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E-edition July 23, 2013

July 23, 2013

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Evelyn Reed was sworn in as
a member of the Benton City
Council on Monday night.
Reed, program man-
ager at the Central Arkansas
Development Council, is
succeeding the late Joe Lee
Richards, who was serving his
fifth council term at the time of
his recent death.
The nine council members
attending Monday night’s meet-
ing unanimously approved a
resolution confirming Reed’s
appointment to the council.
She had been selected last
week following the Personnel
Committee’s interviews with
seven contenders for the Ward
2, Position 2 vacancy.
Mayor David Mattingly
conducted the swearing-in
ceremony, which was followed
by Richards’ daughter, Kathy
Richards Blue, embracing Reed
and voicing her support for
Reed as her father’s successor.
“I can think of on one better
to succeed my father,” Blue
said.
“He would be proud.”
Another resolution that also
drew unanimous approval from
the council recognized the
service of Joe Lee Richards to
the city of Benton and to the
residents of Benton and Saline
County during his years as an
alderman and as a trooper for
the Arkansas State police and
as Saline County sheriff.
The resolution commended
Richards for his dedication to
the city and the residents of
his ward, noting that he had
“a vision for what he felt was
best for the city and he always
adhered to that vision.”
The resolution pointed out
Joe Lee Richards’ “straightfor-
ward and forthright manner”
let others know “where he
stood on a matter and he was
never shy about debating the
issues concerning the city.”
A rezoning ordinance that
ultimately was approved drew
objection from an audience
member, Terry Walker, who
was representing the Beautiful
Lakeview Subdivision Property
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Tuesday, July 23, 2013
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SALINE COUNTY’S NEWS SOURCE SINCE 1876
Place Pet # Pet Name Votes
1 3 ANNIE 1044
2 41 RAINE 987
3 28 HAZEL LAVERNE 717
4 36 MR. DOODLES 600
5 34 MASAI 592
6 21 DON KEE 561
7 35 MESSI 541
8 16 CHA CHA 532
9 56 SUNNIE 476
10 40 PRECIOUS 348
11 32 LU LU 332
12 10 BOOTS 329
13 64 ZOYIE 301
14 22 ELVIS 276
15 43 ROSCOE 269
16 23 EVA 265
17 13 BUD 261
18 47 SACHIMO 220
19 39 PAISLEY 209
20 59 TONKA 200
21 25 GEORGE 184
22 42 RIPLEY 160
23 51 SCOUT 150
24 6 BENTLEY 141
25 19 COPPER 136
26 17 CHRISSY 124
27 5 BELLE STAR 118
28 2 ANNABELLE 104
29 45 RUSTY 101
30 44 ROWDY 100
31 65 BUSTER 100
32 15 CAYNE 84
33 48 SADIE 80
34 14 BUDDY 77
35 58 TEXAS T 62
36 8 BOCEPHUS 45
37 62 WINSOR 44
38 52 SHADOW 42
39 49 SALLEY SUE 41
40 11 BOOTS 37
41 31 JACK JACK 33
42 46 RUTHIE 25
43 63 WINSTON 24
44 20 DIESEL 22
45 33 MAICIE 22
46 1 ANGEL 20
47 4 BABYGIRL 20
48 29 HEIDI 20
49 53 SHASTA 8
50 61 TRUMAN 6
51 9 BOO BOO 5
52 38 OLIVE 5
53 7 BLADE 4
54 12 BUBBA 4
55 18 CHUMLEE 4
56 24 FRECKLES 4
57 26 GIGGET 4
58 27 GWEN 4
59 30 HOMER 4
60 37 OAKLEY 4
61 50 SAMMY 4
62 54 SHORTY 4
63 55 SPIKE 4
64 57 TAZ 4
65 60 TRAMP 4
Pet Calendar
CONTEST
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Tally as of Noon, 7/19/13
MISSED PAPERS
CALL
(501) 317-6013
DURING THESE HOURS
5-7 p.m. Monday-Friday
7-9 a.m. Saturday-Sunday
CONTACT US
Phone: (501) 315-8228
Fax: (501) 315-1920
Email: news@bentoncourier.com
Write: P.O. Box 207,
Benton, AR 72018
INDEX
OBITUARIES .............................. 3
OPINIONS .................................. 4
SPORTS .................................. 5,6
CLASSIFIEDS ............................ 8
COMICS......................................9
Clemmer to announce candidacy for state Senate
Ann Clemmer of Benton
plans to announce her
candidacy for
state senator for
District 33 on
July 25
Clemmer,
currently a state
representative
for District 23,
will challenge
Sen. Jeremy Hutchinson for
the seat.
Both are Republicans.
The announcement will
be made at three loca-
tions in Central Arkansas
and Saline County. The
first announcement will
be from 8 a.m. to 9 a.m.
at the Bryant Chamber of
Commerce. The second will
be held at the Saline County
Courthouse gazebo from
noon to 1 p.m. The final
announcement will be made
on the second floor rotunda
of the state Capitol from 4
p.m. to 5 p.m.
Clemmer indicated that
she made the decision to
run because “Arkansas
continues to face challenges
with economic opportunity
and education. I have spent
the last five years working
toward these goals, but
we still have work to do to
make Arkansas competi-
tive with our neighboring
states.”
Clemmer is cur-
rently serving in her third
term in the House of
Representatives, where she
was selected to serve as
the assistant speaker pro
tem for the Second District.
She is the chairman of
the Higher Education
Committee and the vice
chairman of the Education
Committee. She also serves
on the State Agencies and
Governmental Affairs, Rules
and Legislative Council
committees.
During her tenure in the
House, Clemmer has had
the opportunity to enact leg-
islation to help improve the
lives of Arkansans. A believ-
er in smaller government
and pro-business reform,
she has also been a strong
advocate for Life, a propo-
nent for ethics reform, and
a champion for education.
In 2011 and in 2013
she proposed amend-
ing the Arkansas Lottery
Scholarship to increase the
percentage of proceeds that
would be awarded to stu-
dents. She was also a lead
sponsor of ethics legislation
in 2009 that became law in
2011.
Prior to the beginning of
her campaign for state rep-
resentative, Clemmer was a
By Brent Davis
bdavis@bentoncourier.com
Clemmer
CLEMMER, page 7
LYNDA HOLLENBECK/The Saline Courier
Benton Mayor David Mattingly swears in Evelyn Reed as a member of the City Council. Reed was the council’s
choice over six other contenders who applied to fill a vacancy created by the death of Alderman Joe Lee Richards.
Reed sworn in as alderman;
council commends Richards
LYNDA HOLLENBECK/The Saline Courier
Kathy Richards Blue congratulates Evelyn Reed after Benton Mayor David
Mattingly conducted a swearing-in ceremony for Reed to fill the City
Council seat formerly held by Blue’s father, the late Joe Lee Richards.
Drought
getting
worse
The latest data from the Arkansas
Forestry Commission shows conditions in
Saline County are only getting drier.
The commission goes by the Keetch-
Byram Drought Index, which rates the
drought conditions from 0 (no drought) to
800 (extreme drought).
As of Monday, it was reported the KBDI
had reached 705 in the area.
The National Weather Service calls for
rain several days this week. However, the
same prediction was made last week, and the
drought did not improve.
Soaring temperatures and lack of rain con-
tribute to the dry conditions, which increase
the risk involved with wildfire.
Because of this, the county has been
under a burn ban since July 8.
By Jennifer Joyner
jjoyner@bentoncourier.com
It’s a boy! UK’s
Kate gives birth
to royal heir
LONDON — Champagne bottles popped
and shouts of “Hip! Hip! Hooray!” erupted
outside Buckingham Palace on Monday as
Britain welcomed the birth of Prince William
and his wife Kate’s first child, a boy who is
now third in line to the British throne.
Hundreds of Britons and tourists broke
into song and dance outside the palace gates
as officials announced that the future king
was born at 4:24 p.m., weighing 8 pounds, 6
ounces (3.75 kilograms), at central London’s
St. Mary’s Hospital — the same place where
William and his brother Harry were born
three decades ago.
The imminent arrival of the royal baby
was the subject of endless speculation on
social media and was covered for days on
live television around the world, but in the
end the royal family managed to keep it a
remarkably private affair.
In line with royal tradition, a terse state-
ment announced only the time of birth, the
infant’s gender and that mother and child
were doing well. It gave no information
about the baby’s name, and officials would
say only that a name would be announced
“in due course.”
“Her Royal Highness and her child are
both doing well and will remain in hospital
overnight,” it said. William also issued a brief
statement, saying “we could not be happier.”
Officials said William, who was by his
wife’s side during the birth, would also
spend the night in the hospital.
BABY, page 7
Associated Press
By Lynda Hollenbeck
lyndahol@yahoo.com
REED, page 7
SATURDAY, JULY 27
THEOS, A SUPPORT
GROUP FOR WIDOWS AND
WIDOWERS, will meet for
lunch at 11:30 a.m. Saturday,
July 27 at at Dixie Cafe.
YOU CAN EAT FISH FRY: 3 to
7 p.m., Saturday, July 27, at
Congo Masonic Lodge. Corner
of Steel Bridge and Thompson
Dairy Road. American raised
catfish, homemade hushpup-
pies, beans with ham, river
bank fried taters and more.
$12 for adults, $5 for children
9 to 12, 8 and under free. Last
Saturday of the month, April
through October, 3 - 7 pm.
Money raised goes to area
charities. Public invited.
MONDAY, AUGUST 5
MONDAY AFTERNOON BOOK
CLUB - The Monday Afternoon
Book Club will meet at 1 p.m.
Monday, Aug. 5 at Boswell
Library to discuss its chosen
title. The group is open to
adults 18 and older. Call 847-
2166 for more information.
SATURDAY, AUGUST 31
ALL YOU CAN EAT FISH FRY:
3 to 7 p.m. Saturday, August
31, at Congo Masonic Lodge.
Corner of Steel Bridge and
Thompson Dairy Road.
American raised catfish,
homemade hushpuppies,
beans with ham, river bank
fried taters and more. $12
for adults, $5 for children 9
to 12, 8 and under free. Last
Saturday of the month, April
through October, 3 - 7 pm.
Money raised goes to area
charities. Public invited.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26
ALL YOU CAN EAT FISH FRY:
3 to 7 p.m. Saturday, October
26, at Congo Masonic Lodge.
Corner of Steel Bridge and
Thompson Dairy Road.
American raised catfish,
homemade hushpuppies,
beans with ham, river bank
fried taters and more. $12 for
adults, $5 for children 9 to
12, 8 and under free. Money
raised goes to area charities.
Public invited.
ONGOING EVENTS
ART DISPLAY: During the
months of June and July the
Saline County Library will
feature the works of Benton
resident and art teacher Tane
Steed at Herzfeld Library in
Benton. The display is located
in the meeting room and is
open for viewing during regu-
lar library hours.
HEAD START ENROLLMENT:
CADC Head Start Centers in
Saline County are accepting
applications, through the end
of May, for enrollment for
the 2013-2014 school year.
Applications are accepted
during regular business hours
at the following locations:
Benton Head Start Center, 321
Edison Avenue. Call 501-315-
6456. Harmony Grove Head
Start Center, 115 School Road
(Haskell). Call 501-776-1697.
