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December 13, 2013

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COURIER
Volume 136
Number 347
1 Section 10 Pages
50¢
Home of Verl Harris
and Connie Britt
THE SALINE
www. bent oncouri er. com
Friday, December 13, 2013
Join us on Facebook and Twitter
A tradition of
Excellence
A Reputation
for Results
ANGIE JOHNSON Executive Broker
GRI, GRLA,SRES
501-529-1584
KAREN CROWSON Principal Broker
ABR, CRS, GRI
501-860-3000
SALINE COUNTY’S NEWS SOURCE SINCE 1876
Serving Central Arkansas Since 1957
455-1065 778-7270
Only 12 Days
til Christmas!
MISSED PAPERS
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DURING THESE HOURS
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CONTACT US
Phone: (501) 315-8228
Fax: (501) 315-1920
E-mail: news@bentoncourier.com
Write: P.O. Box 207,
Benton, AR 72018
INDEX
OBITUARIES .............................. 3
EDITORIAL ................................. 4
SPORTS .................................. 5,6
CLASSIFIEDS ............................ 8
COMICS ..................................... 9
PET CALENDAR
SALINE COUNTY
WEATHER FORECAST
FRIDAY NIGHT: Lows in the
lower 30s.
SATURDAY: Cloudy with highs
in the lower 50s.
SATURDAY NIGHT: Lows in the
upper 20s.
SUNDAY: Mostly cloudy with
highs in the mid 40s.
SUNDAY NIGHT: Lows in the
upper 20s.
MONDAY: Sunny with highs in
the mid 50s.
MONDAY NIGHT: Lows in the
lower 30s.
TUESDAY: Sunny with highs in
the lower 60s.
TUESDAY NIGHT: Lows in the
lower 30s.
The 2014 Saline Courier
Pet Calendars are now on
sale at the Courier office,
321 N. Market Street.
The calendars cost $2
each and all proceeds ben-
efit The Saline Courier’s
Newspaper In Education
program.
Taggart to take down medical shingle
Sam Taggart wears
many hats, so much so
that he’s been described as
“a Renaissance man.”
He’s an avid outdoors-
man, a passion he shares
with his wife, Dr. Annette
Enderlin, an ophthalmolo-
gist. The two enjoy travel-
ing, camping, canoeing,
small-stream fishing and
long-distance running and
biking. And Sam is well
past 100 in the number of
marathons he has run.
He’s also a successful
author of biographical and
fiction books, a playwright
and a would-be theater
director (one of his goals).
First and foremost, how-
ever, for many years, Sam
has been a doctor and a
wellness expert, enjoying a
successful medical practice
in Benton. But that role is
changing.
He’s decided it’s time
to close his practice and
move on to enjoy some of
his many other interests.
A drop-in celebration
marking his retirement is
scheduled from 2 to 4 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 15, at Family
Practice Associates, 1304
Military Road in Benton.
He invites his patients and
others to attend the event.
Sam said many people
doubted him when he
announced he planned to
retire.
“I’ve lied about retire-
ment repeatedly, so
nobody believed me at
first,” he said. “Finally,
though, I decided it was
time and informed my part-
ners that I’m leaving.”
Dr. Sam Taggart
presents a story
during a “Tales
From the South”
broadcast in
Benton. Taggart
is retiring from
his medical
practice, but
plans to contin-
ue writing plays
and books.
A retirement
reception is
set from 2 to 4
p.m. Sunday at
Family Practice
Associates,
1304 Military
Road in Benton.
Taggart invites
his patients and
others to attend
the event.
LYNDA HOLLENBECK/
The Saline Courier
OPEN UP AND SAY ... ‘HO HO HO’
Special to The Saline Courier
Santa gets a dental checkup at the Christian Community Care Clinic on Tuesday. With elf Lisa Thornton by his side, Dr.
Mike Bourns gives Santa the OK to eat all the cookies and milk left for him on Christmas Eve.
Benton, county
seek agreement
on land purchase
Benton Mayor David Mattingly has pre-
sented a letter of interest to Saline County
Judge Lanny Fite aimed at the city’s pur-
chase of two tracts of county-owned land
located south of the fairgrounds.
The 16-acre site includes county prop-
erty where the county barn is located and
a tract currently being leased to the city
for parking at Bernard Holland Park. If the
purchase is approved by both parties, that
lease becomes null and void.
The property was appraised by Yingling
Appraisal Service for $650,000 this past
spring.
In his letter to Fite, Mattingly noted
that “questions have been raised regard-
ing the amount of the acreage and value
of the property” and a new appraisal and
survey are being sought before finalizing
an offer price.
Yingling Appraisal Services has recom-
mended a survey be conducted to deter-
mine the exact tract size “as this will have
an effect on the appraised value.”
In the current plan for the new River
Center, a project approved by voters
in November, Jackman Street will be
extended westward across the old airport
location to Fairfield Street, which runs
Hospice quilt gives peace to family
Mildred Oxenrider hugged
the homemade quilt as she
spoke about how honored she
was to receive such a thought-
ful token.
Many different groups and
individuals donate from 100 to
150 quilts to Saline Memorial
Hospice House each year.
The quilts are then given to
every patient there, said Mary
Large, volunteer coordinator.
Employees match the quilts
to the individual patients, said
Kim Hammer, chaplain.
One quilt with an
Americana-type look was
special to nurse Michelle
Lawhon.
Lawhon, whose grandfather
fought at Normandy during
World War II, kept the quilt
in her office for about a year
before deciding on the person
she believed should have it.
It was at this time she
learned about Roy “Roxy”
Oxenrider, currently a patient
at Hospice House, who had
fought in the Battle at Chosin
Reservoir during the Korean
War.
“I wanted to save it for
someone special,” Lawhon
said.
“It touches your heart that
someone would make some-
thing to give to you,” said
Mildred Oxenrider, Roy’s
wife.
In Roy’s room at Hospice
House, Mildred told stories
By Sarah Derouen
sderouen@bentoncourier.com
QUILT, page 7
Displaying a special
quilt presented to
Saline Memorial
Hospice House patient
Roy Oxenrider are,
from left, Chaplain
Kim Hammer; the
patient’s wife, Mildred
Oxenrider; Mary
Large, volunteer coor-
dinator for Hospice
House; and Michelle
Lawhorn, a nurse in
the unit. The coverlet
is known as “a quilt of
valor” and was given
to Oxenrider to com-
memorate his service
during the Battle at
the Chosin Reservoir
during the Korean
War.
SARAH DEROUEN/The Saline Courier
By Brent Davis
bdavis@bentoncourier.com
AGREEMENT, page 7
By Lynda Hollenbeck
lyndahol@yahoo.com
TAGGART page 7
2 The Saline Courier
Friday, December 13, 2013
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1304 Military Rd, Benton—501-778-0934
Family Practice Associates
Monday, August 5 at 5:30pm and 6:00pm
Saturday, August 17 at 10am
Thursday, August 22 at 5:30pm and 6:00pm
Tuesday, August 27 at noon
We now offer a medically managed meal replacement
weight loss program! Designed for patients with 30 or
more pounds to lose. Current patients or new patients
are welcome. High protein, low calorie diet with proven
results! Come to one of our interest meetings held at our
office; upcoming meetings are scheduled for:
Visit www.FPABenton.com for more information!
1304 Military Rd, Benton—501-778-0934
Family Practice Associates
Monday, August 5 at 5:30pm and 6:00pm
Saturday, August 17 at 10am
Thursday, August 22 at 5:30pm and 6:00pm
Tuesday, August 27 at noon
We now offer a medically managed meal replacement
weight loss program! Designed for patients with 30 or
more pounds to lose. Current patients or new patients
are welcome. High protein, low calorie diet with proven
results! Come to one of our interest meetings held at our
office; upcoming meetings are scheduled for:
Visit www.FPABenton.com for more information!
1304 Military Rd, Benton—501-778-0934
Family Practice Associates
Monday, August 5 at 5:30pm and 6:00pm
Saturday, August 17 at 10am
Thursday, August 22 at 5:30pm and 6:00pm
Tuesday, August 27 at noon
We now offer a medically managed meal replacement
weight loss program! Designed for patients with 30 or
more pounds to lose. Current patients or new patients
are welcome. High protein, low calorie diet with proven
results! Come to one of our interest meetings held at our
office; upcoming meetings are scheduled for:
Visit www.FPABenton.com for more information!
Weight Loss Program
Nowis a great time to start planning for NewYear’s Resolutions’!!!
Wednesday, December 4 at noon
Tuesday, December 10 at 5:30pm
Wednesday, Dec 18 at noon
Friday,December 27 at noon
Thursday, Jan 2 at 5:30pm
Acupuncture is a
very effective treatment
for knee pain!
We Can Help... Call Today
Call Dr. Simmons for a FREE CONSULTATION
Dr. J. Terry Simmons
501.847.7246
BryantChiropractor.com
SALINE COURIER SCRAPBOOK 1987
Courier Photo
Travis Strandridge brings the ball down the court for the Eastside Cougars; closely shadowed by
Scott Mattingly of the Westside Bulldogs.
204 Edison Ave., Benton • 776-1050
Happy Holidays
Bedding Gallery
from
Shop with us for Your Holiday Needs
Mattress Sets, Sofas and Love Seats,
Futons, Recliners, Kids Recliners and
Chairs, Bean Bags, Shoe Chairs,
Chaise Loungers and more
• Layaways for Christmas • Financing Available
• No Credit Check • Best Quality for LESS Money
DAILY DISPATCH
Benton Police
Department:
Thursday
•A man was cited for
public intoxication and shop-
lifting near Waffle House on
South Highway 5.
•A woman reported a
package was stolen from her
porch on Kensington Drive
in Benton.
•A woman was cited for
disorderly conduct at Radio
Shack on Military Road.
•A woman reported an
individual stole several items
from her residence on Alcoa
Road.
•A woman reported a
man assaulted her on North
Conrad Street.
•A woman reported a res-
idential burglary on North
Highway 5.
•A woman reported a grill
was stolen from her resi-
dence on Congo Road.
Saline County
Sheriff’s Office
Thursday
•A man reported a theft
on Sierra Place Drive in
Alexander.
•A woman reported an
individual tampered with her
mail on Whipple Drive in
Alexander.
•A man reported a theft
of fuel on Congo Road in
Benton.
Benton Fire
Department:
Benton firefighters
responded to two rescue
calls, two medical calls and a
smoke detector malfunction.
Bryant Fire
Department:
Bryant firefighters
responded to three medical
calls.
Daily Dispatch is published daily in The Saline Courier as
reports are received from local law enforcement agencies. Daily
Dispatch articles are edited for brevity and relevancy, and con-
tain only information provided by law enforcement. Content
written by Sarah Derouen, a reporter for The Saline Courier.
LITTLE ROCK — A
detention hearing is set in
Little Rock for a Chinese
scientist accused of trying
to steal seed samples from
a company’s research facil-
ity in Kansas.
Wengui Yan, who lives
in Stuttgart, has a hear-
ing scheduled for 3 p.m.
Friday. On Thursday, fed-
eral prosecutors in Kansas
charged Yan and Weiqiang
Zhang, of Manhattan, Kan.,
with conspiracy to steal
trade secrets.
The federal complaint
says Yan worked for
the U.S. Department of
Agriculture as a rice geneti-
cist at the Dale Bumpers
National Rice Research
Center in Arkansas. Zhang
worked as an agricultural
seed breeder for an uniden-
tified company.
They each face up to 10
years in prison and fines.
Zhang has a detention
hearing set for Tuesday in
Kansas City, Kan.
Hearing set
for scientist
charged in
seed case
Associated Press
Hearing begins in case over
Arkansas gay marriage ban
LITTLE ROCK —
Lawyers for the state and the
Faulkner County clerk asked
a judge Thursday to dismiss
a lawsuit that seeks to allow
gay marriages in Arkansas.
A number of same-sex
couples sued in July, two
weeks after the U.S Supreme
Court issued two rulings
supporting gay-marriage
laws. They claim a 2004
constitutional amendment
approved by Arkansas vot-
ers, which defines marriage
as between one man and one
woman, should be thrown
out.
Some of the couples
want Arkansas to recognize
same-sex marriages from
other states. Others want the
opportunity to marry. They
say the federal court deci-
sion supports them.
But Assistant Attorney
General Colin Jorgenson
said the voters’ will —
Amendment 83 passed by
a 3-1 margin — could not
be thrown out because the
state’s residents had a right
to determine their own con-
stitution.
