe someone gives up nights
and weekends to coach children, even when they don’t have any. Maybe
someone brightens your day with a smile, a laugh or an act of kindness.
They are:
Extraordinary People
The Saline Courier will publish a magazine with stories about the
individual nominees, and honor these extraordinary people with
an awards banquet September 26.
Please include your name and phone number.
Use a separate piece of paper if you need more room.
Extraordinary People • Autumn 2012 • 37
Extraordinary!
arolyn Westbrook has served as
“mother” to hundreds of babies.
The exact total isn’t known. It would
include her own three children, plus
numerous foster babes – only these
babies are usually feline, though she’s
also raised orphaned puppies, squirrels
and even quail. It should be explained that Westbrook
serves as the primary foster mom for
motherless kittens that fi nd their way to
the Humane Society of Saline County. It’s
an area in which she’s found her true call-
ing, Westbrook said. “Someone once asked me, how I was
able to part with them after I’ve raised
them from tiny babies — and to them I’m
the only mother they’ve known,” she said.
“I’ll admit it’s really hard, but I know that
they need to be placed in loving homes
so that I’m able then to take in more that
need care — and there will always be
more that need nurturing.” She noted that, by caring for the ani-
mals in her home, “these babies get
acclimated to children and other animals.
They start out in a box, but when they get
litter-box trained, I give them the run of
the house and they learn to be good pets.
I have baby gates when I need to confi ne
them.
“It takes lots of discipline, and I’m very
structured and organized. That helps in
taking care of animals.” Westbrook, a medical transcriptionist
who works out of her home, previously
was employed for 18 years as a secre-
tary at Holland Chapel Baptist Church in
Benton. By the time she retired in 2003,
she was living in an area near a creek
where there was a number of feral cats.
“People would move away and often
wouldn’t take their cats with them,” she
said. “We called them our creek kitties.
And we were also close to Military Road
and a number of restaurants that were a
refuge for homeless animals.”
From these situations, Westbrook
became the unintentional savior to many
kittens.
During some of these experiences, she
became acquainted with Ann Sanders,
director of the Humane Society of Saline
County animal shelter. This association resulted in Westbrook
eventually becoming the chief foster mom
for the society. Though all of the ani-
mals under her care didn’t survive, many
thrived, and Westbrook has many success
stories, including one that could only be
called miraculous. “The veterinarian was spaying a cat
that did not appear to be pregnant, but
she was,” Westbrook said. “Most of the
kittens were not formed, but he noticed
one amniotic sack appeared to have a live
animal struggling to get out. He opened
the sack and there was this tiny kitten —
obviously premature but fully formed.
“They brought it to me, and the doc-
tor taught me how to take care of it,” she
said. “It was behind other kittens of that
age because it really was premature. I
had to feed it every hour for a while, then
every two hours. It was really hard, but so
rewarding. And it lived. “Caring for these animals teaches life
lessons to my grandchildren,” Westbrook
said. “They’re always excited to see what
animals Grandma has. I’ve taught them to
be compassionate and gentle with them,
but it’s also taught them about the life
cycle and helped them understand death.
We’ve had burial services when I’ve lost
them.”
She encourages young parents to have
pets because of the wonderful bonds that
will form between children and animals.
“If an animal is jealous of a baby, you can
work with it, and it will grow to love the
child. There’s enough love there for every-
thing.”
She shared an account involving a
baby squirrel. “We had a place at Heber
Springs where a baby squirrel fell out of a
tree. I took care of it and bottle-fed it, then
released it when it was older. She would
come back when we were there and sit on
our porch. We even made friends with her
mother. In fact we raised three genera-
tions from that squirrel.” Westbrook said she loves volunteering
for the Humane Society. “As my own per-
sonal cats die off, I don’t intend to replace
them. I’ll concentrate strictly on foster
animals.”
She said her husband, Andy, is “totally
supportive” of the service she provides
to the homeless animals. “They become
part of our family. We get Christmas cards
from ‘grand-dogs’ and ‘grand-cats’ and
people who have adopted pets we’ve
raised. We stay connected.”
If Westbrook has a regret, it’s that she
didn’t become a veterinarian. “I grew up at
a time when women weren’t encouraged
to go into that profession, but caring for
homeless babies is a permanent part of
my life now. “People are always bringing them to
me. I have everything ready now on a
moment’s notice. I have my kit and just
pull out my stuff to take care of them. I
love working with the Humane Society and
the two wonderful vets who regularly work
out there. They have helped me so much,
and I hope I help them.
“I wear my badge proudly,” she said.
Ann Sanders commended Westbrook
for her volunteer service. “By her taking in
so many foster kittens, it allows us to save
more lives every year.” ■
lo
ve e
v
e
ry
th
in
g
By Lynda Hollenbeck
C
Carolyn Westbrook Place of birth: Benton How long have you lived in Saline
County? All my life Favorite place in Saline County: Lake
Winona area, and its many trails Favorite book: I just like old movies – no
favorite.
Hobbies: Hiking and searching for
waterfalls.
Something about you that would surprise
others: I’m certified in scuba
enough
for
Page 6 – The Saline Courier
sports@bentoncourier.com Thursday, August 1, 2013
SportS
saline
scoreboard
The Saline County
Razorback Club is plan-
ning a bus trip to the
Arkansas vs. Ole Miss
game on Nov. 9 in Oxford,
Miss.
There are currently 10
seats still available and
they are $150 each.
That includes a game
ticket, transportation to
and from the game and
a box lunch. For more
information call Phillip
Montalvo at 501-353-6357.
saline coUnTY
raZorbacK clUb
Mlb
CO ED FALL BALL
At Bernard Holland Park
Sign ups are in the Gene
Moss Building at Tyndall
Park on Aug. 8 at 7:30 p.m.
Deadline is Aug. 20. Call
Carl West at 840-1743.
GIRLS FALL BALL
Sept. 7, 14, Oct. 5,
and 12.. If interested call
Shannon Earnest at 860-
5788
benTon P&r
soFTball
TODAY
White Sox at Cleveland, 11:05 am
Mets at Miami, 11:40 a.m.
KC Royals at Minnesota, 12:10
Houston at Balttimore, 6:05 p.m.
Arizona at Texas, 6:05 p.m.
San Fran. at Philly, 6:05 p.m.
St. Louis at Pittsburgh, 6:05 p.m.
Seattle at Boston, 6:10 p.m.
Colorado at Atlanta, 6:10 p.m.
Dodgers at Cubs, 7:05 p.m.
Toronto at LA Angels, 9:05 p.m.
FRIDAY
LA Dodgers at Cubs, 3:05 p.m.
Seattle at Baltimoore, 6:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Philly, 6:05 p.m.
Colorado at Pittsburgh, 6:05 p.m.
White Sox at Detroit, 6:08 p.m.
Arizona at Boston, 6:10 p.m.
St. Louis at Cincinnati, 6:10 p.m.
KC Royals at Mets, 6:10 p.m,
Cleveland at Miami, 6:10 p.m.
San Fran. at Tampa Bay, 6:10
Washington at Milwaukee, 7:10
Houston at Minnesota, 7:10 p.m.
Toronto at LA Angels, 9:05 p.m.
Texas at Oakland, 9:05 p.m.
Yankees at San Diego, 9:10 pm
NL Central Division Standings
W L PCT Stk. GB
Pittsburgh 65 42 .607 W4 0
St. Louis 62 44 .585 L7 2.5
Cincinnati 60 49 .550 W1 6
Chicago 49 58 .458 W1 16
Milwaukee 46 62 .426 L1 19.5
Cardinals in a funk, lose Molina
W
ell, it’s here.
That time
Cardinals fans
were dreading. St. Louis is
experiencing its bad stretch
of baseball. After that hot
start to the season and
busting out in the second
half with a
5-1 record,
St. Louis has
lost seven
consecutive
games for
the first time
all year. The
Cardinals’
previous
longest los-
ing streak
was three
straight,
coming in
late April and late June.
The solid pitching teams
of the Atlanta Braves and
Central Division rival
Pittsburgh Pirates has
shut the Cardinals offense
down these past six losses.
St. Louis has allowed 4.7
runs per game against the
Braves and Pirates, but
have scored just 10 runs
(1.4 rpg) total in those
seven games, getting shut
out twice.
The Cardinals, which are
now 2.5 games behind the
Pirates in the Central, are
hitting just .183 on the los-
ing streak, and are batting
just 10 of 47 (.213) with
runners in scoring posi-
tion during that time. The
Cardinals are still killing
the major leagues in the
RISP category with a .333
average, but were batting
.340 with RISP before the
streak. The Detroit Tigers
are batting .294 with RISP,
good for second in the
majors.
Allen Craig, the
Cardinals’ first baseman/
outfielder now batting .316
on the season, is 1 for his
last 28 at bats, but still
leads the majors with RISP
at .475. Again, Detroit is
right behind the Cardinals
in that respect as well, with
monster Miguel Cabrera
stinking it up with a .436
average – 39 points less
than Craig – with RISP.
The Cardinals are allow-
ing 4.7 runs per game dur-
ing the streak, and if not for
a 9-2 loss in the first game
of the series to Pittsburgh,
the Cardinals would just
be giving up 3.8 runs per
game. Without the 9-2 loss,
Cardinal pitching is pretty
good with a 3.38 ERA, but
when your offense is aver-
aging one run per game
in your last six contests,
it puts a lot of pressure on
your pitching staff.
So not only are the
Cardinals on a seven-game
losing streak and have
forgotten how to hit, but
St. Louis’ best player and
leader, catcher Yadier
Molina, is now on the dis-
abled list with a knee issue.
Before this injury, Molina
was on pace to surpass his
career RBI total for the the
fifth consecutive year (he
had 76 last season and has
54 this season) and is bat-
ting a career-high .330, and
has led the NL in batting
for much of the season.
And that’s just his offense.
Molina has won five con-
secutive Gold Gloves and is
throwing out 42 percent of
would-be base stealers this
season.
And the fact that staff ace
Adam Wainwright couldn’t
shut the door on the Pirates
in last night’s 5-4 loss isn’t a
good sign. Wainwright was
leaving pitches up in the
zone and couldn’t uphold
the Cardinals’ two-run lead.
No Waino has been excel-
lent all season as he is 13-6
with a 2.61 ERA, but his
ERA has steadily raised his
past nine games. He has a
very good 3.29 ERA during
those nine games, but its
not what he’s been doing
most of the season.
The Cardinals are in
danger of being swept for
the second consecutive
series and losing their
eighth game, and things
aren’t really looking up
after Molina was placed on
the DL.