Paron Head Start Center,
16494 W. 12th Street. Call
501-594-5668. and Shannon
Hills Head Start Center, 11925
County Line Road. Call 501-
455-4932. To be eligible to
enroll in the Head Start pro-
gram, a child must be three or
four years old. The family must
also meet income guidelines.
Verification of family income,
child’s birth certificate and
immunization records are
required to complete an appli-
cation.
TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY
(TOPS): 5 p.m. Every Monday
at the Benton Main Fire
Department. Come join
TOPS Chapter 57. the group
meets every Monday. For
more information contact Lisa
Goodrich at 249 -3169.
CADC PROVIDING FREE TAX
PREPARATION SERVICES IN
SALINE ARKANSAS: 7:30 am.
Mondays and Tuesdays at
CADC Senior Activity Center,
210 Jefferson in Benton. Local
residents can receive valuable
help at tax time from Central
Arkansas Development
Council, which is offering free
tax preparation assistance in
Saline County. Free electronic
filing will be offered. For more
information, please contact
CADC at 501-778-1133.
BENTON ALZHEIMER’s
CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP
MEETING: 7 p.m. every third
Tuesday of the month at First
Baptist Church, 211 South
Market in Benton. The meet-
ing is open to everyone who
has a loved one living with
Alzheimer’s or other related
dementia.  The group offers
a safe environment where
discussions are kept confi-
dential. For more information,
please contact Sam Sellers at
(501) 663-3900 or samuel.sell-
ers@sbcglobal.net. 
BRYANT HIGH SCHOOL CLASS
OF 1973: is beginning plan-
ning for a 40th Class Reunion
in the Fall of 2013. If you
attended Bryant High School
Class of 1973, we want to get
your contact information to
inform you of the upcoming
planning meetings and the
Reunion. Please call 501-920-
8188 or e-mail peglew55@
gmail.com.
STARTING POINT SUPPORT
GROUP MEETING: 1 p.m.
every Sunday at Christ Is The
Answer Fellowship Church,
Traskwood. This is a Christian
based recovery program. Call
Vince for details 722-3110
POOL TOURNAMENT: First and
third Fridays of every month
at 7:30 p.m., Saline County
Moose Lodge, Highway. 67,
Benton. Must be 21 to enter
lodge, but membership in
lodge not required to partici-
pate.
SALINE COUNTY HISTORY AND
HERITAGE SOCIETY MEETING:
7 p.m., the third Thursday of
each month at 123 N. Market
St. in Benton.
BRYANT HISTORICAL SOCIETY
MEETING: 6:30 p.m., the third
Tuesday of each month in the
Heritage Room of the Mabel
Boswell Memorial Library on
Prickett Road in Bryant.
2 The Saline Courier
Tuesday, July 23, 2013
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LITTLE ROCK —
Opponents of a set of uni-
form benchmarks for read-
ing, writing and math that
have been fully adopted in
most states asked Arkansas
lawmakers Monday to back
out of the standards, say-
ing the plan takes away the
state’s control over its class-
rooms.
Teachers, parents and
national groups opposed to
the Common Core standards
urged lawmakers to drop
the benchmarks as a legisla-
tive panel opened a two-day
long hearing. Arkansas is
among 45 states that have
adopted the standards,
which will be fully imple-
mented in the state by the
2014-2015 school year.
Virginia Wyeth, an
English teacher at Little
Rock Central High School,
said she believed the new
standards would burden
teachers by forcing them
to spend even more time
preparing students for stan-
dardized tests rather than
focusing on lessons.
“These are our schools
and our children. We need
to keep the policy making
right here at home,” Wyeth
told members of the House
and Senate Education com-
mittees. “Common Core
takes those decisions out of
our hands.”
The Arkansas Board of
Education voted in 2010 to
adopt the Common Core
standards, and state legisla-
tors endorsed the effort a
year later. Under the stan-
dards, students are taught
English, language arts and
math using standards that
are heavily focused on skills
needed for future careers
and college work.
“We believe these stan-
dards are what students
need to know and be able
to do at these grade levels,
and we’re getting teachers
trained to get there,” state
Education Commissioner
Tom Kimbrell told the com-
mittee.
Kimbrell told lawmakers
Arkansas still has control
over its curriculum after
adopting the Common Core
standards, saying “they
become whatever standards
you want them to be.”
The standards, however,
have drawn criticism from
Republicans in other states
that are reconsidering the
benchmarks. A measure
approved by the Republican-
led U.S. House last week to
dismantle the No Child Left
Behind law includes a provi-
sion that bars Education
Secretary Arne Duncan and
his successors from encour-
aging states to implement
Common Core.
Sen. Johnny Key, a
Republican who chairs
the Senate Education
Committee, said the meet-
ings were intended to
address concerns raised
about the standards and to
allow education officials to
explain Common Core. Key
said he didn’t know of any
plan by legislators to block
Common Core’s implemen-
tation.
“I felt like these hearings
would be good to fill in the
gaps,” Key, of Mountain
Home, said. “We know the
state board adopted it, we
know we’re implementing
it, but there’s some back-
ground that a lot of mem-
bers have questions on and
there’s some pros and cons
that important for members
to weigh in.”
The hearing is scheduled
to continue Tuesday, with
testimony from the chair-
woman of the state Board
of Education, the head
of the state Chamber of
Commerce, teachers and
students.
news across
-Associated Press
Saline county eventS
Opponents ask Arkansas to
drop new school standards
Email calendar items to news@bentoncourier.com or call 501-315-8228 ext. 234.
Calendar items are intended for nonprofit organizations.
Saline Courier photo
Doug Robinson, 16, is pictured with a four-and-a-half-foot water moccasin killed Tuesday after-
noon by his grandfather, Virgil Lovell, in his Garden on River Street.
Saline courier ScraPBook 1976
Sentence thrown out after
Arkansas officer’s arrest
LITTLE ROCK — A
Pulaski County judge has
vacated the 42-year prison
sentence for a North Little
Rock man after the arrest
of an Arkansas State Police
lieutenant who testified in
his case.
Circuit Judge Barry Sims
on Monday dismissed the
drug and weapon convic-
tions handed down last
week to Devinn Deshawn
Sheppard.
Prosecutor Larry Jegley
said his office didn’t know
about the federal investiga-
tion involving Lt. Sedrick
Reed, who was arrested on a
federal drug charge the day
after Sheppard’s trial.
Jegley told the Arkansas
Democrat-Gazette that he
moved to have Sheppard’s
drug and weapon convic-
tions dismissed as soon as
he learned about Reed’s
arrest.
“I wish somebody would
have let us know (about the
Reed investigation),” Jegley
said. “It could have totally
changed our analysis of the
case.”
But Jegley noted that
Sheppard is already serving
a 25-year prison term for an
unrelated conviction.
Reed was charged last
week with possession with
intent to distribute less than
500 grams of cocaine.
Reed, a 17-year veteran
of state police, was fired
shortly after his arrest.
Last week, Reed testified
that the drugs Sheppard was
charged with possessing —
about 1 ounce of marijuana
and nearly half an ounce of
cocaine — had disappeared
from the state police evi-
dence room after Sheppard’s
arrest in 2010.
Reed testified that police
had searched for the drugs
but couldn’t find them.
Reed is not accused
of taking the drugs in
Sheppard’s case.
He remains in the Pulaski
County jail and was due in
court Tuesday for a deten-
tion hearing.
Tuesday, July 23, 2013
The Saline Courier 3
Benton Transmission Automotive & Tire
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OBITUARIES
Activities continue through summer at Bryant center
The summer months have
been extremely busy at the
Bryant Senior Activity and
Wellness Center.
We enjoyed a nice out-
ing at Charlotte’s Eats &
Sweets in Keo. After lunch
we stopped at Hardin Farms
for fresh fruit and veggies.
Next month (August) is the
visit to the Old State House
Museum and Your Mama’s
Good Food.
Karaoke is always offered
the last Monday of the
month, from 9:30-11:30 a.m.
All are invited to pick a song
from 100,000 song titles and
then stay for lunch while
you’re here,
On July 2, we really had a
nice show for Independence
Day. The show was
“Celebrate America.”
Stephanie Godelfer with
Helix Hearing started the
show with our national
anthem, followed by Max
Pyron and the Geyer
Springs Heritage Singers.
They entertained us with
many patriotic tunes and
finally “Elvis,” sponsored by
Little Rock Funeral Home.
This is an annual
event; don’t miss us next
year for our third annual
Independence Day show.
Baptist Health has part-
nered with us to do blood
pressure and blood sugar
screenings on the second
Wednesday of every month.
They also will provide BMI
screenings (body mass
index), cholesterol checks,
flu shots and health educa-
tion throughout the year.
We entered the fifth
annual Care Link Quiz Bowl
competition on Friday, July
12. We entered two teams;
both did great. Team A took
the first-place trophy back
to the center; this was our
third first-place trophy.
The 2013 team included:
Jack Jenkins, Jeannie
Jacobs, Mary Donovan,
Bob Tarver, Jimmy Wilson,
Devona Wilson, Linda
Donaldson, Johnnie Neu,
Hoyt Bunn, Joyce Ward,
Dorothy Keisler and Terri
Jenkins.
On Monday we had the
“Drug Store Cowboys.”This
is a group of retired phar-
macists who get together
to make good country and
western music. The group
is highly sought after and
hard to book.
The Crochet Circle meets
at 10 a.m. Tuesdays; come
to learn or just come to cro-
chet. The group is working
on hats for the Winthrop P.
Rockefeller Cancer Institute.
This is a good way to get
involved.
Every Saturday night
there is a dance with a live
band. The cost is $5 per per-
son; the dance kicks off at 7
p.m. and ends at 9:30 p.m.
Refreshments are served.
There are three periods in
life: Youth, Middle Age and
“How well you look.”
See you at the center.
For more information, call
the center at 943-0056, Ext.
3; or email mvickers@cadc.
com.
By Mary Vickers
Special to The Saline Courier
‘Conjuring’ simple, good
Finally, here’s an old
school horror film that
doesn’t feel cheap or too
gory or have a thousand
jump scares with little ten-
sion to back them up. This
is a movie that proves that
when director James Wan
wants to make a good hor-
ror movie, he can and the
audience won’t feel like
they’ve been pandered
too for easy thrills. “The
Conjuring” is a film that
harkens back to a time dur-
ing the 1970s when real
horror films such as “The
Exorcist,” “Halloween” and
“The Omen” were bring-
ing entertaining fear to the
masses.
The story is a good old
fashioned ghost story.
The Perron family has just
moved into a new house
that happens to be the
only one they can afford.
The husband Roger (Ron
Livingston) is a truck driver
just trying to make ends
meet for his wife Carolyn
(Lili Taylor) and their five
daughters.
Not long after they move
in, strange things begin to
happen. Doors slam shut,
clocks stop working, people
get dragged out of their
beds and just what is in that
recently discovered cellar?
The entity seems bent on
terrorizing and possessing
the Perron family and they
are forced to turn to para-
normal investigators Ed and
Lorraine Warren.
It’s funny that a film about
the real-life Warrens should
be so affective. I actually
thought that this would be
one of the movie’s major
problems. I knew they were
real people, but while watch-
ing the film, I somehow for-
got that fact and was drawn
straight into the story.