“Domestic relations laws
are the province of the
states,” he said, adding the
U.S. Supreme Court rulings
“did not say states must rec-
ognize same-sex marriage.”
At the end of a three-hour
hearing, the judge did not
indicate when he might
rule — or how, telling law-
yers that he typically knows
which way he is leaning
while considering a request
to throw out a case.
“I’m floating on a creek
right now,” Pulaski County
Circuit Judge Chris Piazza
said.
The couples claim that the
state’s constitution includes
a provision that guaran-
tees rights for all people.
Jorgenson says that while
that is true, the people can
make changes.
“That’s what the people
have done with Amendment
83,” he said.
Jorgenson also said an
1851 case cited by the
couples as a precedent —
which saw a constitutional
amendment overturned —
involved a change made by
legislators. Jorgenson said
that decision made clear that
the people have the right to
make the same change.
In addition to the request
to end the lawsuit, Pulaski
County Circuit Judge Chris
Piazza was asked to prevent
the state from enforcing the
anti-gay-marriage amend-
ment.
That injunction request
applied only to couples who
were married out-of-state
but are not recognized as
married here. Lawyer Jack
Wagoner said one couple
is expecting a child in early
2014 and wants to register
as a same-sex couple on the
child’s birth certificate.
Wagoner said it would
be an extraordinary step for
Piazza to dismiss the lawsuit
outright. He said a prelimi-
nary injunction was in order
because the couples were
suffering irreparable harm
by the state not recognizing
their relationships.
Associated Press
Darr to reimburse Arkansas for improper spending
LITTLE ROCK — A state
audit released Thursday
documents more than
$12,000 in improper expens-
es incurred by Lt. Gov.
Mark Darr, who pledged to
repay the money.
The report by the
Division of Legislative
Audit said Darr broke state
rules that govern spending
with his state credit card
and travel reimbursement.
Auditors found that Darr,
a Republican, had claimed
$9,836 in improper reim-
bursement for travel and
expenses and said he should
pay it back.
The audit, which covered
the fiscal year ending June
30, 2012, also said Darr
“charged $2,339 on a state
credit card for personal
expenses.”
Of the credit card sum,
Darr reimbursed $1,202 to
the state and submitted a
copy of a July 1, 2012 pay-
ment of $1,137 to pay off the
rest of the amount.
“A credit for this amount
could not be located on the
credit card statements,”
the audit report stated.
“Personal expenses of
$1,137 have not been reim-
bursed as of the date of this
report.”
The report was released
Thursday, but it is dated
Nov. 12. Audit reports
remain unavailable until
they are presented to a leg-
islative committee, which
happened on Thursday.
Darr said in the report he
wasn’t aware he was being
improperly reimbursed for
travel and noted that no
problems had been pointed
out over three years and
prior audits.
“Had this been brought
to our attention earlier, I can
assure you it would have
been addressed properly,”
Darr said in the report. “I
acknowledge the errors I
have committed, and I am
endeavoring to make full
restitution.”
Darr’s spokeswoman,
Amber Pool, said the lieu-
tenant governor had no com-
ment beyond his response
included in the report.
Darr has been in office
since 2011. His duties
include presiding over the
state Senate and serving as
acting governor when the
governor is out of state.
He had been seeking the
GOP nomination for the 4th
Congressional District seat
being vacated by Republican
U.S. Rep. Tom Cotton but
dropped out during the sum-
mer when questions were
raised about his campaign
finances by lawyer and lib-
eral blogger Matt Campbell.
Darr filed a complaint
against himself with
the Arkansas Ethics
Commission, which is inves-
tigating Darr’s spending
while in office and while
he was a 2010 candidate.
Campbell also filed a com-
plaint with the panel.
Darr said earlier that the
lieutenant governor’s race
marked the first time he ran
for office and that he made
mistakes on his campaign-
finance reports. Darr said he
intended no wrongdoing.
He is just the latest
Arkansas public official
to face ethics allegations.
Democratic state Sen. Paul
Bookout resigned in July
after the Ethics Commission
said he spent thousands
of campaign dollars on
clothing, home theater
equipment and other per-
sonal items. The panel fined
Bookout $8,000 and repri-
manded him.
Treasurer Martha
Shoffner, a Democrat,
resigned in May after she
was arrested and accused of
steering state investments to
a bond broker who gave her
more than $36,000 in cash.
Shoffner, a Democrat, faces
a federal trial in March.
Associated Press
Consumers’ big purchases lift hopes for US economy
WASHINGTON —
Americans ramped up
spending at retail businesses
in November, providing a
boost to the economy just in
time for the holidays.
But traditional retail
stores didn’t benefit as
much from the latest burst
of spending. Consumers
bought more cars, electron-
ics, furniture and other
big-ticket items. They also
did more shopping online.
Those trends reflect chang-
es in consumers’ shopping
habits and in the broader
economy.
Total retail sales rose 0.7
percent in November, the
Commerce Department said
Thursday. It was the biggest
gain in five months. And
spending at retail businesses
rose 0.6 percent in October,
higher than previously esti-
mated.
Steady hiring and modest
wage gains have boosted
consumers’ confidence and
given them more money
to spend. Big increases in
stock and home prices have
also driven up household
wealth. Stock indexes have
reached record highs this
year, disproportionately ben-
efiting wealthier households.
Those trends are prob-
ably pushing up sales of
more-expensive goods. Auto
sales jumped 1.8 percent in
November, furniture pur-
chases increased 1.2 percent
and sales at electronics and
appliance stores rose 1.1
percent.
“Consumers who have
money are spending and
spending big,” said Diane
Swonk, chief economist at
Mesirow Financial. “Those
who don’t aren’t.”
Sales of everyday items,
such as clothes and grocer-
ies, fell last month. And
sales at sporting goods out-
lets and department stores
barely rose. That partly
reflects steep discounting as
many shoppers still demand
bargains before they buy.
But it also suggests
Americans cut back on
smaller purchases after
splurging on cars and other
large items. And it reflects
shifts in where Americans
do their holiday shopping.
“You can see why tradi-
tional retailers were squirm-
ing,” Swonk said.
Many large chains and
industry groups have issued
gloomy reports on the holi-
day shopping season. The
National Retail Federation
estimates that sales during
the four-day Thanksgiving
Day weekend dropped 2.9
percent to $57.4 billion com-
pared with last year. That
was the first decline in the
seven years the group has
tracked the data.
And other industry data
have shown that, so far,
fewer Americans have vis-
ited malls and brick and
mortar stores compared
with last year.
But more people are
shopping on their comput-
ers. Online and catalog
sales rose 2.2 percent in
November from the previ-
ous month — the biggest
month-over-month gain
since July 2012. In the past
year, online sales jumped 9.4
percent. That’s double the
4.7 percent increase in total
retail sales.
Michael Niemira,
chief economist at the
International Council of
Shopping Centers, pointed
to another factor that could
illustrate the growing health
of the consumer. Americans
plan to purchase nearly $30
billion in gift cards this year,
according to a survey by the
retail federation, a record
high. Yet purchases of gift
cards don’t count as sales in
either industry or govern-
ment data. Those sales are
tallied when the cards are
redeemed.
Associated Press
Friday, December 13, 2013
The Saline Courier 3
My
Answer
By Doug
Hawkins
FUNERAL HOME & INSURANCE
NARROWAY & MAIN, BENTON, AR 72015
778-2544 • 847-3371
www.ashbyfuneralhome.com
ONE STEP
CLOSER TO
HEAVEN
Many individuals who choose
to be cremated direct family
members to place their cremated
remains in places that they loved
while alive. Very often, these
wishes will be carried out at sea,
in gardens, or even major league
ballparks. Thus, it should come
as no surprise that technology
has finally caught up with peo-
ple’s dreams of spending eternity
in outer space. The company that
makes all this possible has com-
mitted itself to placing the cre-
mated remains of those wishing
to do so in an orbiting spacecraft
that will orbit the earth for sev-
eral months, after which it will
re-enter the earth’s atmosphere in
a fiery ball. This “space burial”
appeals to those fascinated with
space and space travel.
Should cremation be your
choice, we are here to assure that
your intentions are met. Preneed
planning may be the way to
ensure that your death is dealt
with according to your individu-
alized taste. ASHBY FUNERAL
HOME can provide you with a
wide variety of preneed options.
Reach us today at 778-2544
(Benton), or 847-3371 (Little
Rock) and we will schedule an
initial, confidential meeting to
discuss preneed. You are invited
to tour our tastefully appointed
facility, conveniently located at
108 West Narroway. We have
been family-owned and operated
for four generations. Preneed
may be for you. “Because We
Care”
“If the doors of perception were
cleansed every thing would
appear to man as it is, Infinite.”
William Blake
In Loving Memory
Tina Marie
Wingate
Love,
Doug & Doris Oliver & Mike, Shelby
and Syndey Wingate
We would like to thank you,
Ashby Funeral Home, ER Staff, Dr. Menard,
ICU Staff, Bauxite High School,
Brother Jason Tallent of Holland Chapel,
First Southern Baptist Church and the hundreds
of other people that shared prayers and
love to the family.
OBITUARIES
Elizabeth Lovett ‘Betty’ Valachovic
Elizabeth Lovett “Betty” Valachovic of Little Rock passed
away Tuesday, Dec. 10, 2013. She was born Dec. 19, 1925,
in Texarkana, the daughter of Paul Eugene and Lela Nelson
Lovett.
She was married on June 18, 1944, to Ernest Valachovic,
Sr., who was a political reporter for the Arkansas Gazette.
Ernest died on Oct. 15, 1968, when Betty was only 42 years
old; she never remarried.
She has three children: Ernie Valachovic Jr.
and wife Wanda of Benton, Pat Crocker and
husband Gary of Coral Gables, Fla., and Carol
Bohannan and husband Terry of North Little
Rock.
Also surviving are four grandchildren, Kristen
Adcock and husband Nick, Bethany Waldo,
Chance Bohannan and Nate Bohannan; two
great-grandchildren, Will and Reagan Adcock;
a special “daughter,” Mary Boyd Finch Boudreau and her
family.
Betty left the Arkansas Education Association (where
she had worked for 13 years) to serve as an administrative
aide for then-gubernatorial candidate Bill Clinton. After
the successful election, she was offered the opportunity to
work as the executive director of the Arkansas Optometric
Association. She worked there for 18 years until her retire-
ment in August 2000.
She served as president of the International Association
of Optometric Executives and the Arkansas Society of
Association Executives. She received the First Virgil
Deering Optometric Executive Director of the Year award
given at the American Optometric Association Congress
for outstanding services to the optometric profession by an
executive director. She also was the first non-optometrist to
be awarded the Distinguished Service Award given by the
Arkansas Optometric Association. Betty has received numer-
ous other professional service awards, but there are too
many to list.
Betty was a member of the Women’s Emergency
Committee to Open Our Schools during the Central High
School crisis. She served as president of the Pilot Club of
Little Rock, served on the board of the Ouachita Girl Scout
Council and served in almost every capacity (including
president) of the PTA organizations of her children’s schools
when they were growing up. She was very active in Life
Quest and was in charge of the travel log classes.
She was a member of VOSH (Volunteer Optometric
Service to Humanity) group and went to several third world
nations on service trips.
She was a founding volunteer at the Clinton Library. She
loved being a member of this very special volunteer family
and playing an active part in supporting a wonderful facility
that allows so many people from all across the world to take
pride in President Clinton’s service to the country. She was
scheduled to be honored this week by President Clinton
with a special award for her volunteer work.
She had traveled extensively and loved to see new places.
She was active up until the time of her death.
She was adored by everyone who knew her and “Maw
Maw” will be greatly missed by her family and friends.
A memorial service is scheduled for 3 p.m. on Monday,
Dec. 16, at Roller-Chenal Funeral Home, 13801 Chenal
Parkway in Little Rock. Visitation will be held one hour prior
to service.
Memorials may be made in loving memory of Betty
Valachovic to Project 222 (African Mission Trip), in care of
Deep Well Campus Ministries, P.O. Box 10614, Conway, AR
72034; the Arkansas Optometric Scholarship Fund, Southern
College of Optometry, 1245 Madison Ave., Memphis, TN
38104; or to a favorite charity of choice.
Online guestbook: www.rollerfunerlahomes.com/chenal
Kayla Suszette King Harrington
Kayla Suszette King Harrington, 39, of Benton joined her
Ma and Pa in heaven on Dec. 11, 2013.
She was born May 3, 1974, to Richard King and Sara
Davis Jones.
She dearly loved her children and her family. She loved
to spend time with family and friends. Kayla never meet a
stranger. She was always happy.