Tony
Lenahan
Tony’s Take
Familiar faces for the interim
BENTON – It will be an
interim reunion of sorts
when Benton Panther
Assistant Coach Dwaine
Fishburn and Freshman
Panther Head Coach David
Torres begin the basketball
season. After
six seasons
as Benton’s
head basket-
ball coach,
Chris Nail
took the
assistant
principal
position.
Fishburn
was named
interim head
basketball
coach and
Torres was
named the
interim assis-
tant coach at the Benton
School Board Meeting on
Tuesday night. The duo also
were interim coaches for the
Panthers for the 2006-2007
seasons before Nail’s arrival.
“He’s going to be the
interim coach,” Benton
Athletic Director Steve
Quinn said of Fishburn.
“Due to the late timing
of the position coming
open with school starting
in August, we felt like we
would be better served to go
with an interim head coach
this year. He is going to be
the interim head basketball
coach and Coach David
Torres is going to step up
and be the interim high
school assistant this year,
and then we’ll open the posi-
tion back up in the spring
where the timing will be a
little better.”
The move makes sense as
6A South Conference cham-
pion Panthers will definitely
have a familiarity with the
coaching staff as Fishburn
and Torres have been a part
of Benton basketball for
years.
“I think the fact that
Dwaine and I have been
under [Nail’s] system is
going to make the transition
for those seniors [smooth],”
Torres said. “That’s the most
important thing. The transi-
tion won’t be as devastating
as it would be with a new
coach with a new system.
“I’m happy for Chris, I’m
happy for Dwaine to get the
opportunity to be the head
coach this year, because
he’s definitely head-coaching
material. He’s been a high
school coach. Congrats to
the seniors because we don’t
have to change the system,
and I guess as far as myself,
I’m glad to be able to help
the program in any way,
form or fashion.”
Trent Morgan was also
hired on Tuesday to become
the ninth-grade head bas-
ketball coach and Seth
Glidewell was hired to assist
with freshman basketball
and football.
Former Coach Nail also
thinks the transition for the
Panthers will go smoothly.
“I think Coach Fishburn
will do an outstanding job,”
Nail said. “I think the kids
will have some comfort-
ability with him, which
can make a big difference.
I think he’s going to do a
really outstanding job for
our students this year. The
kids know Coach Torres
as well, which will make it
smooth. There’s going to be
quite a few seniors this year
so it will be a good situation
for everybody.”
Torres said he and
Fishburn have coached
against each other and with
each other throughout their
treks in Arkansas basketball,
and Torres is excited about
the opportunity to coach
with Fishburn again.
“It’s good to be back in
the co-pilot seat with him fly-
ing the plane,” Torres said.
“He’ll do an outstanding job.
The program will be in solid
hands with Dwaine running
the helm.”
by Tony lenahan
tlenahan@bentoncourier.com
Fishburn
Torres
Special to The Saline Courier
Austin Odom, of Benton, won the Junior Men’s gold medal in
Olympic trap at the National Championships in Colorado Springs,
Colo., Sunday July 28. Odom would defeat Alex Rennart (Surfside,
Fla.) for the junior gold-medal in the gold/silver medal final. The
match took place over five days in Colorado while battling wind,
hail, rain, heat, fog and 280 clay targets.
Odom spent the week of July 4 in Granada, Spain, participating in
his first World Cup shotgun event and finished shooting his per-
sonal best total match score. The ISSF “International Sport Shooting
Federation” match in Spain featured 23 US shotgun team members,
five of which are USA Olympians. This World Cup was the biggest
of the year since all Olympic shooting disciplines were combined
with a total of 1,018 athletes from 78 nations participating.
Junior Ace
Swanson lays foundation
FAYETTEVILLE — Travis
Swanson’s ascent to captain
at Arkansas began well
before last year’s scandal-rid-
den spring and subsequent
fall collapse.
How the center handled
the turmoil off the field,
however, may just prove to
be the defining moment of a
playing career that is among
the school’s best.
A core group of senior
leaders, led by Swanson,
gives new coach Bret
Bielema a foundation to
work with as Arkansas heads
into fall practice next week.
Swanson and Co. have been
through a lot, too.
There was the Sugar Bowl
three seasons ago. Then
there was last year’s epic col-
lapse in the wake of former
coach Bobby Petrino’s firing;
a 4-8 record under interim
coach John L. Smith.
Through it all, Swanson’s
class has endured, thanks
in large part to the four-
year starter’s endearing
personality. The Texas
native has earned his fair
share of awards throughout
his career, and he enters
this season as a preseason
first-team All-Southeastern
Conference selection.
He’s also earned plenty of
praise from his new coach
after just one set of spring
practices.
“Travis Swanson is the
best center, in my opinion,
in college football,” Bielema
said.
For all of Swanson’s acco-
lades, it’s worth noting the
6-foot-5, 318-pound former
lacrosse standout had never
played center prior to his
arrival at Arkansas. It was
only after a camp during his
senior year of high school
that Petrino recommended
the former guard learn the
new position.
Swanson took the advice
to heart — taking part in 4:30
a.m. workouts during his
final semester of high school
and learning everything he
could about snapping the
ball. It was the same kind of
selfless display he had shown
since first starting football at
6 years old, continuing into
his sophomore year of high
school when he was asked
by coaches to also play on
the defensive line.
Swanson accepted the
defensive assignment, even
though his career path was
already winding its way JAY MANNING/jaysphotodesign.com
Senior Arkansas center Travis Swanson gets set to hike the ball to former Hogs’ quarterback Tyler
Wilson in a game last season.
by Kurt Voigt
AP Writer
SWANSON, page 7
Thursday, August 1, 2013
The Saline Courier 7
4 Drawer
Video
Center
Compare at
$
149
$
66
Deluxe 5
Drawer
Chest
Roller Glides
Compare at
$
199
$
98
4 Drawer
Chest
Compare at
$
109
$
48
Compare at
$
99
Assorted
Storage
Cubes
Home
Stretch
Where Great Quality Lives for Less
Visit
us at
www.
ffohome
.com
PLEASE PLACEADDRESSES
HERE-THANKS
Scatterback
Sofa
Super Buy, Lots of Comfort!
$
277
Compare at
$
399
4 Piece Bedroom Group
Dresser, Mirror, Headboard and Nightstand
$
598
Compare
at
$
899
$
1
00
a Day!
SAVINGS
For the Dorm & Home
a
Day!
Plush Top
Elite Sets
Twin-
$
148
Compare at
$
299
Twin-
$
238
Compare at
$
349
Twin-
$
298
Compare at
$
399
King-
$
598
Compare at
$
799
Full-
$
188
Compare at
$
349
Full-
$
278
Compare at
$
429
Full-
$
358
Compare at
$
449
Queen-
$
398
Compare at
$
499
Queen Set-
$
198
Compare at
$
399
Pillow-Top
Luxury Sets
Pillow Top
Pacifica Sets
Queen Set-
$
298
Compare at
$
469
Queen
Luxury Shown
Save on Mattresses
Desk & Chair
Study Set-
$
298
Futon &
Frame
$
148
Compare at
$
278
$
27
Sign up to WIN!
$
1,000
DORM
ROOM
MAKE-
OVER!
Details in store
13-P8-WK1-FFOHome-V4-With$1000_Layout 1 7/19/13 9:06 AM Page 1
22401 Hwy. I-30 • BRYANT
501.847.5402
1703 Military Rd
in Benton
778-5111
Open
Mon-Sat 6 am
Sunday 8 am
exmark.com
BUY A MOWER FROM
SOMEONE WHO KNOWS
MORE THAN
WHAT AISLE THEY’RE IN.
3.99% for 60 months
based on QTE651KA421
$
61
ZERO-TURN RIDERS AS LOW AS
PER
MO.
0
%
FINANCING
GOING ON NOW
On all mowers. Limited time offer.
See dealer for complete details.
Malvern Power Equipment
1105 West Moline
Malvern, AR. 72104
501-337-0218
malvernpower@sbcglobal.net
exmark.com
BUY A MOWER FROM
SOMEONE WHO KNOWS
MORE THAN
WHAT AISLE THEY’RE IN.
3.99% for 60 months
based on QTE651KA421
$
61
ZERO-TURN RIDERS AS LOW AS
PER
MO.
0
%
FINANCING
GOING ON NOW
On all mowers. Limited time offer.
See dealer for complete details.
Malvern Power Equipment
1105 West Moline
Malvern, AR. 72104
501-337-0218
malvernpower@sbcglobal.net
exmark.com
BUY A MOWER FROM
SOMEONE WHO KNOWS
MORE THAN
WHAT AISLE THEY’RE IN.
3.99% for 60 months
based on QTE651KA421
$
61
ZERO-TURN RIDERS AS LOW AS
PER
MO.
0
%
FINANCING
GOING ON NOW
On all mowers. Limited time offer.
See dealer for complete details.
Malvern Power Equipment
1105 West Moline
Malvern, AR. 72104
501-337-0218
malvernpower@sbcglobal.net
toward the offensive line.
The two-way experiment
was a success before ending
after three games, but it was
Swanson’s willingness to do
whatever he was told that
was remembered by his par-
ents, Todd and Gina.
You see, Travis Swanson’s
theory on earning play-
ing time was, and still is, a
simple one: “Just don’t give
people a reason not to like
you,” he said. “And do every-
thing right.”
Swanson put that theory
into practice while red-
shirting his first season at
Arkansas, heeding the advice
of coaches and older team-
mates, alike. By the time
his second year came along,
Swanson took over at center.
Even now, after spending
the past eight months try-
ing to impress a new set of
coaches, Swanson’s thoughts
on his ability are less about
his own considerable tal-
ent — born out of a potent
mix of intelligence, athleti-
cism and size — and more
about the humble nature he’s
always known.
“The only reason a player
doesn’t play is if you give
the coaches a reason, like if
you do something that they
don’t like off or on the field,”
Swanson said. “There’s no
reason for me not to start if I
don’t give them a reason.”
Arkansas quarterback
Brandon Allen served as
Tyler Wilson’s backup last
season, and he exited the
spring as the starter. Allen
credited Swanson for much
of his success in transition-
ing to his new role, saying
the center helped him quick-
ly deliver defensive adjust-
ments to offensive coordina-
tor Jim Chaney.
“It’s almost like having
another quarterback out
there,” Allen said.
New Razorbacks offen-
sive line coach Sam Pittman
echoed the praise for
Swanson, both for his on-
the-field ability as well as
how the center has used his
platform as captain to sell the
upperclassmen on the merits
of the new coaching staff.
“I’ve relied on him as
much or more than anybody
I’ve ever coached,” Pittman
said.
Swanson’s most diffi-
cult task after being voted
a captain last year came
after Arkansas lost an early
season game to Louisiana-
Monroe — beginning a
losing stretch that sent the
Razorbacks from preseason
top five to missing a bowl
game for the first time since
the 2008 season.