As I stated above, this
film is a love letter to films
of the ‘70s. Wan uses old
school camera techniques
such as long zooms, slow
pans and muted colors
to set the chilling tone
throughout the film. He also
uses old fashioned practical
effects with only a minimal
use of CGI and therefore
avoids the biggest trap that
several inferior horror films
have fallen into over the
past decade.
Wan understands that
horror films should not look
pristine and pretty. They
should be grainy and dirty
and help give the flick a
sense of dread. It also helps
that there is a pretty decent
story to go along with the
filmmaking.
The story keeps things
simple with a narrative
that includes a haunting,
demons, exorcisms and
monsters in the closet. The
Perrons are victims that are
similar to the Lutz family
from 1979’s “The Amityville
Horror,” another supposedly
true case that the real Ed
and Lorraine Warren investi-
gated. Taylor and Livingston
in particular give great per-
formances as parents who
simply want to keep their
kids safe and get rid of the
demonic possession of their
house.
When it comes to the
horror of the film, this story
knows how to pull off some
great scares, but it sets up
the anticipation flawlessly.
By not having several crazy
scares that come one after
another, when the audience-
jumping moments do occur,
they feel right. They don’t
feel like cop outs or that
some executive somewhere
ordered the director to put
more scares in the movie.
For some people, they
may miss the blood and the
guts and the gore.
The problem with show-
ing more blood is that it’s
the easy way out.
This film reminds audi-
ences why subtlety and a
chilling atmosphere add
more to the movie than actu-
ally showing brutal violence.
Also, it’s just a welcome
change to see a decent hor-
ror movie for once.
By John T. Johnson
Special to The Saline Courier
Gertrude Alonda Springer
Gertrude Alonda Springer, 94. of Benton passed away
July 17, 2013. She was born May 5, 1919, to Oliver Theodore
(OT) and Alice Brown Wimberley in Recto.
She lived briefly in Litchfield, Ill., and later moved with
her family to Jonesboro, where she met and married William
Augustus Springer of Shannon, Miss. They moved to Benton
in 1942.
During her full and productive life, Gertrude
was a loving and devoted wife of 65 years. She
began an early career in photography, progress-
ing from an apprentice to a manager to estab-
lishing her own studio. She enjoyed people and
capturing their image for prosperity.
She enjoyed a short-term position as Saline
County treasurer and was always interested in
the progress and development of Benton.
As a charter member of Parkview United Methodist
Church, she was once a Sunday School teacher and then
an active member of the Adult Sunday School Class taught
by Don Crowson. She was an active member of the Mary
Martha United Methodist Women’s Circle and a strong sup-
porter of the church’s missions and programs. Her joy for
her family, including her church family and friends, was rich
as well as her joy in reading, studying, cooking, sewing, sing-
ing and gardening.
Mrs. Springer was preceded in death by her husband; her
parents; her sisters, Zula Johnson, Ethelene Jolly and Mable
Cully; and her son-in-law, Frank Boggs Bartholow.
She is survived by her sister, Donna Faye (Holly) Roberts
of Temple, Texas.; two daughters, Sherry Lee Bartholow of
Dallas, Texas, and Patricia Kay Harley and husband Herman
of Benton; her grandchildren, Sherrie Loyd, Vickie Durham
and husband Mike of Benton, Brad Bartholow and Betsy
Garza and husband Jesse of Dallas; her great-grandchildren,
Amanda Andres and husband Jon, Glen Loyd, Cole Durham
and Hailey Durham of Benton, Brandon Bartholow, Julia
Bartholow, Luke Garza, and Jillian Garza of Dallas; and a
great-great-granddaughter, Abigale Andres.
A memorial service was scheduled for 10 a.m. today, July
23, at Parkview United Methodist Church in Benton followed
by visitation and dinner in the Harp-Johnson Fellowship Hall.
The Rev. Walt Garrett will be officiating.
Memorials may be made to Parkview United Methodist
Church or to a favorite charity.
Arrangements are by Roller-Ballard Funeral Home.
Online guestbook: www.rollerfuneralhomes.com/ballard
Family comments: Her family expresses their deep
gratitude for the tender and loving care provided by Joyce
Brothers, which enabled her to remain in her home until
such loving care was continued at Saline Memorial Hospice
House under the care of Dr. Daniel Cartaya and his staff.
Springer
PAID OBITUARY
Arkansas deputies find pipe
bomb after pickup crashes
PEARCY — The Garland
County Sheriff’s Office says
deputies found a pipe bomb
amid the wreckage of a
pickup truck that a Pearcy
teenager crashed.
Authorities told the
Arkansas Democrat-Gazette
that the device was found in
a toolbox that was thrown
from the truck after it
crashed into a ditch about
4:20 a.m. Monday. The
device was later disarmed
by the Little Rock Fire
Department Bomb Squad
and Arkansas State Police.
The teen was arrested for
driving while intoxicated and
authorities say he may face
federal charges related to
the pipe bomb.
Associated Press
Drive-by
shooter hits
girl in eye
with BB gun
HARRISON — A Harrison
Police report shows a
21-year-old Harrison man
was arrested after two girls
were shot — in near the eye
— with a BB gun Sunday
afternoon at the park sur-
rounding Lake Harrison.
Records show Tyler
Walters, 21, of Dogpatch was
being held Monday in the
Boone County Jail in lieu of
$20,000 bond.
The report said one of the
girls called about 3:20 p.m.
Sunday to report four men
were at Minnie Harris Park
on the east side of the bridge
shooting at a trash can, but
they started shooting at her
as she walked away. One BB
hit her in the elbow.
She went to the far end
of Lake Harrison Park on
the west side of the bridge
and was sitting with another
13-year-old girl when the
men drove by and shot at
them, striking the girl in the
right eye lid, just missing her
eye ball, the report said.
Police began looking
for the vehicle the girls
described, a report said.
Associated Press
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
State Sen. Jeremy Hutchinson, District 33,
201 E. North St., Benton, AR 72015, (501) 773-
3760, jeremy.hutchinson@senate.ar.gov.
State Sen. David Sanders, District 27 Room
320 State Capitol, Little Rock, AR 72201, (501)
682-6107, davidjamessanders@gmail.com.
State Sen. Alan Clark, District 13 P.O. Box
211, Lonsdale, AR 72087, (501) 262-3360, alan.
clark@senate.ar.gov.
State Rep. Ann Clemmer, District 23, 7415
Camille Drive, Benton, AR 72015, (501) 316-
0364, avclemmer@sbcglobal.net.
State Rep. Andy Davis, District 31 P.O. Box
30248, Little Rock, AR 72260, (501) 837-5109,
andy.davis@arkansashouse.org.
State Rep. Andy Mayberry, District 27 3022
E. Woodson Lateral Road, Hensley, AR 72065,
(501) 888-3522, andymayberry@windstream.net.
State Rep. Kim Hammer, District 28, 1411
Edgehill Dr., Benton, AR 72015, (501) 840-3841,
kimdhammer@yahoo.com.
Circuit Judge Bobby McCallister, 22nd
Judicial District, Division 1, Saline County
Courthouse, 200 N. Main St., Benton, AR 72015,
(501) 303-5635.
Circuit Judge Gary Arnold, 22nd Judicial
District, Division 2, Saline County Courthouse,
200 N. Main St., Benton, AR 72015, (501) 303-
5664.
Circuit Judge Grisham Phillips, 22nd
Judicial District, Division 3, Saline County
Courthouse, 200 N. Main St., Benton, AR 72015,
(501) 303-5628.
Circuit Judge Robert Herzfeld, 22nd
Judicial District, Division 4, Saline County Annex,
321 N. Main St., Benton, AR 72015, (501) 303-
1584.
District Judge Michael Robinson, Benton
District, 1605 Edison Ave., Benton, AR 72019,
(501) 303-5670.
District Judge Stephanie Casady, Bryant
District (Bryant, Alexander, Bauxite, Haskell,
Shannon Hills), Boswell Municipal Complex, 210
SW Third St., Bryant, AR 72022, (501) 847-5223.
Saline County Judge Lanny Fite,
Courthouse 200 N. Main St., Benton, AR 72015,
(501) 303-5640.
Prosecuting Attorney Ken Casady, 22nd
Juicial District, 102 S. Main St., Benton, AR
72015, (501) 315-7767.
Saline County Sheriff Bruce Pennington,
Saline County Detention Center, 735 S. Neeley
St., Benton, AR 72015; (501) 303-5609.
news@bentoncourier.com
HOW TO REACH YOUR ELECTED OFFICIALS
“Congress shall make no law ... abridging the freedom
of speech, or of the press ... .”
— From the First Amendment to Constitution
A
merica cannot catch a break. First, the
National Security Agency holds a magnifying
glass to our private matters.
Now, a new conspiracy has surfaced.
According to Section 1021 of the National Defense
Authorization Act of 2012, the Obama Administration
has won the power to indefinitely detain US citizens
and foreigners suspected of being involved in ter-
roristic affairs. This means that if anyone “seems” to
be a terrorist, they can legally be interrogated and/or
put behind bars.
Does our nation even have morals anymore?
It seems that the authority of our country has
strayed so far from the morals our founding fathers
created at the beginning.
Back then, people trusted each other
enough to leave the doors open and
let the kids play in the yard. If you left
your door open for too long these days,
you might just find a government offi-
cial investigating you from afar.
Another thing that gets under
my skin is the way our government
handles threats. So someone plants
a bomb in the middle of a highly
crowded marathon. It’s tragic and
my thoughts and prayers go to those
affected. However, should an entire
nation be accused and punished for
one selfish act?
No.
Our privacy and rights are dwindling
because of an overly-skeptic government. Our author-
ities have gained too much power, and are abusing it
every day.
It’s one thing to have a lot of power and use it
respectfully towards the people. However, it’s a total-
ly different thing to gain so much power and use it to
manipulate a nation for your own agenda.
An example that most of you may be familiar with
is the arrest of the apostle Paul. Acts 21:33 says,
“Then the chief captain came near, and took him, and
commanded him to be bound with two chains; and
demanded who he was, and what he had done.”
Does this sound familiar or relevant to anything
that has been occurring within our country within the
past few months?
This Bible verse says that Paul was detained with-
out reason. It even states that the chief captain didn’t
know who he was or even what crime he supposedly
committed.
It’s tragic to say that our authority could even
relate to the harsh authoritative conditions of Biblical
times.
I realize that America is one of the more “spoiled”
countries, but it has really gotten out of hand. We
may not have a dictator ruling over us, and we may
not have to bow at a king or queen’s feet. But, we
also seem to not have a Constitution anymore.
Sure, we can still call this a “free country,” but for
how much longer?
It appears the Administration is just going down
the Bill of Rights, taking swings at our freedom one
by one. We aren’t dealing with a Hitler or a Stalin by
any means. But, our government seems to think that
they have gained just as much power as any ruler in
history.
Don’t get me wrong, I’m proud to call myself a
citizen of the United States of America. But, when I
say “United States of America,” I’m referring to the
America of my childhood. Maybe even the America
of before I was even born. The America that not only
acknowledged its historical documents, but fully
respected them.
One could only wish to go back in time to witness
the country’s atmosphere when Roosevelt or Lincoln
was president. I’m sure things were extremely differ-
ent compared to today.