She was preceded in death by her grandparents, Joe and
Sue Davis, and Ed and Leta King, all of Benton.
She is survived by three children, Blake, Bryson and
Alayna Harrington, all of Benton; her fiance, Robert Gilbert;
her father, Richard King, mother, Sara Davis Jones (Robert),
sisters, Riki King Bagley (Greg), Brittany Synnott Bryant
(Dustin), Kelli Pauley; her brother, Dennis King; uncles and
aunts, Rick and Lesa Davis, Steve and Judy Davis, Tony and
Diane Keene, Ron and Sherry King, Guy King, and Micki
King; her nieces, Laura Bagley, Anabelle and Macy Bryant;
her nephews, Brock and Brett Bagley; and lots of other rela-
tives.
A memorial service will be held at 2 p.m. Saturday, Dec.
14, at Ashby Funeral Home in Benton.
Online guest book: www.ashbyfuneralhome.com.
Marlene Lynette Perrow
Marlene Lynette Perrow, 60, of Lonoke passed from this
life on Dec. 5, 2013, with her family by her side. She was
born in Benton to her parents George and Dixie Smith on
Sept. 18, 1953.
Marlene loved the outdoors, fishing, watching
movies and collecting rocks, but was at her best
when she was spending time with her family
and friends, especially her grandbabies.
She was preceded in death by her father,
George “Mutt” Smith; one son, Robert McCool;
and her grandson, Preston Crutchfield.
She is survived by her husband, Tom Perrow,
along with her daughters, Kristi McCool-Spray, Casey
Perrow and Carrie Middleton. She is also survived by her
sons, Tom Perrow III and Travis Perrow; her grandson,
Chris Crutchfield; her granddaughters, Presley and Delaney
Perrow; one brother, Eddie Smith;her sisters, Denise
Scarbrough and Lisa Henley; and her father and mother-in-
law, Thomas Perrow, Sr. and Virginia Perrow.
A celebration of life will be held at noon Saturday, Dec.
14, in the chapel of Dial & Dudley Funeral Home in Bryant.
Matthew ‘Matt’ Wade Withrow
Matthew “Matt” Wade Withrow, 55, of Bryant passed
away on Friday, Dec. 7, 2013.
He was preceded in death by his father, Vernon Withrow,
and his mother, Beulah Withrow.
He is survived by his wife, Sinda Sue; his three sons,
Edward Withrow of Hot Springs, Eric Withrow and wife
Tamera of Denver, Colo., and Korey Withrow and wife
Madeline of Bryant.
Also surviving are three brothers, James Michael Withrow
of Garland, Texas, Robert Lee Withrow of Russellville, and
Terry Lee Withrow of Hot Springs. He also was a wonderful
grandfather to five grandchildren.
Matt was known as a family man with a gentle heart. He
was willing to help his family and his neighbors with any-
thing they needed, including maintenance and yard work.
He enjoyed spending time in the garden and loved his job
and the people he worked with. He was known and liked by
many people, and will be missed by them all.
A private memorial service will be held at a later date.
Arrangements are by Dial and Dudley Funeral Home.
Perrow
Valachovic
PAID OBITUARIES
TODAY
CRAFT WORKSHOP: ANGEL:
Ages 18 and older are
invited to a craft workshop
at 10 a.m. Friday, Dec. 13
at Herzfeld Library. The
class will be led by mem-
bers of the Saline County
Cooperative Extension
Homemakers group and
requires no registration.
All supplies are provided.
December’s theme is holi-
day angels. Call 778-4766 for
more information.
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 14
BRYANT SENIOR ACTIVITY
CENTER has changed the
date of the “Barn Dance”
fundraiser to Saturday,
Dec. 14. The dance will be
held at 11617 Alexander
Road in Mablevale from
6-9 p.m. There will be door
prizes and live music. For
more information call 501-
943-0056 ext 3.
CHRISTMAS FOR KIDS
FUNDRAISER is set for
Saturday, Dec. 14 from 10
a.m. to 6 p.m. at Holland
Chapel Family Life Center.
Guests are asked to bring a
toy. For more information
call Gene Gray at 501-337-
3432 or Kristi at 501-249-
8826.
FREE COMMUNITY YARD
SALE will be Saturday, Dec.
14 from 8 a.m. to noon
at Grape Chapel Church
Fellowship Hall located
at 7100, Arkansas 298 in
Benton.
MONDAY, DECEMBER 16
HABITAT HOMEOWNERSHIP
APPLICATION MEETING is
set for Monday, Dec. 16 at
6 p.m. at Herzfeld Library in
benton. Anyone interested
in owning a home should
plan to attend.
HANDS OF HOPE cancer
support group will meet
Monday, Dec. 16 at 6:30 p.m.
at Western Sizzlin in Benton. 
This month the challenge
project is  “Bring one person
that has been instrumental
in making you the gift you
have become.” For more
information call Linda
Hankins at 501-939-9823 or
email l.hankins@outlook.
com.
GAME ON!: Teens are invited
to play video and/or board
games from 3:30-5 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 16 at Herzfeld
Library. Call 778-4766 for
more information.
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17
PUPPET SHOW: All ages are
invited to a family-friendly
puppet show at 4 p.m.
Tuesday, Dec. 17 at Herzfeld
Library. Call 778-4766 for
more information.
BRYANT HISTORICAL
SOCIETY will meet Tuesday,
Dec. 17 at 6:30 p.m. at the
Boswell Library in Bryant.
This is an important meeting
for planning for next year
including election of offi-
cers. Please attend. Anyone
interested in the history and
heritage of Bryant and the
preservation of that history
in encouraged to attend. For
more information, call 501-
249-9655.
WEDNESDAY,
DECEMBER 18
BLOCK PARTY-LIBRARY
LEGO CLUB: Ages 4-14 are
invited to create a Lego
masterpiece from 3:30-5
p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 18
at Boswell Library during
the monthly Block Party. A
new theme is explored each
month. Call 847-2166 for
more information.
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 19
GENEOLOGY/LOCAL
HISTORY HELP: Steve
Perdue, head of genealogy/
local history at the Saline
County Library, will be
available to answer your
genealogy and local history
questions from 9 a.m. to 5
p.m. Thursday, Dec. 19 at
Boswell Library in Bryant.
Call 778-4766 to make an
appointment.
Sharon Extension Club
will celebrate its annual
Christmas Party at 10 a.m.
on Dec. 19 at the Saline
County Fairgrounds. The
Club will furnish a meat
tray and members are to
bring pot luck. A $10.00 gift
exchange will take place and
members are to bring three
wrapped gifts for Bingo.
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 21
BREAKFAST WITH SANTA,
sponsored by Benton Parks
& Recreation, will be held
Saturday, Dec. 21 begin-
ning at 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. at
the Gene Moss Building at
Tyndall Park. Ben E. Keith
is providing the breakfast.
There will also be craft
tables and photo opportuni-
ties.
OPERATION GIVE HOPE
Dance Party 2013 is set
for Sunday, Dec. 21 from 5
p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Benton
Event Center. The event is
to help gather donations
for families in need for
Christmas. Snacks and drinks
will be provided by local
merchants. Admission is free
to all guests.
MONDAY, DECEMBER 23
CHRISTMAS CLOSING: Both
branches of the Saline
County Library will close at
5:30 p.m. Monday, Dec. 23
and will remain closed until
9 a.m. Thursday, Dec. 26 in
observance of Christmas Eve
and Christmas Day. Call 778-
4766 for more information.
TUESDAY, JANUARY 14
THEOS, A SUPPORT
GROUP FOR WIDOWS AND
WIDOWERS: 5 p.m. Jan. 14
for its regular monthly meet-
ing and Bingo.
SALINE COUNTY EVENTS
Email calendar items to news@bentoncourier.com or call 501-315-8228 ext. 236.
Calendar items are intended for nonprofit organizations.
House GOP conservatives help propel budget bill
WASHINGTON — After a
sweeping vote by conserva-
tive Republicans controlling
the House and President
Barack Obama’s Democratic
allies, a bipartisan budget
pact is in the hands of
the Senate, where it will
encounter stronger but prob-
ably futile resistance from
Republicans.
The modest package
passed by the House on
Thursday would ease the
harshest effects of another
round of automatic spending
cuts set to hit the Pentagon
and domestic agencies next
month. Supporters of the
measure easily beat back
attacks on it from conser-
vative organizations that
sometimes raise money by
stoking conflict within the
Republican Party.
At the same time,
Democrats who were upset
that the bill would not
extend jobless benefits for
the long-term unemployed
suppressed their doubts
to advance the measure to
the Democratic-led Senate,
where Obama’s allies appear
set to clear it next week for
his signature.
Senate Majority Leader
Harry Reid, D-Nev.,
said Friday morning he
would confer with GOP
leader Mitch McConnell of
Kentucky to push consider-
ation of the budget agree-
ment sooner.
Senate Democrats
promise to force a vote on
extending unemployment
benefits when the chamber
reconvenes next year. They
hope that political pressure
after 1.3 million people lose
their benefits on Dec. 28
will force GOP leaders to
knuckle under and extend
aid averaging under $300 a
week to people who’ve been
out of work longer than six
months.
The bipartisan bill
breezed through the House
on a 332-94 vote, with lopsid-
ed majorities of Republicans
and Democrats alike voting
in favor.
Thursday’s vote was a big
win for House Speaker John
Boehner, R-Ohio, who earli-
er in the day lobbed another
salvo at conservative interest
groups that routinely attack
Republicans for supporting
legislation they deem not
conservative enough. But
that is what Republicans can
achieve given the realities of
a divided Washington.
“If you’re for reducing
the budget deficit, then you
should be voting for this bill.
If you’re for cutting the size
of government, you should
be supporting this budget,”
Boehner said. “These are
the things that I came here
to do, and this budget does
them. Is it perfect? Does it
go far enough? No, not at all.
I think it’s going to take a lot
more work to get our arms
around our debt and our
deficits.”
Republican Sen. Marco
Rubio of Florida criticized
the deal, saying it takes the
country in the wrong direc-
tion.
“I mean, compromise just
for the sake of compromise,
so we can feel good about
each other, I don’t think is
progress for the country,”
Rubio said Friday on CBS
“This Morning.”
“We have a government
that continues to spend
more money than it takes in
at an alarming pace. That is
going to trigger a debt crisis.
It is stifling job creation. It is
holding American ingenuity
back,” Rubio said.
The measure would bring
a temporary cease-fire to the
budget wars that have grid-
locked Washington for much
of the three years since
Republicans reclaimed con-
trol of the House. It leaves in
place the bulk of $1 trillion
or so in automatic cuts slam-
ming the Pentagon, domes-
tic agencies and Medicare
providers through 2021 but
eases an especially harsh set
of cuts for 2014 and 2015.
Nobody is claiming the
pact worked out between
high-profile Wisconsin Rep.
Paul Ryan, the Republican
Party’s vice presidential
nominee last year, and
Senate Budget Committee
Chairwoman Patty Murray,
D-Wash., a 21-year veteran
of the Senate, is perfect. It
eases $63 billion in sched-
uled spending cuts over the
next two years and replaces
them with longer-term
savings measured over 10
years, many of which don’t
accumulate until 2022-2023.
Deficits would increase by
$23.2 billion in 2014 and by
$18.2 billion the year after
that.
Associated Press
“Congress shall make no law ... abridging the freedom
of speech, or of the press ... .”
— From the First Amendment to Constitution
“T
he world is getting smaller all the time”
may be a well-worn phrase, but nonethe-
less it is true. I recently read a tweet that
included a factoid regarding something a great num-
ber of people use each day.
Facebook.
I read about statistics related to an average minute
for users on the popular website. It said that every
minute, 208,000 photos are uploaded to Facebook.
This might not sound like much on the
surface when you consider there are
more than 1.1 billion users who spend
700 billion minutes on the social media
platform each month.
I’m about to get into an analysis of
numbers, but I will try to keep it simple.
First, lets look at the 208,000 photos.
Assume a photo takes 10 seconds to
upload. I think this is a fair number.
Some load faster. Some take longer.
Variables that affect upload speed are
the file size of the photo and the indi-
vidual Internet connection. So, let’s do
the math. 208,000 photos times 10 sec-
onds each equals 2.08 million seconds.
Breaking it down further by hours and finally to days,
we come to an interesting number. The combined
time it takes to upload the 208,000 photos one after
the other from one minute on Facebook at 10 sec-
onds each equals the same amount of time contained
in 24 days.
