Skip to main content

E-Edition, August 16, 2013

August 16, 2013

To view the E-Edition of the newspaper, please login. If you have not subscribed to the E-Edition, you can do so by subscribing here.

The rates for the E-Edition are:

1 day 99¢
3 months $18 for 90 days
6 months $36 for 180 days
12 months $72 for 360 days

Embedded Scribd iPaper - Requires Javascript and Flash Player

Courier
Volume 136
Number 228
1 Section 10 Pages
50¢
Home of Kay Shaw
and John Green
The Saline
www. bent oncouri er. com
Friday, August 16, 2013
Join us on Facebook and Twitter
A tradition of
Excellence
A Reputation
for Results
ANGIE JOHNSON Executive Broker
GRI, GRLA,SRES
501-529-1584
KAREN CROWSON Principal Broker
ABR, CRS, GRI
501-860-3000
Saline County’S newS SourCe SinCe 1876
MACK AND THE CORN STALK
BRENT DAVIS/The Saline Courier
Mack Johnson of Benton stands in his garden, dwarfed by the 12-foot corn stalks he has grown. Johnson attri-
butes the growth to the rainy weather and mild temperatures the county has experienced. He planted the white
corn seed in his garden and the rest was done by nature. Johnson is retired and spends the day in his garden
and helping a friend with horses. He is a Master Gardener.
Vet home
task force to
tour possible
building site
A legislative task force designated to choose
a location for a new veterans home next week
will tour the state property near the Arkansas
Health Center in Haskell as one of four pos-
sible sites.
Mike McCune, commander of Veterans of
Foreign Wars Post 2256, said the post “strong-
ly supports” the prospect of building the home
in Saline County.
McCune said the home would bring a “great
economic boost for our county and will allow
post members to interact with veterans that
will reside in the facility.”
The new home became necessary after the
Little Rock facility was deemed uninhabitable
by the government in 2012.
McCune said that when the facility was in
Little Rock, his post members made regular
visits to the veterans who resided in the home,
bringing them personal necessities and also
Christmas gifts.
If the facility is built in Haskell, he looks for-
ward to continuing that practice, McCune said.
Right now, the closest veterans home is too
far away to drive to, he said.
The three other sites being looked at
as potential locations are in Fort Smith,
Jacksonville and Russellville. However, the
force has not ruled out choosing a location that
is not one of the four, said Kelly Ferguson,
public affairs officer for the Department of
Veterans Affairs.
According to Sen. Jane English, chair of the
force, this decision on where to build the facil-
ity might be a first in Arkansas state govern-
ment because it is an “open process.”
The decision of where to build the home will
be made, in part, by the veterans themselves.
In addition to three members of the
Arkansas Senate and the Arkansas House of
Representatives, the task force is comprised
of the director of the Department of Veterans
Affairs, the chair of the Arkansas Veterans
Commission and representatives from The
American Legion, Department of Arkansas;
The Disabled American Veterans, Department
of Arkansas; the Arkansas Council of Chapters
of the Military Officers Association of
America; the Arkansas Veterans Coalition; the
Department of Arkansas Veterans of Foreign
Wars, and the director of the Central Arkansas
Veterans Healthcare System.
Terry Callahan of Saline County, former
commander of VFW Post 2256 and a former
By Jennifer Joyner
jjoyner@bentoncourier.com
VET HOME, page 6
Doctor: Kali will survive
Child stands with help, plays catch
The word “survive” has new
meaning for a Benton family.
Physicians at
Arkansas Children’s
Hospital are now using
that word when they
speak of Kali Hardig,
who has been hospital-
ized since July 19 after
contracting amoebic
parasitic meningitis.
In a statement released by one
of the physicians treating Kali, Dr.
Vikki Stefans attributed Kali’s prog-
ress “to her wonderful family and
support system. There is no longer
a question of whether she’ll survive
and do well, but just how well.”
Kali, 12, is believed to be one of
only three people in the world to
survive the infection.
Her family and physicians are
reporting nothing but good news
about her situation. The Benton
girl is the daughter of Joseph and
Traci Hardig, who have been at her
side supporting her throughout her
ordeal.
Traci Hardig has given optimis-
tic reports from the beginning,
expressing gratitude for each sign
of progress her daughter has made.
“We continue to be amazed by
Kali’s progress,” her family said.
“Today she’s able to sit up on her
own, write some words on a white
board and stand with assistance for
very brief stretches. She’s even able
to throw and catch a ball with her
therapists.
“We are grateful for the contin-
ued prayers from Kali’s supporters,
which no doubt drive her recovery,”
she said.
Traci Hardig said she and other
family members “get excited with
every little thing she does.”
“We’re just staying up here with
her and helping her,” she said.
Kali still isn’t speaking, but can
write her name and earlier this
week wrote her dad a note that
said: “Kali Hardig loves Daddy.”
“It’s going to take a while for her
to learn to talk again,” Traci Hardig
said. “She’s getting therapy and
can make sounds, but she was on a
ventilator for days and her muscles
weren’t used at all during that time.
“She’s having to retrain them,”
she said. “It’s a matter of keeping
on doing the therapy.”
Traci Hardig repeatedly has
asked that people pray for her
daughter and has expressed grati-
tude for the outpouring of support
the family has received.
By Lynda Hollenbeck
lyndahol@yahoo.com
Kali
MISSED PAPERS
CALL
(501) 317-6013
DURING THESE HOURS
5-7 p.m. Monday-Friday
7-9 a.m. Saturday-Sunday
CONTACT US
Phone: (501) 315-8228
Fax: (501) 315-1920
Email: news@bentoncourier.com
Write: P.O. Box 207,
Benton, AR 72018
INDEX
OBITUARIES .............................. 3
OPINIONS .................................. 4
SPORTS ..................................... 5
CLASSIFIEDS ......................... 7,8
COMICS......................................9
SALINE COUNTY
WEATHER FORECAST
FRIDAY NIGHT: Lows in the
lower 60s.
SATURDAY: Sunny with highs
in the lower 80s.
SATURDAY NIGHT: Lows in the
lower 60s.
SUNDAY: Sunny with highs in
the upper 80s.
SUNDAY NIGHT: Lows in the
lower 60s.
MONDAY: Sunny with highs in
the lower 90s.
MONDAY NIGHT: Lows in the
lower 60s.
TUESDAY: Sunny with highs in
the lower 90s.
TUESDAY NIGHT: Lows in the
upper 60s.
WEDNESDAY: Sunny with highs
in the lower 90s.
SCRAPBOOK
Reynolds Layoffs 1982
PAGE 2
WORKING HARD
Hogs focusing on takeaways
PAGE 5
Justin Moore to headline
Boys & Girls Club function
Justin Moore will per-
form Oct. 8 for this year’s
Boys & Girls Club of
Saline County fundraising
dinner and silent auction.
The new Benton event
center will be the setting
for the function, which is
set for 6 to 9 p.m.
According to the city of
Benton, event center con-
struction will be completed
by then.
Moore has charted eight
times on the Hot Country
Songs charts, including
the No. 1 hits “Small Town
USA,” “If Heaven Wasn’t
So Far Away” and “Til My
Last Day” and the top-10
hit “Backwoods.”
He has won awards at
the Inspirational Country
and American Country
awards and will release a
new album Sept. 17.
Tickets are going fast,
said Emmy Rogers, direc-
tor of development at
the Boys & Girls Club. A
month and a half before
By Jennifer Joyner
jjoyner@bentoncourier.com
Justin Moore
EVENT, page 6
KALI, page 6
After an absolutely won-
derful vacation to Lewes
Beach, Rehoboth Beach
and Dover, Del., where my
daughter and her family are
stationed at Dover Air Force
Base, I have settled back
into the busy business of
the Bryant Senior Activity
Center.
Just before I left, we gave
a bittersweet send-off to
Flora Wright. Flora came
to us from Tucson, Ariz.
She spent a couple of years
visiting her daughter here in
Bryant.
She came to find our cen-
ter and became our family
and friend. Bright and early
every day, Flora was at the
center to make coffee, roll
silverware and help in the
kitchen. On Saturday night,
she also was here faithfully
to help with our dance.
She will be missed and
one day, hopefully, she’ll
come back to stay for good.
She’ll just have to decide if
she wants dry heat or wet
heat.
The Bryant Senior
Activity Center is in need
of bunko players. We have
been playing bunko for sev-
eral years. It is held on the
second and fourth Tuesday
of each month. If you’re
interested in joining us, the
game starts at 9:30 a.m. and
ends around 11 a.m. Feel
free to walk in or call the
center, and we’ll give you all
the information you’ll need.
If you don’t know how to
play, we’ll teach you.
With any nonprofit orga-
nization, fundraisers are
a must. We have several
fundraisers that are always
going on, and one of those
is our re-sale store in the
center. This store is vital to
our success. The store also
helps older adults on fixed
income purchase clothing
and household items at
extremely reasonable prices.
It’s a win-win all the way
around. However, we need
your help. Next time you
have household items, cloth-
ing, furniture or whatever,
consider dropping them
off at the senior center in
Bryant at Bishop Park.
Your donations are greatly
appreciated and are tax-
deductible.
The next fundraiser that
continues throughout the
year is our Saturday night
dance. The dance gives any-
one of any age the opportu-
nity to get out and enjoy an
evening of dancing and good
live music.
The schedule for perform-
ers is:
• Aug. 17 Steel Kickin’
will perform.
• Aug. 24 Tyler’s Bluff
will perform.
• Aug. 31 Country
Showdown will perform.
The doors open at 5:30
p.m. The dances kicks off at
7 and ends at 9:30. The cost
is $5 per person. Coffee and
doughnuts are included.
I want to take a minute
to thank Martha Wrye, who
has been teaching our line
dance classes for nearly
three years. She is geared
up again this year to take
some of the line dance par-
ticipants to the fifth annual
“Dancing with the Seniors”
contest in Jacksonville on
Oct. 11.
The class is held on
Tuesdays at 2 p.m. There is
no charge for the class, and
it is open to anyone 60 and
older.
Lunch is served at 11:30
a.m. every day. Please join
us. The suggested donation
is $2.50 per person for those
60 and older. This includes
your meal, milk or tea. This
is a great alternative to a
pricey restaurant.
Just remember, once
you’re over the hill, you
begin to pick up speed!
Mary Vickers is director of
the Bryant Senior Activity
Center in Bishop Park at
6401 Boone Road. For more
information, call the center at
501-943-0056 ext. 3 or email
mvickers@cadc.com.
Friday, August 16, 2013
The Saline Courier 3
My
Answer
By Doug
Hawkins
FUNERAL HOME & INSURANCE
NARROWAY & MAIN, BENTON, AR 72015
778-2544 • 847-3371
www.ashbyfuneralhome.com
CELEBRATING
A LIFE WELL
LIVED
Prearranging your funeral pro-
vides you with the opportunity
to set the tone of the ceremony,
which you might prefer to be
more celebratory than maudlin.
In most cases, only you have
the power to lay out in specific
detail exactly how you want
your funeral to be conducted.
Prearrangement can make it
possible for your friends, family,
and acquaintances to focus on
the blessings of life instead of
its loss. If you have entertained
such thoughts, give careful con-
sideration to what music, imag-
es, and words you would choose
to celebrate your life. Decide
for yourself how you will be
remembered. Then, meet with
the funeral director, who can set
your plans in action and relieve
your family of that burden.
Preneed is becoming more the
norm when planning how an
individual is commemorated
upon their passing. Planning
ahead alleviates loved ones from
having to make such difficult
decisions while they are griev-
ing. It also allows the individual
to tailor the proceedings to their
taste and budget.
Reach ASHBY FUNERAL
HOME today at 679-4669. We
will arrange an initial, confi-
dential meeting and present you
with a wide variety of preneed
options. We are conveniently
located at 108 West Narroway.
We have been family-owned
and operated for four gen-
erations. We look forward to
assisting you. ”Because We
Care”
“Life is what you celebrate. All
of it. Even its end.”
Joanne Harris
OBITUARIES
Delmer L. Lott
Delmer L. Lott, 81, of Benton passed away Monday, Aug.
12, 2013, at McClellan V.A. Hospital in Little Rock. He was
born June 20, 1932, in Ink to the late Henry M. and Nancy
Brown Lott.
Mr. Lott retired as chief of navigational aides with the
FAA in Little Rock and was a member of the Northside
Church of Christ. He was a past commander of VFW Post
2256 in Benton and a U. S. Army veteran having served in
the Korean War.
In addition to his parents he was also preceded in death
by six brothers and three sisters.
He is survived by his wife of 60 years, M. Oleta Putman
Lott; one son, Dennis Lott and wife Dani of Little Rock; one
daughter, Cathy McLain and husband Billy of Bryant; grand-
children, Julie Dorsey and husband Andrew, Lori Guelker
and husband Jeff, Josh Oldham and Jon Oldham; and a
great-grandchild Randon Guelker.
A graveside service was held at 11 a.m. Thursday, Aug.
15, at Pinecrest Cemetery in Mena with Jim Gardner and
Billy McLain officiating.