I am in no way disrespecting our president or our
other authorities. I am simply expressing my dissatis-
faction as to the road our country is going down.
I see a dead end in our future, and our govern-
ment needs to make a U-turn before it’s too late. Our
nation once held hands in unity, but now our author-
ity has developed into an individual iron fist.
What are your feelings towards what is going on in
the White House? Please let me know via email.
Shelby Woodall is a student in the Bryant School
District. She can be reached at shelby@shelbysays.com.
Her column appears each Tuesday exclusively in The
Saline Courier.
T
he Affordable Care Act origi-
nally passed the House in
2009 with 220 votes, all but
one of them Democrats. Recently 251
members of the House, including
22 Democrats, voted to postpone for
one year implementation of the heart
of the act -- the individual mandate
to purchase health insurance. If this
were any other issue, liberal com-
mentators might see a governing
majority emerging in favor of delay-
ing Obamacare.
In the last couple
of years, House
Republicans have
voted over and over
to repeal the presi-
dent’s health care
plan. It got to be
routine. Not long
ago, however, the
Obamacare battle
took a turn toward
the bizarre.
The cause was the
administration’s deci-
sion to delay by one year the man-
date requiring big businesses to pro-
vide health coverage for employees
or pay a fine. The White House acted
in response to complaints from busi-
ness owners, who called the mandate
burdensome.
So Republicans thought: What
about all those individuals out there
who believe the mandate requiring
them to buy coverage or pay a fine is
just as burdensome? As the GOP saw
it, the White House listened to big
business but ignored the little guy.
So Republicans came up with
a two-part strategy that would,
among other goals, sound out
House Democrats’ attitudes toward
Obamacare less than three months
before it is to become a reality in
American life.
First, Republicans introduced a bill
that would write into law what the
president had already done by fiat --
that is, delay the employer mandate a
year. That seemed unnecessary, and
a little mischievous, but the serious
point, according to one House GOP
aide, was to emphasize that “the
president can’t just determine which
laws he’s going to follow and when
he’s going to follow them.”
Even though it was largely moot,
Obama took the move seriously
enough to take the somewhat odd
action of threatening to veto a bill
that would duplicate his own policy.
And when the White House argued
that the postponement legislation
“would cost millions of hard-working
middle-class families the security of
affordable health coverage and care
they deserve” -- remember, the bill
would simply codify an action Obama
had already taken -- the White
House’s position veered into the sur-
real.
The House voted on July 17, and
in the end 35 Democrats voted in
favor of the president’s delay, while
160 voted against it. It’s hard to inter-
pret exactly what that means, but it
doesn’t seem good for Obama.
The second part of the GOP strat-
egy was introducing the bill that
would delay the individual mandate
the same way Obama had delayed
the employer mandate. The purpose,
Speaker John Boehner said in a spe-
cial floor appearance, was “to make
sure families and individuals get the
same break from Obamacare that the
president wants for big businesses.”
The 22 Democratic votes in favor of
the delay provided another sign that
doesn’t look good for the president.
Boehner sent out a press release
claiming “bipartisan opposition to a
partisan train wreck.”
Seemingly unsteadied by a turn
of events that included his own
threat to veto himself, Obama took
to the White House East Room
for an Obamacare pep rally. The
Republicans were clearly on his
mind.
“Yesterday, despite all the evi-
dence that the law is working the
way it was supposed to for middle-
class Americans, Republicans in the
House of Representatives voted -- for
nearly the 40th time -- to dismantle
it,” the president said. “We’ve got a
lot of problems in this country ... and
yet, instead we’re refighting these
old battles.”
Perhaps the battles would indeed
be old if Democrats had written a law
that went into effect a year or even
two years after it was passed. But
Obamacare became law more than
three years ago and still hasn’t gone
into effect. Of course the battle is still
going on.
Now the House bills go to the
Democratic-controlled Senate, where
they will die. But Republicans will
try to ensure a noisy death. “We can
make sure it doesn’t get bottled up
in committee,” says one Senate GOP
aide, “and then try to attach it to
something on the floor.” That means
there will at least be some debate
on the delays, even though Majority
Leader Harry Reid will never allow a
vote on them.
And after that? Republicans don’t
quite know. But they are confident
that the coming implementation of
Obamacare will give them more
chances to undermine the health
care law. “We had these two votes,”
says the GOP House aide, “because
the president gave us an opportunity
to take another whack at it.”
Byron York is chief political cor-
respondent for The Washington
Examiner
Obamacare battle
takes bizarre turn
EDITORIAL CARTOON
I
remember my mother’s 32nd
birthday pretty well. This is partly
because she — sweet lady that she
is — kept the birthday card my brother
and I made her hanging on her bedroom
wall for several years.
It was a large card, made with poster
board instead of paper.
It featured a picture I drew of my moth-
er with a humongous cake.
The only parts of her that were visible
in the drawing were her
legs behind the huge
cake, and there was a
little caption bubble that
read: “Who turned out
the lights???”
The idea was that we
needed an enormous
cake in order to fit all 32
candles.
Of course, we were
only teasing her about
getting older.
Still, to me — at age 9
— 32 did seem really, really old. I thought
30 was middle-aged.
By 40, you might as well retire.
Obviously, I have gained some perspec-
tive on things since then.
“The big 3-0” is no longer a distant
abstraction that I don’t think I will experi-
ence for a long, long time.
It will be my reality very soon, and it
doesn’t feel like a big deal at all.
It does, however, make me take a look
at where I am in life, and I’m nowhere
near where I thought I would be.
I think we all as little girls assumed
we would grow up, meet the man of our
dreams and start a family that would be
together forever.
This was something that just automati-
cally happened at — oh, say … 23 or 24.
There wasn’t any other future I envi-
sioned.
Everything seemed in line with the plan
a few years ago. I had “the one” — or so
I thought — and we were on track for an
idyllic life together.
But things don’t always go as planned.
Sometimes, even after several years,
issues and fundamental differences begin
to surface.
Some unions are just not meant to be.
And when a relationship is not right, no
matter how long you have been in it, the
end is not nearly as devastating as you
think it’s going to be.
Nobody plans to be divorced or still
single at my age, but it’s not that bad. It is
what it is.
Of course, although expectations have
evolved somewhat from generations past,
it still feels like, particularly in the South,
you’re supposed to have a husband and a
home at my age.
And if you don’t, then what’s the issue?
Sometimes, it seems like being single
is seen as a chronic problem that must be
solved.
Although I can understand why a
romantic relationship is the most impor-
tant thing in many people’s lives, for me,
it is no longer the life-defining element it
once was.
I look forward to meeting the right per-
son, but I’m also content without it.
Like I said, my life is nothing like I
expected it to be.
In some ways, it’s better.
I never, ever could have imagined the
love and joy my wonderful 3-year-old son
brings to my life.
Here is a prime example: the other day,
I was sitting on the floor playing with him,
when I caught him staring up at me.
Wondering if he was examining some-
thing on my face or that he asked a ques-
tion I had not answered, I said, “What?”
And he looked at me with that sweet
face and simply said, “Mommy, you’re the
best,” and gave me a big hug.
If that’s not a dream man, I don’t know
what is.
Jennifer Joyner is a reporter for The
Saline Courier. Her column appears each
Tuesday. She can be reached at jjoyner@
bentoncourier.com.
What happens
while you’re busy
making other plans
Iron fist of leaders
is heavy-handed
• The Saline Courier (USPS 050-660) is published daily by Horizon Publishing Co., 321
N. Market St., Benton, AR. Periodical mailing privileges paid in Benton, AR.
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©Copyright 2006 Horizon Publishing Co.
Columns and cartoons on the opinion page do not necessarily reflect
opinions of The Saline Courier. Weekend delivery times are no later than
7 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. The circulation department has re-delivery
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and Sunday. Call 501-317-6013 or 501-315-8228 during business hours.
The Saline Courier
Founded in 1876
Phone: (501) 315-8228 • Fax: (501) 315-1230 • Email: news@bentoncourier.com
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Business Manager
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coMposing director
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Byron
york
Page 4 – The Saline Courier
news@bentoncourier.com Tuesday, July 23, 2013
OpiniOn
Jennifer
Joyner
ShelBy
Woodall
SHELBY
SAYS
T
he love of my life passed away on
Dec. 5, 2012, of pancreatic cancer.
During her last days of life, she
suffered very much.
The cancer drugs she had to take
became ineffective to ease her pain. We
both prayed the medical marijuana law
would pass so she could at least have
another option to ease her pain. It did not
pass.
The only release from pain she had
was the morphine she was given in hos-
pice that made her unconscious until she
passed away.
I pray we can find a better way to help
the ones we love.
Only the Lord can help us if we can’t.
Ricky Jackson. Glen Rose
Medical marijuana
could help for pain
SportS
saline
scoreboard
Tuesday, July 23, 2013
news@bentoncourier.com The Saline Courier – Page 5
Black Sox seal deal, win Zone 4 title
SHERIDAN – The Bryant Black
Sox won the Senior American
Legion Zone 4 Tournament for
the second consecutive year with
an 18-3 win over the Texarkana
Razorbacks in Sheridan on Monday
night.
With the help from Texarkana
errors, which were aplenty through-
out the Zone Tournament, the Black
Sox (34-3) scored four runs in the
first inning and eight in the second
to take an early 12-0 lead, putting
the game out of reach for a fatigued
Razorbacks’ team.
The score would be 16-0 after
four innings and 18-1 after five
as Bryant starting pitcher Tryce
Schalchlin gave up two hits in five
innings for the win. He struck out
two and walked two.
The Black Sox look to repeat as
state champions this weekend when
they travel to Mountain Home to
play in the Senior American Legion
State Tournament.
by Tony lenahan
tlenahan@bentoncourier.com
Bryant Black Sox
runner Marcus
Wilson starts for
third base in a
game earlier in the
Senior American
Legion Zone 4
Tournament.
Bryant defeated
Texarkana 18-3
on Monday night
in Sheridan to
win the Zone 4
Championship.
TONY LENAHAN/
The Saline Courier
The End
Benton falls game shy of State
TONY LENAHAN/The Saline Courier
Benton McClendon’s player Trey Bishop gets set to field a ball at first base in a game earlier in the
Senior Zone 4 Tournament. The McClendon’s lost 9-5 to Texarkana on Monday night to end their sea-
son at 12-20.
SHERIDAN – After com-
bining for 24 hits its previ-
ous two games, the Benton
McClendon’s Appliances
could manage only two in
a 9-5 loss to the Texarkana
Razorbacks in the Senior
American Legion Zone 4
Tournament on Monday in
Sheridan. Had Benton won
the game, they would have
made the Senior American
Legion State Tournament.
Texarkana would take a
7-0 lead off of Benton start-
ing pitcher Hunter Wray, but
the McClendon’s would get
some help from Razorbacks’
starting pitcher, left-hander
Trey Jeans, in the bottom of
the fourth.
After Trey Bishop lined
out to begin Benton’s half
of the inning, Jeans walked
Clay Holicer on four pitches
and hit Wray with a pitch.
Wesley Ramsey would pick
up Benton’s first hit of the
game, a single to left field
which the left-fielder allowed
to go through his legs and
two runs would score for the
McClendon’s.