He agonized about the
best ways to approach team-
mates during the losing
season, working with Wilson
to use different methods of
motivation on teammates.
Sometimes, it was promot-
ing what laid ahead in the
professional ranks. Others, it
was about simply playing for
pride.
What struck Gina
Swanson throughout the
difficulties of last season
was that her son never once
complained about the pre-
dicament following Petrino’s
firing. Even during their pri-
vate conversations, when she
and her husband expressed
doubts of their own, Travis
Swanson would have none
of it.
“I truly realized he had
become a man,” Gina
Swanson said. “For Travis
to just stand up and tell us
this was their team and the
boys supported everything
and were absolutely 100 per-
cent dedicated to this team
and get through all of this
... I knew that at that point,
‘We’ve done our job.’”
Swanson
From page 6
St. Louis skid reaches 7 in 5-4 loss to Pirates
PITTSBURGH — Adam
Wainwright isn’t worried. The
St. Louis Cardinals clubhouse
is filled with too many players
sporting World Series rings
for their ace to get too worked
up over a late-July swoon.
That doesn’t mean he’s
enjoying it.
Wainwright tried his best
to spin it forward moments
after the last of a series of
leads unraveled into a 5-4 loss
to the Pirates that extended
the Cardinals’ losing skid to
seven.
“You play 162 games, you
always at some point during
the season, every year, no
matter what, you go through
a rough patch,” Wainwright
said. “The good teams find a
way to get out of that rough
patch and find a way to get
back to playing good quality
baseball, and that’s what we’re
going to do.”
The Cardinals will try do it
with the guys already in town.
St. Louis opted to stand pat at
the non-waiver trade deadline,
convinced the parts are in
place for the club to make a
run at a second world champi-
onship in three years.
“We’re just going to go out
there and keep grinding,”
Wainwright said. “Eventually
things are going to go your
way if you keep the same
mindset.”
The Cardinals came in
hitting just .155 (30-194)
during the losing streak but
put together 13 hits. Matt
Holliday went 3 for 5 with two
RBI, yet St. Louis left 13 run-
ners on base.
Pittsburgh extended its
lead in the NL Central to 2½
games.
Wainwright was staked to
leads of 2-0, 3-1 and 4-2 but
couldn’t keep Pittsburgh at
bay. He gave up four runs in
seven innings, striking out six
and walking one, but failed to
earn his 14th victory.
“They gave me the lead
three times and I blew the
save three times,” Wainwright
said. “I can be better than
that, I will be better than that.”
The NL leader in wins was
gone by the time Pittsburgh’s
Russell Martin laced a singled
off Trevor Rosenthal (1-2)
with two outs in the eighth.
The ball rolled into left field,
giving Neil Walker enough
time to score from second.
“We can win just about
every way possible,”
Pittsburgh manager Clint
Hurdle said.
Tony Watson (3-1) worked
two shutout innings in relief.
Mark Melancon pitched a per-
fect ninth for his fifth save.
The teams with the two
best records in the National
League were mostly specta-
tors before Wednesday’s non-
waiver trade deadline, though
the Pirates acquired minor
leaguer Robert Andino from
Seattle.
Pittsburgh general manag-
er Neal Huntington stressed
he aggressively sought
help for one of the National
League’s weaker offenses
but didn’t want to do it while
gutting a replenished farm
system.
“We talk a lot about, we
don’t want to do something
stupid,” Huntington said
before the game. “We were
willing to do something stu-
pid, we just didn’t want to do
anything insane.”
At the moment, the defini-
tion might include breaking
up the chemistry the Pirates
have spent four months care-
fully cultivating.
They put together their
25th comeback win of the
season on a night when All-
Star Jeff Locke struggled. The
25-year-old pitcher’s rapid
ascension from fifth starter
to rotation fixture has fueled
Pittsburgh’s relentless pursuit
of the Cardinals.
St. Louis spent four innings
pecking away at the left-
hander’s usually deft mix of
breaking balls.
The hits came in various
ways, from a hard-hit double
by Beltran in the fourth to
a swinging bunt by David
Descalso that traveled 20 feet.
Locke tied a season high by
giving up four runs. He struck
out six and walked one, and
his ERA rose from 2.15 to
2.36.
“He was fighting uphill all
night,” Hurdle said of Locke.
Perhaps, but now the
Cardinals find themselves
looking up in the standings
at Pittsburgh. There are still
10 games between the teams
over the next nine weeks,
plenty of time for one of base-
ball’s most talented rosters to
get it together.
“We press every day,”
St. Louis manager Mike
Matheny said. “These guys,
there’s a sense of urgency
every day we play. Today is
just like the other days in that
we want to make sure every-
body’s preparing the right
way and getting their work in
and making sure we are not
letting any of these slip by.
And we’re not.
“To go out there and try to
make up something special
doesn’t make any sense right
now.”
NOTES: Tony Cruz went 0
for 4 in his first start at catcher
since All-Star Yadier Molina
went on the 15-day disabled
list with a right knee sprain.
... Pittsburgh is 7-2 against St.
Louis. ... The Pirates placed
reserve C Mike McKenry on
the 15-day disabled after he
underwent surgery on Tuesday
to repair a torn meniscus in
his left knee. Rookie Tony
Sanchez, Pittsburgh’s top pick
in the 2009 draft, will serve as
the primary backup to Martin
for the rest of the season. ... The
series concludes Thursday with
Pittsburgh’s Charlie Morton
(3-2, 3.59 ERA) facing Joe
Kelly (1-3 3.44). The Pirates
are 5-1 in Morton’s last six
starts.
LRM registration opens today
LITTLE ROCK – Little
Rock Marathon race officials
announced that registration
will open at 10 a.m. on Aug.1
for its 2014 event to be held
March 1-2, 2014. The Little
Rock Marathon is presented
by the Arkansas Democrat
Gazette and benefits Little
Rock Parks & Recreation.
Race Weekend events
include the 12th Annual
Little Rock Marathon, the
Little Rock Half Marathon,
the Little Rock 10K, the
Little Rock 5K Fun Run/
Walk, the Little Rockers
Kids Marathon and the
Little Rock Health & Fitness
Expo.
Registration for the Little
Rockers Kids Marathon will
open Sept.1.
The Little Rock Marathon
offers a training program to
individuals participating in
the 2014 race. Official train-
ing begins in mid-September
with a “build-up” training
phase beginning Aug. 6.
The Little Rock Marathon
Training Program, pre-
sented by Bill Torrey’s Rock
City Running and KARK
Channel 4, is free of charge,
but registration is required.
Last year’s 2013 Marathon
was a success with a 15.6
percent increase in race
participation from 2012 and
more than 19,000 individuals
participating in the various
training programs and races
according race officials.
Registration will be
available online at www.
littlerockmarathon.com
through 11:59 PM CST Feb.
21, 2014. A mail in registra-
tion form is also available on
the registration page of the
website or by calling race
headquarters at 371-4639.
Mail-in registration forms
must be postmarked by Feb.
21, 2014.
In the past, all races have
sold out, due in part to our
famously-huge finisher’s
medals and fun race themes.
The 2014 theme is “Epic”
and race officials anticipate
the race will sell out before
the end of the year.
For more information
about deadline, details and
the race, visit the website
or contact the Little Rock
Marathon office at 371-4639.
Special to the Courier
By Will Graves
AP Writer
8 The Saline Courier
Thursday, August 1, 2013
1800 N. Reynolds Rd. • Bryant
(Next to Family Dollar)
NAME BRAND CONSIGNMENT BOUTIQUE
Clothing • Boots • Furniture
Coach • Fossil • The Sak • Dooney & Bourke • Buckle
Miss Me • True Religion • Big Star • Silver • BKE • Hollister
7 For All Mankind • Abercrombie • American Eagle
J
u
n
io
r
s
0
-15
X
S
- X
L
Ladies
2 - Plus
XS - 3X
G
u
y
s
2
7
-4
0
S
m
- X
X
L
evolution
Home Decor
& Furniture
www.evolutionresale.com
Celebrating
10 Years!
We are happy to have “Expressed”
a lot over the years!
Thank you Saline County for
voting us “Best Boutique”
Register for a
$100.00
Gift Certifcate
Anniversary Cake
to be served on
Saturday
Great Selection
of Jeans on Sale!
featuring: Miss Me, AG, 7
for all Mankind, Citizens,
Hudson, Rock Revival,
Big Star, It, Ivy Jane, Big
Buddha, Hobo
611 Offce Park Dr.
Suite 4
(next to Subway)
Bryant
847-9944
fnd us on
Facebook
Join us for our “10” Year Celebration
Fri.-Sun, August 2-4
Enjoy 10% off Storewide
Tax Free Weekend Sale
security of the children and
teachers and to ensure a
safer environment that plac-
es the emphasis on learning
and not fear.
Benton School
Superintendent Jeff Collum
had this to say about the
partnership.
“We are excited to part-
ner with the Benton Police
Department,” he said. “This
year we have taken the
time to review our safety
and security procedures
throughout the district. We
have instituted some chang-
es that include: Adding the
additional school source
officer position, structural
changes to the buildings,
and a new safety team that
includes community mem-
bers, law enforcement, and
school administrators.
“We are moving in the
right direction to ensure the
safety and security of our
children remains a top pri-
ority,” Collum said.
More information was
to be available today at the
Benton school summit,
Collum noted.
He noted that there was
to be a safety forum running
concurrently for the district
staff that was to include sev-
eral presentations on school
safety and security.
Stuart is a 17-year law
enforcement officer with
more than 2,500 hours of
certified law enforcement
training that she brings
to the program. She has
worked in various capaci-
ties within the department
including patrol and the
criminal investigative divi-
sion.
The two veteran school
resource officers are
Quinton Jackson and Joey
Bedsole. Jackson has been
a school resource officer
for nine years and has been
with the department for
more than 11 years overall.
Bedsole has been a
school resource officer for
five years and has been an
officer for more than eight
years overall.
All three officers have
attended numerous train-
ing courses through the
Criminal Justice Institute,
Arkansas Safe School
Association, and other certi-
fied school based training
classes.
The overall mission is
not only help to protect
students from dangers from
the outside, but also to
educate and empower them
to make good choices by
teaching classes on such
things as Stranger Danger,
Prescription Drug Abuse
Prevention, and Bicycle
Safety.
The new school resource
officer vehicle is a Ford
Mustang that was paid
for courtesy of local drug
dealers and was acquired
through Everett GMC.
The wrap design on the
car was done in conjunc-
tion with Big Impressions
in Bryant and local officers,
and it will be the look of
future school resource
vehicles.
Big Impressions did the
final wrap on the car and
Fleet Safety in North Little
Rock outfitted it with the
emergency equipment.