Visitation took place from 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 14,
at Roller-Ballard Funeral Home (315-4047).
In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made
to Corin Read Christian Camp, 917 N. East St., Benton, AR
72015.
Online guestbook: www.rollerfuneralhomes.com/ballard
Elizabeth Maxine Hines Ragan
Elizabeth Maxine Hines Ragan, 88, of Benton passed away
Aug. 14, 2013, at Saline Memorial Hospital in Benton. She
was born Oct. 22, 1924, at the Mountain View Community in
Saline County.
Maxine worked for Dr. John D. Wright and was a retired
RN and an X-ray tech at the Alexander Human Development
Center and a member of Crossroad Missionary Baptist
Church. Maxine loved to camp, fish and was an avid quilter.
The family would like to extend a special thank you to all the
staff of Pine Court at the Arkansas Health Center.
She was preceded in death by her parents, Junie and Pearl
Moore Fowler; first husband, John David Hines; a son, Billy
Hines; an infant son, and second husband, Roy Ragan.
She is survived by two sons and daughters-in-law, Gerald
Lynn Hines and wife Veneta Johnny Max Hines and wife,
Linda, five grandchildren, Theresa Hines, Stephanie Hines
Dunn, Eric Hines, Amanda Baker, and Kylee Homan, four
great-grandchildren, Amelia Bratton, Chloe Hines, Paige
Dunn, and J. D. Dunn.
Funeral service is scheduled for 10 a.m. Saturday, Aug.
17, at Ashby Funeral Home with Brother Jimmy Scott and
Brother Roy Hines officiating. Burial will be at Pinecrest
Memorial Park.
Pallbearers are John Sledd, Jeremy Sledd, Josh Sledd,
Robert Dale Garner, Matthew Fowler, Devon Baker, Justin
Fowler and Eric Hines.
Visitation will be from 6 to 8 p.m. today, Aug. 16, at the
funeral home.
Online guest book: www.ashbyfuneralhome.com
Lula Mae Dunbar
Lula Mae Dunbar, 80, passed away on Aug. 7, 2013, with
her family by her side. She was born April 30, 1933, to the
late Lucien Bluford and Anner Lambert. She
received the Administrative Degree of the
Eastern Star in Detroit, Mich., in 1996. She also
was ordained by Bishop Carry of St. Peter’s
Rock Church in Detroit, Mich., in 1977.
She was preceded in death by two brothers,
Herman Bluford and Fred C. Lambert Sr.; and
two sisters, Glady Carter and Dorethea McAfee.
She is survived by her loving husband, Taylor
Dunbar Jr.; one daughter, Renee Dunbar; one sister, Clotel
McBride; five brothers, Harlan, Samuel, Charles, Harvest
and Joe Lambert; and many relatives and friends who will
miss her dearly.
Funeral service will be held at noon Saturday, Aug. 17, at
Centerpoint Church in Benton. Visitation will be held one
hour prior to the service.
Dial and Dudley Funeral Home is in charge of arrange-
ments.
Online guestbook:www.dialanddudleyfuneralhome.com
Frances (Frankie) Eloise Wilkins
Frances “Frankie” Eloise Wilkins, 86, of Traskwood
passed away Sunday, Aug. 11, 2013.
She was born Jan. 21, 1927, in Willow to the late William
and Lennie Fitzhugh Fleming.
Frances was a retired cosmetologist, wife and homemak-
er. She loved to garden, hunt and fish.
Frances was a member of the First Baptist Church of
Sparkman, where she taught Sunday School for many years.
She loved serving her Lord.
Frances was preceded in death by her parents; her hus-
band of 65 years, Thomas Troy Wilkins; her brothers, Ernest
Fleming, Elwood Fleming and Richard Fleming; her sisters,
Addie Robbins, Agee Pittman, Delia Davis, Hazel Kite, Kate
Kingrey, Lillie Scrimshire and Lois White Davis; and a
grandson, Cody Wilkins.
She is survived by her sons, Tim Wilkins and wife
Gail of Glen Allan, Miss., Tom Wilkins and wife Karen of
Russellville, Jon Wilkins and wife Carol of Sherwood; her
daughters, Donna Duck and husband Rick of Holland, Jacki
Garrett and husband Richard of Traskwood; her grandchil-
dren, Shelley Platt and Hunter Young of Benton,Christi
McPherson of Sheridan, Jim Alan Duck and Gayla Pickard,
both of Vilonia, Stephen Duck of Hattieville, Ark., Corey
Wilkins of Glen Allan, Miss., Brian Wilkins of Pontotoc,
Miss., Julie Scott and Matt Wilkins, both of Russellville; and
14 great-grandchildren.
A memorial services will be held at 3 p.m. Saturday, Aug.
17, at Ashby Funeral Home with Brother Wade Totty officiat-
ing.
Memorials may be made to Saline Memorial Hospice or to
a charity of the donor’s choice.
Online guest book: www.ashbyfuneralhome.com
Dunbar
Bryant center says goodbye to faithful volunteer
By Mary Vickers
Special to The Saline Courier
PAID OBITUARIES
In
Memoriam
A tribute to your lost loved one.
Whether their birthday, anniversary or just
a special day of remembrance.
Place an ad conveying your thoughts and
memories.
Call 315-8228 and let us
help you with your message.
The Saline Courier
ExxonMobil official:
Pipe could be retired
MAYFLOWER — A vice
president at ExxonMobil
Pipeline Co. says it’s pos-
sible a 65-year-old pipe that
leaked oil into a Mayflower
neighborhood could be
taken out of service.
Karen Tyrone, the compa-
ny’s vice president of opera-
tions, told the Arkansas
Democrat-Gazette in a story
published Thursday that it
is too early to know whether
the Pegasus pipeline will be
closed.
“It is within the realm of
possibilities and consider-
ations,” she said, adding that
a decision will be reached
following an investigation
that could take a year or
more.
“I recognize people want
answers, as do we, but we’re
not going to rush the inves-
tigation. And until that’s
done, we won’t know what
the right thing to do with the
pipeline is and exactly what’s
required to ensure the integ-
rity of that pipeline,” she
said.
The line carries heavy
Canadian crude from Illinois
to the Texas Gulf Coast. A
seam ripped in late March,
spilling 210,000 gallons in
Mayflower and threatening
nearby Lake Conway.
Tyrone said pipeline
inspections in 2010 found
“anomalies that we had to
address” but that no trouble
was found in the section of
pipe near Mayflower back
then or during other tests in
February.
The pipeline was made
with a type of steel that fed-
eral regulators have warned
for 25 years is prone to
splitting along long, welded
seams.
Later Wednesday, U.S.
Rep. Tim Griffin, R-Ark.,
released two reports from
the 2010 Exxon Mobil
inspection. One report said
seam weld defects were
distributed throughout the
pipeline.
The pipeline will not be
restarted until the company
and federal government
are sure it’s safe to do so,
Tyrone said.
Associated Press
Annual adoption event set
for Saturday at local business
Tractor Supply Company
in Benton is sponsoring its
annual Pet Adoption Event
on Saturday, Aug. 17.
Animals from area shel-
ters and rescue organiza-
tions will be at the business
and will be available to adopt
that day.
Prizes will be given away
and a photographer will be
on site to take pet photos.
Activities will get under
way at 10 a.m. and continue
until 2 p.m. April Hawley,
manger of Benton Animal
Control and Adoption
Center, said the event will
offer “great family fun.”
She encouraged commu-
nity residents to attend the
event.
Hawley said several ani-
mals from Benton Animal
Control will be among the
animals that can be adopted
at the event.
By Lynda Hollenbeck
lyndahol@yahoo.com
SAU not
crying over
ending milk
program
MAGNOLIA — Southern
Arkansas University is drop-
ping its dairy program, say-
ing it couldn’t find enough
students who wanted to milk
cows twice a day.
Director of Farm
Operations Rusty Hayes said
the milk and dairy program
had been in place for a
century, but the school will
concentrate on other areas
at its $8 million Agriculture
Center.
Associated Press
The Saline Courier encourages
readers to submit letters to the editor
expressing opinions on local, state,
national or international issues.
The Saline Courier prefers typewrit-
ten or emailed letters not more than
250 words in length.
Please provide name, daytime phone
and address for verification.
Letters are checked for libelous and/
or vulgar language and may be edited
for length or content.
Writers are limited to one letter per
calendar month.
We cannot accept form letters in
support of or against any candidate for
public office.
Email letters to news@bentoncou-
rier.com or bring them by the office
at 321 N. Market St. in Benton during
normal business hours.
news@bentoncourier.com
LETTER TO THE EDITOR POLICY
“Congress shall make no law ... abridging the freedom
of speech, or of the press ... .”
— From the First Amendment to Constitution
T
he weather this week has been great. Cooler
temperatures. Lower humidity. What’s not to
love about it. The extended forecast may not
indicate a temperature above 90 for several days, but
as we all know, Arkansas weather can change at any
moment.
When I was a kid growing up on Gibson Street,
changes in weather were opportunities for new activi-
ties.
A thunderstorm meant rain would fill the street
gutters. We built dirt dams to hold back the torrent.
Little green army men took their position on the hills
and fired gravel bullets at the plastic
boats steaming toward them. When the
creek behind our house spilled over its
banks, swimming, or what we called
swimming, was the hit of the day. We
did all this without parental supervision.
Snow presented the opportunity
for grenade launchers, snow forts and
igloos. However, the sparse depth of
accumulation determined whether we
made snowballs or decided to make ice
cream instead. Either way, it was all
good.
The heat of summer was always a
dirty time. But, being young boys with
imagination, we rode our bicycles as
fast as we could down the dirt trails at the end of the
street. The plume we stirred up behind us was the
contrails of a jet fighter chasing the enemy.
Change is good. It recharges our batteries. It stirs
our creativity.
We are experiencing change in our county. The
challenge will be in the effort to manage it effectively
and efficiently, keeping the future in mind, not the
present.
While change may have an immediate impact
on the present, lasting change is made with an eye
focused clearly on what will be when the rest of us
are long gone. The drive to make things better for
the generations that follow is ingrained in American
heritage, filtering down to every citizen of our nation.
We may disagree on how to get there, and that is
healthy. However, stagnation sets in when differing
parties hold an idea hostage based upon ideology and
plain old stubbornness. When this happens, short-
sightedness has raised its ugly head.
Strength of leadership and the art of compromise
can overcome any obstacle. This is the challenge
before the county. Stay tuned and pay attention.
*****
Speaking of change, we are pleased to announce
additions to the editorial department at The Saline
Courier. Sarah Derouen has joined the staff as a
reporter. She will cover crime, courts and the city of
Bryant. Dane Slatten has been hired as a part-time
page designer. Both are skilled at their craft and
fit perfectly with our established professionals on
the news staff. Lynda Hollenbeck, Jennifer Joyner,
Tony Lenahan and Josh Briggs work hard each
day to bring The Saline Courier to life. The level of
their commitment and dedication to this newspaper
is greatly appreciated. Creating a newspaper from
scratch each day is not an easy task.
*****
This Saturday will mark the debut of a new colum-
nist on the Opinion page. George “Bucky” Ellis has
agreed to add his special brand of perspective to our
Saturday paper. We are very pleased with his deci-
sion and look forward to the lively debate his column
will create.
*****
Change is a good thing.
Brent Davis is editor of The Saline Courier. He can
be reached at bdavis@bentoncourier.com.
S
o what’s it going to be for
GOP hotheads in Congress
this fall? A soul-satisfying
episode of adolescent nihilism cul-
minating in a government shutdown
and yet another debt/default scare?
Or an abject capitulation to political
(and fiscal) reality and an acceptance
of the Republican Party’s role as the
loyal opposition?
As I write, there’s just no telling.
It’s partly a contest between the
GOP’s electronic/
infotainment Tea
Party wing and the
party establishment.
Talk radio shouters
and cable TV entre-
preneurs thrive on
melodrama, and
a substantial pro-
portion of the Tea
Party base follows
excitedly along.
Defund
Obamacare! Shut
it down! To those
of us of a certain
age, this has a ring of nostalgia,
like Abbie Hoffman’s 1967 vow to
levitate the Pentagon. I don’t know
what they’re smoking down at RNC
headquarters, but on CNN’s “State
of the Union,” party chairman Reince
Priebus made a lame attempt to
blame President Obama.
“I think all Republicans are unified
on one thing, and that is defunding,
delaying, getting rid of, eliminating
Obamacare,” Priebus said. “So we
have total unanimity on that issue
and the question is: What are the
tactics? ... So Mr. President, if you
want to shut the government down
because you want to continue to fund
this monstrosity ... then go ahead.”
Nice try. No cigar.
Having wasted countless hours
on 40, count ‘em, 40 votes to defund
Obamacare, you’d think House
Republicans might be getting the
message. Their scheme is DOA in
the Senate, and even if it weren’t, the
White House holds veto power. The
GOP’s last constitutional chance to
prevent 30 million Americans from
buying affordable health insurance
coverage expired with Mitt Romney’s
presidential candidacy. End of story.