Even more startling is when you break down the
700 billion minutes spent by individuals on the site
each month. It amounts to 1,331,811.26 years!
In simpler terms, it’s 1.3 million years.
Thanks to Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Google
and many other instant means of communication, we
no longer have to wait to find out what we want to
know. We can see it, hear it and read it right from the
palm of our hand through a smartphone.
If Miley Cyrus twerks with Vladimir Putin in the
middle of Red Square in Moscow, we will know it
before you can say Hannah Montana.
If President Obama shakes the hand of a dictator
half the world away, we will see it faster than you can
say, if you like your insurance plan, you can keep it.
I think you get the point. The world has indeed
become a smaller place.
This Christmas season, the challenge becomes to
make it even smaller.
Imagine if your whole world revolved around your
immediate and extended family, your church fam-
ily and those people who matter most to you. How
long would it take to gather facts about, say, the
new grandchild in the family or the cousin who got
married or the uncle that passed away? Would the
time it takes to find out these facts compare favor-
ably with the time we spend searching out what Kim
and Kanye gave each other for Christmas or if Jean-
Claude Van Damme really did do the splits in that
Volvo truck commercial?
Unfortunately, for some people, the only fam-
ily they have is their online family. In this respect,
Facebook is a good thing. It connects people who
had long since become strangers to one another.
For those of us who are lucky to still have a for-
tune in family ties around us, shrink the world, even
if it’s only for a week or so. We might find that our
smaller world is all we really need.
*****
On Thursday, Dec. 19, my column will include
the poem I publish each year during the Christmas
season. I did not write the poem. I received it in the
mail six years ago from someone I had not heard
from in years. She found out my father had died in
Septmber of the same year. The poem is about realiz-
ing our departed loved ones were spending their first
Christmas in Heaven with the angels. When I read
it, I cried harder than I ever remembered crying.
Actually, it felt good.
My mother passed away in March of this year and
the hole her death created is tough to fill, especially
this time of the year. My parents loved the holidays.
The poem helped me with the deep sense of loss
I was feeling at the time. I hope it does the same for
anyone who needs it.
Brent Davis is editor of The Saline Courier. He can
be reached at bdavis@bentoncourier.com.
“W
e have just enough
religion to make us
hate,” wrote Jonathan
Swift, “but not enough to make
us love one another.” A lifelong
religious controversialist, the 18th-
century Irish satirist definitely knew
whereof he wrote. After all, it’s fewer
than 20 years since Protestants and
Catholics in Northern Ireland quit
dynamiting each other’s gathering
places.
Even here in the United States,
it often seems that picking fights
over religion increases during the
Christmas season. If anything, claim-
ing to be persecuted while express-
ing contempt for
others’ beliefs
appears on the rise.
And, no, I’m not
talking only about
the annual invoca-
tion of paranoid
triumphalism Fox
News calls the “War
on Christmas.” Nor
even about noted
theologian Rush
Limbaugh assail-
ing Pope Francis
as a “Marxist” for
criticizing the tyranny of markets and
the worship of money. Because Jesus
was all about capital formation and
tax cuts for the wealthy.
Everywhere you look, somebody’s
insulting somebody else’s religion.
To me, the cultural left’s only mar-
ginally better than the right. I recent-
ly witnessed a remarkable online
colloquy concerning a Catholic orga-
nization’s shipping 3,000 rosaries to
the Philipines to victims of Typhoon
Haiyan, “so that they can thank
God,” as one cynic wrote.
“Do these people ever use their
minds for one second?” one person
asked. “Hearing this is thoroughly
depressing. It shows how ignorant
and warped so many people are and
how daunting is the amount of edu-
cation there needs to be to cure the
world.”
Cure it of what, I wondered. Of
typhoons? Of charity? Or merely
of belief? Almost needless to say,
Roman Catholic churches worldwide
were taking up special collections for
storm victims in that largely Catholic
nation -- along with religious and
humanitarian organizations world-
wide.
“They are vultures sweeping down
on those in need to shove more con-
trol down their throats,” wrote anoth-
er. “I have nothing but contempt for
the Catholic church and religion as a
whole.”
News flash: The world will never
be cured.
Meanwhile, how this kind of
free-floating rage differs from
Bible-beating preachers who blame
earthquakes and tornadoes on other
people’s sexual sins escapes me. The
main characteristic of the fundamen-
talist mind is an inability to refrain
from expressing contempt for beliefs
different from one’s own -- whether
one’s spiritual example is Pat
Robertson or Christopher Hitchens.
Which brings us back to Sarah
Palin’s remarkable appearance at the
late Jerry Falwell’s Liberty University
last week -- the last stop on a tour
publicizing her book “Good Tidings
and Great Joy: Protecting the Heart
of Christmas.”
“I say in a very jolly Christmasy
way,” the Alaskan babbler claims,
“that, ‘Enough is enough.’ Say
enough is enough with this politi-
cally correct police out there that is
acting to erode our freedom to cel-
ebrate and exercise our faith. Some
Scrooge wants to force Christ out of
Christmas and wants to ban Jesus
out of the reason for the season?”
To hear Palin tell it, there’s a veri-
table army of “angry atheists armed
with an attorney” who “want to try to
abort Christ from Christmas” by fil-
ing lawsuits “when they see a plastic
Jewish family on somebody’s lawn --
a Nativity scene, that’s basically what
it is, right?”
Actually, no.
But never mind theology, here’s
the deal: If Palin or anybody else can
provide a single, verifiable instance
of somebody being successfully
sued for exhibiting a creche, a cross
or any religious symbol on private
property anywhere in the U.S., they’d
have something to complain about.
They’d also have the certain sup-
port of the American Civil Liberties
Union in defense of their First
Amendment rights.
But of course that’s not what these
(to my mind overblown) fights over
Nativity scenes at courthouses, city
halls and state capitols around the
country are about. Instead, they’re
about an “establishment of religion,”
which the same First Amendment
categorically forbids.
In typical scattershot fashion, Palin
even invoked Virginia’s own Thomas
Jefferson, a conventionally pious
Founding Father in her mind, who
would, like, totally object to the per-
secution of people like her who can’t
make everybody admit that their God
is America’s God:
“I think Thomas Jefferson would
certainly recognize it and stand up
and he wouldn’t let anybody tell him
to sit down and shut up.”
Now it’s definitely true that
Jefferson was rarely shy about his
religious views. Courtesy of Martin
Longman in Washington Monthly,
here’s Jefferson’s opinion about
what Palin calls “the reason for the
season” from an 1823 letter to John
Adams: “The day will come when
the mystical generation of Jesus, by
the supreme being as his father in
the womb of a virgin will be classed
with the fable of the generation of
Minerva in the brain of Jupiter.”
Like Swift, Jefferson recognized
the dangers of religious strife.
That’s precisely why, he assured
Connecticut Baptists in 1802, the
First Amendment decreed “a wall
of separation between church and
State.”
A wall that protects us still.
Gene Lyons can be reached at
eugenelyons2@yahoo.com.
Picking fights over
religion
EDITORIAL CARTOON
T
here’s nothing like the holiday
season to make you really appre-
ciate the blessings you have in
life and to also to make you think about
those less fortunate.
As Americans we hear all the time
about starving people in other countries.
The images of hungry, bedraggled chil-
dren are drilled into our minds from
organizations such as Feed the Children
and hundreds of other commercials and
advertisements. Those stories are heart-
breaking and definitely make us want to
help as much as we can.
My husband and I found a wonder-
ful organization called
“Compassion International”
and we have been spon-
soring a young man from
Ecuador for almost two
years now.
But sometimes we for-
get that there are needs
right here in our own
country, too. And, more
importantly in our own
community!
This became apparent to
me a few years ago when
I was assigned to do a
story on the Arkansas Rice
Depot. The organization
has a goal to feed all hungry children
in Arkansas. This really surprised me
because at the time I wasn’t even aware
there were “hungry children” in our state.
I just assumed that with all the gov-
ernment programs out there, food pan-
tries and free meals at school, that kids
weren’t going hungry.
Trust me, writing that story was quite
an eye-opener.
The Arkansas Rice Depot accomplish-
es its goal by filling up backpacks with
ready to eat foods and donating them
to schools to be distributed. Its motto is
simple: A hungry child can’t learn. I had
never thought about it before, but some-
times the meal at school is the only one
that child gets in an entire day.
I applaud the Arkansas Rice Depot and
all it is trying to do. In addition to the
backpacks for school kids, the agency
also provides food for senior citizens.
That was another shocking fact the story
brought to my attention.
When you think of people being “hun-
gry,” a lot of times the first thing that
comes to mind is a homeless person,
but more and more these days with the
rising costs of medication, our elderly
population is having to make the decision
whether to buy life-saving drugs or food.
That’s not a choice anyone should have
to make.
And speaking of the homeless, it
wasn’t something I ever thought about
until I moved to a bigger city. In the
small town where I grew up and worked,
it wasn’t an issue. We didn’t have people
living under bridges or standing on street
corners holding up signs that said “hun-
gry.”
The first few months I lived in the
Little Rock area, I almost went broke
donating to every single person I saw
holding a sign. I finally figured out I
could do more by donating to food banks,
churches or local charities. I also learned
pretty quickly that if the ones on the
street corners were really and truly hun-
gry, they would be happy when I brought
them a burger from McDonalds, instead
of handing them cash. If they looked at
me like I was nuts, they couldn’t be all
that hungry and maybe had a trip to the
local liquor store in mind instead.
My father-in-law taught me that les-
son. He ran into a guy at a gas station
one time who greeted him with a sad
story about how he was out of work and
couldn’t buy groceries for his kids, so he
takes the man to the local Kroger, buys
him a week’s worth of groceries, and the
guy actually got mad and said, “can’t you
just give me cash?”
Seriously?
I would have been one angry Good
Samaritan! But I guess it really isn’t that
important because it’s the thought that
counts and when you do something kind
for someone in need, it truly does matter.
What they do with your gift isn’t impor-
tant; it’s the generosity in which it was
given.
I know you’ve all heard “it’s better to
give than to receive” and you may have
thought, “yeah, right,” but I have to tell
you, it felt pretty good at Family Church
Bryant this past Thanksgiving to buy gro-
ceries for families who wouldn’t have had
a Thanksgiving dinner any other way. It
also felt pretty good last weekend buying
gifts to fill up Christmas stockings for the
children at Second Chance Ranch.
So take the time and look around you.
Trust me, you’ll find plenty of opportuni-
ties to help out, right in your own back-
yard.
And remember, what goes around,
comes around.
Camille Nesler is a resident of Saline
County. Her column appears each Friday
in The Saline Courier.
Lend a helping
holiday hand
Has the digital
age taken over
our holiday?
• The Saline Courier (USPS 050-660) is published daily by Horizon Publishing Co., 321
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©Copyright 2006 Horizon Publishing Co.
Columns and cartoons on the opinion page do not necessarily reflect
opinions of The Saline Courier. Weekend delivery times are no later than
7 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. The circulation department has re-delivery
scheduled from 5 to 7 p.m. Monday-Friday and from 7 to 9 a.m. Saturday
and Sunday. Call 501-317-6013 or 501-315-8228 during business hours.
THE SALINE COURIER
Founded in 1876
Phone: (501) 315-8228 • Fax: (501) 315-1230 • Email: news@bentoncourier.com
VICKI J. DORSCH
BUSINESS MANAGER
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DAVID WILLS
ADVERTISING DIRECTOR
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ANDREW STOVALL
CIRCULATION DIRECTOR
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PATRICIA STUCKEY
COMPOSING DIRECTOR
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RICKY WALTERS
PRESS FOREMAN
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STEVE BOGGS • Publisher
publisher@bentoncourier.com
BRENT DAVIS • editor
bdavis@bentoncourier.com
CAMILLE
NESLER
OUTSIDE
THE BOX BRENT
DAVIS
COMMON
SENSE
Page 4 – The Saline Courier
news@bentoncourier.com Friday, December 13, 2013
OPINION
GENE
LYONS
Friday, December 13, 2013
sports@bentoncourier.com The Saline Courier – Page 5
SPORTS
SALINE
SCOREBOARD
WEDNESDAY
Basketball
Cabot Pre-Holiday Tourney
Bryant (G) def. W. Chap. 54-41
Vilonia def. Benton (G) 54-50
THURSDAY
Basketball
Cabot Pre-Holiday Tourney
Searcy def. Benton (G) 44-42
Benton (B) def. Wat. Chp. 42-35
Conway Tourney
Bryant (B) def. Hot Sprgs 64-59
TODAY
Basketball
Bauxite at Nashville, 5 p.m.