The officers’ uniforms
incorporate the Benton
School District Panther logo
to help them develop a good
rapport with students. The
uniforms are unique to only
school resource officers and
were designed by them.
They were made by Artistic
Threads.
Benton
From page 1
Special to The Saline Courier
The number of school resource officers in the Benton School District has increased to three. Posing
with a new patrol vehicle are, from left, Officer Joey Bedsole, Officer Quinton Jackson, and Sgt. Lisa
Stuart, who is new to the program.
Arkansas tax holiday set for this weekend
Act 757 of 2011 provides
for a sales tax holiday in
Arkansas during the first
weekend of August each
year and parents of local
school children are prepar-
ing for that upcoming event
set for this weekend.
The holiday will begin at
12:01 a.m. Saturday, Aug.
3, and end at 11:59 p.m
Sunday, Aug. 4.
A sales tax holiday report-
edly is a temporary period
when state and local sales
taxes are not collected or
paid on the purchase of
certain products. For most
people in Saline County, this
holiday coincides with the
purchase of back-to-school
supplies. While some par-
ents have started their shop-
ping, others say this week-
end will find them in stores
throughout the county. Most
shoppers expect to pay $50
or higher for each child.
Items on the shopping list
include not just supplies, but
clothing as well.
One parent reported
that shopping for his child
included shoes, a backpack,
seven shirts and two pair
of shorts for a total of $200.
This amount reportedly does
not include supplies.
Some shoppers com-
plained about the quantity of
items on the lists provided
by the local school districts.
In particular, 40 glue sticks
were required for a first-
grade student and four to six
bottles of hand sanitizer.
However, parents at one
local elementary school
were happy to learn that all
supplies were being provid-
ed by the PTO at no cost.
The list of qualified items
for exemption from sales tax
during the sales tax holiday
include: clothing and foot-
wear if the sales price is less
than $100 per item; clothing
accessories and equipment
if the sales price is less than
$50 per item; school sup-
plies, school art supplies;
school instructional materi-
als.
Clothing items priced at
$100 or more are subject to
the full state and local sales
tax. The Department of
Finance and Administration
provides the following exam-
ple as clarification.
A customer purchases
two shirts at $50 each, a pair
of jeans at $75 and a pair of
shoes at $125. No state and
local sales tax is due on the
two shirts and the pair of
jeans, even though the total
cost of $175 exceeds the
$100 threshold. However,
the state and local sales tax
will be due on the full pur-
chase price of $125 of the
shoes since they exceed the
$100 threshold.
Retailers may offer store
discounts and store coupons
to reduce the selling price
of an eligible item in order
to quality for the holiday
exemption. However, the
manufacturer’s discount
coupons do not reduce the
selling price of an item and
cannot be used to determine
the selling price. A manufac-
turer’s rebate also does not
reduce the selling price of
an item and may not be used
to qualify an item for the
exemption.
Eligible property that
customers purchase during
the exemption period with
the use of a rain check will
qualify for the exemption
regardless of when the rain
check was issued. Issuance
of a raincheck during the
exemption period will not
qualify eligible property for
the exemption if the proper-
ty is actually purchased after
the exemption period.
Purchases may be made
at any retailer in Arkansas
to qualify for the sales tax
holiday.
By Brent Davis
bdavis@bentoncourier.com
August 3-4
Classifieds
PLACE AN AD
FIND AN AD
Listings are divided by category.
To get your ad in the Courier,
call 501-315-8228 Monday
through Friday, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.,
online at bentoncourier.com,
come by the offce at 321 N.
Market St. in Benton or mail
to: PO Box 207, Benton,AR
72018. We accept Visa,
MasterCard, Discover, and
American Express.
WHEN TO CALL
FOR ADS APPEARING | CALL BEFORE
Tuesday –––––––––––– Mon Noon
Wednesday –––––––––– Tues. Noon
Thursday ––––––––––– Weds. Noon
Friday –––––––––––––– Thurs. Noon
Saturday –––––––––––– Thurs. Noon
Sunday ––––––––––––– Fri. Noon
Monday –––––––––––– Fri. Noon
GET ONLINE
WHAT
IT
COSTS
YARD
SALES
4 lines – 3 days – $18.68*
4 lines – 7 days – $29.28*
4 lines – 14 days – $ 45.44*
Extra lines available
4 lines – 2 days – $15.64*
4 lines – 3 days – $18.48*
Extra lines available
Cost includes ad and yard
sale packet including signs.
You can place your ad
on our website....
bentoncourier.com
Just go to website and
follow the steps.
Email us at:
class@bentoncourier.
com
}
}
}
}
}
*Price doesn’t include charge for graphic, TMC
rate, or internet. Price is subject to change.
Thursday, August 1, 2013
class@bentoncourier.com The Saline Courier – Page 9
Employment
CARRIERS WANTED
The Saline Courier is accepting applications
for independent contract carriers and
substitute carriers in all home delivery areas.
• Excellent part time income
• Afternoon delivery Mon–Fri and early
AM on weekends
• Must have a valid Arkansas drivers license
with proof of at least state minimum auto
insurance
Route available:
ROUTE 64 – Hwy 5, Hwy 298, Hwy 9 and
Ed Allen Cove, Steelbridge Road
Interested applicants may come by and fll
out an application at 321 N Market in Benton
or email astovall@bentoncourier.com
Employment
P/T Circulation Clerk
The Saline Courier is searching for Part Time
Clerk to work 4-7pm Friday and 7-9am on
Saturday and Sunday answering the phone
and occasional re-delivery (with reimburse-
ment for travel expenses)
Prior carrier or newspaper experience ideal
but not required. Must have valid Arkansas
DL with state min. insurance. Interested
candidates apply in person at 321 N. Market
St. or e-mail astovall@bentoncourier.com
EOE
TIP #7
When setting up your sale, be organized. Put items
of like quality together, such as women’s clothes
together, men’s clothes together and children’s
clothes together. Put tools with men’s items. Put
children’s toys & bikes together, housewares with
dishes, etc. (You get the idea!) Buyers looking
for certain items are sure to find them!
TIP #8
Decide if the sale will be a “cash only“ sale. If you
decide to take checks, who the check should be
made out to. Larger items with higher prices may
not be sold if you decide not to take checks. Buyer’s
normally carry cash only. If you are accepting cash
only, this should be put in your ad.
TIP #9
Make sure that you have plenty of change on hand:
some tens, fives, lots of ones and plenty of currency.
You don’t want to miss a sale because you don’t
have the change needed. It’s best to go to a bank
the day before your sale to set up your change box.
Good change boxes range from a box with cups as
holders to an old jewelry box with dividers. Just
make sure the change is easy to access, so you can
move buyers along faster. Be sure you know the
amount that you started with, so that you can tell
how much profit you made at the end of your sale.
TIP #10
When setting up your sale, use plenty of tables. Not all garage/yard goers are young. Lots of older folks love these sales. Make sure you
have plenty of tables for displaying the items. Be sure to leave plenty of room between aisles so buyers can pass by each other. If tables are
too close then items may be knocked off & no profit is made. Mark all items clearly with price labels. If two or more are having a sale,
plan a way (like by initials or color) so dividing up at the end can be easier.
TIP #11
You will need a table for checkout. An adding machine can ease your stress for figuring large purchases. Don’t forget sacks to put items in
so the buyer can carry their treasures to their car.
TIP #12
Garage/yard sales are usually held one or two days. Starting time is up to you,
generally the start time is from 8am to 9am and most of the time no one is sure
when to close shop. This mainly depends on how many sales are that day. If
there are quite a few, then a sale may stay open later in the afternoon. If there
are just a few, an earlier time may be alright. If you need to set a time make sure
you advertise that the sale ends at a certain time.
TIP #13
If you hold your sale two days, mark down prices on the second day. Figure it this
way, do you want to keep the item & store it again or make a little profit?
TIP #14
If you have larger items for sale (such as furniture), the buyer may want you to
hold their purchase so they can make arrangements to pick it up later. Make sure
you get paid for the item first, so you aren’t out the money if they leave and
change their mind. Put a large “SOLD” sign on the item so other buyers know
that the item is sold. Give the buyer a time limit to pick up the item, so you don’t
wait around for them. Exchange names and phone numbers if necessary.
TIP #15
Again - Don’t forget, “One man’s junk may be another man’s treasure” so don’t
throw out that ugly vase, that blouse that doesn’t fit, the tools that are sitting in
your house, round it up and put in your sale!!!
THE DAY OF THE SALE
•Have everything set up and ready to go the night before or plan on
getting up early to set up.
•Hang up signs (the one the Courier supplies), so people know where
the sale is at. Be sure to obey city ordinances when putting your signs
up.
•Arrange a convenient location to oversee your sale and for your
checkout table. Never leave your cash box unattended!!
•You may need batteries or an outlet for electrical items to be
tried. An extension cord is handy.
•Be ready to barter: garage sale goers are looking for bargains
and barter they will. Remember, do you want it to sell or do
you want to store it again? If you see that some items are
not selling - mark them down. Remember the object of the
sale is to turn unwanted items into cash.
AFTER THE SALE
•Take down your signs immediately after your sale and keep Saline County beautiful!
•If you have items left, either combine them with another friend who is having a sale later. Have a sale later on in the year, nearer to
fall or use the coupon below to sell those items.
•If you are moving and you are not planning on having another sale, you can donate your left over items to the non-profit agencies
such as Habitat for Humanity, Helping Hands, the Civitan Center, etc. Some agencies will even pick your left over items up at your
home.
•Count up your profit, enjoy your clean garage or the extra space you made!!!
•RAIN CHECK - If Mother Nature rains or snows during the day of your sale, the Courier will run your ad the following weekend for
the same amount of days that you paid for FREE OF CHARGE!
As Advertised in the Courier
Y
A
R
D
S
A
L
E
PLACE
TIME
Saline County’S newS SourCe SinCe 1876
Courier
The Saline
GARAGE / YARD SALE KIT
Your kit contains:
• Garage/Yard Sale Tips • Inventory Sheets • Signs • Coupon
especially for you by
321 N. Market St., Benton
Phone (501) 315-8228 Fax (501) 315-1920
Saline County’S newS SourCe SinCe 1876
Courier
The Saline
As Advertised in the C
ourier
Y
A
R
D
S
A
L
E
Place
Tim
e
Let us help you with yours! Call today at
315-8228
or come by the classifed offce at 321 N. Market and
pick-up your C ourier Yard Sale Kit Today! Saline County’S newS SourCe SinCe 1876
Courier
The Saline
15 TIPS & HELPFUL HINTS TO A SUCCESSFUL
GARAGE / YARD SALE
TIP #1
When planning your yard/garage sale, make sure you advertise in the Courier
so that the public knows of your sale. One low rate will get you two or three
days of advertising and in the Garage Sale Directory. The Courier supplies a kit
with bright yellow signs, inventory sheet & helpful hints. When placing your ad,
make sure you put your address, the day and time of your sale (remember yard
salers start early). If you say 8am, they will be there at 7am.