True, rising Republican celebri-
ties like Senators Ted Cruz (Texas),
Rand Paul (Kentucky), Marco Rubio
(Florida), Mike Lee (Utah), and ris-
ing star Rep. Tom Cotton (Arkansas)
are breathing smoke and fire.
However, it’s also true that none of
these worthies hold leadership posi-
tions. Until very recently, nobody
knew who they were. They risk noth-
ing by enrolling in a purely symbolic
resistance.
Quite the opposite: True Believers
in utopian right-wing crusades evalu-
ate politicians according to their fer-
vor, not their coherence. Did Ronald
Reagan ever pay a political price for
describing Medicare as the death
knell of freedom? He did not.
Indeed, the best possible outcome
for senatorial rabble-rousers would
be what now appears likely: a minor-
ity of GOP House moderates voting
with Democrats to pass a continu-
ing resolution, avoiding a party-line
government shutdown that could
doom the Republican Party’s national
electoral chances. Speaker Boehner
won’t have much choice but to allow
it.
See, there’s nothing the Southern
wing of the GOP loves more than a
heroic defense of a lost cause. Save
your Confederate dollars, boys,
because ...
Well, you know the rest.
Lately the party’s adult leadership
has also taken to signaling the need
for restraint regarding the national
debt. According to the Washington
Post’s Greg Sargent, congressional
Democrats scrutinize Wall Street
Journal columnist Stephen Moore for
signs of Republican establishment
thinking.
Recently, Moore informed readers
that “the biggest underreported story
out of Washington this year is that
the federal budget is shrinking and
much more than anyone in either
party expected.”
Overall Federal spending that
peaked at $3.598 trillion in fiscal year
2011 due largely to recession-related
costs will drop to $3.45 trillion by the
end of fiscal year 2013. “The $150
billion budget decline of 4 percent,”
Moore writes, “is the first time fed-
eral expenditures have fallen for two
consecutive years since the end of
the Korean War.”
Also dropping is the annual federal
budget deficit. Projections by the
Congressional Budget Office show a
$642 billion shortfall this year -- less
than half of the $1.3 trillion shortfall
the Obama White House inherited
from George W. Bush. It’s forecast
to drop to $560 billion next year, and
$378 billion in 2015.
Moore: “Already the deficit has
fallen from its Mount Everest peak of
10.2 percent of gross domestic prod-
uct in 2009, to about 4 percent this
year. That’s a bullish six percentage
points less of the GDP of new federal
debt each year.”
In short, informed conservatives
understand that there is no need
whatsoever for a melodramatic
standoff over raising the federal debt
limit. No need to risk “the full faith
and credit of the United States” by
threatening default. Hostages need
not be taken.
As in the opposition-of-Obamacare
charade, Republican posturing on the
debt would only risk catastrophe for
the sake of certain defeat.
Alas, but herein lies the rub: The
great majority of GOP voters out in
the wilderness beyond the Hudson
and the Potomac not only don’t know
these facts, they’re constitutionally
incapable of accepting them.
To followers of politicians like
Rand Paul and Ted Cruz, fears of
fiscal collapse, runaway inflation and
social chaos aren’t political ideas, but
fixed beliefs scarcely amenable to
arithmetic or reason.
And their Antichrist is Barack
Obama.
Arkansas Times columnist Gene
Lyons is a National Magazine Award
winner and co-author of “The Hunting
of the President” (St. Martin’s Press,
2000). You can email Lyons at
eugenelyons2@yahoo.com.
Rhetoric versus reality
for Republicans
EDITORIAL CARTOON
A
few years ago I wrote for a small
family owned newspaper in
North-Central Arkansas and I
was also in charge of the birth announce-
ments. As a result of this experience, I
thought I’d heard every crazy name out
there.
Guess what? I was
WRONG.
Shakespeare once
wrote “What’s in a name?
That which we call a rose
by any other name would
smell as sweet.” Well, I
hate to break it to him, but
Shakespeare was wrong
too. Would a rose smell
as sweet if it were called a
thistle? Or a hogwart?
I don’t think so.
When you think about it,
there are all kinds of say-
ings out there about good
names. Quotes such as “A
good name is better than riches,” and
“A good name, like good will, is attained
by many actions and may be lost by just
one.”
Since names are apparently so impor-
tant, what the heck is up with all the crazy
names people have been saddling their
children with lately?
It first started with the changes in spell-
ing. Now I’m all for originality, and I can
completely understand SOME changes,
such as changing a “y” to an “i” in names
like Crissy and Tammy, or changing a “C”
to a “K” in names like Carrie or Cory.
Letter changes are not a big deal. I’m
talking about ridiculous changes that
will condemn your child to a lifetime of
having the name misspelled, or being
called something different entirely.
For example, I once knew a lady
who named her son Michael. Good old-
fashioned, strong-sounding name, right?
Except that she spelled it “My-kull.”
And I knew another woman who named
her daughters Wendy and Samantha,
except she spelled them “Whenndee” and
“Suhmanntha.”
I’m not kidding either.
I wondered for a long time if she just
couldn’t spell, or if she had been high on
drugs when they were born.
And as if the spelling changes weren’t
bad enough, now it seems to be the
“thing” to give your child a name so com-
pletely outlandish that no-one else will
ever have it.
At first I thought it was just eccentric
movie stars giving their offspring names
such as “Apple” or “Pilot Inspector” or
“Banjo,” but now it seems everyone has
jumped on the band-wagon.
If you don’t believe me, just take a
gander at the birth announcements in
your local paper sometime and you’ll
be amazed at what you’ll find. It’s full of
concoctions such as Quillon, We’shall,
Prestatyn, Berwick and hundreds of crazy
others. In fact, I even saw an announce-
ment one time in which the poor kid had
been named Mountain Tree!
And now we have a name so outlandish
it’s making headlines all over the country.
Some woman in Tennessee named her
child Messiah.
What the heck is up with THAT? Has
she lost her mind?
But what is really amazing is the fact
that a judge has decided to make her
change the name.
Now where does the government get
off telling people what they can and can’t
name their kid? As much as I wish stupid-
ity was against the law, the fact remains
that it’s not. If some idiot out there wants
to name a child Frankenstein Flatulence
Kanklefritz, he or she has the right to do
so.
We don’t live in New Zealand where
they have a ban on stupid names. We live
in the United States where we still have
liberty and freedom.
Because of that, I feel pretty confident
that this ruling will soon be overturned.
And as for the poor kid, well, don’t lose
hope.
After all it’s still legal to change your
name when you’re an adult. It’s just the
first 18 years you have to worry about.
Camille Nesler is a resident of Saline
County. Her column appears each Friday
in The Saline Courier.
Hello. My
name is Mud
Change is good
• The Saline Courier (USPS 050-660) is published daily by Horizon Publishing Co., 321
N. Market St., Benton, AR. Periodical mailing privileges paid in Benton, AR.
• Subscription rates: $7 to $9 per month home delivery (depends on payment plan); $95
per year home delivery; $150 per year by mail within the state or out-of-state.
• POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Saline Courier, P.O. Box 207, Benton,
AR 72018.
• Publishing company reserves the right to reject, edit or cancel any advertising at any time
without liability. Publisher’s liability for error is limited to amount paid for advertising.
©Copyright 2006 Horizon Publishing Co.
Columns and cartoons on the opinion page do not necessarily reflect
opinions of The Saline Courier. Weekend delivery times are no later than
7 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. The circulation department has re-delivery
scheduled from 5 to 7 p.m. Monday-Friday and from 7 to 9 a.m. Saturday
and Sunday. Call 501-317-6013 or 501-315-8228 during business hours.
THE SALINE COURIER
Founded in 1876
Phone: (501) 315-8228 • Fax: (501) 315-1230 • Email: news@bentoncourier.com
VICKI J. DORSCH
BUSINESS MANAGER
vdorsch@bentoncourier.com
DAVID WILLS
ADVERTISING DIRECTOR
dwills@bentoncourier.com
ANDREW STOVALL
CIRCULATION DIRECTOR
astovall@bentoncourier.com
PATRICIA STUCKEY
COMPOSING DIRECTOR
composing@bentoncourier.com
RICKY WALTERS
PRESS FOREMAN
rwalters@bentoncourier.com
STEVE BOGGS • Publisher
publisher@bentoncourier.com
BRENT DAVIS • editor
bdavis@bentoncourier.com
CAMILLE
NESLER
OUTSIDE
THE BOX
BRENT
DAVIS
COMMON
SENSE
Page 4 – The Saline Courier
news@bentoncourier.com Friday, August 16, 2013
OPINION
GENE
LYONS
Today in history
Today is the 228th day of 2013 and the 57th day of
summer.
TODAY’S HISTORY: In 1861, President Abraham
Lincoln prohibited Union states from trading with
states that had seceded.
In 1896, gold was discovered near the Klondike
River in Canada’s Yukon Territory, sparking a gold
rush.
In 1977, Elvis Presley died at age 42.
In 2007, U.S. citizen Jose Padilla was convicted of
conspiracy in a “dirty bomb” terrorism case and sen-
tenced to more than 17 years in prison.
Breaking news
www.bentoncourier.com
SportS
Friday, August 16, 2013
news@bentoncourier.com The Saline Courier – Page 5
The Saline County
Razorback Club is plan-
ning a bus trip to the
Arkansas vs. Ole Miss
game on Nov. 9 in Oxford,
Miss.
There are currently 8
seats still available and
they are $150 each.
That includes a game
ticket, transportation to
and from the game and
a box lunch. For more
information call Phillip
Montalvo at 501-353-6357.
SALINE COUNTY
RAZORBACK CLUB
Bryant Youth Football
signups will take place on
Thursday, Aug. 22, from 6-9
p.m., and Saturday, Aug.
24, from 9 a.m. to noon.
Signups are located at
Ashley Park (400 SW 3rd St.
in Bryant). For more info,
call Terry Speer at 681-8449.
BRYANT YOUTh
fOOTBALL
Future Panther Football
signups will be held
Monday, Aug. 19, and
Tuesday, Aug. 20, and also
Thursday, Aug. 22, and
Friday, Aug. 23, at the
Future Panther Field on
Longhills Road in benton.
Saturday, Aug. 24, sign-
ups will be at the Benton
Athletic Complex on Benton
Parkway. Signup times are
6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Monday,
Tuesday, Thursday and
Friday, and 9 a.m. to noon
on Saturday. Students in
fourth through seventh
grade are encouraged to
signup. Cost is $40 for one
player or $60 for two. New
players must bring a birth
certificate. New player try-
outs will be held Saturday,
Aug. 24, at 2 p.m. at the
Benton Athletic Complex.
All participants must sup-
ply own helmet, shoulder
pads and pants. Some used
equipment will be available
for sale on a first-come,
first-serve basis. For more
information call 440-3867 or
416-7963.
fUTURE PANThER
fOOTBALL
The third annual Hornet
Fan Fare will take place
on Friday, Aug. 23, at the
Bryant High School Field
House and Stadium.The
event will begin at 4:45 p.m.
and last until 9 p.m. It will
be a great opportunity to
meet the Hornet players
and coaches, get autographs,
shop, eat and enjoy a few
scrimmages. Booths will be
set up inside and outside of
the field house showcasing
all kinds of Hornet gear and
tailgating items. Plus there
will be food vendors and
miscellaneous other booths
to check out. Booth spaces
are still available. The fol-
lowing teams will be scrim-
maging:
4:45 7th grade Scrimmage
(Bryant/Bethel)
5:15 8th grade
Scrimmage
5:45 9th grade Scrimmage
6:15 Junior Varsity
Scrimmage
6:45 Varsity Scrimmage
hORNET fAN fARE
Glen Rose Athletics
“Beaver Bash” is set for
August 23 at 6 p.m. on the
Glen Rose Football Field.
Admission is $2 or $7 for
a hamburger, chips, drink
and admission. Both senior
and junior high teams will
be announced, along with
both senior and junior high
cheerleading and dance
teams. The band, golf and
wrestling teams will also be
introduced.
GLEN ROSE
BEAvER BASh
Big Red Stores’ David
Hendrix Jr. hands Bryant
Athletic Director Mike
Lee a donation of $5,000
as part of an ongoing
premium partnership
with Bryant Athletics.
From left is Bryant soft-
ball Coach Debbie Clark,
Lady Hornets’ basketball
Coach Brad Matthews,
volleyball Coach Beth
Solomon, Hornets’
basketball Coach Mike
Abrahamson, dance
Coach Laura Wooten
and cheer Coach Karen
Scarlett. Big Red Stores
is happy to serve and
support the student ath-
letes and educators of
Bryant.
TONY LENAHAN/The Saline Courier
Defense works on stripping
FAYETTEVILLE
- Arkansas’ defense didn’t
take away much pride from
last Saturday’s never taking
away the ball from either the
Razorbacks’ first or second
offense.
So the Razorbacks defend-
ers vow to turn things around
by turning over the offense
some in Saturday night’s
closed scrimmage.
“Obviously the offense did
a great job not turning it over,
but we definitely want take-
aways,” Arkansas cornerbacks
Coach Taver Johnson said
after the Razorbacks’ closed-
to-public and media practice
in pads Thursday afternoon.