BHG at Mayflower, 5 p.m.
Benton vs. Springdale, 5 p.m.
Football
ROUND 3 PLAYOFFS
Glen Rose vs. Smackover, 7 p.m.
SATURDAY (Dec. 21)
New Mexico
Colo. State vs. Wash. St.
Las Vegas
Fresno St. vs. USC
Famous Idaho Potato
Buffalo vs. San Diego St.
New Orleans
LLU vs. Tulane
MONDAY (Dec. 23)
St. Petersburg
East Carolina vs. Ohio
TUESDAY (Dec. 24)
Hawaii
Boise St. vs. Oregon St.
THURSDAY (Dec. 26)
Little Caesars Pizza
Bowling Green vs. Pitt
Poinsettia
N. Illinois vs. Utah St.
FRIDAY (Dec. 27)
Military
Marshall vs. Maryland
Texas
Minnesota vs. Syracuse
Fight Hunger
BYU vs. Washington
SATURDAY (Dec. 28)
Pinstripe
Notre Dame vs. Rutgers
Belk
Cincinnati vs. UNC
Russell Athletic
Louisville vs. Miami (FL)
Buffalo Wild Wings
Michigan vs. Kansas State
MONDAY (Dec. 30)
Armed Forces
Midd. Tenn. vs. Navy
Music City
Georgia Tech vs. Ole Miss
Alamo
Oregon vs. Texas
Holiday
Arizona St. vs. Texas Tech
TUESDAY (Dec. 31)
AdvoCare V100
Arizona vs. Boston
College
Sun
UCLA vs. Virginia Tech
Liberty
Rice vs. Miss. St.
Chick-fil-A
Duke vs. Texas A&M
WEDNESDAY (Jan. 1)
Gator
Nebraska vs. Georgia
Heart of Dallas
North Texas vs. UNLB
Capital One
S. Carolina vs. Wisconsin
Outback
LSU vs. Iowa
BCS Rose
Mich. St. vs. Stanford
BCS Fiesta
Baylor vs. Central Florida
THURSDAY (Jan. 2)
BCS Sugar
Alabama vs. Okla.
Friday (Jan. 3)
BCS Orange
Ohio St. vs. Clemson
Cotton
Missouri vs. Okla. St.
SATURDAY (Jan. 4)
BBVA Compass
Vandy vs. Houston
SUNDAY (Jan. 5)
GoDaddy
Ball State vs. Ark. State
MONDAY (Jan. 6)
BCS National Title
Florida St. vs. Auburn
2013-14 NCAA
BOWL SCHEDULE
Beavers vying for finals berth
GLEN ROSE — The
Glen Rose Beavers (12-
1), along with every other
Arkansas football team
remaining in the playoffs,
have not touched a football
field for a game in two
weeks. Thanks to a winter
storm that blanketed most
of the state in snow and ice,
Head Coach Mark Kehenr
and company have been
forced to take some much
unneeded or unwanted time
off.
“This is basically two
bye weeks in the same
playoffs,” Kehner said. “We
were disappointed we didn’t
play, but still understand
why.”
The Beavers earned a
bye week in Round 1 after
finishing the regular season
9-1 (7-0 in 5-3A play). This
week Glen Rose is set to
tango with the Smackover
Buckaroos (12-1) with a
finals berth hanging in the
balance.
“We have got to increase
the speed of our game for
this one,” Kehner said.
“That is hard for us to
simulate until we get out
there and try to get used to
it. They can all fly. That is
going to be a challenge for
us, just to catch them and
keep up with them.”
The Beavers have
made easy work of their
opponents thus far in the
playoffs, winning by a com-
bined 90-7 in two games
(48-0 over Lavaca and
42-7 over Green Forest).
Smackover has also had a
rather leisurely stroll thus
far as well, beating Paris
41-19, Melbourne 41-13 and
Little Rock Episcopal 36-15.
But just like Glen Rose,
the teams that Smackover
has played has not pos-
Panthers top Wildcats
JAY MANNING/jaysphotodesign.com
Junior Glen Rose running back Carlos Burton throws a stiff-arm to the chest of a Fountain Lake defend-
er during a 5-3A conference game earlier this season. Burton and company are looking for a second
straight 3A finals berth tonight when they take on Smackover at 7 p.m. at Harmony Grove. Glen Rose is
looking for its 12th consecutive victory of the season.
By Josh Briggs
jbriggs@bentoncourier.com
CABOT – Undermanned
and undersized on
Thursday at the Cabot Pre-
Holiday Tournament, the
Benton Panthers played
stingy defense in the sec-
ond half to come away with
a 42-35 victory over the
Watson Chapel Wildcats,
holding them to just nine
shots total in the second
half.
“We had to stop them
in the transition,” Benton
Coach Dwaine Fishburn
said. “They score over
a third of their points in
transition offense as well as
offensive put backs. I think
we limited them to maybe
five offensive rebounds
total. They’re used to scor-
ing 15, 20 points on offen-
sive rebounds. Our kids
did such a good job.”
Watson Chapel, which
beat Searcy 50-39 in the
first round, have three play-
ers at least 6-5 and would
lead 14-8 late in the first
quarter before the Panthers
put together a run. Senior
Josh Bowling would get
an and-1 layup and hit the
free throw, senior Tarek
Beaugard picked off a pass,
was fouled and hit two free
throws, and sophomore
Clay Anderson would hit
two free throws to give the
Panthers (3-2) a 15-14 lead
after one.
TONY LENAHAN/The Saline Courier
Sophomore Panther Clay Anderson, 1, is fouled while making a basket in Benton’s 42-35 win over
Watson Chapel on Thursday in the Cabot Pre-Holiday Tournament. Anderson scored 7 points, hitting 5
of 5 free throws for the game. Benton will play in the tourney final on Monday at 8:30.
Hogs pick
it up in
2nd half
FAYETTEVILLE - For
one entire half the Arkansas
Razorbacks played down to
their level of competition
before defeating the strug-
gling Savannah State Tigers
72-43 Thursday night before
5,654 at Walton Arena.
Savannah State, a small
predominantly black college
in the MEAC (Mid-Eastern
Athletic Conference) play-
ing for an athletic depart-
ment payday guarantee with
Arkansas needing a game
just before breaking for final
exams, dropped to 2-9 but
only trailed Arkansas by 2 at
the half.
Paced by Ky Madden’s
career-high 21 points, 13
in the first half when the
Razorbacks desperately
needed them, Arkansas
advances to 7-2 before
breaking for exams at
the UA running Saturday
throughThursday morning.
Arkansas’ next
game is next Thursday
night against Tennessee-
Martin at Walton Arena.
Freshman center Bobby
Portis scored 10 Arkansas
points, double-doubling with
a game-high 11 rebounds
Thursday night, while
Arkansas senior forward
Coty Clarke grabbed 10
BEAVERS, page 6
PANTHERS, page 6 HOGS, page 6
By Nate Allen
Razorback Report
By Tony Lenahan
tlenahan@bentoncourier.com
Lady Panthers fall flat in Cabot
TONY LENAHAN/The Saline Courier
Junior Braylee Landreth, 45, drives in the Lady Panthers’ 44-42 loss to the Searcy Lady Lions at the
Cabot Pre-Holiday Tournament on Thursday. Landreth scored 19 points and grabbed nine rebounds.
CABOT – Leading by
10 at halftime, the Benton
Lady Panthers didn’t score
a point in the third quarter
on their way to a 44-42 loss
to the Searcy Lady Lions
at the Cabot Pre-Holiday
Tournament on Thursday.
Benton, which defeated
Searcy 70-59 in the Searcy
Classic this season, suf-
fered its second consecu-
tive loss, going 0 for 9 with
six turnovers in the third
quarter.
“That’s been the story
in all five of our games,”
Benton Coach Jerry
Chumley said. “We play
well for a half or three
quarters, but we haven’t
put together a full game
yet. For whatever reason,
right after halftime, we got
wild and we got selfish,
and it just kind of snow-
balled. It went through
the team and nobody was
doing anything well. What
little leadership we had
left the building early third
quarter.”
Down 11-7 early after a
layup by 6-5 post Angelina
Williams, the Lady
Panthers (3-2) would go
on a 14-3 run begun by
senior Allison Reynolds’
put in and capped by junior
Braxton Chumley’s 8-foot
running jumper to give
Benton a 21-14 lead with
2:37 left in the first half.
Junior Braylee Landreth
had a jumper and offensive
rebound and put back dur-
ing the run.
Benton would close the
half on a 6-0 run capped by
Chumley’s 3-pointer with
three seconds left for a
27-17 halftime advantage.
The Lady Panthers came
out flat in the third quarter
as Searcy used Williams’
size to hurt Benton inside.
Williams scored 8 of the
Lady Lions’ 14 third-quar-
ter points, many of them
easy buckets.
By Tony Lenahan
tlenahan@bentoncourier.com
LADY PANTHERS, page 6
6 The Saline Courier Friday, December 13, 2013
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sessed a well-rounded
defense, leaving key parts
of the oppositions offense to
run rampant.
Glen Rose, paced by run-
ning back Carlos Burton,
has been able to run past
its opponents by use of
the ground game but with
an occasional toss for a
touchdown in the playoffs.
Burton has blown last year’s
impressive resume out of
the water this season and is
just shy of a 100 yards rush-
ing from eclipsing 2,000
on the year to go with 32
touchdowns.
The speedster has been
put in another role for the
Beavers as well hoping to
make a difference this week
— safety. With Burton’s
speed, combined with that
of fellow running back
Austin Kehner, quarter-
back Clay Holicer and wide
receiver Kyle Peterson, the
trio is looking to shutdown
what has shown to be a
decent passing game.
The Buckaroos bring
back their coach on the
field in junior quarterback
Logan Clark. the receiv-
ing core is not big by any
means, but it is fast with
5-foot, 10-inch senior Reid
Malone leading the charge.
Juniors Elmore Hempstead
(6-foot) and Jackson Martin
(5-foot, 10-inches) to round
out the wide outs for
Smackover. The Buckaroos
own an All-3A double
punch at running back with
seniors Fabian Sims and
Kevante Lowery manning
the backfield on Fridays.
One of the biggest weak-
nesses, though, has been
the linemen on both sides
of the ball, something
Burton and the rest of the
Beavers could be looking to
take advantage of.
Glen Rose and the
Buckaroos will be playing
at a neutral sight due to
field conditions at Beaver
Stadium. Kickoff is set for
7 p.m. at Sykes Stadium on
the campus of Harmony
Grove.
After an offensive
rebound and put in by
Searcy, senior Luke
Vincent nailed a 3-pointer
assisted by sophomore
Cason Maertens and the
Wildcats would never lead
again. Senior Blake Bowlin
followed with another
3-pointer to put Benton
up 21-16 with 4:14 left in
the half. Searcy tied it at
24-24 after a 3-pointer, but
Maertens would drive to
the basket for a layup with
three seconds left to put
the Panthers up 26-24 at
the half.
Offense came to a halt in
the third quarter as Searcy
could not take advantage of
its size down low.
“It wasn’t just Josh and
Blake stopping their post
players,” Fishburn said.
“The key tonight was our
guards did such a tre-
mendous job helping our
post play. We got them in
foul trouble. Offensively
we kept taking it down to
them. It wasn’t just one
person scoring. There
were multiple people. Our
guards played big for us.
They made all the differ-
ence in the world.”
The Panthers outscored
the Lions 3-2 in the third
to lead 29-26 going into
the fourth. A 31-30 Panther
lead with 3:28 left in
the game turned into a
38-31 lead quickly when
Anderson started the run
with an and-1 bucket and
free throw, Bowling hit two
free throws and Beaugard
laid it in with a pass from
Bowling.
Though the Panthers
shot just 35 percent from
the field, Benton hit 12 of
14 from the free-throw line
and committed just two
turnovers all game (forcing
13), which has been the
theme of Benton basketball
this season. Fishburn said
he hasn’t seen so few turn-
overs this far into a season
in his 25 years of coaching.
“One big key for us,
I’ve never coached a team
and never seen one do
this, we’re only averaging
around five or six turnovers
per game,” he said. “With
the pressure we’re seeing,
that’s an amazing feat. That
shows some maturity. If we
get 12 turnovers or less,
that’s amazing. That’s a
good statistic.”
Despite their lack of
size and depth (Benton
played just six players), the
Panthers were outrebound-
ed by just one, 19-18, and
outrebounded the Lions
10-7 in the second half.