GOOD AD EXAMPLE: 123 Any Street, Bryant. Saturday, 8-3. 3 Families. Antiques, old clocks, dishes, men & women’s clothes, great children’s clothes, shoes, etc. Cash only, please. Don’t miss this sale!
BAD AD EXAMPLE: 123 Any St., Sat., Lots of junk! Yes, your ad may cost a little more, but you will get the customers that is
interested in what you have to sell. Wallah! Your garage is clean and you made
more money! P.S. Add directions, especially if it is a new subdivision. Your sale won’t work if no one knows where you are.
TIP #2
When you get ready to advertise your sale, make a list of items you have, whether it be household items, camping equipment, baby
items, and/or furniture to let buyers know what you have to offer. The more information you give, the bigger, better & more profitable
your sale will be. Put yourself in the yard sale shoppers place and check out the
AD EXAMPLES above - which sale are you going to??? TIP #3
Check the attic, storage shed, garage, closets & basement. Leave no stones unturned! Anything & everything including the kitchen sink
that you no longer use can be sold for cash. This includes clothing, dishes, collectibles, craft items, knick-knacks, tools, books, furniture,
lamps, rugs, even large items such as a vehicle or recreational vehicles. Larger items should be listed in the ad, as this may bring more
buyers to your sale. Also, don’t forget seasonal items (Christmas, Halloween, etc.) You can sell anything from soup to nuts at a yard/
garage sale. Remember “One man’s junk may be another man’s treasure”. TIP #4
It is hard to have a sale solely on your own. Try to get a relative to help: your sister, your parents, your spouse, your neighbor or a friend.
While someone manages the cash & sale the other can see if customers have questions about an item or need to see if the price can be
lowered, or if an item works, or maybe even the size of a piece of clothing or the size of a tire.
TIP #5
Combine your effort & have a block sale. Get your neighbors in on it. One
advertisement will cover the block. As the saying goes “the more the
merrier”. Plus, buyers love to be able to go house to house. Sales seem to
increase this way.
TIP #6
Make sure items are neat, clean & usable. Items sell faster in this
condition & you will make more money!!! If an item is broken or does not
work, make sure to tell your buyers (just because an item is broken or does
not work, does not mean it will not sell).
Give them a little bit
of home...
Have your hometown
newspaper mailed to
your favorite student.
Call Today to fnd out
how, 315-8228
Garage Sales
1201 THELMA ST,
8a-3p Fri & Sat, a va-
riety of items, new
grill
1801 EAGLE Point
Way Sat. 8a-4p Home
Decor, Chri stmas,
Tools, & various items
4212 PINE Shaw be-
hind Huckaby!s on
Hwy 35 Fri & Sat
6:30a-6:30p Last
Sale 4 Yrs. Ago RCA
Color Tv w/rem., For-
mals, Porc. Dolls,
New Sleigh Cherry
Crib, Cradle, Elec.
Bassinet, Inf. Boy/Tod
Clths., Bouncy Seat,
Baby Mont., Sports
Theme Crib Set,Adult
Clothes
COLLEGE Girls’ closet
sale, 901 Bridgewater
Women's Boutique Clothes
& Jewelry, Sat Only 9a-5p
EARLY BIRD SANITATION
Once a week pick up
+ Rolloff Dumpsters
332-7202 • 840-6758
• 778-3969
I BUY JUNK CARS
Fri & Sat 7a-7p Off
Hwy 298 Follow Signs
Large Assortment 5
Family Sale
Fri & Sat 7a-? 302
East Cross St. LOOK
For Signs Furn,
Appl., Clths, Misc.
MULTI-FAM, HH, de-
si gner ki ds adul t
clothing, 411 Wesley
Way Fri/Sat 7am-??
Garage Sales
Yard Sale Fri & Sat,
3400 Rushwood
Cove, lots of kids items,
hunting, fishing, & shooting
supplies, assorted tools
Benton
HUGE INDOOR
YARD SALE
Parkview United
Methodist Church
514 N. Border St.
(Benton across
from Jr. High School)
Sat. Aug. 3 7a-1p
Furn., playground equip.
clothes (adult & kids),
toys, books, appliances.
Stuff the bag starts at
11am. (All you can stuff
in a 13 gal. trash bag)
Only $3.00!
Salem
1201 SUNSET-SALEM
Fri & Sat 7a-1p Furn,
Electronics, HH,Toys,
& Clothes
Freebies
FREE FLUFFY Kittens All
Colors Male & Female
501-794-7727
Adoption
Happily Married Couple
yearning to love a child in
a secure home. Expenses
paid-private Legal. Kim &
Werner 1-888-416-5056
SEEK AND YOU
SHALL FIND
Great deals in the
Courier Classifieds.
Yard Sales, Jobs,
Homes for Sale or
Rent. Check them out
daily. Call to sub-
scribe at 315-8228.
Adoption
UNPLANNED PREG-
NANCY? THINKING
OF ADOPTI ON?
Open or closed adop-
tion. YOU choose the
family LIVING EX-
PENSES PAID. Ab-
by!s One True Gift
Adoptions Call 24/7.
1-866-459-3371
Personal
MEET SINGLES right
now! No paid opera-
tors, just real people
l i ke you. Browse
greetings, exchange
messages and con-
nect live. Try it free.
C a l l n o w
1-877-939-9299
Health Services
CANADA DRUG
CENTER Safe and af-
fordable medications.
Save up to 75% on
your medi cat i on
n e e d s C a l l
1-800-304-6217
$10.00 off first pre-
scription and FREE
Shipping
Employment
AIRLINE CAREERS
begin here - Become
an Aviation Mainte-
nance Tech. FAA ap-
proved training. Fi-
nancial aid if qualified
Housing available.
Job placement assis-
t ance. Cal l AI M
877-424-4177.
AVON AGENTS
WANTED: Start Your
Business Today!
1-800-206-0799
www.PROPEL92.com
DRIVERS – APPLY
NOW! 13 Dri vers
needed, Top 5% Pay
& Benefits, Class A
CLD r equi r ed.
877-258-8782.
www.Ad-Drivers.com
Employment
CLASS A CDL Driv-
ers Great Home
Ti me! Benefi ts &
Safety Bonus Avail-
able. Must have 1
year OTR in the last 3
years. Call Dancor
T r a n s i t I n c .
@866-677-4333
www.dancortransit.com
COMPANY DRIVERS &
Owner Operators
Wanted! No touch
freight, 90% drop &
hook, dedicated op-
portunities available.
Call 888-710-8707
Also seeking Recent
Grads. Call Lavonna
877-440-7890. Apply
online: www.drivefor-
pamtransport.com
DIETARY COOK with
experience needed at
Mt. Carmel Commu-
ni ty Center. Cal l
501-315-1555
DRIVERS - Want to
be part of a team, not
a number? Good
home time, pay & ex-
cellent benefi ts. Mini-
mum of 1 year OTR
flatbed experience.
Diamond State Truck-
i ng, I nc. Cal l
1-800-332-5551
DRIVERS-CRST of-
fers the Best Lease
Purchase Program!
SIGN ON BONUS.
No Down Payment or
Credit Check. Great
Pay. Class-A CDL re-
quired. Owner Opera-
tors Welcome! Call:
866-261-6532.
EXPERIENCED
COOK/WAITSTAFF
CALL HOME PLATE
DINER ASK FOR
RICK 813-4423
Want to Downsize
Your Gas Guzzler?
Sell it in the Courier
Classifieds. Call to
place your ad today!
315-8228
Employment
THE BAUXITE
Police Department in
cooperation with the
Bauxite School Sys-
tem is accepting
applications for a full
time School Re-
source Officer for the
2013-2014 school
year.! Applications
will be accepted until
Thursday, August 8,
2013.! Download an
application at:
www.bauxiteminers.org
click on: District,
Human Resources,
Employment
Opportunities or
bit.ly/applybauxite
Grams House
Now Hiring
TEACHERS
Health & Life
Insurance, Retirement
Call Melba
501-794-4726
HELP WANTED!!!
Make $1000 weekly
mai l i ng brochures
from HOME! NO ex-
perience required-
Start Immediately!
www.TheMailingHub.com
LPN! S (PRN) &
CNA!S FULL-TIME &
ALL SHIFTS for Long
Term Care Facility in
Benton apply online
http://newbeginnings.
vikus.net
MAKE UP to $1000 a
week mailing bro-
chures from home!
Genuine Opportunity!
NO Experience Re-
quired. Start Immedi-
ately, www.Brochure-
mailers.com
PART-TIME MAINTE-
NANCE/CARETAKER
Position Open Little Rock
Management Company is
seeking a Part-Time Main-
tenance Caretaker person
for 104 units in Bryant, Ar-
kansas. Must be profes-
sional, outgoing, ener-
getic,and capable of per-
forming duties of day to
day minor maintenance
and grounds care Back-
ground check required
Send letters or resumes
with references to
MONICA WINDERS, PDC
Companies 1501 N.
University Ave., Suite 740
Little Rock, AR 72207 Or
e-mail to monica@pdc
companies.com EOE
TRUCK DRIVERS
Wanted Best Pay and
Home Time! Apply
Online Today over
750 Companies! One
Application, Hundreds
of Offers!
www.HammerLaneJobs.com
Buy • Sell • Trade
in the Classifieds
Employment
EARLY CHILDHOOD
Education Parapro-
fessional The Dawson
Education Coopera-
tive Early Childhood
Speci al Educati on
Paraprofessional. The
application process is
open until the position
is filled. Interested ap-
plicants should send
a resume to Sandra
Francis, Early Child-
hood Speical Educa-
tion Coordinator, 711
Clinton Street, Ar-
kadelphia, AR. 71923,
An Equal Opportunity
Employer.
Cleo’s Furniture
SALES ASSOCIATE
Arkansas’ fastest growing furniture
company with over 25 years in the
business is looking to fill a sales
position in our Benton location.
LIFTING AND MOVING
FURNITURE IS REQUIRED
Health and Life Insurance,
Retirement, Vacations,
No Sundays, Excellent Pay,
Advancement Available
Must apply in person Monday thru
Friday 10:00 am to 6:00pm
201 N. Main St. Benton, AR
Business
Opportunities
I WOULD like to pur-
chase or operate a
small mail out or col-
lection business Seri-
ous inquires only!
Call 501-428-6592
Instruction
CAN YOU DIG IT? –
Heavy Equipment Op-
erator Career! 3wk
Hands On Training
School. Bulldozers,
Backhoes, Excava-
tors. National Certifi-
cations. Lifetime Job
Pl acement Assi s-
tance. VA Benefits
Eligible 866-362-6497
Child Care
IN-HOME DAYCARE
Spotless - Non-smoking
Drop-ins Welcome!