“That’s always an emphasis.”
Have the defenders picked
on some passes and flopped
on fumbles during the closed
practices even though they
couldn’t generate turnovers
during last Saturday’s open-to-
public scrimmage?
“We have had more PBU’s
(pass break ups) and INT’s
(interceptions), for sure,”
Johnson said. “But I think
it goes by the day. We
had a couple of today. Will
(Hines) had a couple. Tevin
(Mitchel) has had some.
Jared (Collins) has had some.
Jared last week had a chance
to break one during practice
and it bounced right off his
shoulder pads. We have had
them here and there.”
Redshirt freshman Collins
and sophomore Hines battle
at one corner.
Mitchel, a junior two-year
starter, stars at the other, and
is looked to by both.
“He is one of the more
experienced guys on our
defense,” Johnson said. “We
talked all offseason about him
taking that leadership role
and doing it by example first,
and he is definitely trying to
do that.”
Having taken away the
starting job once moved from
Sam outside linebacker to
Mike middle linebacker early
in preseason camp, senior
Austin Jones stressed the
defense taking away what
most call turnovers.
“We don’t call them turn-
overs,” Jones said. “We call
them takeaways for a reason.
We want to literally take the
ball away from the offense
and give it to our offense. As
a defensive corps, we are
going and working on our
strip attempts. Every time the
ball is on the ground, if it’s an
incomplete pass or a fumble,
we are scooping and scoring
like it’s a fumble.”
In some second-team line-
backer shuffling, sophomore
Otha Peters now backs up
Jones in the middle while
freshman Brooks Ellis of
Fayetteville and junior college
transfer Martrell Spaight of
North Little Rock back up out-
side ‘backers Braylon Mitchell
of Heber Springs and Jarrett
Lake of Jenks, Okla.
Lake is a senior and
Mitchell a fourth-year junior.
Though the defense vows
to take some away Saturday,
its practice Thursday was only
so-so, Johnson, the lone coach
media available on Thursday’s
day of only defense talking to
media post the closed prac-
tice.
“Today wasn’t one of our
better days but you have
those days sometimes,”
Johnson said. “Guys fought
through it. One thing that
was happening some pads
were popping and that was
good to hear and good to
see.”
The NCAA mandates every
other day for two-a-days so
the Razorbacks will practice
twice today, this morning and
tonight, and devote Saturday
night to scrimmaging.
Hunter Henry, came out
of Pulaski Academy in Little
Rock as a nationally touted
tight end but the Razorbacks
heralded freshman tight end
really didn’t line up as a high
school tight end, offensive
coordinator Jim Chaney
explained when some offen-
sive coaches and players met
with media after Wednesday
night’s practice.
Though tight end size at
6-6, 245, Henry was more
wideout than tight end,
Chaney said.
“Everybody was worried
about him putting his hand on
the ground coming from their
style of offense,” Chaney said.
“He said that’s something he
has never done a lot of and he
has made that transition eas-
ily. He’s intelligent and he’s a
tough kid and has no trouble
with the physical nature. So
there is no reason the sky
isn’t the limit for him.”
Especially since Coach
Bret Bielema and Chaney
seize the advantage of split-
ting Henry out from time to
time.
“That’s all I did in high
school was split out so that’s
a very comfortable thing for
me,” Henry said Wednesday
night. “It’s more of an adjust-
ment for me putting my hand
on the ground. It’s easy for
me to get out there in a two-
point stance.”
How is the conventional
tight end blocking coming
along?
“It’s coming along great,”
Henry said. “I am going
against two of the best D-ends
(senior Preseason All-SEC
defensive end Chris Smith
and fellow returning starting
end Trey Flowers) all the time
so it’s going to be better every
day.”
JAY MANNING/jaysphotodesign.com
Arkansas strong safety Rohan Gaines gets air on an attempted tackle last season. This year’s
Razorbacks’ defense is working hard to get more turnovers this season.
By Nate Allen
Razorback Report
Ready to play, former starter may redshirt
FAYETTEVILLE - It seems
A.J Turner and the Arkansas
Razorbacks staff view the
same red shirt in different
shades.
Turner, the sophomore
linebacker from Lepanto via
East Poinsett County High,
sees himself garbed on home
game days actively wearing
Razorbacks red as he did
last year as a true freshman.
With 2012 senior lineback-
ers Alonzo Highsmith and
Tenarius Wright both injured
early, Turner played every
game for the 4-8 Razorbacks
of 2012. He started six and
made 53 tackles, including 3.5
behind the line for minus-9
yards. He closed the season
making 12 tackles against
LSU and was on the SEC All-
Freshman team.
From those giddy heights,
Turner has taken a fall going
into the fall.
New Coach Bret Bielema
and new defensive coordina-
tor Chris Ash obviously are
strongly considering to red-
shirt him.
That would preserve his
sophomore eligibility in 2014
and allow the still slender 6-2,
224-pound ‘backer to hit the
weights that his ailing wrist
impeded him from hitting for
much of the offseason.
Turner broke his wrist
during the winter offseason.
Linebackers passed him
by while he missed most of
spring ball.
It was a tough spring,
Bielema said for Turner
adjusting to a new staff while
beset with the wrist injury
and finally the death of his
grandfather.
“I explained to him there
have been a lot of things that
have been taking hits at him,”
Bielema said last April. “He’s
got the injuries and the
grandparent, and the transi-
tion hasn’t exactly been a bed
of roses for him just because
we want to hold him to a little
bit higher accountability in
all areas. He’s buying in and
he hasn’t left. That’s a great
statement on his behalf.”
After a week of August
preseason practice, Bielema
sounded a similar theme.
“A.J. has got some linger-
ing wrist issues,” Bielema
said. “The good thing is he’s
got a year of redshirt if we
try to use that. He’s a willing
soul. I love his attitude. I love
his energy. He just needs to
come along quite a bit in the
physical development to be
able to play winning football
for us.”
For his part, Turner vows
to play winning football right
now.
“I’m back healthy and I
don’t plan on redshirting,”
Turner said. “I plan on play-
ing. Right now I am in camp
and trying to get back on the
chart. I’m showing improve-
ment every day so redshirt-
ing is not on my mind right
now. “
Of course this time last
year Turner and probably fel-
low 2012 freshman co-starter
Otha Peters, too, were set to
redshirt.
Highsmith and Wright
going down prompted Turner
and Peters to become regu-
lars.
Peters (hip) also ailed last
spring. Now Peters clings
to a second-team berth while
Turner is down to third team
and his 2013 role in question.
“I don’t know what his role
is going to be, either,” Ash
said. “We have identified who
are top linebackers are and
right now he is probably not
one of them. People want to
talk about him playing last
year. He played, but I think
he played more out of neces-
sity than anything.”
On Ash’s last sentence,
Turner agrees remember-
ing the 2012 plans of interim
coach John L. Smith’s staff
were to redshirt him.
“Then when everything
started hitting the fan,”
Turner said. “It was next
name up and my name was
called. So I had to go in and
do what I could to help the
team.”
Turner’s 2012 playing time
first took hold on special
teams. It seems that would be
his shot for wedging his foot
in the 2013 door.
“I think right now we have
got to see if A.J. can help
us on special teams,” Ash
said. “He shows up every
day and works hard. He has
changed his body and put on
some weight and is stronger
and things like that, but right
now he is not in our two-
deep.”
Turner vows he’ll over-
come to crack the chart.
“I trained all summer in
rehab to get back,” Turner
said. “I feel like I’m going
to compete for a spot again. I
feel like I am ready to play.”
By Nate Allen
Razorback Report
Big Red Stores donates to Bryant Athletics Lady ‘Backs
almost home
FAYETTEVILLE — The
University of Arkansas
women’s basketball team is
wrapping up its competition
schedule in Italy.
Arkansas will square
off against the Chemcats
Friday night before the
return trip to Northwest
Arkansas on Saturday.
On Thursday, team
members enjoyed an early
morning boat tour from
Como to Bellagio, a com-
mune in the Province of
Como, in the Italian region
of Lombardy. The hour-
long water taxi was filled
with stories about the many
villas the team passed on
the way including homes
owned by area aristocrats
and the American actor
George Clooney.
Associated Press
6 The Saline Courier
Friday, August 16, 2013
BOLL WEEVIL PAWN SUPERSTORE
WE BUY GOLD!!!
We pay top $$$ for
GOLD • SILVER • COINS
BOLL WEEVIL PAWN SUPERSTORE
501-778-7900 • 1205 Military Rd. Suite 4
Like us on bollw@ymail.com
The New Generation....
Short on cash??
We can help!
F
R
E
E
!
Bring in this AD and
get 1 movie FREE!!!
1304 Military Rd, Benton—501-778-0934
Family Practice Associates
Monday, August 5 at 5:30pm and 6:00pm
Saturday, August 17 at 10am
Thursday, August 22 at 5:30pm and 6:00pm
Tuesday, August 27 at noon
We now offer a medically managed meal replacement
weight loss program! Designed for patients with 30 or
more pounds to lose. Current patients or new patients
are welcome. High protein, low calorie diet with proven
results! Come to one of our interest meetings held at our
office; upcoming meetings are scheduled for:
Visit www.FPABenton.com for more information!
1304 Military Rd, Benton—501-778-0934
Family Practice Associates
Monday, August 5 at 5:30pm and 6:00pm
Saturday, August 17 at 10am
Thursday, August 22 at 5:30pm and 6:00pm
Tuesday, August 27 at noon
We now offer a medically managed meal replacement
weight loss program! Designed for patients with 30 or
more pounds to lose. Current patients or new patients
are welcome. High protein, low calorie diet with proven
results! Come to one of our interest meetings held at our
office; upcoming meetings are scheduled for:
Visit www.FPABenton.com for more information!
1304 Military Rd, Benton—501-778-0934
Family Practice Associates
Monday, August 5 at 5:30pm and 6:00pm
Saturday, August 17 at 10am
Thursday, August 22 at 5:30pm and 6:00pm
Tuesday, August 27 at noon
We now offer a medically managed meal replacement
weight loss program! Designed for patients with 30 or
more pounds to lose. Current patients or new patients
are welcome. High protein, low calorie diet with proven
results! Come to one of our interest meetings held at our
office; upcoming meetings are scheduled for:
Visit www.FPABenton.com for more information!
Weight Loss Program
state commander of the
organization, serves on the
task force. Callahan com-
pleted his term at the state
level on June 30 of this year.
“I think it will be a great
opportunity for Saline
County,” Callahan said.
“From my perspective, the
advantages to building it
here far outweigh any rea-
sons not to.”
Shane Broadway, chair of
the Saline County Economic
Development Corp., said
there are many beneficial
factors to having the home
at the Haskell location.
One positive would be its
proximity to the Veterans
Hospital in Little Rock and
its close proximity to the
Arkansas Health Center and
Saline Memorial Hospital.
The location’s access to
Little Rock and Hot Springs,
as well as Saline County,
provides veterans and their
families with shopping, res-
taurants and other activities,
Broadway said.
“It’s beautiful and quiet,
and there will be lots of
room,” Broadway said.
Because the land is
already state-owned, it effec-
tively would be free.
After touring the four
proposed locations, the task
force is scheduled to have
two meetings, on Sept. 12
and on Oct. 10, before its
Oct. 30 deadline to make a
site recommendation to the
Arkansas Legislature.
According to the
Department of Veterans
Affairs, Col. Cissy Rucker,
director of the department,
gets the final say on the
location choice.
Vet Home
From page 1
Bryant PD gives
kids step in
right direction
The Bryant Police
Department is debuting a
program to help children
have new shoes for the
beginning of school.
On Saturday, Bryant
Police officers will be wash-
ing cars in the police depart-
ment parking lot from 9 a.m.
to noon to raise money to
buy shoes for local children.
One child is trying to do
his part for the cause.
Philip Plouch, 13, son of
Lt. J. W. Plouch, is helping
to organize the project to
earn a Boy Scout merit. His
goal is to become an Eagle
Scout.
Originally, Bryant Police
Chief Mark Kizer set a goal
to raise $2,000, but after
letting people know about
the effort on Facebook, that
much has been received
from private donations.
“It is already a success,”
Kizer said.
The Bryant police officers
will buy gift cards from
Shoe Carnival after the
event on Saturday and then
divide them equally among
the Bryant schools. School
counselors will let officers
know who needs the shoes.
“It was very important to
have a good pair of shoes
for school,” Kizer said.
Kizer said he plans to
continue this program next
year since it has already
been so successful.
By Sarah Derouen
sderouen@bentoncourier.com
Holiday brings crackdown
on DWI enforcement
Drivers should use cau-
tion when considering drink-
ing and driving as local law
enforcement agencies join
a nationwide crackdown on
drinking and driving viola-
tions starting today as the
Labor Day holiday approach-
es.
Both the Arkansas State
Police and Benton police offi-
cers are participating in the
crackdown.
“We want everyone to
have a safe holiday, but it
requires important steps on
the part of motorists — click-
ing that seat belt and driving
sober,” said Col. Stan Witt,
director of the Arkansas
State Police and Governor’s
Highway Safety representa-
tive. “Safety is a primary
concern, not just for drivers,
but also for passengers and
others on the road.”