Shawn Beesley would
fly out to centerfield, but
Jeans would walk Hunter
McDade and Tyler Turbyfill
on eight straight pitches
and leadoff man Tyler Lewis
would hit a two-run single
to center to make it a 7-4
Benton deficit, and Turbyfill
would score on Texarkana’s
by Tony lenahan
tlenahan@bentoncourier.com
BENTON, page 6
3 Razorbacks
picked as
summer
league stars
FAYETTEVILLE – Three
members of the University
of Arkansas baseball team
have earned all-star honors
in their respective summer
baseball leagues. Rising
junior Jalen
Beeks was
named an all-star
in the Cape Cod
League, while
rising redshirt
junior Jackson
Lowery and ris-
ing sophomore
Colin Poché
were selected
as all-stars in
the Northwoods
League.
Beeks will
represent
the Eastern
Division in the
2013 Cape Cod
League All-Star
Game, which is
scheduled for
Saturday, July
27 at 3:30 p.m.
(CT). The game will be tele-
vised on Fox College Sports
(Cox Communications chan-
nel 134/DirecTV channel
623).
Beeks, who is playing his
summer baseball with the
Harwich Mariners, has com-
piled a 3-1 record with a 2.42
ERA in five starts. In 29.2
innings, Beeks has allowed
just 25 hits, while striking
out 12 batters. Opposing
hitters are batting just .227
against the left hander.
A native of Prairie Grove,
Ark., Beeks was one of the
most reliable pitchers out
of the Arkansas bullpen in
2013. Beeks pitched in a
team-high 29 games, all in
relief, and had a 6-2 record
with two saves and a 2.20
ERA. Beeks held opponents
Coaches remain, but positions switch
A
s he officially last
December and
January decided
to retain Bobby Allen
and Taver Johnson from
the Bobby
Petrino/
John L. Smith
regimes, new
Razorbacks
football
Coach Bret
Bielema
ordained they
would not
perform the
same tasks
at Arkansas
that they per-
formed before.
Johnson, Petrino’s last
hire before Petrino was
fired, coached linebackers
for Smith, the Razorbacks’
interim coach in 2012.
He coaches cornerbacks
now. Originally coming to
Arkansas from Boise State
in 1998 as an assistant to
Houston Nutt, Allen has
coached every defensive
position with the Razorbacks
including two stints as
defensive coordinator.
Allen now is in adminis-
tration as the Razorbacks’
director of high school rela-
tions.
“One of the things I
vowed to do if I retained
somebody, like a Bobby
Allen or a Taver Johnson
or on my support staff, I
changed everybody’s role,”
Bielema said. “I didn’t
allow them to stay in the
same position because I
wanted them to do things in
a way that we needed to do
to move forward. I would
learn from them, and lean
on them and ask them a
lot of different things, but I
didn’t want to put them in a
position of doing the same
job under a different, new
boss.”
Bielema comes to
Arkansas after head coach-
ing Wisconsin from 2006 to
2012, but said he developed
the switching assignments
philosophy after coaching
linebackers at Iowa for
Hayden Fry, also the coach
that Bielema played for in
college, then continuing to
coach Iowa linebackers after
Fry retired.
“When Coach Fry left and
the new coach, Kirk Ferentz,
came in, he retained me in
the exact same position,”
Bielema said. “I was line-
backers coach for Hayden
Fry and became the line-
backers coach for Coach
Ferentz. Every day I was in
a personal struggle of transi-
tion. It took me a year and
half to get it right because
I was still trying to do it the
way I did it before and I was
resistant to change of the
new way of doing things and
I was in a constant battle. In
my opinion I wasn’t as serv-
ing and supportive of my
head coach as I should have
been. I didn’t realize that
until it was all done.”
No matter what Bobby
Allen’s assignment, it was
going to be different for
Bielema.
Third-year sophomore
Brandon Allen not only
is Bobby Allen’s son but
Arkansas’ starting quar-
terback. Austin Allen,
Brandon’s brother, now is
on scholarship as a fresh-
man fresh off quarterback-
ing Fayetteville High to the
state championship.
“I never have been in a
situation where you are at
a staff room complaining
how a kid is playing and his
dad is sitting right next to
you,” Bielema said “It’s a
very unique scenario and
thankfully I haven’t been
complaining too much.”
Brandon Allen, play-
ing the second half of last
season’s loss to Louisiana-
Monroe after graduated
senior starter Tyler Wilson
suffered a concussion dur-
ing the first half and then
starting the following week’s
loss to national champion
Alabama as Wilson still
ailed, is the only quarter-
back beginning Aug. 4 drills
with varsity experience
other than walk-on Brian
Buehner holding for place-
kicks.
Nate alleN
RazoRback
RepoRt
special to The saline courier
Beeks
Lowery
Poche
HOGS, page 6
The Saline County
Razorback Club is plan-
ning a bus trip to the
Arkansas vs. Ole Miss
game on Nov. 9 in Oxford,
Miss.
There are currently 20
seats still available and
they are $150 each.
That includes a game
ticket, transportation to
and from the game and
a box lunch. For more
information call Phillip
Montalvo at 501-353-6357.
saline coUnTY
raZorbacK clUb
Free Travs
TicKeTs
The Bryant Soccer Club
is offering a speed, agility,
quickness and flexibility
training schedule camp
instructed by certified
professionals from the
University of Central
Arkansas.
The camp costs $80 and
will be July 22-25. It will be
from 5:30-8 p.m. at Bryant
High School Track and
the lead instructor is Kim
Eskola.
Team camps are avail-
able for any BSC coach
who would like to sched-
ule a team camp at $50 per
player for a four-day camp.
Private skills training les-
sons are also available at
$30-$50 an hour.
Contact Kim Eskola
at 501 690 0332 or Kim
Eskola@yahoo.com to
schedule a team camp or
skills trainer.
brYanT soccer
clUb
A limited number of
free tickets are available
at The Saline Courier
office for the Friday, Aug.
16, Arkansas Travelers
game at Dickey-Stephens
Park. The “Benton Night”
promotion features the
Travelers against the
Corpus Christi Hooks at
7:10 p.m. The rain date is
Saturday, Aug. 17.
Tickets are on a first-
come, first-serve basis and
are available while sup-
plies last.
Mlb
TODAY
Pitt. at Washington, 6:05 p.m.
Cinn. at Giants, 6:05 p.m. G1
Dodgers at Toronto, 6:07 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Boston, 6:10 p.m.
Atlanta at Mets, 6:10 p.m.
Yankees at Texas, 7:05 p.m.
Padres at Milwaukee, 7:10 p.m.
Detroit at White Sox, 7:10 p.m.
Baltimore at KC, 7:10 p.m.
Oakland at Houston, 7:10 p.m.
Philly at St. Louis, 7:15 p.m.
Miami at Colorado, 7:40 p.m.
Cubs at Arizona, 8:40 p.m.
Minnesota at Angels, 9:05 p.m.
Cleveland at Seattle, 9:10 p.m.
Giant at Cincinnati, 9:15 p.m. G2
Texas lands
RHP Garza
ARLINGTON — The
Texas Rangers finally
have Matt Garza in their
starting rotation. Texas
acquired Garza from the
Chicago Cubs in a trade
completed Monday, getting
a pitcher they had long
coveted just more than a
week before the July 31
non-waiver trading deadline
and several days after it ini-
tially appeared that the two
teams had a deal in place.
“He’s an extremely tal-
ented pitcher that’s had
success in the toughest of
divisions and the biggest
of stages, who’s throwing
the ball as well as anybody
right now,” Rangers general
manager Jon Daniels said.
associated Press
6 The Saline Courier
Tuesday, July 23, 2013
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centerfielder’s errant throw.
But, Lewis’ single would be
the McClendon’s last hit as
Razorback Nathan Stubber
pitched 3.2 scoreless innings
of relief, walking two bat-
ters without giving up a hit.
Jeans gave up five runs on
two hits and six walks in 5.1
innings, while striking out
six. Wray gave up nine runs
on 13 hits, walking two and
striking out two in a com-
plete game. Wray threw 132
pitches.
Texarkana was trying to
keep Benton in the game
early as Lewis reached on an
error by the third baseman,
but ended up getting picked
off at second base to end
the inning. Holicer reached
on an error by the shortstop
to begin the second inning,
but he was picked off at first
base to kill any momentum
the McClendon’s might
muster. After a Wray ground
out after the pickoff, Ramsey
and Beesley walked, which
would have loaded the bases
with one out.
Texarkana made five
errors in the first five
innings of the game, but
played errorless ball the last
four to squash any hopes
for a Benton comeback. No
team scored in the last three
innings of play.
Ramsey went 1 for 3
with a run and Lewis went
1 for 4 with two RBI for
the McClendon’s, which
finished the season with a
12-20 record. For Texarkana,
Luke McGuire went 3 for
5 and scored twice, and
Jackson Murphy went 2 for
5 with a homerun and two
RBI.
Benton
From page 5
to a .224 batting average,
giving up 33 hits in 41
innings of work.
A pair of Razorbacks will
play in the Northwoods
League All-Star Game as
Lowery will represent the
South Division and Poché
will suit up for the North
Division. The Northwoods
League All-Star Game is
scheduled for Tuesday, July
23, at 7:35 p.m. (CT).
Lowery, who redshirted
the 2013 season at Arkansas,
is playing for the Wisconsin
Woodchucks. A native of
Little Rock, Ark., Lowery
has pitched in a team-high
19 games, 18 out of the bull-
pen, and has a 1-3 record
with five saves and a 1.44
ERA. Lowery has only given
up 15 hits in 25 innings and
has struck out 29 batters.
Poché is pitching for the
Willmar Stingers this sum-
mer. The southpaw has
pitched in eight games, four
as a starter, and has a 3-2
record with one save and a
1.55 ERA. Poché has struck
out 33 batters in 29 innings
and has allowed just 23 hits.
A native of Flower
Mound, Texas, Poché
pitched in eight games, five
as a starter, in his freshman
season at Arkansas and
had a 3-0 record with a 1.37
ERA. Poché struck out 23
batters in 19.2 innings, while
holding opponents to a .176
batting average, allowing 12
hits.
Hogs
From page 5
HERE’s THE PITCH
WIL CHANDLER/The saline Courier
Bryant Everett pitcher Devin Dupree delivers a pitch against Malvern
National Bank earlier this season. Bryant defeated Cabot 2-1 in the
Junior State Tournament on Monday and is one win away from
winning the championship they will play today at 4:30 p.m. against
Jacksonville. Bryant is undefeated in the tournament and will have
two chances to win the title. The Black Sox are now 32-1 and will
host the Junior Regional Tournament beginning Friday.
Braun suspended for rest of 2013
NEW YORK —
Ryan Braun stood on a
spring training field and
proclaimed he was innocent
of using banned testoster-
one.
“I would bet my life,” he
said back then, “that this
substance never entered my
body at any point.”
Seventeen months later,
he accepted a 65-game sus-
pension from baseball and
admitted, “I am not perfect.
I realize now that I have
made some mistakes. I am
willing to accept the conse-
quences of those actions.”
The 2011 National
League MVP was suspend-
ed without pay for the rest
of the season and the post-
season Monday, the start of
sanctions involving players
reportedly tied to a Florida
clinic accused of distribut-
ing performance-enhancing
drugs.