Bowling led the Panthers
with 15 points, seven
rebounds, five steals and
three assists. Anderson
and Bowlin (five rebounds)
added 7 points each,
Beaugard had 6 points,
three rebounds, two
assists and two steals, and
Maertens had 4 points, two
assists and two steals.
Benton will host
Springdale tonight before
playing in the Cabot Pre-
Holiday Tournament
Championship on Monday
at 8:30 p.m.
boards and scored eight
points in 17 minutes.
Michael Qualls,
Arkansas’ leading scorer
and rebounder coming into
the game, sat out the entire
first half because he was
late for a practice, Arkansas
Coach Mike Anderson said,
but started the second half
and finished with 7 points
and one of Arkansas’ 10
blocked shots including five
by freshman center Moses
Kingsley off the bench.
Arkansas gagged on its
first-half cupcake leading
Savannah State just 27-25 at
intermission.
Only junior guard
Madden, 6 of 7 from
the first-half field while tal-
lying 13 first-half points,
brought his Arkansas
A-game in the first half.
“I didn’t force it,”
Madden said. “I just hap-
pened to be open and my
teammates hit me in the
right place at the right
time.”
The rest of the Hogs shot
4 of 21 from the first-half
field and didn’t capitalize on
12 first-half Savannah State
turnovers.
The visiting Tigers led
3-0 on Alante Penner’s
3-pointer.
It marked Savannah
State’s only lead, but the
Tigers had it tied 12-12
after trailing 9-5 and never
trailed by more than 5 first-
half points.
Arkansas surpassed 6
points as a lead for the first
time (36-29) on a Madden
to Qualls dunk with 15:38
left in the second half.
Arkansas achieved its
first double-digit lead (43-
31) on freshman center
Moses Kingsley’s field goal-
and-1 3-point play at 10:44.
Three-pointers by
Alandise Harris and
Madden had the Hogs soar-
ing 51-35.
Madden’s final basket, a
three at 4:02 before being
removed to a nice ovation at
3:23 had the Hogs up 61-37.
The junior guard from
Lepanto via East Poinsett
County High hit 3 of 4 treys
for the game and for the
game shot 8 of 11 from the
field and 2 for 2 from the
line.
“He is playing with a lot
of confidence,” Anderson
said. He is playing instinc-
tively 29 minutes and no
turnovers. And I always
thought he was capable of
scoring. He did in high
school, but now that we
have guys who can score
inside people have to pay
attention to that.”
Alante Fenner and Deven
Williams led Savannah State
with 10 points each.
Anderson, celebrating
his 54th birthday, joked
that Thursday’s first half
didn’t age him but certainly
“matured” him.
“It wasn’t easy with that
first half,” Anderson said.
“Savannah State controlled
tempo. The second half
we played Razorback bas-
ketball and our defense
wreaked havoc. This is a
young team getting ready
for final exams, but that’s
no excuse. We were flat
and didn’t make shots and
weren’t in an attacking
mode. It was a grinding
game at their pace and we
had to turn the tide and get
them playing the way we
want to play.
Arkansas senior guard
Rickey Scott, a nice game
off the bench with 7 points
in 13 minutes, said there
was no first-half panic
though Anderson firmly set
a different tone.
“Coach Anderson told
us come out in the second
half with more energy,”
Scott said. “They had their
half now show them what
Razorback basketball is.”
Savannah State Coach
Horace Broadnax, said he
knew the other shoe would
fall on his Tigers in the sec-
ond half.
“I kind of knew we could
hang with them for a few
minutes,” Broadnax said.
“But I knew their relent-
less pressure would wear
us down and it did. They
killed us on the glass (48-
35) and they got into a
rhythm and started shoot-
ing jump shots. They
weren’t making shots early
and didn’t get too many
opportunities off their
press I guess, but over
the 40-minute stretch he
got accomplished what he
wanted.”
Broadnax recalled
coaching against one of
Anderson’s Missouri teams
under similar circumstanc-
es and that “we hung with
that team for a half then
ran out of gas at about the
11-minute mark and we ran
out of gas tonight.”
“We told them at half-
time [the Lady Lions] were
going to come out and give
us their best shot,” Coach
Chumley said. “They were
down 10 and we built a
lead. We didn’t accept that
challenge. Everybody was
trying to do things they’re
not good at and they got
back in the game. We just
have to learn there’s five
of us out there, we have to
play together and we have
to play for four quarters.
Benton trailed 31-27 after
three and 41-35 with 2:39
to play after to Williams’
free throws, but the Lady
Panthers didn’t give up.
Chumley picked up a steal
and a lay up and Landreth
hit a 12-foot jumper to get
within 2 with just over a
minute remaining. Chumley
would hit two free throws
to make it a 43-41 Benton
deficit. The Lady Panthers
had a chance to tie it when
Landreth went to the line
with 6.8 seconds left, but
missed the first free throw.
Landreth led Benton
with 19 points and nine
rebounds, Chumley had
13 points on 2 of 4 from
3-point range, added three
assists and three steals.
Reynolds scored 8 points.
For Searcy, Williams
scored 16 of her 22 points
in the second half, added
12 rebounds and three
blocks.
“When we started doing
poorly on the offensive
end, it trickled down on
the defensive end,” Coach
Chumley said. “We got soft,
didn’t get in the passing
lanes and this team has yet
to talk well together. They
haven’t bought in to some
of the little things we have
to do to be a good team on
both ends.”
The Lady Panthers will
take on the Springdale
Lady Bulldogs at Benton
Arena after junior varsity
plays, which begins at 5
p.m.
Lady Panthers
From page 5
Beavers
From page 5
Hogs
From page 5
Panthers
From page 5
TONY LENAHAN/The Saline Courier
Senior Panther guard Tarek Beaugard goes up for a layup in Benton’s 42-35 win over Watson Chapel
at the Cabot Pre-Holiday Tournament on Thursday. Beaugard finished with 6 points, three rebounds,
two steals and two assists. The Panthers play Springdale tonight at Benton Arena.
Friday, December 13, 2013
The Saline Courier 7
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of the battle that Americans
initially expected would be
an easy defeat.
In November 1950, troops
from the U.S. Marines, U.S.
Army, and the British Royal
Marines set up around the
Chosin Reservoir, “a frozen,
man-made lake high in
the Hamgyong mountains
that supplied hydroelectric
power to the industrial cit-
ies on the coastal plain,”
according to CNN.
“They were preparing for
what they believed would
be the Korean War’s final
offensive. The North Korean
Army teetered on the brink
of defeat; men expected ‘to
be home for Christmas’,”
according to CNN.
What they did not know
was that they were sur-
rounded by about 80,000
Chinese soldiers. With
temperatures at minus 34
degrees, they were not only
fighting men, they were
fighting the cold.
Of the 15,000 U.S. troops
involved, more than 3,000
died in the battle, according
to CNN.
Roy Oxenrider was
wounded but was able to
escape.
In an earlier account from
The Benton Courier, he
described the experience.
“Finding a tree limb for
a crutch, we followed the
commander and moved
cautiously throughout the
night. At one point, the
Chinese walked by us. We
lay quietly among the dead.
There were so many they
never noticed us.”
Roy and Mildred met
while he was in the Korean
War. They have been mar-
ried for 62 years, and have
one daughter, Tami, who
is a quilter herself. Tami
told her mother that the
quilt she received was made
using the Quilt of Valor pat-
tern.
The Oxenrider family has
decided that they will bury
the quilt with Roy.
“He is an awesome guy,”
Mildred said. “He is my
hero. I always told him
that.”
Quilt
From page 1
north and south and provide
saccess to Sunset Lake.
In his letter to Fite,
Mattingly has proposed the
construction of a parking
lot that would be beneficial
to the River Center and the
Saline County Fairgrounds.
A parcel of land behind the
current rodeo arena at the
fairgrounds would be the
site for the proposed lot. The
extension of Jackman Street
would create access to the
lot on the south side of the
fairgrounds. Mattingly noted
that the “approximately 7.88
acres would be conducive to
the city as an overflow park-
ing area for major events
held at the River Center.
The city would be willing
to construct a parking lot
by doing the necessary
site preparation, covering
the area with appropriate
ground cover and maintain-
ing it via a lease agreement.”
The parking area would
be fenced and accessible
from two different sides.
Mattingly noted, adding,
“We would honor the coun-
ty’s requirement to use the
parking lot during specific
times of the year when they
need additional parking.”
The proposal must be
approved by the Benton
City Council and the Saline
County Quorum Court.
Attorneys for both entities
currently are involved in a
review of the proposal. If
approved, the city and the
county hope to finalize the
agreement by mid-2014.
Agreement
From page 1
He said he didn’t intend
to mark the event with an
occasion. “I didn’t want
a party. I just thought I’d
wrap it up and fade into the
background, but then they
changed my mind.”
The focus of the event,
he said, is to express his
appreciation to his patients
and other community resi-
dents with whom he’s been
associated during his years
of practice.
“And we’ll enjoy showing
off our photographs that we
have on display here from
the 1930s and 1940s,” he
said.
He noted that his wife
plans to retire later in the
year and the two plan to
travel extensively while he
also works on additional
writing projects.
“I’ve been working a
book for the Arkansas
Health Department,” he
said. “The Arkansas Times
is publisher and the U of A
Press will distribute it.
“It’s about the evolution
of health and disease in
Arkansas over
the last 200 years with
special emphasis on the
evolution of public health in
last 100 years.”
He explained his writing
process.
“The way I write general-
ly is that I’ll work on a book
for three or four years,
complete the story, then set
it aside. I don’t look at it at
all for a while, then go back
to it, work on it another six
months or so, then turn it
over to the editors.”
He said he’s looking for-
ward to several additional
writing projects in the midst
of the traveling he and his
wife are planning.
“We’ve got several places
we want to go — some
where we’ve never been
and a number we want to
go to again. We spent a lot
of time in the Tetons and
Yellowstone in September
and we’ve visited Utah tak-
ing pictures.”
The couple resides in Hot
Springs.
“We bought a fishing
cabin on Lake Hamilton and
we lived in it part-time for
a few years till we realized
we were spending more
time over there than at our
home in Benton. So we
bought a house three doors
down from the cabin — a
nice, cozy bungalow, and
that’s where we live now.”
The couple are a two-
some now, but for 20 years
the family included a cat
named Gracie. They also
have adult children and
grandchildren.
Looking back on his
career, Sam said he first
came to Benton in 1972
“when Saline Memorial had
interns coming to work in
the ER. I was among that
first group of interns.”
“After that I finished my
training, went into the to
Army, and returned in 1977
to start practicing medi-
cine.”
That was a good move,
he said.
“I’ve never regretted my
decision to come to Benton
to practice medicine. I have
become really close to a lot
of my patients.
“As I flirted with retire-
ment during the last two
years, I encouraged my
patients to establish rela-
tionships with other doc-
tors,” he said. “It’s been
a fun time. We started in
September helping a lot of
people arrange to go some-
where else.”
Sam said he looks for-
ward to what the coming
years offer, but is grateful
for the relationships he
made in the doctor-patient
role.
“I’ll be concentrating
some on my writing,” he
said. “I’ve got another play
in mind, and I really do
want to direct.”
His last play, “Nobody’s
Business,” played to sell-
out audiences at the Royal
Theatre.
“And there are more
stories coming out of that
play,” he said.
And now he’ll have time
to write them.
Taggart
From page 1
CLASSIFIEDS
PLACE AN AD
FIND AN AD
Listings are divided by category.
To get your ad in the Courier,
call 501-315-8228 Monday
through Friday, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.,
online at bentoncourier.com,
come by the offce at 321 N.
Market St. in Benton or mail
to: PO Box 207, Benton,AR
72018. We accept Visa,
MasterCard, Discover, and
American Express.
WHEN TO CALL
FOR ADS APPEARING | CALL BEFORE
Tuesday –––––––––––– Mon Noon
Wednesday –––––––––– Tues. Noon
Thursday ––––––––––– Weds. Noon
Friday –––––––––––––– Thurs. Noon
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WHAT
IT
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YARD
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4 lines – 3 days – $18.68*
4 lines – 7 days – $29.28*
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Cost includes ad and yard
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Just go to website and
follow the steps.
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}
}
}
}
}
*Price doesn’t include charge for graphic, TMC
rate, or internet. Price is subject to change.
Page 8 – The Saline Courier
class@bentoncourier.com Friday, December 13, 2013
Public Notice
Public Notice
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF SALINE COUNTY, ARKANSAS
4TH DIVISION
IN RE THE ADOPTION OF E.C.