The campaign will include
high-visibility enforcement,
high-profile event and nation-
al paid advertising, said Lt.
Kevin Russell, public infor-
mation officer for Benton
police.
“Research has shown that
high-visibility enforcement
like the ‘Drive Sober or
Get Pulled Over’ campaign
reduces drunk driving fatali-
ties by as much as 20 per-
cent. By joining this nation-
wide effort, we will make
Benton’s roadways safer for
everyone throughout the
Labor Day period,” Russell
said.
About 30 people in the
U.S. die each day in acci-
dents where the driver was
drunk, according to the
Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention. One death
reportedly occurs every 48
minutes,
The CDC lists young
people, motorcyclists and
drivers with prior DWI con-
victions as most at risk for
driving while impaired.
“At all levels of blood alco-
hol concentration, the risk
of being involved in a crash
is greater for young people
than for older people,”
according to the CDC.
For the Bryant Police
Department, the crackdown
is normal.
“We have always worked
that area hard,” said Chief
Mark Kizer.
Last month, Bryant Police
officers made 10 DWI
arrests.
By Sarah Derouen
sderouen@bentoncourier.com
Bryant schools launches app
Mobile device users can
more easily stay in touch
with what’s going on in
the Bryant School District
thanks to a new app devel-
oped for parents, students,
staff and the community.
Anyone can subscribe for
free by searching for Bryant
Public Schools at the Apple
Store for iPhone users and
the Google Play store for
Android users.
“If we hope to engage
students and parents in the
learning process, we need
to be where they are,” said
Devin Sherrill, communica-
tions director.
The majority of parents in
the Bryant School District
have smart phones, Sherrill
said. Some families might
have a smart phone, but
not a home computer, she
noted, and the app allows for
easier access to information
without needing to log onto
a computer.
With the app, parents
and students may view class
schedules, grades, assign-
ments and attendance in one
place, and the app will allow
for direct communication
with teachers.
The app will make it
easier and more convenient
to communicate with parents
during emergencies and bad
weather, Sherrill said.
It is available in 70 lan-
guages, including Spanish.
By Jennifer Joyner
jjoyner@bentoncourier.com
Start of school means drivers
need to adhere closely to laws
I
t is that time a year
again when the
big yellow buses
start rolling and kids start
making their way back to
school.
Along with school start-
ing comes
increased traf-
fic volume on
our local road-
ways. Due to
the increased
traffic volume
we will experi-
ence in the
school zones,
officers will
be out in force
to ensure that
drivers adhere
to all traffic
laws in the school zones.
Officers will be looking
for these violations in addi-
tion to other distracted driv-
ing issues, such as texting
and driving. There will
be a zero tolerance stance
in school zones involving
distracted driving, speed-
ing, passing stopped school
buses, seat belt usage and
other pertinent traffic laws.
There is still ongoing
construction in the area
of lower Military Road so
be sure to leave a little
earlier if you plan on going
through that area to a
school. It is a construction
zone, so traffic laws will be
strictly enforced, both for
your safety and the work-
ers.
For those that have teen-
agers that will be driving
themselves to school please
consider going over some
basic rules with them. One
thing to be mindful of is the
graduated driver’s licenses
that limit the juvenile pas-
sengers they can carry
based on their age. This
was instituted a few years
ago to reduce the risk juve-
nile drivers pose to them-
selves or others due to risky
actions they may take when
accompanied by numerous
juvenile passengers.
Also, distracted driving
is a big safety concern for
everybody and can include
risky actions while driving
such as: texting, checking
social media, eating, apply-
ing makeup, or watching a
video. Sending or receiving
a text takes a driver’s eyes
from the road for an aver-
age of 4.6 seconds — the
equivalent at 55 mph of driv-
ing the length of an entire
football field blind.
Remember, it’s illegal for
anybody to text and drive
and this includes adults as
well as juveniles. It should
be noted that a law was
passed in 2011 where driv-
ers can be pulled over and
given a citation for talking
on a cellular telephone in a
school zone when children
are present.
We ask that everyone
leave a little earlier if you
have to travel through the
construction zone on lower
Military Road or to a school
next week, and to expect
some delays. We under-
stand that it will be difficult,
but we ask that everyone
have a little patience with
each other.
Our goal, as well as
yours, is to ensure the safe-
ty of our children as they
travel to and from school
throughout the year.
Stay Safe Out There.
Kevin
Russell
THE COP
CORNER
the event, the club is half-
way to its goal of selling 600
tickets, and premium tables
are completely sold out.
Tickets are $75 for indi-
viduals and $750 for a table.
All proceeds will go to the
Boys & Girls Club.
The event, which is in
its 25th year, is themed
a “Night to be GREAT,”
Rogers said.
The theme correlates
with the club’s national “Be
GREAT campaign.”
Last year, the fundraiser
raised $19,000, and the Boys
& Girls Club is hoping to
almost double this figure
with the size of this year’s
event.
Anyone interested in
tickets may call Emmy
Rogers at the Boys & Girls
Club, 501-315-8100 or email
emmy@scbgclub.com.
Event
From page 1
Kali became ill after a
swimming outing. Her symp-
toms were a severe head-
ache, fever and vomiting.
Other symptoms of meningi-
tis can include a stiff neck.
Her mother took her to
the emergency room at
Children’s, where she was
admitted on suspicion of
meningitis.
Within days, it was deter-
mined that she had con-
tracted the amoebic parasitic
form that usually proves
fatal.
She has been treated
with an experimental drug
imported from Germany.
Reports are that now anoth-
er child in another state who
has been diagnosed with the
parasite is being treated with
the drug that apparently has
proven lifesaving for Kali.
An account to assist
the Hardig family with
medical-related expenses is
still active at Arvest Bank.
Contributions may be made
at any branch by noting
that the donation is for Kali
Hardig.
Kali
From page 1
Ross criticizes GOP
rivals’ tax-cut plans
LITTLE ROCK —
Democratic gubernato-
rial hopeful Mike Ross is
criticizing his
Republican
rivals for the
state’s top office,
accusing them
of pushing for
tax cuts without
explaining to
voters how they’d pay for
them.
Ross on Friday told mem-
bers of the Political Animals
Club that he’d support tar-
geted tax cuts that would
help create jobs if the state
was running a surplus. He
said the Republican guber-
natorial hopefuls aren’t
explaining what taxes they’d
raise or services they’d cut
to pay for the reductions
they’re calling for.
Republican gubernatorial
hopeful Asa Hutchinson
has called for a phased-in
cut of Arkansas’ income
tax. Another GOP hopeful,
Curtis Coleman, has called
for broader tax cuts that
include eliminating the capi-
tal gains tax.
Ross is the only
announced Democratic can-
didate for governor.
Associated Press
Ross
New school year awaits
kids who survived twister
MOORE, Okla. — Nearly
three months after a
twister blasted through this
Oklahoma City suburb and
destroyed two elementary
schools, officials and many
families hope Friday’s start
of a new school year will
help students put the mem-
ory of the deadly tornado
behind them.
Though many families are
ready to return to a familiar
routine, parents and teachers
say the town’s children have
fears that are still fresh and a
lot more healing to do.
Seven students at the
Plaza Towers Elementary
School were among the 24
people killed by the EF-5
twister that wrecked scores
of homes and businesses
along a 17-mile path through
the heart of Moore on May
20. Students at Plaza Towers
and nearby Briarwood
Elementary, which also was
destroyed, will attend classes
in temporary buildings at
least for this school year.
“I’m a little nervous about
the beginning of school
because I want the kids
so badly to feel good and
comfortable at school,” said
Plaza Towers Principal Amy
Simpson, who took cover
from the storm in a 4-by-
5-foot bathroom with her
office staff and emerged to
find a mangled car on a co-
worker’s desk.
Since the storm, different
students have found differ-
ent ways to cope with their
memories of the mayhem.
Haley Delgado, 8, carries
headphones to block out the
noise of the wind and her
brother, Xavier, 10, says he
is scared by loud thunder.
Ruby Macias, 9, who was
trapped under the same wall
that crushed her classmates,
remembers the screaming
and the crying.
“She says she dreams
about her friend,” said
Ruby’s mother, Veronica
Macias. “I don’t know what
to tell her.”
The site where the Plaza
Towers school once stood, in
the heart of a neighborhood
decimated by the tornado,
has become a makeshift
memorial for the dead and a
meeting spot for volunteers,
even though there is just a
slab where the school used
to be.
A handful of wind-battered
trees are beginning to grow
new leaves and branches
again. Seven crosses, each
carrying the name of a child
killed in the storm, are
accompanied by an eighth
that has a black “7’’ inside a
red heart.
“I’m not going to act as
though those first couple
of weeks (after the storm)
weren’t so terribly difficult,
because they were,” said
Superintendent Robert
Romines, a longtime Moore
resident who took the dis-
trict’s top post over the sum-
mer. “But since that day, we
have turned a lot of corners.
After our last funeral, we
turned a corner.”
Associated Press
Classifieds
PLACE AN AD
FIND AN AD
Listings are divided by category.
To get your ad in the Courier,
call 501-315-8228 Monday
through Friday, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.,
online at bentoncourier.com,
come by the offce at 321 N.
Market St. in Benton or mail
to: PO Box 207, Benton,AR
72018. We accept Visa,
MasterCard, Discover, and
American Express.
WHEN TO CALL
FOR ADS APPEARING | CALL BEFORE
Tuesday –––––––––––– Mon Noon
Wednesday –––––––––– Tues. Noon
Thursday ––––––––––– Weds. Noon
Friday –––––––––––––– Thurs. Noon
Saturday –––––––––––– Thurs. Noon
Sunday ––––––––––––– Fri. Noon
Monday –––––––––––– Fri. Noon
GET ONLINE
WHAT
IT
COSTS
YARD
SALES
4 lines – 3 days – $18.68*
4 lines – 7 days – $29.28*
4 lines – 14 days – $ 45.44*
Extra lines available
4 lines – 2 days – $15.64*
4 lines – 3 days – $18.48*
Extra lines available
Cost includes ad and yard
sale packet including signs.
You can place your ad
on our website....
bentoncourier.com
Just go to website and
follow the steps.
Email us at:
class@bentoncourier.
com
}
}
}
}
}
*Price doesn’t include charge for graphic, TMC
rate, or internet. Price is subject to change.
Friday, August 16, 2013
class@bentoncourier.com The Saline Courier – Page 7
Employment
Employment
Employment
3 PT Supportive Living/
Employment Instructors
needed to work various hours with individuals with
developmental disabilities located in Benton and
Jacksonville. Must pass criminal record check, drug
screen and have a valid Arkansas driver’s license
w/auto insurance and good driving record.
Apply at 2520 West Main, Jacksonville,
AR. 72076 or visit www.pathfinderinc.org
EO/AA Employer. Job Code: (62-02)
Deadline: 08/19/2013
No resumes accepted without complete application
Mail your “Extraordinary People” nomination form to:
The Saline Courier, P.O. Box 207, Benton, AR 72018
or email us at news@bentoncourier.com / fax 501-315-1920
Nominations must be received no later than Sept. 6, 2013
I Nominate _____________________________________ as one of
Saline County’s Extraordinary People. The reason(s) why include:
Saline County’S newS SourCe SinCe 1876
Courier
The Saline
S
e
e
S
a
l
i
n
e
M
A
G
A
Z
I N
E
A U T U MN 2 0 1 2 I S S U E
They are the backbone to any community –
the next-door neighbor, your friend at church.
They are the people that give of themselves
selflessly.
MORE INSIDE ON:
Honorable Mentions
Shoe Tree
Lake Norrell
Saline River
Haunted Highway
E
x
t
r
a
o
r
d
i
n
a
r
y
P
e
o
p
l
e
Nominate
Extraordinary People
Reflections • Summer 2009 • 1 36 • Extraordinary People • Autumn 2012
They are the backbone to any
community – the next-door neighbor,
your friend at church. They are the
volunteers that give of themselves
selflessly. Their only reward...
the belief they did something good.
Now is your chance to give back. This September the Courier will
honor a dozen people from Saline County that you nominate as
Extraordinary People
The rules: Nominations should be for everyday heroes, not people
who accomplish good through their job. They must be people who
are accomplished outside the public spotlight. A politician cannot
be nominated for assisting the citizenry, that’s their job.
Examples: Maybe someone looks after ailing neighbors, drives people
to the doctor or assists in their church. Maybe someone gives up nights
and weekends to coach children, even when they don’t have any. Maybe
someone brightens your day with a smile, a laugh or an act of kindness.
They are:
Extraordinary People
The Saline Courier will publish a magazine with stories about the
individual nominees, and honor these extraordinary people with
an awards banquet September 26.
Please include your name and phone number.
Use a separate piece of paper if you need more room.
Extraordinary People • Autumn 2012 • 37
Extraordinary!
arolyn Westbrook has served as
“mother” to hundreds of babies.