Attention quickly turned
to who’s next? Will Alex
Rodriguez or any of the
other players tied in media
reports to the Biogenesis
of America clinic get disci-
plined and, if so, when?
“I’m pretty sure Braunie
won’t be the last,” Detroit
All-Star outfielder Torii
Hunter said. “It’s going to
be for the next 100 years,
somebody’s going to try
to beat the system, and as
long as they keep catching
guys, the system works.”
Braun, a five-time All-
Star, accepted a penalty 15
games longer than the one
he avoided last year when
an arbitrator overturned his
positive test for elevated
testosterone because the
urine sample had been
improperly handled.
More than a dozen
players were targeted by
MLB following a report
by Miami New Times in
January revealing relation-
ships between Biogenesis
and major leaguers. When
Yahoo Sports reported in
February that Braun’s name
was listed in Biogenesis’
record, Braun said his
lawyer had retained clinic
owner Anthony Bosch as a
consultant. Braun issued a
statement that said “I have
nothing to hide.”
MLB Commissioner Bud
Selig announced Braun’s
penalty, citing the outfielder
for unspecified “violations”
of both baseball’s drug pro-
gram and labor contract.
Braun’s ban will cost him
about $3 million of his $8.5
million salary. With the
Brewers in last place in the
NL Central, they aren’t like-
ly to have any playoff games
for him to miss.
“I wish to apologize to
anyone I may have disap-
pointed,” Braun said. “I am
glad to have this matter
behind me once and for
all, and I cannot wait to get
back to the game I love.”
Under the agreement
reached by MLB and the
players’ association the spe-
cifics of Braun’s admission
were not made public.
A person familiar with
the deal, speaking on condi-
tion of anonymity because
no statements were autho-
rized, said 50 games of the
penalty were connected to
Biogenesis. The additional
15 games stemmed from
Braun’s actions during the
grievance that overturned
his positive test from
October 2011. The suspen-
sion will count as a first vio-
lation of the drug program,
the person said.
“I’m shocked, but people
make mistakes every
day,” Yankees pitcher CC
Sabathia said. “He’ll serve
his time but, hopefully,
he’ll be able to continue his
career.”
Union head Michael
Weiner said last week that
arbitration hearings for
players contesting suspen-
sions likely would not start
until September, which
would delay any penalty
until next season. But he
also indicated the union
would urge players to make
a deal and get a suspen-
sion over with if there was
strong evidence of guilt.
“I am deeply gratified to
see Ryan taking this bold
step,” Weiner said in a
statement. “It vindicates the
rights of all players under
the joint drug program. It
is good for the game that
Ryan will return soon to
continue his great work
both on and off the field.”
Braun’s acceptance of
the suspension marks a
180-degree turnaround from
his defiant spring training
news conference in Phoenix
last year, after his 50-game
ban was overturned.
“We won,” he said then,
“because the truth is on my
side. The truth is always rel-
evant, and at the end of the
day, the truth prevailed.”
The 29-year-old Braun
was hitting .298 with nine
homers and 38 RBIs this
year, slowed by a thumb
injury that limited him
to one game between
June 9 and Friday. He
was at Miller Park before
Monday’s game against San
Diego and addressed the
Brewers, then left without
speaking to reporters.
“He apologized,”
pitcher John Axford said.
“Whatever else was said
beyond that, I don’t think
we need to carry outside of
the clubhouse.”
Braun met with MLB
investigators in late June.
Baseball’s probe was
boosted when Bosch, who
ran Biogenesis, agreed last
month to cooperate with the
sport’s investigators.
The suspension is the lat-
est in a string of high-profile
drug cases across sports.
Cyclist Lance Armstrong, a
seven-time Tour de France
winner, ended years of deni-
als in January, admitting he
doped to win. Positive tests
were disclosed this month
involving sprinters Tyson
Gay, Asafa Powell and
Sherone Simpson.
By serving the entire pen-
alty this year, Braun gains a
slight monetary advantage.
His salary increases to $10
million next year, when a
65-game suspension would
cost him about $500,000
more.
“We commend
Ryan Braun for taking
responsibility for his past
actions,” Rob Manfred,
MLB’s executive vice
president for economics
and league affairs, said in
a statement. “We all agree
that it is in the best inter-
ests of the game to resolve
this matter. When Ryan
returns, we look forward to
him making positive con-
tributions to Major League
Baseball, both on and off
the field.”
Negotiations over pen-
alties for other players
haven’t begun, according
to a second person familiar
with the probe, also speak-
ing on condition of anonym-
ity because no statements
were authorized.
Rodriguez acknowledged
using PEDs while with
Texas from 2001-03, but has
denied taking them since.
A three-time AL MVP,
Rodriguez has been side-
lined all season following
January hip surgery and
was hoping to be activated
this week. A quadriceps
injury developed while he
played at Triple-A Scranton/
Wilkes-Barre and caused
him to remain on the dis-
abled list. He is not expect-
ed at the Yankees’ minor
league complex in Tampa,
Fla., until Wednesday.
Braun became the latest
star tripped up by baseball’s
drug rules.
The sport was criticized
for allowing bulked-up slug-
gers to set power records in
the 1990s and only started
testing in 2003. Since then,
testing and penalties have
become more stringent and
last year San Francisco’s
Melky Cabrera was sus-
pended for 50 games, just
weeks after he was voted
MVP of the All-Star game.
Four All-Stars this year
have been linked in media
reports to Biogenesis:
Texas outfielder Nelson
Cruz, San Diego shortstop
Everth Cabrera, Oakland
pitcher Bartolo Colon and
Detroit shortstop Jhonny
Peralta.
“I guess it is what it is,”
Cruz said of Braun’s sus-
pension. “I don’t have any
comment.”
Other players tied to
Biogenesis in media reports
include Melky Cabrera, now
with the Toronto Blue Jays,
Yankees catcher Francisco
Cervelli and Seattle catcher
Jesus Montero.
“It’s frustrating to know
that there are people who
have played on perfor-
mance-enhancing substanc-
es against us,” Los Angeles
Angels pitcher C.J. Wilson
said. “Whether it was this
year, last year, couple years
ago — even the guys who
got caught, it’s not like they
got tested the day that they
started doing it, so I feel
like this is the first domino
to fall.”
AP
Milwaukee Brewer star and ex-MVP Ryan Braun slaps hands in
the dugout after a home run at Miller Park last season. Braun was
suspended for the rest of the 2013 season on Monday for using a
banned drug. Braun proclaimed he was innocent when asked about
the incident during Spring Training this year.
Associated Press
Tuesday, July 23, 2013
The Saline Courier 7
SERVICE DIRECTORY
Air Conditioning
HEATING AND
AIR CONDITIONING
Installation,
Maintenance and
24 Hour Service
501-425-3796
Residential &
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Attorneys
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in Benton
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frequent panelist on AETN’s
“Arkansas Week”, a regular
commentator for “Arkansas
Viewpoint” on KUAR (NPR-
Little Rock) and provided
radio, print, and television
political commentary on a
regular basis. In addition
to serving as an elected
official, Clemmer has more
than 25 years’ experience
as an educator. She taught
for a number of years at
Arkansas Northeastern
College (then Mississippi
County Community College)
before accepting a fac-
ulty position in the Political
Science Department at
the University of Arkansas
at Little Rock, where she
teaches classes in American
Politics.
Clemmer has lived in
Saline County since 1992.
She and her husband, Jamie,
have three daughters, two
sons-in-law and a grand-
daughter. District 33 encom-
passes parts of Saline and
Pulaski counties.
Clemmer
From page 1
William’s press aides had
talked about preserving
Kate’s “dignity” throughout
the pregnancy, and the
way the birth was handled
showed that the palace’s
impressive stagecraft could
give the royals a bubble of
privacy even in the age of
Twitter and 24-hour news
broadcasts.
Just before 6 a.m., 31-year-
old Kate, also known as
the Duchess of Cambridge,
entered the hospital through
a side door, avoiding the
mass of journalists camped
outside. Officials did not
announce she was hospital-
ized until more than an hour
later.
Later, as the world media
gathered outside filled hours
of airtime with speculation,
the baby’s birth went unan-
nounced for nearly four
hours, allowing the royal
couple the private time they
needed to act like a regular
family — a goal 31-year-old
William has cherished.
He was able to tell his
father, Prince Charles,
and grandmother, Queen
Elizabeth II, about the birth
and enjoy his wife’s company
without having to cope with
the overwhelming media and
public desire for information.
By nightfall, the public
still knew very few details,
but most people seemed
satisfied with the day’s
events. London’s landmarks,
including the London Eye, lit
up in the national colors of
red, white and blue, and the
city had a party atmosphere
unmatched since last sum-
mer’s Olympics.
Outside the hospital, a
man dressed as a town crier
in traditional robes and an
extravagant feathered hat
shouted the news and rang
a bell.
A car carrying the
announcement drove from
the hospital to the palace,
where the news was greeted
with shrieks of “It’s a boy!”
and strains of “For He’s a
Jolly Good Fellow.” A large
crowd rushed against the
palace fences to catch a
glimpse of an ornate, gilded
easel displaying a small bul-
letin formally announcing
the news.
The framed sheet of paper
became the target of a thou-
sand camera flashes as peo-
ple thrust their smartphones
through the railings. Hours
after the initial announce-
ment, crowds were still surg-
ing forward to get near the
easel. Some placed presents
and bouquets in front of the
palace, while others waved
Union Jack flags and partied
on the streets to celebrate.
“It’s a crazy atmosphere.
Everyone is getting very
excited,” said Andrew
Aitchison. “It’s great to be
part of history, to say we
were here and saw it all hap-
pen.”
More celebrations are
expected Tuesday, including
gun salutes by royal artil-
lery companies to honor the
birth. Riders in uniform will
trot past the palace to Green
Park, where six field guns
will fire 41 blank rounds.
Prince Charles spoke of
his joy and pride in becom-
ing a grandparent for the
first time.
“It is an incredibly special
moment for William and
Catherine and we are so
thrilled for them on the birth
of their baby boy,” Prince
Charles said in a state-
ment. “Grandparenthood
is a unique moment in
anyone’s life, as countless
kind people have told me in
recent months, so I am enor-
mously proud and happy to
be a grandfather for the first
time, and we are eagerly
looking forward to seeing
the baby in the near future.”
Baby
From page 1
Owners Association.
Finis Shelnutt, owner of
the property, requested the
property be rezoned from
single-family residential to
neighborhood commercial.
Walker told the council
that approving the change
would violate the property
owners’ covenant.
Shelnutt, who now lives
in New Orleans, was pres-
ent and countered Walker’s
arguments with the fact that
“Red Crawford, who devel-
oped the subdivision, put
together the covenant and
he violated it from the time
he built the first structure
there.
Shelnutt said numerous
violations of the covenant
have occurred throughout
the years since the area’s
development in the 1950s.
When a vote was taken
on a motion to approve
the zoning change, only
Alderman Frank Baptist
voted against it.
Alderman Brad Moore,
who serves as the council’s
liaison to the Public Utilities
Commission, announced
that a workshop is set for 5
p.m. Thursday, July 25, at
the Electric Utility Center
on Dale Street to hear
GDS, the Public Utilities
Commission’s consultant,
review the process involved
in efforts to lower the city’s
electric rate structure.