(4/10/2007), A MINOR Case No. 63PR 13-242-4
WARNING ORDER
The Respondent, Enrique Cortez, is warned to appear in this Court
within 30 days from the date of the first publication of this warning or-
der or face entry of judgement by default or be otherwise barred from
asserting his interest.
Witness my hand and seal of this Court this 13 day of November,
2013
By: Doug Curtis, Clerk • L Brown, DC
Legal Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF SALINE COUNTY, ARKANSAS
2ND DIVISION
THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON AS
TRUSTEE FOR CIT MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2007-1 PLAINTIFF
VS. CASE NO. 63CV-13-622-2
BENJAMIN B BOYETTE; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
BENJAMIN BOYETTE; TENANTS OF 2418 RICHLAND PARK,
BRYANT, AR 72022; CENTENNIAL BANK DEFENDANTS
WARNING ORDER
TO THE DEFENDANT: BENJAMIN B BOYETTE
You are hereby warned to appear in this court within thirty (30) days
from the first date of publication of the Warning Order and answer
the complaint of the Plaintiff wherein the property or thing to be af-
fected is described as follows:
LOT 20, RICHLAND PARK SUBDIVISION TO THE CITY OF
BRYANT, SALINE COUNTY, ARKANSAS.
Commonly known as: 2418 Richland Park, Bryant, Arkansas 72022.
Your failure to file a written answer within thirty (30) days may bar
you from answering or asserting any defense you have.
Given under my hand and seal of said court this 5th day of
December, 2013.
DENNIS MILLIGAN, COMMISSIONER
By: Elizabeth Alvarado, D.C.
Prepared by: Robert S. Coleman, Jr.P.A., Bar No. 91144
Marinosci Law Group P.C.
1405 North Pierce, Suite 306, Little Rock, Arkansas 72207
(501) 663-6200 (501) 663-6201 (fax)
Legal Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF SALINE COUNTY, ARKANSAS
2ND DIVISION
THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON AS
TRUSTEE ON BEHALF OF CIT MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2007-1 PLAINTIFF
VS. CASE NO. 63CV-13-622-2
BENJAMIN B BOYETTE; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
BENJAMIN BOYETTE; TENANTS OF 2418 RICHLAND PARK,
BRYANT, AR 72022; CENTENNIAL BANK DEFENDANTS
WARNING ORDER
To the Defendent: The Unknown Spouce of Benjamin B. Boyette
You are hereby warned to appear in this court within thirty (30) days
from the first date of publication of the Warning Order and answer
the complaint of the Plaintiff wherein the property or thing to be
affected is described as follows:
LOT 20, RICHLAND PARK SUBDIVISION TO THE CITY
OF BRYANT, SALINE COUNTY, ARKANSAS.
Commonly known as: 2418 Richland Park, Bryant, Arkansas 72022.
Your failure to file a written answer within thirty (30) days may bar
you from answering or asserting any defense you have.
Given under my hand and seal of said court this 5th day of
Deccember, 2013
DENNIS MILLIGAN, COMMISSIONER
By: Elizabeth Alvarado, D.C.
Prepared by:Robert S. Coleman, Jr., P.A., Bar No. 91144
Marinosci Law Group, P.C.
1405 North Pierce, Suite 306, Little Rock, Arkansas 72207
(501) 663-6200 (501) 663-6201 (fax)
Legal Notices
IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT
EASTERN DISTRICT OF ARKANSAS
WESTERN DIVISION
REBECCA L. NICHOLS PLAINTIFF
VS. NO. 4:13-CV-0124SWW
TRI-NATIONAL LOGISTICS, INC.; DEFENDANTS
RMR DRIVER SERVICES, INC.; JAMES PARIS, IN HIS INDIVID-
UAL CAPACITY; CHARLES KYE, IN HIS INDIVIDUAL AND OFFI-
CIAL CAPACITIES; AND DONALD LEWIS, IN HIS INDIVIDUAL
AND OFFICIAL CAPACITIES
WARNING ORDER
TO: JAMES PARIS
You are hereby notified that the Plaintiff, Rebecca Nichols, whose
attorney is David A. Hodges of The David Hodges Law Firm, Centre
Place, Fifth Floor, 212 Center Street, Little Rock, AR 72201, has filed
a Complaint against you seeking a monetary judgement. A copy of
the Complaint and Summons shall be Delivered to you or to your at-
torney upon your request. You are also notified that you must appear
to defend by filing your Answer or other responsive pleading within
(30) days of the date of the first publication of this Warning Order;
and in the event of your failure to do so, judgement by default will be
entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint as cir-
cumscribed by the laws of this state, and you will be forever barred
from answering and asserting your interests.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and seal as
Clerk of the Court on this 22nd day of November, 2013.
James McCormack, U.S. District Clerk • Vicki Turner, Deputy Clerk
Legal Notices
NOTICE OF SALE OF ABANDONED VEHICLES
Newcomb Wrecker and Recovery
218 Edison Ave, Benton, AR, 72015 • 501-860-4252
By Arkansas Law everything has been done to notify owners of the
following vehicles. Registered owners and lien holders were notified
by certified mail or are unknown. All parties that feel they have any
claim to these vehicles must contact Newcomb Wrecker within 10
days of this notice / publication. If we have not been contacted the
vehicles will be dismantled, destroyed, or sold at public sale.
VEHICLE VIN#
2000 Pontiac Grand Am 1G2NW52E7YM723749
1998 Chevrolet Monte Carlo 2G1WW12M9W9292799
2008 Chevrolet Malibu 1G1ZK577184234987
2007 Honda Civic 1HGFA16837L075036
1991 Ford Aerostar 1FMDA31U5MZA57485
2005 Dodge Ram 1D7HA18N35J618880
2000 Jeep Cherokee 1J4GW58S6YC162882
Garage Sales
FREE COMMUNITY
Yard Sale. Sat, Dec.
14th, 8a-12p @
Grape Chapel Church
Fellowship Hall. 7100
Hwy 298- Benton
I BUY Junk Cars
Call Jerry Toland
332-7202 • 840-6756
Auctions
ABSOLUTE AUCTION -
Commercial Buildings
& Land - Cabot, AR.,
On Site & Webcast
Bidding, Thurs., 12-19
at 10am 61,000 sf.
bldg / 6 ac. and 4,000
sf bldg. , at 1100 W.
Elm St & 203 S. 10th
Street, 200 ac Next
to Golf Community off
Cobblestone Drive,
Gr eyst one Bl vd.
www.auctionEbid.com
(479) 790-5513 • Paul
Colvin AALB #1103
Adoption
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Open or closed adop-
tion. YOU choose the
family LIVING EX-
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by!s One True Gift
Adoptions Call 24/7.
1-866-459-3371
Personal
FEEL THE Vibe- Ur-
ban women and men
ready to MAKE THE
CONNECTION. Call
singles in your area!
Try FREE! Cal l
1-800-915-1039
HAVE FUN and find a
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The next voice on the
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could be the one. Call
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1-800-955-3137.
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MEET SINGLES right
now! No paid opera-
tors, just real people
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greetings, exchange
messages and con-
nect live. Try it free.
C a l l n o w
1-877-939-9299
WHERE LOCAL Sin-
gles Chat- Real call-
ers in YOUR area!
Fun and Discreet!
Live 1-on-1 phone
chat. Try FREE! Call
1-800-404-6851.
Let the
Courier Classifieds
work for you.
Call Cathy or Kim
to place your
Classified Ad.
Mon.-Fri. 8am-5pm
315-8228
or come by
321 N. Market St.
Health & Beauty
30-80% OFF Pre-
scription Drugs! Wide
range of Products &
Services. Licensed
Pharmacists Avail.
For Consult. Able to
fulfill ALL of your Pre-
scr i pt i ons. CALL
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for info CODE CN29
www.TotalCareMart.com
Health Services
CANADA DRUG
CENTER Safe and af-
fordable medications.
Save up to 75% on
your medi cat i on
n e e d s C a l l
1-800-304-6217
$10.00 off first pre-
scription and FREE
Shipping
Employment
15 DRIVER TRAIN-
EES NEEDED NOW!
Become a driver for
Empire Express. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! New Driv-
ers can earn $800+
per week! Call for de-
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CDL DRIVER TRAIN-
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Roehl is a Certified
"Top Pay Carrier"!
NEW Drivers can
earn $750/ week! No
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you get t rai ned!
1-888-528-7112.
CNA'S & LPN's
NEEDED. Apply in
person at Sheridan
Healthcare & Rehab
Center, 113 S. Briar-
wood Dr., Sheridan.
COMPANY DRIVERS &
Owner Operators
Wanted! No touch
freight, 90% drop &
hook, dedicated op-
portunities available.
Call 888-710-8707
Also seeking Recent
Grads. Call Lavonna
877-440-7890 Apply
online: www.drivefor-
pamtransport.com
COOK NEEDED
Must pass drug /
background check.
Apply in person at
Four Seasons
2408 Military Rd
DOMINO!S PIZZA of
Benton is now hiring
Delivery Drivers &
CSR Apply in person
at 17310 I-30 in Ben-
ton between 1p-5p
EXPERIENCED COOK
/ WAITSTAFF
CALL HOME PLATE
DINER ASK FOR
RICK 813-4423
Employment
DRIVERS... TOP 1%
Pay & CSA, Friendly
Equip. Up to 50 cpm
Full Benefits + Pet &
Ri d e r . CDL - A
Req.877-258-8782
www.Ad-Drivers.com
EVENING JANITORIAL
Position. No Exp.
Needed, Ref. Req.,
Must be able to pass
Drug Test & Back-
gr ound Chec k .
501-617-4567.
EXP. CAREGIVER
with exc. references.
Will cook, clean, run
errands. Call
501-860-1624
MARKETING DIRECTOR
LPN / RN LICENSE
REQUIRED
SOUTHERN TRACE
REHAB & CARE
22515 I-30
BRYANT, AR 72022
OWNER OPERA-
TORS/HOME WEEK-
ENDS Regional End
Dump Division FREE
base plates and per-
mits, Weekly Settle-
ments, Call us today!!
Oakl ey Trucki ng,
(888) 725-4175
TRUCK SALESPER-
SON MHC Kenworth
in LR, We offer the
BEST benefits, BEST
compensati on and
BEST training. Apply
o n l i n e a t
www.mhctruck.com/jobs
or send resume to
kevin.tackett@mhctruck.
com
Business
Opportunities
FREE STORE-
FRONT! Set up your
FREE STORE and
sell your products and
homemade crafts on
InternetSupermall.com!
Easy setup. Make
money for Christmas!
www.InternetSupermall.com
Instruction
AIRLINES ARE HIR-
ING – Train for hands
on Aviation Mainte-
nance Career. FAA
approved program.
Housing and Finan-
cial aid for qualified
students – CALL
Aviation Institute of
Maintenance
1-800-335-9129
Child Care
IN-HOME DAYCARE
Spotless - Non-smoking
Drop-ins Welcome!
778-2920
Child Care
CHILDCARE
Infants to 5 B •L• S
Vouchers
562-0691 • 951-2923
6:30a -5:30p
Services
CALL EMPIRE To-
day® to schedule a
FREE in-home esti-
mate on Carpeting &
Flooring. Call Today!
1-800-858-0126
DISH TV Retailer
- SAVE! St ar t i ng
$19.99/month (for 12
months.) FREE Pre-
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Act i vat i on. CALL,
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DEALS!
1-800-278-8081
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whole-home Satellite
system installed at
NO COST and pro-
gramming starting at
$19.99/mo. FREE
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new callers. CALL
NOW 1-800-474-0423
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Professional Installa-
tion! Call NOW and
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1-866-725-5135
STOP MORTGAGE &
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CEL YOUR TIME-
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Pr ogr am 100%
Money Back Guaran-
tee. FREE Consulta-
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We Can Hel p!
1-800-282-3206
Apartments
Unfurnished
2 BR Apts, kit. appl.,
W&D conn., $500 &
up. Handicap access.
317-5190 / 317-5192
2 BR, 1 BA, kitch.
appl., W/D conn.,
$500 mo., $250 dep.
Call between 9am-
8pm, (501)315-9337
BRYANT: 200 Prick-
ett Rd., 2 BR., 1 BA
apt., Nice. $595 mo.,
$200 dep., 847-5377
HURRY
CALL NOW!
Super clean, well
maintained 1 & 2 BR
Apts, 1/2 Mo. Free
Rent Must Qualify.
New applicants only.
Castle Properties
Call Connie
501-626-4596
Classifieds Work!