The exact total isn’t known. It would
include her own three children, plus
numerous foster babes – only these
babies are usually feline, though she’s
also raised orphaned puppies, squirrels
and even quail. It should be explained that Westbrook
serves as the primary foster mom for
motherless kittens that fi nd their way to
the Humane Society of Saline County. It’s
an area in which she’s found her true call-
ing, Westbrook said. “Someone once asked me, how I was
able to part with them after I’ve raised
them from tiny babies — and to them I’m
the only mother they’ve known,” she said.
“I’ll admit it’s really hard, but I know that
they need to be placed in loving homes
so that I’m able then to take in more that
need care — and there will always be
more that need nurturing.” She noted that, by caring for the ani-
mals in her home, “these babies get
acclimated to children and other animals.
They start out in a box, but when they get
litter-box trained, I give them the run of
the house and they learn to be good pets.
I have baby gates when I need to confi ne
them.
“It takes lots of discipline, and I’m very
structured and organized. That helps in
taking care of animals.” Westbrook, a medical transcriptionist
who works out of her home, previously
was employed for 18 years as a secre-
tary at Holland Chapel Baptist Church in
Benton. By the time she retired in 2003,
she was living in an area near a creek
where there was a number of feral cats.
“People would move away and often
wouldn’t take their cats with them,” she
said. “We called them our creek kitties.
And we were also close to Military Road
and a number of restaurants that were a
refuge for homeless animals.”
From these situations, Westbrook
became the unintentional savior to many
kittens.
During some of these experiences, she
became acquainted with Ann Sanders,
director of the Humane Society of Saline
County animal shelter. This association resulted in Westbrook
eventually becoming the chief foster mom
for the society. Though all of the ani-
mals under her care didn’t survive, many
thrived, and Westbrook has many success
stories, including one that could only be
called miraculous. “The veterinarian was spaying a cat
that did not appear to be pregnant, but
she was,” Westbrook said. “Most of the
kittens were not formed, but he noticed
one amniotic sack appeared to have a live
animal struggling to get out. He opened
the sack and there was this tiny kitten —
obviously premature but fully formed.
“They brought it to me, and the doc-
tor taught me how to take care of it,” she
said. “It was behind other kittens of that
age because it really was premature. I
had to feed it every hour for a while, then
every two hours. It was really hard, but so
rewarding. And it lived. “Caring for these animals teaches life
lessons to my grandchildren,” Westbrook
said. “They’re always excited to see what
animals Grandma has. I’ve taught them to
be compassionate and gentle with them,
but it’s also taught them about the life
cycle and helped them understand death.
We’ve had burial services when I’ve lost
them.”
She encourages young parents to have
pets because of the wonderful bonds that
will form between children and animals.
“If an animal is jealous of a baby, you can
work with it, and it will grow to love the
child. There’s enough love there for every-
thing.”
She shared an account involving a
baby squirrel. “We had a place at Heber
Springs where a baby squirrel fell out of a
tree. I took care of it and bottle-fed it, then
released it when it was older. She would
come back when we were there and sit on
our porch. We even made friends with her
mother. In fact we raised three genera-
tions from that squirrel.” Westbrook said she loves volunteering
for the Humane Society. “As my own per-
sonal cats die off, I don’t intend to replace
them. I’ll concentrate strictly on foster
animals.” She said her husband, Andy, is “totally
supportive” of the service she provides
to the homeless animals. “They become
part of our family. We get Christmas cards
from ‘grand-dogs’ and ‘grand-cats’ and
people who have adopted pets we’ve
raised. We stay connected.” If Westbrook has a regret, it’s that she
didn’t become a veterinarian. “I grew up at
a time when women weren’t encouraged
to go into that profession, but caring for
homeless babies is a permanent part of
my life now. “People are always bringing them to
me. I have everything ready now on a
moment’s notice. I have my kit and just
pull out my stuff to take care of them. I
love working with the Humane Society and
the two wonderful vets who regularly work
out there. They have helped me so much,
and I hope I help them.
“I wear my badge proudly,” she said.
Ann Sanders commended Westbrook
for her volunteer service. “By her taking in
so many foster kittens, it allows us to save
more lives every year.” ■
love everything By Lynda Hollenbeck
C
Carolyn Westbrook Place of birth: Benton How long have you lived in Saline
County? All my life Favorite place in Saline County: Lake
Winona area, and its many trails Favorite book: I just like old movies – no
favorite.
Hobbies: Hiking and searching for
waterfalls.
Something about you that would surprise
others: I’m certified in scuba
enough
for
Garage Sales
1108 SUNSET
Fri. & Sat.
7am-?
Household
Items, Toys,
Seasonal
Items,
Clothes,
Much More!
2009 JOHNSWOOD
Rd, 8a-? Fri & Sat,
Huge Yard Sal e
501-847-2850
5017 CONGRES-
SIONAL Drive (Long-
hills Village) Fri 8a-12
& Sat 7a-12
802 TULANE St, Fri
& Sat, 7a-?, books,
too much list.
BENEFIT YARD Sale
for Six Flags Sat.
8a-12 201 Jefferson
Huggie Diapers Size
6 129 Count for $20,
144 Count for $25,
too much more to list.
BIG GARAGE Sale
Sat. 7a-12 1215 Cam-
bridge Circle Lots of
small appliances, etc.
EARLY BIRD SANITATION
Once a week pick up
+ Rolloff Dumpsters
332-7202 • 840-6758
• 778-3969
I BUY JUNK CARS
HUGE YARD Sale!
Lots of kids and teen
clothes. All season.
Lots of name brand
jeans. There will also
be tons of misc. You
don!t want to miss this
one! Sat. 7a-1p 118
Timberlake Sub.
MULTI FAMILY Yard
Sale Sat 7a-? 610
Houston Drive Lots of
boys & girls clothes,
books, and household
items. NO EARLY
BIRDS!
Haskell
3 FAMILY Yard Sale,
(Silver Springs
Country Club) Riviera,
Friday, 8a-?
LARGE YARD Sale
Sat. 7a-? 506 St.
Charles Ct. Lots of
Home Decor, Baby
items, clothes, misc.
Everything must go!
Lost & Found
LOST MALE Hound
Mix Mostly brown with
white paws & white
on nose 247-0239
Looking for a good
deal? Search the
Courier Classifieds!!
Freebies
FREE CHIHUAHUA
Approx 11 Months
Old Tan & Chocolate
Good with kids and
other animals. Call
501-249-8848
MOTHER CAT and
(3) 5 Month old kit-
tens All have been
spayed Call 317-6663
Announcements
AUCTION - Sat.,
Aug. 17 1:00 p.m.
Preview: 11 a.m. - 1
p.m. 418 E. 5th St.,
Russel l vi l l e, AR
72801 The residual
Estate Auction of H.
Buford Smith will fol-
low Real Estate Auc-
tion. For terms and
details, please visit:
jw@thegoodstuffauc-
tion.com Gold Star
Reality | John Wil-
liams Realtor & Auc-
tioneer
AALB#2122
MLS#10358307
Salem Fire Dept.
Sat., Sept. 28
Renting 10x10
Booth Spaces
$
25 each
Call 501-794-2707
FALL
Adoption
ADOPT: A Truly
happily married
couple seeks to adopt
infant to nurture and
to love. Expenses
paid. Please call
Diane & George
1-888-250-3557
Personal
MEET SINGLES right
now! No paid opera-
tors, just real people
l i ke you. Browse
greetings, exchange
messages and con-
nect live. Try it free.
C a l l n o w
1-877-939-9299
Health Services
CANADA DRUG
CENTER Safe and af-
fordable medications.
Save up to 75% on
your medi cat i on
n e e d s C a l l
1-800-304-6217
$10.00 off first pre-
scription and FREE
Shipping
Employment
$1,000 WEEKLY or
more guaranteed sal-
ary mailing our finan-
cial company letters
from home No experi-
ence required.FT/PT.
Genuine opportunity.
Rapid Advancement.
Fr ee I nf or mat i on
(24/7) 1-888-557-5539
Classifieds Work!
Employment
CNA!S 7A-3P &
3P-11P SHIFTS for
Long Term Care
Facility in Benton ap-
ply online http://new
beginnings.vikus.net
COMPANY DRIVERS &
Owner Operators
Wanted! No touch
freight, 90% drop &
hook, dedicated op-
portunities available.
Call 888-710-8707
Also seeking Recent
Grads. Call Lavonna
877-440-7890. Apply
online: www.drivefor-
pamtransport.com
EXPERIENCED
COOK/WAITSTAFF
CALL HOME PLATE
DINER ASK FOR
RICK 813-4423
FULL TIME COOK -
Prior school or institu-
tional experience pre-
ferred Apply in person
at: Youth Home, Inc.
20400 Colonel Glenn
Rd. LR, AR 72210
EOE Drug-free Workplace
GENERAL HELP
Needed Must be 21
with computer skills
and CDL. Primary job
duty will be city deliv-
ery with cross training
in other areas. Apply
in person at 1130 1/4
Military Rd (Benton).
HELP WANTED!!!
Make $1000 weekly
mai l i ng brochures
from HOME! NO ex-
perience required-
Start Immediately!
www.TheMailingHub.com
JOB OPENING
RN OR LPN
Needed Immediately
For “Private Duty
Nursing" Malvern &
Mabelvale Contact:
garyhughes@cable
lynx.com
Medical Technology
870-494-5132
870-633-5176
Now Hiring at Sub-
way & Mama Delu-
ca!s Pizza. Come on
in friendly applicant,
Walmart in Benton.
OWNER OPERATORS
Needed End-Dump Exp. In
State Hauling Weekly Pay
Cal l 501-778-3138 or
501-840-5219
P/T HELPER wanted,
Yardwork, carpenter
work, misc. odd jobs
$10 an hour 317-7770
PT LPN position available
at growing Family Practice
Clinic. Please fax
resume: 501-847-6680
TRUCK DRIVERS
Wanted Best Pay and
Home Time! Apply
Online Today over
750 Companies! One
Application, Hundreds
of Offers!
www.HammerLaneJobs.com
Employment
RED RIVER DODGE
IS NOW HIRING
SALE ASSOCIATES!
Our newest location
in Malvern is growing
and we need to add 3
people to our sales
team! Red River
Dodge is a family
owned company with
a great work environ-
ment and a team
atmosphere! This is a
commission based
position in which hard
work is rewarded.
No experience required!
What is required
• Strong work ethic
• Honest
• Dependable
• Willing to learn
If you think you have
what it takes to be
part of the #1 New
Ram dealer in the
state call or email
Jeff to schedule an
interview.
jeff@redriverdodge.com
501-337-9600
SUBSTITUTE TEACHER
needed for Central
Arkansas Develop-
ment Council!s
Benton Head Start
Center. High School
Diploma or GED
required, Child Devel-
opment Associate
Credential (CDA) and
experience working
with preschool
children preferred.
Pre-Employment
Drug Screening and
Criminal Background
Check required. To
download an Employ-
ment Application go
to www.cadc.com.
Employment Applica-
tions are retained on
file for (1) one year.
You must contact HR
if application was pre-
viously submitted and
you want to be con-
sidered for the above
position or for more
information call
501-315-1121. Equal
Opportunity Employer
SUMMER FREIGHT
is Here! $$$ Up to 50
cpm $$$, $500 Orien-
tation Pay, CDL-A
Req 877-258-8782,
www.ad-drivers.com
TRUCK SALESPER-
SON. - MHC Ken-
worth in Little Rock.
We offer the BEST
benefits, BEST com-
pensation and BEST
training. Apply at
www.mhctruck.com/jo
bs or send resume to
kevin.tackett@mhctruck.com
WANTED DENTAL
Assistant for Oral Sur-
gery office in Bryant
Minimum 5 Years
exp. required. No
Benefits Fax Resume
to 501-225-0334
Time to get your own
place? Check out the
Rental Section in to-
day!s Classifieds...
Instruction
AIRLINE CAREERS
begin here - Become
an Aviation Mainte-
nance Tech. FAA ap-
proved training. Fi-
nancial aid if qualified
Housing available.
Job placement assis-
t ance. Cal l AI M
877-424-4177.
X-RAY MEDI CAL
TECHNICIAN®
MEDICAL ASSIS-
TANT Trai ni ng –
www.changelives.co
m, 1- 800-449-4802,
1309 Forge Rd, LR, *
www.bls.gov/ooh/heal
thcare/medical-assis-
tants.htm, For local-
ized employment and
wages:
www.bls.gov/oes For
important program
i nfo, pl ease vi si t
www.heritage-educa-
tion.com/disclosures
ABHES Accredited ,
Lic. by SBPCE | Fi-
nancial Aid for Those
who Qualify
Child Care
CHILDCARE
Infants to 5 B •L• S
Vouchers
562-0691 • 951-2923
6:30a -5:30p
Child Care
IN-HOME DAYCARE
Spotless - Non-smoking
Drop-ins Welcome!
778-2920
Services
*REDUCE YOUR CA-
BLE BILL! * Get a
whole-home Satellite
system installed at
NO COST and pro-
gramming starting at
$19.99/mo. FREE
HD/DVR Upgrade.
C A L L N O W
1-800-474-0423.