778-2920
LICENSED CHILDCARE
Infants to 8 B •L• S
Vouchers • Drop-Ins
562-0691 • 951-2923
Services
*REDUCE YOUR CA-
BLE BILL! Get a
4-Room Al l -Di gi tal
Satellite system in-
stalled FREE Pro-
gramming starting at
$24.99/mo. FREE
HD/DVR Upgrade to
new callers, SO CALL
NOW (800) 799-4935
HOUSE CLEANING
Reasonable Rates
Dependable
501-282-8836
Classifieds Work!
Services
*REDUCE YOUR CA-
BLE BILL! * Get a
whole-home Satellite
system installed at
NO COST and pro-
gramming starting at
$19.99/mo. FREE
HD/DVR Upgrade.
C A L L N O W
1-800-474-0423.
Apartments
Unfurnished
2 BR Apts, kit. appl.,
W&D conn., $500 &
up. Handicap access.
317-5190 / 317-5192
2 BR, 1 BA, $500
mo., No Pets, 6 mo.
l ease @ 204 N.
Fourth St. Benton,
Call 501-778-3324
2 BR, 1 BA, kitch.
appl., W/D conn.,
$500 mo., $250 dep.
Call between 9am-
8pm, (501)315-9337
Looking for love in all
the wrong places????
Check out the Freebie
section in today!s
classifieds. You will
fi nd uncondi ti onal
love there FREE!
Furry & Free!!
Apartments
Unfurnished
CAMRY COURT
Now Open
in Bryant
New Construction
2 BR, 2 BA or 2.5 BA
off Wilkerson Rd.
on Sadie Dr.
(By Hill Farm Elem.)
Call Terri the on-site
manager for appt.
501-804-0125
Bldg. 1225 #2
or call Dale King
501-539-1935
Visit our web-site
www.arkansas
apartments.net
NOTICE: All real es-
tate advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to the Fair Housing
Act which makes it il-
legal to advertise any
preference, limitation
or di scr i mi nat i on
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or in-
tention to make any
such preference. We
will not knowingly ac-
cept any advertising
for real estate which
is in violation of the
law. All persons are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis.
Houses for Rent
2 BR, 2 ba on 1 acre.
Central Heat and Air.
$495mo+dep. Bryant
School . No pets.
501-847-1789
2382 Northshore, 2
BR, 1 BA, CH/A, $600
mo. , $300 dep. ,
860-4882/ 315-2431
3 & 4 BEDROOM
$825 -$1400 mo.,
Haskell, Benton &
Bryant. 315-9370
3 BR, 1 ba, 415 Bor-
der St. $600 mth.
$300 dep. Refs. req!d.
No i nsi de pet s.
501-840-3211
3BR 2BA, Beautiful
new home, Bryant,
affordablepropertiesark.
com 501-672-0407
Houses for Rent
3 BR, 1 BA, Partially
Furn., CH/A
$525mo, $275dep.
background check.
No pets! 352-9214
3 BR, 2 BA, Bryant
Schools, $1250 mo.,
$1,000 dep.. Avail
August 1st Please
Call 501-840-7626
3BR 1.5 BA Newly
Remodeled Bryant
School Di st r i ct
$900mo + $900 Dep
Call 501-317-0422
3BR 1BA House,
$595 mo., 6mo. lease
No Pet s, Cal l
501-778-3324
Eagle Properties
LLC
315–2075
Nice 2 & 3 BR Homes
from $500 to $925
Apartments
1 BR’s from $415
2 BR’s from $475
*based on availability
Deposit & References
Required
eaglepropsaline.com
FOR LEASE/SALE
New 3 & 4 BR, 2 BA,
brick, FP, ceiling fans,
carpet, 2 car garage,
patio. Go to: www.
catalyst-residential.com
or 501-697-6342
HASKELL 204
GLENN OAK 3BR, 2
BA, 2 car garage.
Nice. $790 mo. $600
dep. 501-847-5377
Heritage Farms
home for rent. Fenced
back yard. 3 br, 2 ba.
$1135 mo.,
501-922-7072
NEW 4BR 2Ba 2 Car
garage Fenced yard
1750sq.ft. $1200mo
Benton Schools Call
326-8000
Mobile Homes
For Rent
2BR STOVE, Refrig.,
Washer & Dryer,
Dishwasher, All new
inside $595mo No
Pets 317-6426 or
778-1993
Business Property
For Rent
BUSINESS PROP-
ERTY For Lease 608
S. East Street Office
with large parking
area Call 315-9337
between 9a&8p
Miscellaneous
For Rent
*REDUCE YOUR CA-
BLE BILL! Get a
4-Room Al l -Di gi tal
Satellite system in-
stalled FREE Pro-
gramming starting at
$24.99/mo. FREE
HD/DVR Upgrade to
new callers, SO CALL
NOW (800) 795-6129
DISH TV Retailer
- SAVE! St ar t i ng
$19.99/month (for 12
months.) FREE Pre-
mium Movie Chan-
nels. FREE Equip-
ment, Installation &
Act i vat i on. CALL,
COMPARE LOCAL
DEALS!
1-800-278-8081
Time to get your own
place? Check out the
Rental Section in to-
day!s Classifieds...
Classifieds
SERVICE DIRECTORY
Air Conditioning
HEATING AND
AIR CONDITIONING
Installation,
Maintenance and
24 Hour Service
501-425-3796
Residential &
Commerical
Attorneys
David Heasley
attorney at law
Divorce &
Family Law
Free phone consultation
Payment Plan
681-4452
622 Alcoa Road,
in Benton
Backhoe & Dozer
315-2343
Peas
Gravel
Fill
SB-2
Topsoil
Sandy Loam
Sands
Donnafill
Pick-Up
or
Delivery
Build & Remodel
Build & Remodel
Þ4kIfh
00Yf7k007I0Y
BUILDING AND
REMODELING
*31 yrs experience
Small or Large
Jobs Done to
Your Satisfaction
tFree Estimates
tReasonable
Prices
Licensed
501-231-9230
501-316-2994
Carpentry
EXPERIENCED
CARPENTER
- Out of Work -
Home Maintenance
& Remodeling
of All Kinds
Vinyl Siding Installation
Call TIM
778-5171
OVER 30 YEARS
EXPERIENCE
- Free Estimates -
No job too LARGE
or small
Satisfaction Guaranteed!
DAVID BURTON, SR.
794-2563
Cleaning Services
Double A’s
Cleaning
• Competitive &
Affordable Pricing
• Satisfaction
Guarantied
• Detail Oriented
• I Provide Supplies
Call For Free Estimate
Alexis
501-794-7236
lexi92981@hotmail.com
Residential &
Commercial Cleaning
References
Available
Call
Laurie
501-380-5748
Computer Services
A-1 COMPUTER
REPAIR
A+
Certified
Repair
Technician
•Desktop /Laptop
Repairs & Cleanup
•Virus-Spyware Removal-
Starting at $80.
1200 Ferguson Dr.
Ste. 5 • Benton
501-776-7577
Drywall Repair
DRYWALL
REPAIR
SERVICE
• Cracks & Holes
• Discolored Ceilings
• Water Stains
• Small Remodels
Valid References
40 Yrs. Experience
� � � � � �
Steve Burrow - Owner
337–4525
Handgun Classes
Arkansas
Concealed
Permit Class
George Brooks, Instructor
License No. 12-763
501.413.2393
email:
georgebrookstheshooter@gmail.com
website:
www.georgebrookstheshooter.com
3470 Quapaw Rd., Benton
Advanced Shooting instruction available
George Brooks Instructo
CONCEALED
HANDGUN
CLASSES
Course completed
in one day.
All
paperwork
provided.
Tim Bragg, Instructor
#95-055
501-776-7419
Let the
Courier Classifieds
work for you.
Call Cathy or Kim
to place your
Classified Ad.
Mon.-Fri. 8am-5pm
315-8228
or come by
321 N. Market St.
Want to Downsize
Your Gas Guzzler?
Sell it in the Courier
Classifieds. Call to
place your ad today!
315-8228
Handyman
Will be
Handyman
Tree trimming
�������
Bush & garden
trim & clean up
Brick
Junk hauling
Decks
Flower Bed
clean out
Block
Stump Grinding
Leaf Blowing
Painting
Any Yard Work!
FREE
ESTIMATES!
Owner
Deanna Massey
One Call Does It
All Lawncare!
501-326-2839
and ask for
Damon Massey
Horses
Clinic’s Certified
HOLTZMAN
Riding Academy, LLC
BIRTHDAY PARTIES
10 & UNDER
SUMMER HORSE CAMP
316-1141
House Leveling
HOUSE
Leveling/Foundation
REPAIR
Concrete Foundations
or Pier & Beam
• Shaky floors
• Rotten wood
• Cracked brick
• French drains, etc.
~ Free Estimates ~
501-304-2040
SEEK AND YOU
SHALL FIND
Great deals in the
Courier Classifieds.
Yard Sales, Jobs,
Homes for Sale or
Rent. Check them out
daily. Call to sub-
scribe at 315-8228.
Looking for love in all
the wrong places????
Check out the Freebie
section in today�s
classifieds. You will
fi nd uncondi ti onal
love there FREE!
Furry & Free!!
Insulation
Southern
Southern
INSULATION &
GUTTERS, Inc.
INSULATION &
GUTTERS, Inc.
INSULATION &
GUTTERS, Inc.
INSULATION &
GUTTERS, Inc.
Family Owned & Operated
for 33 Years
ª Residential & Commercial
ª Seamless ßutters
ª Leal Frool System
ª Fiberqlass, Batts & Blown
ª Stabili/ed Cellulose
ª ínsulation Removal
FREE ESTIMATES
Licensed - ínsured - Bonded
FINANCING AVAILABLE
315-2306
Toll Free. 888·278·7GOG
Landscaping
Lawn Care
Richard
May’s
Lawn Care
10 years Local
Experience
Average yard:
Cut & Weed
Eat $25-$30
317-8966
316-6655
Flawless
Lawns
Flawless
Lawns
`,·¡ ´`·u,
Leaves, Beds & Mulch
Mowing, Trimming, Edging
Odd Jobs and Light Hauling
Ryan Harmon 860-8789
MaRK 8:36
Classifieds Work!
Painting
SUPERIOR
PAINTING
3al|slacl|or 0uararleed
· 0ryWa|| F|r|s|
& Repa|r
· lrler|or & Exler|or
· Texlure
· Pressure was||rç
FREE E8T|HATE8
|N8URE0
Ke||y h||| - 0wner
501-31ô-3328
501-840-1470
Bull Painting Co.