In relation to this issue,
Mayor Mattingly announced
that a special City Council
meeting will take place
Sept. 16 to review the work-
shop findings and possibly
vote on the rate structure at
that time.
In another matter,
the council unanimously
approved an ordinance
authorizing the acquisi-
tion of seven sites under
construction in the area of
Sharon Road and Wright
and Nalley streets in order
to widen the roadway to the
Benton Event Center, which
is expected to be completed
this fall.
City Attorney Brent
Houston, in the council’s
agenda session preced-
ing the regular meeting,
explained that attempts
have been made to negoti-
ate with the owners con-
cerning the acquisition of
the easements, most of
which are temporary. He
said the easements are
necessary for the construc-
tion company to complete
its work, but the property
owners are not willing to
cooperate.
The ordinance notes that
there is a timeline affecting
the project which will cause
the city to lose $250,000 if
the work is not completed
quickly.
The property owners
affected are Christine Elrod
and Melissa McAdoo;
Michael R. Sipes; Steven
Casey Harris; U.S. Bank;
Wayne and Martha Still; and
Willis and Bonnie Nalley.
In other matters, the
council approved budget
amendments to allow for
construction of a dog park
adjacent to Bernard Holland
Park and Sunset Lake.
The budget amend-
ment appropriates money
to purchase equipment
in the amount of $31,833
and $99,550 (plus $21,000
engineering fees) for the
construction of a parking
lot and $19,000 for the con-
struction of a fence at the
park.
In conjunction with the
budgetary amendments, the
council approved a resolu-
tion accepting the low bid
for the project from Dog-
On-It-Parks and Redstone
Construction.
Other council action
included:
•Approving an ordinance
levying the annual tax on all
real and personal property
in the city. This is a continu-
ation of an existing tax and
does not increase anyone’s
property tax.
It applies 4.1 mills on the
dollar on real and personal
property for the city general
fund and .4 mills on the
dollar on real and personal
property for the firemen’s
pension and relief fund. The
tax is placed upon the tax
books by the county clerk
and collected in the same
manner that state and coun-
ty taxes are collected by the
tax collector.
•Approving a resolu-
tion abandoning police
department property and
transferring ownership to
the Alexander and Haskell
police departments. The
items involved include two
radar units and eight com-
bat ballistic helms.
•Approving a resolu-
tion authorizing the mayor
and Police Chief Kirk
Lane to apply for funding
from the Edward Byrne
Memorial Justice Assistance
Grant program with the
Department of Justice to
fund a computer replace-
ment project.
Reed
From page 1
Classifieds
Announcements
FISH DAY!!
Now Is The Time For Stocking
*3-5” Channel Catfish - $35 per 100
*6-8” Channel Catfish - $55 per 100
*5-7” Hybrid Catfish - $80 per $100
*Bluegill (Coppernose & Hybrid) • *Redear • *Large-
mouth Bass • *Black Crappie (if avail.) • *8-11” Grass
Carp • *Fathead Minnows • *Koi
Farmers Association in Benton, AR
Saturday, August 3rd, 10 am - 11 am
To Pre-order call: Arkansas Pondstockers
1-800-843-4748 • Walk Ups Welcome
Employment
CARRIERS WANTED
The Saline Courier is accepting applications
for independent contract carriers and
substitute carriers in all home delivery areas.
• Excellent part time income
• Afternoon delivery Mon–Fri and early
AM on weekends
• Must have a valid sas drivers license
with proof of at least state minimum auto
insurance
Routes available:
ROUTE 70 – Lonsdale, Hwy 70 areas
ROUTE 64 – Hwy 5, Hwy 298, Hwy 9 and
Ed Allen Cove, Steelbridge Road
Interested applicants may come by and fll
out an application at 321 N Market in Benton
or email astovall@bentoncourier.com
Legal Notices
COMMISSIONER!S SALE NOTICE
NOTICE IS HERE BY GIVEN that pursuant to the authority and di-
rections contained in the decretal order of the Circuit Court of Saline
County, Arkansas, made and entered on July 1, 2013, in a certain
cause (No. 63CV-12-727-2) then pending between DEUTSCHE
BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE
POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT RELATING TO IMPAC
SECURED ASSETS CORP., MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CER-
TIFICATES, SERIES 2004-1 Plaintiff, and Bridgett Nelson, et al., De-
fendants, the undersigned, as Commissioner of said Court, will offer
for sale at public vendue to the highest bidder, at the Saline County
Courthouse in which said court is held, located in Benton, Arkansas,
within the hours prescribed by law for judicial sales, on August 27,
2013 at 11:00 A.M., the following-described real estate, situated in
Saline County, Arkansas:
Lot 22, Emerald Valley Subdivision, Phase 1, an addition to
the City of Benton, Saline County, Arkansas.
Also known as 3224 Leanna Lane, Benton, Arkansas 72015
TERMS OF SALE: On a credit of three months, provided the pur-
chaser shall execute a commercial corporate surety bond as re-
quired by law and the order and decree of said Court in said cause,
with approved security, bearing interest at the maximum legal rate
per annum from date of sale until paid, and a lien being retained on
the premises sold to secure the payment of the purchase money.
The property will be sold subject to any and all property taxes due
and payable.
GIVEN under my hand this 19 day of July, 2013.
DENNIS MILLIGAN, Commissioner in Circuit • By: Lana Davis
Prepared by: WILSON & ASSOCIATES, P.L.L.C.
1521 Merrill Drive, Suite D-220, Little Rock, Arkansas 72211
501-219-9388 By:Heather Martin-Herron (2011136), Atty for Plaintiff
Legal Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF SALINE COUNTY, ARKANSAS
2nd DIVISION
IN THE MATTER OF THE ADOPTION OF
DESTINY SCOTT, a minor child CASE NO.:63PR-13-181-2
ANDREW and CATALINA BEASLEY PETITIONER
WARNING ORDER
To: John Scott whose last known county of residents was Saline:
Your are hereby notified that Andrew and Catalina Beasley, Peti-
tioners, whose attorney is The Law Offices of Thomas Burns, PA. PO
Box 1045, 23251 Interstate 30 South, Bryant Arkansas 72089-1045,
has filed a Complaint herein against you, a copy of which complaint
and summons shall be delivered to you or to your attorney upon re-
quest.
You are also notified that you must appear and defend by filing
your Answer or other responsive pleading within thirty (30) days of
the date of the first publication of this Warning Order; and in the
event of your failure to do so, judgement by default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint as circum-
scribed by the laws of this State.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and seal
of this Court this, the 3rd day of July, 2013
By: Doug Curtis, Circuit Court Clerk
by: Annette Ashley D.C
Prepared by: Sarah Shirley (2012130)
Law Offices of Thomas Burns, PA • P.O.Box 1045• 23251 Interstate
30 South• Bryant, Arkansas 72089-1045 Telephone (501) 847-2263•
Fax (501) 847-7733• thomas@burnslawfirm.com
Legal Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF SALINE COUNTY, ARKANSAS
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF EDWARD L. GOOKIN,
a/k/a ED GOOKIN, DECEASED NO. 63-PR-13-365-4
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
Last known address: 6116 Zona Drive, Mablevale, AR
Date of Death: May 25, 2013
On the 19th day of July, 2013, an Affidavit for Collection of Small
Estate by Distributees was filled with respect to the estate of
EDWARD L. GOOKIN, a/k/a ED GOOKIN, deceased, with the Clerk
of the Probate Division of the Circuit Court of Saline County, Arkan-
sas, under Ark. Code Ann.§28-41-101. The legal description of the
real property listed in the Affidavit is as follows:
Lot 32 and 40 of Carolyn Acres Subdivision, and Lots 1,2 and 3
of Block 4 of Sharon Heights Subdivision, all in Saline County,
Arkansas.
All persons having claims against the estate must exhibit them,
duly verified, to the undersigned within three (3) months from the
date of the first publication of this notice, or they shall be forever
barred and precluded from any benefit in the estate.
This notice first published the 23rd day of July, 2013.
VALDEMAR B. gookin,, a/k/a VAL GOOKIN
C/O EUDOX PATTERSON, Attorney for Estate
225 Woodbine Street, Hot Springs, AR 71901
501-321-1136 Fax: 501-321-1137
Legal Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF SALINE COUNTY, ARKANSAS
PROBATE DIVISION
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF
MARJORIE FANCILLE FOGGO, DECEASED NO.63PR-13-317-4
Last Known Address: 1710 Grand Avenue-Haskell
Benton, AR 72015
Date of Death: May 9 2013
NOTICE
All persons having claims against the estate must exhibit them, duly
verified, to the undersigned attorney for the personal representative
within six (6) months from the date of the first publication of this no-
tice, or they shall be forever barred and precluded from any benefit
in the estate.
This notice first published the 24th day of July,2013.
Respectfully Submitted,
Jensen Young & Houston, PLLC
Attorneys for Estate of Marjorie Francille Fogo
P.O. Box 1500, Benton, AR 72018
(501) 315-2255, (501) 315-3355 Fax
Brent D. Houston, Bar No. 92157
Legal Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF SALINE COUNTY, ARKANSAS
PROBATE DIVISION
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF
JENNY SKORUPA, DECEASED NO.63PR-13-330-4
Last Known Address: 701 Sheffield, Bryant, AR 72022
Date of Death: May 30, 2013
NOTICE
All persons having claims against the estate must exhibit them, duly
verified, to the undersigned attorney for the personal representative
within six (6) months from the date of the first publication of this no-
tice, or they shall be forever barred and precluded from any benefit
in the estate.
This notice first published the 26th day of July,2013.
Respectfully Submitted,
Jensen Young & Houston, PLLC
Attorneys for Estate of Jenny Skorupa
P.O. Box 1500, Benton, AR 72018
(501) 315-2255, (501) 315-3355 Fax
Brent D. Houston, Bar No. 92157
Garage Sales
EARLY BIRD SANITATION
Once a week pick up
+ Rolloff Dumpsters
332-7202 • 840-6758
• 778-3969
I BUY JUNK CARS
Lost & Found
FREE FEMALE Cat
1Yr old Spayed, de-
clawed Older couple
preferred 804-9879
FREE TERRIER MIX
Approx 2 Yrs. old
Found on Fairplay Rd
To Good Home Only
Call 317-8224
Announcements
DIVORCE WITH or
wi t hout chi l dr en
$125.00. Incl udes
name change and
property settlement
agreement. SAVE
hundreds. Fast and
Easy. Call 1-888-733-
7165, 24/7.
Adoption
UNPLANNED PREG-
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OF ADOPTI ON?
Open or closed adop-
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family LIVING EX-
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by!s One True Gift
Adoptions Call 24/7.
1-866-459-3371
Adoption
WE'RE EXCITED to
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Health Services
CANADA DRUG
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fordable medications.
Save up to 75% on
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Employment
DRIVERS – APPLY
NOW! 13 Dri vers
needed, Top 5% Pay
& Benefits, Class A
CLD r equi r ed.
877-258-8782.
www.Ad-Drivers.com
Employment
AIRLINE CAREERS
begin here - Become
an Aviation Mainte-
nance Tech. FAA ap-
proved training. Fi-
nancial aid if qualified
Housing available.
Job placement assis-
t ance. Cal l AI M
877-424-4177.