DISH TV Retailer
- SAVE! St ar t i ng
$19.99/month (for 12
months.) FREE Pre-
mium Movie Chan-
nels. FREE Equip-
ment, Installation &
Act i vat i on. CALL,
COMPARE LOCAL
DEALS!
1-800-278-8081
SEE THE SATELLITE
TV Difference Pack-
ages as LOW as
$19.99/month! FREE
DVR Upgrade. FREE
HD Upgrade. FREE
Professional Installa-
tion! Call NOW and
Start SAVING!
1-866-725-5135
Classifieds Work!
Apartments
Unfurnished
2 BR Apts, kit. appl.,
W&D conn., $500 &
up. Handicap access.
317-5190 / 317-5192
2 BR, 1 BA, $500
mo., No Pets, 6 mo.
l ease @ 204 N.
Fourth St. Benton,
Call 501-778-3324
Let the
Courier Classifieds
work for you.
Call Cathy or Kim
to place your
Classified Ad.
Mon.-Fri. 8am-5pm
315-8228
or come by
321 N. Market St.
Classifieds Work!
Apartments
Unfurnished
Need to publish a
Legal Notice in
Saline County? We
can help...accurate
and published
7 days a week...
501-315-8228
Apartments
Unfurnished
Want to Downsize
Your Gas Guzzler?
Sell it in the Courier
Classifieds. Call to
place your ad today!
315-8228
P/T Circulation Clerk
The Saline Courier is searching for Part Time
Clerk to work 4-7pm Friday and 7-9am on
Saturday and Sunday answering the phone
and occasional re-delivery (with reimburse-
ment for travel expenses)
Prior carrier or newspaper experience ideal
but not required. Must have valid Arkansas
DL with state min. insurance. Interested
candidates apply in person at 321 N. Market
St. or e-mail astovall@bentoncourier.com
EOE
We are seeking dynamic, aggressive
salespeople with a stable work history,
to be part of our team in a fast-paced
work environment. B2B or media sales
experience is a plus.
If you can. . .
•achievemonthlysalesgoals
•workprofessionallywithclients
•enjoyprospectingandcoldcalling
•haveexcellentoralandwrittenskills
•canresolveproblemseffciently
You may be the one we’re looking for!
We offer base account list in central Arkansas,
base salary, plus commission, frequent bonus
plans, 401k available, health insurance, vacation
and sick leave.
Saline County’S newS SourCe SinCe 1876
Courier
The Saline
Please forward resume to: The Saline Courier
P.O. Box 207, Benton, AR 72018
fax to 501-315-1920 or email to:
dwills@bentoncourier.com
Advertising
Account
Executive
Classifieds
Friday, August 16, 2013
class@bentoncourier.com The Saline Courier – Page 8
SERVICE DIRECTORY
Air Conditioning
HEATING AND
AIR CONDITIONING
Installation,
Maintenance and
24 Hour Service
501-425-3796
Residential &
Commerical
Attorneys
David Heasley
attorney at law
Divorce &
Family Law
Free phone consultation
Payment Plan
681-4452
622 Alcoa Road,
in Benton
Backhoe & Dozer
315-2343
Peas
Gravel
Fill
SB-2
Topsoil
Sandy Loam
Sands
Donnafill
Pick-Up
or
Delivery
Let the
Courier Classifieds
work for you.
Call Cathy or Kim
to place your
Classified Ad.
Mon.-Fri. 8am-5pm
315-8228
or come by
321 N. Market St.
Looking for a good
deal? Search the
Courier Classifieds!!
Build & Remodel
Þ4kIfh
00Yf7k007I0Y
BUILDING AND
REMODELING
*31 yrs experience
Small or Large
Jobs Done to
Your Satisfaction
tFree Estimates
tReasonable
Prices
Licensed
501-231-9230
501-316-2994
Carpentry
EXPERIENCED
CARPENTER
- Out of Work -
Home Maintenance
& Remodeling
of All Kinds
Vinyl Siding Installation
Call TIM
778-5171
OVER 30 YEARS
EXPERIENCE
- Free Estimates -
No job too LARGE
or small
Satisfaction Guaranteed!
DAVID BURTON, SR.
794-2563
Looking for love in all
the wrong places????
Check out the Freebie
section in today�s
classifieds. You will
fi nd uncondi ti onal
love there FREE!
Furry & Free!!
Computer Services
A-1 COMPUTER
REPAIR
A+
Certified
Repair
Technician
•Desktop /Laptop
Repairs & Cleanup
•Virus-Spyware Removal-
Starting at $80.
1200 Ferguson Dr.
Ste. 5 • Benton
501-776-7577
Drywall Repair
DRYWALL
REPAIR
SERVICE
• Cracks & Holes
• Discolored Ceilings
• Water Stains
• Small Remodels
Valid References
40 Yrs. Experience
� � � � � �
Steve Burrow - Owner
337–4525
Handgun Classes
CONCEALED
HANDGUN
CLASSES
Course completed
in one day.
All
paperwork
provided.
Tim Bragg, Instructor
#95-055
501-776-7419
Ark rr ansas
Concealed
Permit Class
George Brooks, Instructor
License No. 12-763
501.413.2393
email:
georgebrookstheshooter@gmail.com
website:
www.georgebrookstheshooter.com
3470 Quapaw Rd., Benton
Advanced Shooting instruction available rr
George Brooks Instructo
SEEK AND YOU
SHALL FIND
Great deals in the
Courier Classifieds.
Yard Sales, Jobs,
Homes for Sale or
Rent. Check them out
daily. Call to sub-
scribe at 315-8228.
Buy • Sell • Trade
in the Classifieds
Classifieds Work!
Handyman
Will be
Handyman
Tree trimming
�������
Bush & garden
trim & clean up
Brick
Junk hauling
Decks
Flower Bed
clean out
Block
Stump Grinding
Leaf Blowing
Painting
Any Yard Work!
FREE
ESTIMATES!
Owner
Deanna Massey
One Call Does It
All Lawncare!
501-326-2839
and ask for
Damon Massey
Horses
Clinic’s Certified
HOLTZMAN
Riding Academy, LLC
BIRTHDAY PARTIES
10 & UNDER
SUMMER HORSE CAMP
316-1141
House Leveling
HOUSE
Leveling/Foundation
REPAIR
Concrete Foundations
or Pier & Beam
• Shaky floors
• Rotten wood
• Cracked brick
• French drains, etc.
~ Free Estimates ~
501-304-2040
Need to publish a
Legal Notice in
Saline County? We
can help...accurate
and published
7 days a week...
501-315-8228
Want to Downsize
Your Gas Guzzler?
Sell it in the Courier
Classifieds. Call to
place your ad today!
315-8228
Insulation
Southern
Southern
INSULATION &
GUTTERS, Inc.
INSULATION &
GUTTERS, Inc.
INSULATION &
GUTTERS, Inc.
INSULATION &
GUTTERS, Inc.
Family Owned & Operated
for 33 Years
ª Residential & Commercial
ª Seamless ßutters
ª Leal Frool System
ª Fiberqlass, Batts & Blown
ª Stabili/ed Cellulose
ª ínsulation Removal
FREE ESTIMATES
Licensed - ínsured - Bonded
FINANCING AVAILABLE
315-2306
Toll Free. 888·278·7GOG
Landscaping
L.W. Lawn &
Landscaping
SERVICES, LLC
501-350-9137
870-942-9641
Call
Today!
WE DO IT ALL!
Lawn Maintenance, Trimming,
Sprinkler Installation, French
Drains, Shrub & Tree Pruning,
Leaf Removal, Landscaping,
Gutter Maintenance and more
www.lwlawnandlandscaping.com
lwlawnandlandscaping@yahoo.com
VETERAN & SENIOR
Discounts Offered
For FREE
Estimate
Christian Owners
Lawn Care
Richard
May’s
Lawn Care
10 years Local
Experience
Average yard:
Cut & Weed
Eat $25-$30
317-8966
316-6655
Ready to take the
Real Estate Plunge?
Check out the Homes
for Sale in the Classi-
fieds daily.
Lawn Care
Flawless
Lawns
Flawless
Lawns
`,·¡ ´`·u,
Leaves, Beds & Mulch
Mowing, Trimming, Edging
Odd Jobs and Light Hauling
Ryan Harmon 860-8789
MaRK 8:36
Painting
SUPERIOR
PAINTING
3al|slacl|or 0uararleed
· 0ryWa|| F|r|s|
& Repa|r
· lrler|or & Exler|or
· Texlure
· Pressure was||rç
FREE E8T|HATE8
|N8URE0
Ke||y h||| - 0wner
501-31ô-3328
501-840-1470
Bull Painting Co.
“Where Quality
Meets Afordability”
Darrel Bull, Owner
Quality Work GUARANTEED
Interior/Exterior
Painting
Cabinet Painting
& Refnishing
Wallpaper & Popcorn
Removal
Deck & Fence Restoration
Wood Repair
Pressure Washing
2nd Generation Painter
.
Insured
.
References Available
.
Free Estimates
AR Lic #307430813
501.860.2442
SCHAY PAINTING CO
Interior/Exterior
20 Years Experience
References Provided
Steve Schay
501-425-4492
Pet Care
Absolute
All breed mobile
dog grooming
501.732.6850
Kim McWhirter
kimmcwhirter
@ymail.com
Time to get your own
place? Check out the
Rental Section in to-
day�s Classifieds...
Pressure Washing
Royal
Flush
Servicing
Central Arkansas
since 1988
316-1536
��������������������
spccic|izing in
���������������
��������������������
���������������������
����
Pressure Wosh & More
Deck Pepoir
Fences
0uffer CIeoning
Lown Service
ond More
������������
Roofing
ROOFING
Wagner
Residential
Commercial
&
VOTED
“Best of the Best”
2009
Free Estimates
847-6630
K & L
ROOFING
• Don’t Wait For
Roofing Repair
• All Insurance
Claims Welcome
• 40 years exp.
• Financing Avail.
w/approved credit
Upgrade to a metal roof with
a class 4 fire rating & you
may qualify for a discount on
your homeowners insurance
501-249-7735
501-778-7600
210 W. SEVIER
ST. • BENTON
ARKANSAS SERVICE CO.
Roofing & Waterproofing
YRS %XPERIENCEsFREE Estimates
501.425.2995
Toll Free 877.942.1977
Senior & Veteran Discounts
Roofing
Action
Roofing Co
ROOFING AND
REPAIR!
Free Estimates
No job too large
or too small.
30 yrs. experience
501-225-4444
Tree Service
M00ߣ
ñFF0ßßñ8l£
Tߣ£ 5£ß¥l8£
501-778-8071
501-860-5911
28-Years
Experience
Insured &
Licensed
*Stump Grinding
*Take Downs
*Trimming
*Pruning
*Storm Cleanup
Parsons & Son
Tree Service LLC
“The Total Package”
Call us about
Tree Health Care
º 1rinning
º 1ake Lowns
º Pruning
º Renovals
º Stunp Renoval
º lirewood
º Oreen vaste lauling
Conplete
lnsuranoe Coverage
Owned 8 Operated
by an
lSA Lioensed Arborist
SO·L"PGA
840-1436
602-2959
Classifieds Work!
Tree Service
CRITES
& TACKETT
TREE SERVICE
~ Free Estimates ~
Workman's Comp
& Liability Insured
•Stump Removal
501-337–1565
501-337-9094
501.317.6788
ROCKIN B
TREE SERVICE
B
TRIMMING
PRUNING
STUMP GRINDING
REMOVALS
large & small
FREE ESTIMATES
Insured for
Your Protection
Excellent Clean up
Senior and
Military Discounts
available
Looking for a good
deal? Search the
Courier Classifieds!!
Legal Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF SALINE COUNTY, ARKANSAS
GREEN TREE SEVICING LLC. PLAINTIFF
V. No. 63CV-13-409-2
FLOYD H. GOODE DEFENDANT
WARNING ORDER
TO: Floyd H. Goode
You are hereby notified that the plaintiff, Green Tree Serv-
ice LLC, whose attorney is Martha Jett McAlister, Eichenbaum Liles
P.A., 124 W. Capitol Avenue, Suite 1900, Little Rock, Arkansas
72201, has filed a Complaint against you for the replevin of the 1998
Legend, 76 x 28, Manufactured Home, located at 19613 Marilyn
Dr., Hensley, AR 72065, more specifically described in the Com-
plaint, a copy of which Complaint, Notice of Petition for Order of De-
livery, and Summons shall be delivered to you or to your attorney
upon your request. You are also notified that you must appear and
defend by filing your answer or other responsive pleading within
thirty (30) days of the date of the first publication of this Warning Or-
der; and in the event of your failure to do so, judgment by default will
be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint as
circumscribed by the laws of this State.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand
and seal as Clerk of the Court on this day of Aug. 7th, 2013.
Dennis Milligan, Saline County Circuit Clerk
By: Jennifer Davis, D.C
Apartments
Unfurnished
CAMRY COURT
Now Open
in Bryant
New Construction
2 BR, 2 BA or 2.5 BA
off Wilkerson Rd.
on Sadie Dr.