“Where Quality
Meets Afordability”
Darrel Bull, Owner
Quality Work GUARANTEED
Interior/Exterior
Painting
Cabinet Painting
& Refnishing
Wallpaper & Popcorn
Removal
Deck & Fence Restoration
Wood Repair
Pressure Washing
2nd Generation Painter
.
Insured
.
References Available
.
Free Estimates
AR Lic #307430813
501.860.2442
SCHAY PAINTING CO
Interior/Exterior
20 Years Experience
References Provided
Steve Schay
501-425-4492
Pet Care
Absolute
All breed mobile
dog grooming
501.732.6850
Kim McWhirter
kimmcwhirter
@ymail.com
Pressure Washing
Royal
Flush
Servicing
Central Arkansas
since 1988
316-1536
��������������������
spccic|izing in
���������������
��������������������
���������������������
Pressure Washing
����
Pressure Wosh & More
Deck Pepoir
Fences
0uffer CIeoning
Lown Service
ond More
������������
Roofing
ROOFING
Wagner
Residential
Commercial
&
VOTED
“Best of the Best”
2009
Free Estimates
847-6630
K & L
ROOFING
• Don’t Wait For
Roofing Repair
• All Insurance
Claims Welcome
• 40 years exp.
• Financing Avail.
w/approved credit
Upgrade to a metal roof with
a class 4 fire rating & you
may qualify for a discount on
your homeowners insurance
501-249-7735
501-778-7600
210 W. SEVIER
ST. • BENTON
Action
Roofing Co
ROOFING AND
REPAIR!
Free Estimates
No job too large
or too small.
30 yrs. experience
501-225-4444
ARKANSAS SERVICE CO.
Roofing & Waterproofing
YRS %XPERIENCEsFREE Estimates
501.425.2995
Toll Free 877.942.1977
Senior & Veteran Discounts
Buy • Sell • Trade
in the Classifieds
Tree Service
M00ߣ
ñFF0ßßñ8l£
Tߣ£ 5£ß¥l8£
501-778-8071
501-860-5911
28-Years
Experience
Insured &
Licensed
*Stump Grinding
*Take Downs
*Trimming
*Pruning
*Storm Cleanup
Parsons & Son
Tree Service LLC
“The Total Package”
Call us about
Tree Health Care
º 1rinning
º 1ake Lowns
º Pruning
º Renovals
º Stunp Renoval
º lirewood
º Oreen vaste lauling
Conplete
lnsuranoe Coverage
Owned 8 Operated
by an
lSA Lioensed Arborist
SO·L"PGA
840-1436
602-2959
CRITES
& TACKETT
TREE SERVICE
~ Free Estimates ~
Workman's Comp
& Liability Insured
•Stump Removal
501-337–1565
501-337-9094
Need to publish a
Legal Notice in
Saline County? We
can help...accurate
and published
7 days a week...
501-315-8228
Tree Service
501.317.6788
ROCKIN B
TREE SERVICE
B
TRIMMING
PRUNING
STUMP GRINDING
REMOVALS
large & small
FREE ESTIMATES
Insured for
Your Protection
Excellent Clean up
Senior and
Military Discounts
available
Ready to take the
Real Estate Plunge?
Check out the Homes
for Sale in the Classi-
fieds daily.
Time to get your own
place? Check out the
Rental Section in to-
day�s Classifieds...
Using the Courier
Classifieds is just a
smart thing to do!
Subscribe Today!!!
Looking for a good
deal? Search the
Courier Classifieds!!
Time to get your own
place? Check out the
Rental Section in to-
day�s Classifieds...
It’s an advertising
BREAKTHROUGH!!!
get the most for your advertising dollar!
Place your 2x2 or 2x4 classifed or display ad in The Saline Courier
and let us upgrade your ad to publish in up to 113 other
Arkansas newspapers through our APA affliate package.
Statewide, regionally, nationwide and/or the internet,
with just
ONE CALL, ONE ORDER, ONE BILL!
Call Today – 315-8228
Miscellaneous
For Sale
ELECTRIC
WHEELCHAIR
Lightweight. Portable
Like new. Low $ or
perhaps FREE to
elderly. 888-442-3390
Musical
Merchandise
Cushing
Piano Service
Tune • Repair
Player Pianos & Pump Organs
778-6584
Pets & Supplies
BENTON ANIMAL
Control & Adoption
501-776-5972
benton.petfinder.com
BRYANT ANIMAL
Control & Adoption
www.bryant.petfinder.com
www.1-800-save-a-pet.com
www.1888pets911.org
Produce
Produce 840-4076
Home Grown Tomatoes,
Purple hull Peas shelled &
unshelled, AR Peaches,
Squash, & Okra
Heavy Equip-
SURPLUS EQUIP-
MENT. Online auc-
tions HUGE selection.
BIG savi ngs. NO
Buyer fees Low Seller
f ees BARGAI NS!
Register FREE Use
Promo Code cnhi313.
LIVE support.
www.SurplusOnThe.NET
334-215-3019
Autos For Sale
80 CJ7 Jeep Hard
Top Doors & Bikini
Top $3500 OBO Call
501-454-0551
Trucks / Vans
For Sale
1994 CHEVY 3500
Dually 6.5 Diesel
Good Cond. $5000
Call 501-733-7638
Autos Wanted
DONATE A CAR
Humane Society of
the United States
FREE Next-DAY
TOWING! Running or
Not. Tax Deductible.
Call Before Tax Year
Ends!
1-800-418-1562
I Buy Junk Cars
free pick-up &
Haul all types
of scrap metal
Call Jerry Toland
332-7202 • 840-6756
Motorcycles
2007
HONDA
VTX 1300C
Cruiser
Like new!
Only 10K miles,
Removable
Windshield,
Sissy Bar w/rack
$4,600
Pics Available
Call
501-993-6284
Looking for a good
deal? Search the
Courier Classifieds!!
Recreational
Vehicles
RIVERSIDE BOAT
and RV storage, cov-
ered and uncovered
parking, gated 24
hour access, security
lights, 4167 Mulberry
Rd. 501-860-5737
Houses For Sale
HOUSE FOR Sale By
Owner 3BR 2BA 3003
Wi l d Berry Dri ve
Benton Priced To Sell
Great Fi rst Ti me
Buyer Home Cal l
479-886-0276
NEWER home for
lease or lease option.
4 BR, 2 BA, open
floor plan. $1,200 mo.
Cal l t o s ee.
501-804-4400
Mobile Homes
For Sale
$$$ 0 DOWN $$$
with your Land!
Call 501-653-3201
14X50 3BR 2BA
$3500 Down Owner
Financed No Credit
Needed $600mo Lot
Rent Included Newly
Remodeled Must Stay
in Sherwood Park
Call 501-541-6855
FORECLOSED
DOUBLEWIDE on
Private Lot. Great
Schools, Great
Location, must sell!
501-653-3201
MUST SELL 3/2 MO-
BILE HOME - MOVE, AC
& APPLI ANCES I N-
CLUDED CALL NOW:
501-407-9500
NEW 4 BR 2 BA
Home $39K includes
delivery to your prop-
erty. Call for Quick
Approval 653-3202
Classifieds Work!
Mobile Homes
For Sale
RENT TO OWN
REMODEL/RECONDTION
CLEAN/GOOD SHAPE
‘00 16x80 3BR $570-6yrs
‘97 16x80 3BR $570-6yrs
‘95 16x72 2BR $550-6yrs
‘99 16x80 3BR $550-6yrs
Includes lot Rent & Ins
Lake • Fish • Walk Trail
Sunset Lake • 951-2842
Buy • Sell • Trade
in the Classifieds
Lots & Acreage
33.5 WOODED Acres
5 minutes North of
Lake Degray on Hwy
347 Pl ease cal l
501-580-0358 for de-
tails Priced for Quick
Sale
Ready to take the
Real Estate Plunge?
Check out the Homes
for Sale in the Classi-
fieds daily.
Business Property
For Sale
Turn Key ready restaurant
business in Downtown
Benton includes like new
equipment motivated seller
leaveittoliz@aol.com,
Using the Courier
Classifieds is just a
smart thing to do!
Subscribe Today!!!
Real Estate
CANCEL YOUR
TI MESHARE. NO
Risk Program STOP
Mortgage & Mainte-
nance Payments To-
day. 100% Money
Back Guarant ee.
FREE Consultation.
Call Us NOW. We
C a n H e l p
1-888-356-5248
Buy • Sell • Trade
in the Classifieds
Professional
Services
STOP MORTGAGE &
Mai ntenance Pay-
ments TODAY! CAN-
CEL YOUR TIME-
SHARE. NO Risk
Pr ogr am 100%
Money Back Guaran-
tee. FREE Consulta-
tion. Call Us NOW.
We Can Hel p!
1-800-282-3206
Page 10 – The Saline Courier
class@bentoncourier.com Thursday, August 1, 2013
Check out the
Garage Sales
this week!
Moderately Confused Herman
Crossword Challenge
Kit ‘n’ Carlyle
Celebrity Cipher
Here’s How It Works:
Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken
down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the
numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and
box. Each number can appear only once in each row,
column and box. You can figure out the order in which
the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues
already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you
name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!
Astro•graph
bernice bede osol
www.bernice4u.com.
Alley Oop
Big Nate
Born Loser
Thatababy
Frank and Ernest
Grizzwells
Monty
Arlo and Janis
Soup to Nutz
THURSDAY, AUGUST 1, 2013
A great emphasis will be placed
on your leadership qualities in the
year ahead. Whereas in the past
you didn’t mind taking orders,
you’ll now want to be the person
who issues all the directives. Make
sure you’re ready for the job.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) --
Financial conditions could be
rather testy, so it behooves you to
manage your resources as wisely
as you can. Avoid all excessive
spending and don’t borrow or
lend out any money.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
-- If you fail to establish some
realistic objectives for yourself,
you could burn out striving for
an unattainable goal. Be practical,
and you’ll do fine.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
-- Don’t do anything that could
cause you problems today. You’re
in a cycle where you need to pay
strict attention to your inner judg-
ment. If you stray, you’ll regret it.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) --
A domineering companion might
attempt to involve you in some-
thing that you want no part of.
You’ll need to muster the neces-
sary resolve to stay out of trouble.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) -- To underestimate your
competition would be a grievous
error. You’ll have to bring your
“A” game and go at it with every-
thing you’ve got.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) -- Review your tasks and/or
assignments first thing, especially
those that are distasteful to you. If
your heart isn’t in your work, you
could make things worse.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) -- Hard feelings will result if
you expect too much from a joint
endeavor. Of course, the same
might be true if your partner
expects too much from you as
well. All efforts must be equal.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20)
-- Before you start finding fault
with your mate, keep in mind not
to blow things out of proportion.