Apartments
Unfurnished
315-4900
SUMMERWOOD
APARTMENTS
· Pool & Park
· All units available
with or without full
size washer & dryer
· Pets welcome with
limitations
· On-site Management
justinproperties.com
Silica Heights off Hwy 183
Edison Ave. & Cole Dr.
3200 Congo Road
COUNTRY OAKS
DUPLEXES
Manager Special
Call for details
CAMRY COURT
Now Open
in Bryant
New Construction
2 BR, 2 BA or 2.5 BA
off Wilkerson Rd.
on Sadie Dr.
(By Hill Farm Elem.)
Call Terri the on-site
manager for appt.
501-804-0125
Bldg. 1225 #2
or call Dale King
501-539-1935
Visit our web-site
www.arkansas
apartments.net
Looking for a good
deal? Search the
Courier Classifieds!!
Apartments
Unfurnished
NOTICE: All real es-
tate advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to the Fair Housing
Act which makes it il-
legal to advertise any
preference, limitation
or di scr i mi nat i on
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or in-
tention to make any
such preference. We
will not knowingly ac-
cept any advertising
for real estate which
is in violation of the
law. All persons are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis.
Apartments Furnished
1 BR, 1 BA apartment
$300 mo. No Pets, 6
mo lease @ 204 N.
Fourth St. Benton.
Call 501-778-3324.
Houses for Rent
1BR 1BA Storm Rm
All Appl. W&D Conn.
Cov. Deck Dbl Car-
port 1ac. $650mo
$300dep 602-6161
2BR 1.5 Ba Kitchen
Appl. W/D Conn. No
Pets $600mo
$300dep. Please call
between 9a & 8p
501-315-9337
3 & 4 BEDROOM
$825 -$1400 mo.,
Haskell, Benton &
Bryant. 315-9370
3 BR 1 BA carport,
stove, dishwasher, re-
fri g. new carpet.
CH/A, fenced yard, no
pets, good location,
$650mo+$400dep.
Please call 562-0691
or 951-2919
319 S. Neeley St. by
Tyndall Park. All
elect. w/fridge, dish
washer, stove, W&D
included, 3 br, 2 ba,
$850 mth. No pets ,
no smokers. (office)
501-916-9256
3BR 3BA CH/A Ben-
ton School District
Call 501-672-6671
519 PEARSON 2Br
1BA $575mo + 400
Dep. No Pet s
326-3907
BRYANT - Nice
Townhome. 3 BR, 2
BA, 1300 sq. ft., $750
mo., 501-847-5377
Luxury Home in
Longhills Benton
4BR 3.5BA approx. 3K
sq ft. new carpet & paint
Lease or Rent to Own
$2,250mo Call Steve
@ SPR 501.590.6089 or
www.arkhouses.com
Classifieds Work!
Houses for Rent
Eagle Properties
LLC
315–2075
Nice 2 & 3 BR Homes
from $500 to $925
Apartments
1 BR’s from $415
2 BR’s from $475
*based on availability
Deposit & References
Required
eaglepropsaline.com
FOR LEASE/SALE
New 3 & 4 BR, 2 BA,
brick, FP, ceiling fans,
carpet, 2 car garage,
patio. Go to: www.
catalyst-residential.com
or 501-697-6342
FOR RENT or Lease
to Buy Brand New
1600 sq. ft 3Br 2Ba
will finance in Mars
Hi l l l Area on a
cul-de-sac $1113mo
Please call 944-4976
LONSDALE AREA,
3/2..5, 3000 sq' on 4.5
ac, all elec, Benton
schools, $1,400 Call
(501) 538-6556
NEW 4BR 2BA
Fenced yard Vaulted
Ceilings 1800sq.ft.
$1150mo - $1250mo
Bent on School s
Please call 326-8000
Mobile Homes
For Rent
2 BR/1BA, Salem
area, No pets, $385.
Rent, $200. Dep.
326-3907.
2BR 1BA STOVE
REFRIG NO PETS
317-6426 778-1993
Miscellaneous
For Rent
REDUCE YOUR CA-
BLE BILL Get a
4-Room Al l -Di gi tal
Satellite system in-
stalled for FREE! Pro-
gramming starting at
$19.99/MO. FREE
HD/DVR upgrade for
new callers. CALL
NOW 866-735-4255
SEE THE SATELLITE
TV Difference Pack-
ages as LOW as
$19.99/month! FREE
DVR Upgrade. FREE
HD Upgrade. FREE
Professional Installa-
tion! Call NOW and
Start SAVING!
1-866-795-9295
Looking for love in all
the wrong places????
Check out the Freebie
section in today!s
classifieds. You will
fi nd uncondi ti onal
love there FREE!
Furry & Free!!
Miscellaneous
For Sale
ATTENTION VIAGRA
USERS Help improve
your stamina, drive, and
endurance with Ever-
Gene. 100% natural.
Call for FREE bottle.
NO PRESCRIPTION
NEEDED! Please call
866-410-3965
SEE THE SATELLITE
TV Difference! Pack-
ages as LOW as
$19.99/month! FREE
DVR Upgrade. FREE
HD Upgrade. FREE
Professional Installa-
tion! Call NOW and
Start SAVING!
1-866-725-5125
Musical
Merchandise
Cushing
Piano Service
Tune • Repair
Player Pianos & Pump Organs
778-6584
Pets & Supplies
BENTON ANIMAL
Control & Adoption
501-776-5972
benton.petfinder.com
BRYANT ANIMAL
Control & Adoption
www.bryant.petfinder.com
www.1-800-save-a-pet.com
www.1888pets911.org
Hay For Sale
HAY FOR SALE
Round Bales
Net Wrapped. Call
501-317-1365
HAY
FOR SALE
Mixed grass clean.
Fertilized. 4X5 net
wrapped. In the field
cutting now.
$
35.00 loaded
1 to 400 bales
available
Buy as many as you
need. Great horse hay.
501-840-1529 or
501-860-8080
Produce
PECANS: Fresh
papershell, cracked or
shelled. Hwy 70 Hot
Springs, 1 mile before
bypass 501-262-2053
SEEK AND YOU
SHALL FIND
Great deals in the
Courier Classifieds.
Yard Sales, Jobs,
Homes for Sale or
Rent. Check them out
daily. Call to sub-
scribe at 315-8228.
Buy • Sell • Trade
in the Classifieds
Heavy Equipment
SURPLUS EQUIP-
MENT. Online auc-
tions HUGE selection.
BIG savi ngs. NO
Buyer fees Low Seller
f ees BARGAI NS!
Register FREE Use
Promo Code cnhi313.
LIVE support.
www.SurplusOnThe.NET
334-215-3019
Autos Wanted
DONATE A CAR
Humane Society of
the United States
FREE Next-DAY
TOWING! Running or
Not. Tax Deductible.
Call Before Tax Year
Ends!
1-800-418-1562
ATVs
2013 Yamaha Grizzly
700 4x4 PS Camo New
Winch Brushguards
120 Mi. $7700
++++++++++
2011 Yamaha Grizzly
550 4x4 PS Green Brush-
guards 500 Mi. $5800
++++++++++
2011 Kawasaki 250
Bayou Green $2500
++++++++++
Please call 425-0791
Mobile Homes
For Sale
2005 32X66 Double-
wide Mobile Home
3Br 2Ba Large Activ-
ity Room FIreplace &
Stainless Steel Appl.
All elec. $50,000 Call
366-7039 or
213-6356 after 5
RENT TO OWN
Clean / Good Shape
‘00 16x80, 4BR, $590 7yrs
‘99 16x80, 3BR, $580 7yrs
‘94 16x64, 2BR, $530 6yrs
‘97 16x80, 3BR, $580 7yrs
Includes Lot Rent & Ins.
Lake • Fish • Walk Trail
Sunset Lake • 951-2842
FSBO A must See
2 Acres Fenced in
Yard, 3BR 2BA, CH/A
All Electric, New Stove
& Frig, Metal Roof,
Nice Deck on Front &
Back Storm shelter
with carpet 3-sheds /
car cover, near
schools,$80,000
Call 501-794-5999
for Info & viewing
Real Estate
CANCEL YOUR
TI MESHARE. NO
Risk Program STOP
Mortgage & Mainte-
nance Payments To-
day. 100% Money
Back Guarant ee.
FREE Consultation.
Call Us NOW. We
C a n H e l p
1-888-356-5248
Moderately Confused Herman
Crossword Challenge
Kit ‘n’ Carlyle
Celebrity Cipher
Here’s How It Works:
Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken
down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the
numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and
box. Each number can appear only once in each row,
column and box. You can figure out the order in which
the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues
already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you
name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!
Astro•graph
BERNICE BEDE OSOL
www.bernice4u.com.
Alley Oop
Big Nate
Born Loser
Thatababy
Frank and Ernest
Grizzwells
Monty
Arlo and Janis
Soup to Nutz
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2013
Step up and do your best to get
things done this year. High energy
and plenty of good ideas should help
you reach your goals. Your responses
will be quick, and your actions will
impress onlookers. Prosperity is
apparent, but frugality will also be
part of the deal.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21)
-- Push your ideas, discuss your inten-
tions and show confidence in your
every move. Your enthusiasm will
help to motivate others as well as lead
to some new possibilities.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) --
Follow your heart and your dreams.
Creative pursuits that have been care-
fully thought out will be successful.
Your ability to get things done will
enhance your popularity and attract
valuable partners.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
-- Change the things in your life that
haven’t been working. Look at your
options, speak up about what you
want and follow through with your
plans.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) --
Network, socialize and interact with
your peers today. Get involved in
organizations that have something to
offer you. A business venture should
be seriously considered. Put your
creative talent to work if you want to
make a splash.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) --
Patience, compassion and supportive
dialogue will help you gain respect
and avoid criticism. Don’t let a job
you’ve been asked to do get you down
-- get it over with and keep moving.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
-- Today calls for a diversion. You
should take time to pursue some new
activities or cherished hobbies. Put
romance at the top of your list and
work on the quality of your personal
life in general.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- The
value of certain partnerships will
depend on the discussions you have
and the ideas you present. Have alter-
natives ready to offer but be willing
to compromise and make things hap-
pen.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) --
Network, join in the festivities and
share your thoughts, ideas and capa-
bilities. Don’t be afraid to be a little
different if you want to encourage an
enticing partnership opportunity.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Make
your move with confidence and dash.
Your intellectual appeal will be your
ticket to the spotlight. Be persistent and
entertaining to win the support you
need.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Don’t
say anything that you may regret. Size
up your situation and offer a kind
word or gesture. Make decorative
changes to your surroundings. Actions
will take priority over dialogue.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Add
a little excitement to your life. Travel
plans or signing up for an interesting
course will lift your spirits. A relation-
ship may take an unexpected and
costly turn.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
-- Good fortune will come through
interaction with people of different
backgrounds. Find ways to make per-
sonal improvements or to indulge in a
trip that will bring you satisfaction or
joy.
Friday, December 13, 2013
news@bentoncourier.com The Saline Courier Page 9
COMICS
10 The Saline Courier
Friday, December 13, 2013
GM CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED SELECT MODELS AS LOW AS 1.9% APR WAC
‘13 Buick Lacrose
‘13 GMC Sierra
‘12 GMC Sierra
‘12 Chevy Camaro
‘11 BMW 328 Conv.
‘13 Honda CR-V
‘13 Hyundai Elantra
‘08 BMW 5 Series
Premium Z Package, Loaded, Navigation,
Heated and Cooled Seats, Sunroof, Only
6,000 miles
All Terrain Package, Sunroof, Navigation,
4X4, Heated Leather Interior, 12,394 miles
X-Cab, Z-71 Package,
Tow Package, 13,020 miles
SS, Sunroof, 6.2 V8, Heated Leather, 20”
Wheels, 22,310 miles
Hard Top, Convertible, Navigation, Heated
Leather, Loadd, 34,306 miles
EX-L, Sunroof, Heated Leather Seats,
18,170 miles
PW/PL, Alloy Wheels, Tilt Cruise, 15,324
miles
Sunroof, Navigation, Loaded, M5 Package,
46,664 miles
STK #2487
STK #5651
STK #4732
STK #7376
STK #0895
STK #6394
STK #0590
STK #8164
$
32,900
$
33,900
$
34,900
$
22,900
$
11,900
$
23,900
proud
member of
I-30 Alcoa Exit
Next to Target
501.315.7100
Save Thousands
vs New
Save Thousands
vs New
WWW.EVERETTBG.COM
BUICK • GMC
Family Owned CUSTOMER FRIENDLY
Merry Christmas
from our family to yours
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