(By Hill Farm Elem.)
Call Terri the on-site
manager for appt.
501-804-0125
Bldg. 1225 #2
or call Dale King
501-539-1935
Visit our web-site
www.arkansas
apartments.net
Ready to take the
Real Estate Plunge?
Check out the Homes
for Sale in the Classi-
fieds daily.
Classifieds Work!
Classifieds Work!
Apartments
Unfurnished
NOTICE: All real es-
tate advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to the Fair Housing
Act which makes it il-
legal to advertise any
preference, limitation
or di scr i mi nat i on
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or in-
tention to make any
such preference. We
will not knowingly ac-
cept any advertising
for real estate which
is in violation of the
law. All persons are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis.
Using the Courier
Classifieds is just a
smart thing to do!
Subscribe Today!!!
Classifieds Work!
Houses for Rent
2BR 1BA, 212 W
Ashley, $450mo +
$300dep No Pets!
326-3907
2BR 1BA, Kit appl
CH/A W/D conn,
$475mo + $250dep,
call 501-315-9337
between 9a-8p
3 & 4 BEDROOM
$825 -$1400 mo.,
Haskell, Benton &
Bryant. 315-9370
3 BR, 1 ba , CH/A,
kitchen appli.$675 mo
+ $500 dep. 1502
Sorrell. 612-8848
3 BR, 2 BA, quiet
neighborhood off Al-
coa Road. No pets,
$650 mo. plus dep. &
refs. 501-680-4463
3BR 1BA House,
$595 mo., 6mo. lease
No Pet s, Cal l
501-778-3324
Classifieds Work!
Houses for Rent
3BR 1.5 BA Newly
Remodeled Bryant
School Di st r i ct
$900mo + $900 Dep
Call 501-317-0422
3BR 1BA 2 Living
Rooms, Refrigerator
Furn.,Call 672-6671
3BR 2BA, very nice
CH/A carport, trash
pd, 420 South Shady
Lane, $875mo + dep
840-3694 No Pets!
Eagle Properties
LLC
315–2075
Nice 2 & 3 BR Homes
from $500 to $925
Apartments
1 BR’s from $415
2 BR’s from $475
*based on availability
Deposit & References
Required
eaglepropsaline.com
FANTASTIC HOME
4Br 2Ba 3 Car Ga-
rage 1095 Skyline
Dri ve (Al exander)
$1600mo $1600dep
Please Call 743-0930
FOR LEASE/SALE
New 3 & 4 BR, 2 BA,
brick, FP, ceiling fans,
carpet, 2 car garage,
patio. Go to: www.
catalyst-residential.com
or 501-697-6342
Low Rents
GINGLES RENTALS
501-778-2516
unfurnished
2 BR Duplex Apts
$280 per mth.
2 BR Homes
from $400 per mth
for qualified renters
References &
Deposit Required
Houses for Rent
GREAT HOME 3Br
2Ba 2 Car Garage
353 Meadow Creek
(Haskel l ) $900mo
$900dep 743-0930
HASKELL 204
GLENN OAK 3BR, 2
BA, 2 car garage.
Nice. $750 mo. $600
dep. 501-847-5377
NEW 4BR 2Ba 2 Car
garage Fenced yard
1750sq.ft. $1200mo
Benton Schools Call
326-8000
Mobile Homes
For Rent
3BR 2.5BA For Rent,
Haskell/Traskwood,
$800mo $500dep
501-315-9800
RENT OR
RENT TO OWN
CLEAN/GOOD SHAPE
‘00 16x80 3BR $570
‘95 16x72 2BR $550
‘99 16x80 3BR $530
Includes lot Rent & Ins
Lake • Fish • Walk Trail
Sunset Lake • 951-2842
$1,000 Senior 55+ special
SMALL 2BR 1Ba on
2 acres $475mo
$450dep off Springhill
Rd. Call 317-8435
Business Property
For Rent
BUSINESS PROP-
ERTY For Lease 608
S. East Street Office
with large parking
area Call 315-9337
between 9a&8p
SEEK AND YOU
SHALL FIND
Great deals in the
Courier Classifieds.
Yard Sales, Jobs,
Homes for Sale or
Rent. Check them out
daily. Call to sub-
scribe at 315-8228.
Miscellaneous
For Rent
SEE THE SATELLITE
TV Difference Pack-
ages as LOW as
$19.99/month! FREE
DVR Upgrade. FREE
HD Upgrade. FREE
Professional Installa-
tion! Call NOW and
Start SAVING!
1-866-795-9295
Miscellaneous
For Sale
SEE THE SATELLITE
TV Difference! Pack-
ages as LOW as
$19.99/month! FREE
DVR Upgrade. FREE
HD Upgrade. FREE
Professional Installa-
tion! Call NOW and
Start SAVING!
1-866-725-5125
Musical
Merchandise
Cushing
Piano Service
Tune • Repair
Player Pianos & Pump Organs
778-6584
Pets & Supplies
BENTON ANIMAL
Control & Adoption
501-776-5972
benton.petfinder.com
BRYANT ANIMAL
Control & Adoption
www.bryant.petfinder.com
www.1-800-save-a-pet.com
www.1888pets911.org
Produce
OKRA FOR Sale
557-5655
Buy • Sell • Trade
in the Classifieds
Classifieds Work!
Produce
RI PE REPORT
PEACHES! And other
various summer veg-
gies. Faulkner Lake
Orchard & Produce
503 Morris Road,
NLR. 501-961-9988
Heavy Equip-
SURPLUS EQUIP-
MENT. Online auc-
tions HUGE selection.
BIG savi ngs. NO
Buyer fees Low Seller
f ees BARGAI NS!
Register FREE Use
Promo Code cnhi313.
LIVE support.
www.SurplusOnThe.NET
334-215-3019
Autos Wanted
DONATE A CAR
Humane Society of
the United States
FREE Next-DAY
TOWING! Running or
Not. Tax Deductible.
Call Before Tax Year
Ends!
1-800-418-1562
I Buy Junk Cars
free pick-up &
Haul all types
of scrap metal
Call Jerry Toland
332-7202 • 840-6756
Looking for love in all
the wrong places????
Check out the Freebie
section in today!s
classifieds. You will
fi nd uncondi ti onal
love there FREE!
Furry & Free!!
Looking for love in all
the wrong places????
Check out the Freebie
section in today!s
classifieds. You will
fi nd uncondi ti onal
love there FREE!
Furry & Free!!
Motorcycles
2007
HONDA
VTX 1300C
Cruiser
Like new!
Only 10K miles,
Removable
Windshield,
Sissy Bar w/rack
$4,600
Pics Available
Call
501-993-6284
Mobile Homes
For Sale
$$$ 0 DOWN $$$
with your Land!
Call 501-653-3201
FORECLOSED
DOUBLEWIDE on
Private Lot. Great
Schools, Great
Location, must sell!
501-653-3201
MUST SELL 3/2 MO-
BILE HOME - MOVE, AC
& APPLI ANCES I N-
CLUDED CALL NOW:
501-407-9500
NEW 4 BR 2 BA
Home $39K includes
delivery to your prop-
erty. Call for Quick
Approval 653-3202
SEEK AND YOU
SHALL FIND
Great deals in the
Courier Classifieds.
Yard Sales, Jobs,
Homes for Sale or
Rent. Check them out
daily. Call to sub-
scribe at 315-8228.
Lots & Acreage
20 ACRES FREE!
Buy 40-Get 60 Acres.
$0-Down $198/mo.
Money Back Guaran-
tee, NO CREDIT
CHECKS Beautiful
Views. Roads/Sur-
veyed. Near El Paso,
Texas1-800-843-7537
www.SunsetRanches.com
33.5 WOODED Acres
5 minutes North of
Lake Degray on Hwy
347 Pl ease cal l
501-580-0358 for de-
tails Priced for Quick
Sale
Business Property
For Sale
FLOWER SHOP For
Sale in Benton Please
call 501-840-6681
Real Estate
CANCEL YOUR
TI MESHARE. NO
Risk Program STOP
Mortgage & Mainte-
nance Payments To-
day. 100% Money
Back Guarant ee.
FREE Consultation.
Call Us NOW. We
C a n H e l p
1-888-356-5248
Moderately Confused Herman
Crossword Challenge
Kit ‘n’ Carlyle
Celebrity Cipher
Here’s How It Works:
Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken
down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the
numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and
box. Each number can appear only once in each row,
column and box. You can figure out the order in which
the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues
already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you
name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!
Astro•graph
bernice bede osol
www.bernice4u.com.
Alley Oop
Big Nate
Born Loser
Thatababy
Frank and Ernest
Grizzwells
Monty
Arlo and Janis
Soup to Nutz
FRIDAY, AUGUST 16, 2013
Speak from the heart and share your
plans for the future with those you
feel are heading in the same direction
as you. New beginnings will lead to
greater satisfaction. Explore possibilities
and locations that could improve your
lifestyle.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) --
Experience will be your greatest asset.
Indulge in activities and events that will
broaden your outlook and prepare you
for long-contemplated changes. You
have several friendships and interests
that could be broadened and expanded.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Don’t
get caught up in a colleague or family
member’s melodrama. Distance your-
self from negativity and embrace people
who are trying to do something that
will benefit your community or a cause
you believe in.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Protect
your rights and back away from people
who are demanding too much or trying
to control your life. Stick to those who
share your concerns and you will be
much more effective.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
-- If you need to lift your spirits, you
should take a day trip or make pleasant
alterations to your home. Sharing your
thoughts with a loved one will lead to
travel or educational plans.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21)
-- Set out on an adventure and share
your knowledge and experience with
those you encounter along the way.
The people you touch emotionally and
intellectually will offer just as much in
return.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) --
Don’t let obstacles hold you back. Size
up your situation and turn a lemon into
lemonade. A partnership will undergo
change, but in the end it will help you
make a crucial decision.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
-- You’ll be drawn toward people who
enjoy discussing ideas and are willing to
try new things. The more experimental
or challenging someone or something
becomes, the more your interest will
increase.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) --
Capitalize on what you have to offer
instead of helping someone else gain
recognition. Focus on your own inter-
ests and what you can do with them.
You will make a big splash if you work
hard.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) --
Take a break, have some fun and try
new things. Embark on a journey that
stimulates you mentally, physically or
emotionally. Romance is on the hori-
zon, and a positive change is heading
your way.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
-- Don’t get down; get busy. Look for
ways to become involved in your com-
munity or help someone in need. If
you talk less and do more, you will gain
respect.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) --
Spend your time fixing up your home
and taking care of family and personal
comfort. An emotional situation with
someone you care about will result in
positive changes.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- Your
interest in diverse subjects will help you
deepen your awareness and expertise.
Setting up a space at home to work on
personal projects will ensure that you
finish what you start.
Friday, August 16, 2013
news@bentoncourier.com The Saline Courier – Page 9
ComiCs
I-30 Alcoa Exit
Next to Target
501.315.7100 BUICK • GMC
Family Owned
CUSTOMER FRIENDLY
proud
member of
Customer Scott Lovell with
Salesman Coach Hall
Custom
er Klesa Baker with
Salesm
en Cody Harm
on and Ryan Larsen
10 The Saline Courier
Friday, August 16, 2013
GM CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED SELECT MODELS AS LOW AS 1.9% APR WAC
‘10 Chevy Impala
‘11 Nissan Murano
STK #2777
STK #6773
STK #6773
‘11 Kia Forte Koup
‘05 Ford F-150
Sunroof, Alloy Wheels,
PW/PL, 25,822
‘13 GMC Sierra
TONS OF EXTRA’S! Leather, Loaded, Wheels, Tires, Z-71,
‘11 Cadillac CTS
‘12 GMC Acadia
Performace Package, Navigation,
Sunroof, Chrome Wheels, Fully
Loaded, 24,684 miles
$
14,900 $
12,900
$
25,900
$
16,900
Save
Thousands
vs New
Save Thousands
vs New
STK #3774
STK #8520
STK #8234
PW/PL, Alloy
Wheels, Spoiler,
32,388 miles
Black on Black, Sunroof,
Heated Leather, 31,234 miles
Crew Cab, Carbon Hood, Lariat Package, 20”
Wheels, Body-Kit - Ground Effects, 68,007 Miles
Denali Package, Sunroof,
Navigation, Cooled Seats,
DVD, 1,177 miles!
$
28,900
‘12 Audi Q5
Quattro Premium Plus, AWD, Sunroof,
Navigation, 11,000 miles
STK #4212
STK #231
$
39,900
This document is © 2013 by editor - all rights reserved.
AttachmentSize
E-Edition, August 16, 2013.pdf13.51 MB
View more articles in:
The Bryant Lady Hornets went 2-1 over the weekend at the Beebe/Cabot Tournament. Falling 4-3 to...
The Bauxite Lady Miners went 2-1 in the Beebe/Cabot Tourney on Saturday. Bauxite defeated Greenwood...
The Benton Panther baseball team defeated Arkadelphia 9-2 and Cabot 6-5 on Saturday in the Central...

 

Premium Drupal Themes by Adaptivethemes