Once you open Pandora’s box,
you might not be able to close it
again.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
-- Because you have acute criti-
cal faculties, it is sometimes easy
for you to spot flaws in others.
However, should you see a distur-
bance in someone today, you’d be
wise to keep it to yourself.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
-- Your extravagant urges could
demand your attention, making it
possible for you to do something
financially foolish. Before spend-
ing money outlandishly, remem-
ber how hard you worked for it.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) --
The consequences of your behav-
ior could deleteriously affect your
colleagues. Make doubly certain
that your motives are constructive
and noble.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
-- Under most conditions, you’re
not prone to holding grudges, yet
today some old complaints might
rear their heads. Try to forgive and
forget, and you’ll be a lot happier.
Thursday, August 1, 2013
news@bentoncourier.com The Saline Courier – Page 11
ComiCs
12 The Saline Courier
Thursday, August 1, 2013
BUICK • GMC
Family Owned CUSTOMER FRIENDLY
501.315.7100 • www.everettbpg.com Interstate 30 at Alcoa Exit
21099 I-30 Bryant, AR 72202
proud
member of
more than 11 years overall.
Bedsole has been a
school resource officer for
five years and has been an
officer for more than eight
years overall.
All three officers have
attended numerous train-
ing courses through the
Criminal Justice Institute,
Arkansas Safe School
Association, and other certi-
fied school based training
classes.
The overall mission is
not only help to protect
students from dangers from
the outside, but also to
educate and empower them
to make good choices by
teaching classes on such
things as Stranger Danger,
Prescription Drug Abuse
Prevention, and Bicycle
Safety.
The new school resource
officer vehicle is a Ford
Mustang that was paid
for courtesy of local drug
dealers and was acquired
through Everett GMC.
The wrap design on the
car was done in conjunc-
tion with Big Impressions
in Bryant and local officers,
and it will be the look of
future school resource
vehicles.
Big Impressions did the
final wrap on the car and
Fleet Safety in North Little
Rock outfitted it with the
emergency equipment.
The officers’ uniforms
incorporate the Benton
School District Panther logo
to help them develop a good
rapport with students. The
uniforms are unique to only
school resource officers and
were designed by them.
They were made by Artistic
Threads.
not likely the sheriff will
be removed from office
because of this incident,
which resulted in two mis-
demeanor charges.
Under Arkansas law
— specifically Article 5,
Section 9 of the Arkansas
Constitution — an elected
official could be removed
from office if he or she has
been “convicted of embez-
zlement of public money,
bribery, forgery or other
infamous crime.”
The term “infamous
crime” has been a critical
point of contention in previ-
ous cases, because it is not
defined in the Arkansas
Constitution and a bill that
would clarify the term in
the Constitution died in
committee this legislative
session.
The Arkansas Supreme
Court, however, consis-
tently has ruled that an
infamous crime is one that
involves “deceit or dishon-
esty” and is “indicative of
great moral turpitude.”
Although the U.S.
Constitution’s definition of
infamous crime does not
directly apply to the sher-
iff’s situation, it equates the
term with a felony.
According to the
Arkansas Sheriffs
Association, the removal of
a sheriff from office “rarely
happens” and usually
involves the sheriff being
convicted of a felony.
Earlier this year, how-
ever, the Arkansas Supreme
Court ruled that Searcy
County Sheriff Kenny
Cassell was ineligible for
office because of a misde-
meanor he committed in
1979.
The crime in that
instance, however, was theft
by receiving.
The court ruled this was
an instance of dishonesty.
The prosecuting attor-
ney in the Cassell case,
Cody Hiland of Conway, is
also the special prosecut-
ing attorney appointed to
Pennington’s case.
Pennington is scheduled
for an Aug. 5 plea and
arraignment proceeding in
Benton District Court.
In addition to an
online petition to remove
Pennington from office, a
Facebook group called “Fire
Sheriff Bruce Pennington”
has been started and, as of
press time, had 141 mem-
bers.
Linda Ives and John
Cooper are listed as admin-
istrators for the page.
In addition, Ives publicly
urged the Saline County
Quorum Court earlier this
month to take a no-confi-
dence vote for the sheriff.
If a motion of no confidence
were to be approved by the
Quorum Court, the sheriff
would still hold the office,
but would not be able to
perform his duties.
The no-confidence
motion is not on the
Quorum Court agenda at
this time.
Pennington has served as
sheriff since January 2009.
He was re-elected to the
position in November of last
year, garnering 76 percent
of the vote.
In 2010, he was named
Sheriff of the Year by the
state Fraternal Order of
Police.
Pennington
From page 1
The online petition is
located at the website
Change.org.
The petition, titled
“Remove Bruce Pennington
from Sheriff of Saline
County,” has garnered 347
signatures in three weeks.
According to the numbers
listed on the site, an addi-
tional 1,653 are needed.
According to the site’s
privacy policy, names and
information of signers will
not be released without per-
mission.
The actual petition listing
all the signers cannot be
viewed by the public or any-
one accessing the site, but
those who leave comments
along with their signing are
listed.
The following list of
names from most current
signers to first are:
•Sharon Dozier, Jana
Workman, John Matthews,
Robert Wirzfeld, Michael
Fields, Cara Smith, Charlie
Johnsom, Jon Lawrence,
Joanie Ward, DeWayne
Reed, Tina Lopez, Melissa
Mitcham, Mike Howard,
Janet Statler Horvath, Lilian
Wadley, Evelyn Cornelius,
Kenneth Halpaine, Anita
Burkett, Selena Henson,
Lindsay Glenn, Alvin Byrd,
Adam Glenn, Davin Webb,
Amy Ernst, Audrey Dunn,
Kacie Minton, Eric Hairston,
Dennis Tackett, Shelia
Emmert, Andrea Daniel,
Clayton Hutchins,
•Robbie Burchfield,
Steven Cook, Michael
Williams, Mary Henderson,
Ivy Williams, Tina Bowwers,
George Stanley, Michael
Henry, Elizabeth Wharton,
Pamela Primm, Karla
Roberts, Erin Hughes,
Chad Johnson, Andrea
Rockefeller, Krystal
Koch, Emily Tate, Crystal
McKinney, Richard Mackey,
David Chastain, Trudy
Ray, Dawn Phillips, Penny
Boyer, Debbie Smith, Kim
Loftis, Tina Woodard, Jenna
Merritt, Ernest Harris,
Ramona McKinney, Kathy
Chism, Elzie Lester,
•Charles Ray Skinner,
Misty Ramsey, Phyllis
Rickard, C. Alexander
White, Cheryl Brooks, Leslie
Richards, James Seyfert,
Nancy Smith, William Terry,
Ernest Harris (listed twice),
Jason Pilkington, Marquina
Sanchez Rainwater, Heather
Wright, Debbie Tackett,
James Ward, Teresa
Cummings, Eddie Landreth,
Jackie Campbell, Pollyanna
Wherry, Christie Sonk,
Lamar Pickens, David
Brierley, Branda Blakley
(listed twice), Keely Culver,
Angela Williams, Rob Qualls
(listed twice), Rocklin
Rachaner, Jackie Nance,
Connie Padgett, Eileen
White, Patricia Cox, Donna
Jones.
The place of residence
for those who posted com-
ments range from Saline
County cities to the United
Kingdom.
A petition may be started
by any individual or organi-
zation to support a specific
cause.
Signing a petition requires
signers to submit their
names, email addresses,
street addresses, cit-
ies, states and zip codes.
Comments are optional.
According to the website,
Change.org “is the world’s
largest petition platform,
empowering people every-
where to create the change
they want to see.”
There are more than
40 million Change.org users
in 196 countries, and “every
day people use our tools to
transform their communi-
ties.”
A petition is deemed to be
a “victory” when the purpose
for the petition has brought
about the desired change.
Recent petitions des-
ignated victorious are an
effort to keep a bridge open
for pedestrians, a procla-
mation to designate July
7 as National Rox Day in
Bloomington, Ind., and an
effort to built a fence around
a park playground.
The site also lists a peti-
tion created by the parents
of Trayvon Martin as critical
in pressuring the Florida
state attorney to bring sec-
ond-degree murder charges
against George Zimmerman.
Petition
From page 1
include:
•Makayla Johnson, spe-
cial education teacher at
Angie Grant Elementary
School.
•Dale Morgan, elemen-
tary physical education
teacher/assistant junior
high boys basketball coach/
assistant junior high boys
track coach for the district.
•Seth Glidewell, social
studies/science teacher/
assistant junior high football
coach/assistant junior high
basketball coach at Benton
Junior High School. This is
a one-year interim position.
In addition to the certified
personnel hired, classified
personnel hired included:
•Angela Ross, guidance
counselor secretary at the
high school.
•Chance Buster, IT tech-
nician for the district.
•Josh P. Doddridge,
custodian at Angie Grant
Elementary School.
•Dana J. Himes, custo-
dian at the high school.
•Sherry Spurgeon, kitch-
en helper at the junior high
school.
•Jessica Wayne, sec-
retary to the district’s
assistant superintendents,
Mary Morgan and Karla
Neathery.
Additional personnel mat-
ters approved by the board
included two transfers.
These involve Dwaine
Fishburn, a junior high
social studies teacher
and assistant high school
boys basketball/head high
school girls track coach,
who will be transferred to
the high school to serve as
a one-year interim physical
education/health teacher
and head high school
boys basketball/head high
school girls track coach.
The other transfer affects
David Torres, a junior high
science teacher and head
junior high boys basket-
ball/assistant junior high
boys track coach, who will
be transferred to different
coaching duties only. He
will serve in a one-year
interim position as assistant
high school boys basket-
ball/head high school golf
coach.
The board also approved
resignations from two certi-
fied employees and four
classified employees.
Bill Waskom, director
of gifted and talented pro-
grams and special projects
for the district, is resigning;
and Donna Ziller, elemen-
tary literacy instruction
facilitator for the district,
also is resigning.
Classified employees who
are resigning are:
•Catherine Simmons, a
private duty nurse for the
district.
•Brenda Barnett, a spe-
cial education paraprofes-
sional for the high school.
•Mary Hurst, a cus-
todian at Howard Perrin
Elementary school.
•Carl Thomas Young, a
custodian at Benton High
School.
School Board
From page 1
This document is © 2013 by editor - all rights reserved.
AttachmentSize
E-Edition, August 1, 2013.pdf9.76 MB
View more articles in:
David Price is the biggest name being thrown around leading up to the 2014 Major League Baseball...
NORTH LITTLE ROCK – Technically, the Bryant Everett Black Sox didn’t go undefeated in the Junior...
BAUXITE — With the 2014 high school football season quickly approaching, the Bauxite Miners now...

 

Premium Drupal Themes by Adaptivethemes