Apartment Mainte-
nance including paint-
ing, electrical repairs,
plumbing repairs and
tenant make-readies,
must have own tools
and a dependable ve-
hicle. HVAC Experi-
ence with EPA certifi-
cation.! Fax resume"
or work history to
501-778-9301 or ap-
ply in person at 151
Summerwood Drive
Benton, AR! M-F
12noon-6pm EOE
DRIVERS - Want to
be part of a team, not
a number? Good
home time, pay & ex-
cellent benefi ts. Mini-
mum of 1 year OTR
flatbed experience.
Diamond State Truck-
i ng, I nc. Cal l
1-800-332-5551
EXPERIENCED
COOK/WAITSTAFF
CALL HOME PLATE
DINER ASK FOR
RICK 813-4423
EXPERIENCED TIRE
man needed. 21 or
older with a clean
driving record. Hourly
& commission pay,
See Brian @ JJ!s
Truck Stop, Exit 106,
I-30.
Grams House
Now Hiring
TEACHERS
Health & Life
Insurance, Retirement
Call Melba
501-794-4726
HELP WANTED!!!
Make $1000 weekly
mai l i ng brochures
from HOME! NO ex-
perience required-
Start Immediately!
www.TheMailingHub.com
I NSURANCE OF-
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ice Representative
Personal Lines CSR
with experience in un-
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all personal lines in-
surance new busi-
ness and serving ex-
isting customers, Ex-
peri ence requi red.
emai l resume to
njackson@roberson
insurance.com or mail
to 315 N Market Ben-
ton, AR 72015
Time to get your own
place? Check out the
Rental Section in to-
day!s Classifieds...
Employment
LOCAL POA office is
looking to hire an Ac-
tivities Director / Front
Desk Help Interested
individuals must have
previous customer
service experience,
an outgoing personal-
ity, and good commu-
nication skills.This is
an hourly position that
requires experience in
Microsoft Word and
the ability to type 40
wpm.Previous experi-
ence in Quickbooks &
Microsoft Publisher is
helpful. Qualified can-
didates can submit re-
sumes to Hurricane
Lake Estates POA at
6015 Worth Ave. Ben-
ton or email resumes
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MAKE UP to $1000 a
week mailing bro-
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Genuine Opportunity!
NO Experience Re-
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mailers.com
LABORER
The City of Benton
Utilities is currently
taking applications for
Laborer in the Waste-
water Department.
Job function is to as-
sist in providing gen-
eral repair and main-
tenance to the waste-
water collection sys-
tem of the City. Re-
quirements are valid
driver!s license and
ability to obtain CDL
within one year, High
School education or
GED and ability to ob-
tain Class I Arkansas
Operator!s License
within one year. A
complete job descrip-
tion is available upon
request. Interested
persons may obtain
applications at City
Hall, 114 S. East
Street, Benton, AR,
Monday through Fri-
day, between the
hours of 8:00 A.M.
and 5:00 P.M. or by
visiting the City of
Benton website at
www.benton.ar.gov
for a printable em-
ployment application.
Deadline for returning
applications is 5:00
P.M., Friday, July 26,
2013. EQUAL OPPOR-
TUNITY EMPLOYER
Cleo’s Furniture
SALES ASSOCIATE
Arkansas’ fastest growing furniture
company with over 25 years in the
business is looking to fill a sales
position in our Benton location.
LIFTING AND MOVING
FURNITURE IS REQUIRED
Health and Life Insurance,
Retirement, Vacations,
No Sundays, Excellent Pay,
Advancement Available
Must apply in person Monday thru
Friday 10:00 am to 6:00pm
201 N. Main St. Benton, AR
TRUCK DRIVERS
Wanted Best Pay and
Home Time! Apply
Online Today over
750 Companies! One
Application, Hundreds
of Offers!
www.HammerLaneJobs.com
Let the
Courier Classifieds
work for you.
Call Cathy or Kim
to place your
Classified Ad.
Mon.-Fri. 8am-5pm
315-8228
or come by
321 N. Market St.
Instruction
CAN YOU DIG IT? –
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m, 1- 800-449-4802,
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thcare/medical-assis-
tants.htm, For local-
ized employment and
wages:
www.bls.gov/oes For
important program
i nfo, pl ease vi si t
www.heritage-educa-
tion.com/disclosures
ABHES Accredited ,
Lic. by SBPCE | Fi-
nancial Aid for Those
who Qualify
Child Care
Child Care In My Home
CPR Cert, affordable
rates, Mon - Fri
(501)317-1676
IN-HOME DAYCARE
Spotless - Non-smoking
Drop-ins Welcome!
778-2920
LICENSED CHILDCARE
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cheap-auto-insurance.com
HOUSE CLEANING
Reasonable Rates
Dependable
501-282-8836
TREE SERVICE SPECIALIZ-
ING IN DANDEROUS & HAZ-
ARDOUS TREE REMOVAL
FREE ESTIMATES, LICENSED,
INSURED 501-762-5786.
WELL WATER -
Treatment Softening,
Iron Removal, Re-
verse Osmosis, Drink-
ing water systems,
Odor r emov al ,
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kansasSoftWater.com
, Since 1962.
Apartments
Unfurnished
2 BR Apts, kit. appl.,
W&D conn., $500 &
up. Handicap access.
317-5190 / 317-5192
STUDIO APT, Down-
town Benton private
parking, $350 mo
Refs req. 315-3266
Apartments
Unfurnished
2 BR, 1 BA, $500
mo., No Pets, 6 mo.
l ease @ 204 N.
Fourth St. Benton,
Call 501-778-3324
SEEK AND YOU
SHALL FIND
Great deals in the
Courier Classifieds.
Yard Sales, Jobs,
Homes for Sale or
Rent. Check them out
daily. Call to sub-
scribe at 315-8228.
Want to Downsize
Your Gas Guzzler?
Sell it in the Courier
Classifieds. Call to
place your ad today!
315-8228
Apartments
Unfurnished
CAMRY COURT
Now Open
in Bryant
New Construction
2 BR, 2 BA or 2.5 BA
off Wilkerson Rd.
on Sadie Dr.
(By Hill Farm Elem.)
Call Terri the on-site
manager for appt.
501-804-0125
Bldg. 1225 #2
or call Dale King
501-539-1935
Visit our web-site
www.arkansas
apartments.net
Houses for Rent
1 ROOM CABIN
$350 per month. $175
dep. Call 860-4882 or
501-315-2431
2 BR, 2 ba on 1 acre.
Central Heat and Air.
$495mo+dep. Bryant
School . No pets.
501-847-1789
2382 Northshore, 2
BR, 1 BA, CH/A, $600
mo. , $300 dep. ,
860-4882/ 315-2431
3 & 4 BEDROOM
$825 -$1400 mo.,
Haskell, Benton &
Bryant. 315-9370
3 & 4 BR, 2BA, FBY,
st ai ned concr et e
floors, 2 car garage,
Benton Schools. For
info 501-326-8000
3 BR, 1 ba , CH/A,
kitchen appli.$675 mo
+ $500 dep. 1502
Sorrell. 612-8848
3 BR, 2 BA, 2 story, 1
acre, no pets, Salem
area, $950 mo., $950
dep., 501-909-2804
3 BR, 2 BA, Bauxite
Schools. All appli-
ances. No pets. $850
mo., $400 dep., Call
529-3999
3BR 1.5 BA Newly
Remodeled Bryant
School Di st r i ct
$900mo + $900 Dep
Call 501-317-0422
3BR 1BA House,
$595 mo., 6mo. lease
No Pet s, Cal l
501-778-3324
3BR 2BA, Beautiful
new home, Bryant,
affordablepropertiesark.
com 501-672-0407
Eagle Properties
LLC
315–2075
Nice 2 & 3 BR Homes
from $500 to $925
Apartments
1 BR’s from $415
2 BR’s from $475
*based on availability
Deposit & References
Required
eaglepropsaline.com
FOR LEASE/SALE
New 3 & 4 BR, 2 BA,
brick, FP, ceiling fans,
carpet, 2 car garage,
patio. Go to: www.
catalyst-residential.com
or 501-697-6342
HASKELL 204
GLENN OAK 3BR, 2
BA, 2 car garage.
Nice. $790 mo. $600
dep. 501-847-5377
HASKELL 3/2/2 Built
in 2006 $800mo Re-
vised Phone Number
Call 870-490-1633
Heritage Farms
home for rent. Fenced
back yard. 3 br, 2 ba.
$1135 mo.,
501-922-7072
IN BRYANT 3Br 2
Full Baths Double Car
Garage Fenced Back-
yard $950mo+Dep.
Call 501-315-4110
Ready to take the
Real Estate Plunge?
Check out the Homes
for Sale in the Classi-
fieds daily.
Mobile Homes
For Rent
RENT TO OWN
‘95 16x72 2BR $550-6yrs
‘99 16x80 3BR $550-6yrs
Includes lot Rent & Ins
Lake • Fish • Walk Trail
Sunset Lake • 951-2842
2BR STOVE, Refrig.,
Washer & Dryer,
Dishwasher, All new
inside $595mo No
Pets 317-6426 or
778-1993
Business Property
For Rent
BUSINESS PROP-
ERTY For Lease 608
S. East Street Office
with large parking
area Call 315-9337
between 9a&8p
Miscellaneous
For Rent
*REDUCE YOUR CA-
BLE BILL! Get a
4-Room Al l -Di gi tal
Satellite system in-
stalled FREE Pro-
gramming starting at
$24.99/mo. FREE
HD/DVR Upgrade to
new callers, SO CALL
NOW (800) 795-6129
DISH TV Retailer
- SAVE! St ar t i ng
$19.99/month (for 12
months.) FREE Pre-
mium Movie Chan-
nels. FREE Equip-
ment, Installation &
Act i vat i on. CALL,
COMPARE LOCAL
DEALS!
1-800-278-8081
Furniture &
Household
3 SHELVING Units
Ideal for a closet, ga-
rage, or shop. Call
655-9442
Lawn & Garden
GOING OUT of busi-
ness sale. 7 riding
lawn mowers call
Johnny 501-247-1603
Musical
Merchandise
Cushing
Piano Service
Tune • Repair
Player Pianos & Pump Organs
778-6584
Pets & Supplies
BENTON ANIMAL
Control & Adoption
501-776-5972
benton.petfinder.com
BRYANT ANIMAL
Control & Adoption
www.bryant.petfinder.com
www.1-800-save-a-pet.com
www.1888pets911.org
Produce
FRESH FROZEN PEAS
Fresh Green Beans, AR
Peaches,Watermelons,
Cantaloupes
501-672-2248
OKRA &
BLUEBERRIES
Home grown
501-794-2337
Peaches,!home
grown tomatoes,!5k
Orchard, Donaldson,
AR. 501-384-2486
Open Mon.-Sat., 8-5.
Call for orders.
Produce 840-4076
Tomatoes, Peas, Squash,
Okra, Peaches,
1492 Salem Rd
Heavy Equip-
SURPLUS EQUIP-
MENT. Online auc-
tions HUGE selection.
BIG savi ngs. NO
Buyer fees Low Seller
f ees BARGAI NS!
Register FREE Use
Promo Code cnhi313.
LIVE support.
www.SurplusOnThe.NET
334-215-3019
Autos For Sale
2000 DODGE Grand
Caravan-Sport High
Mi l es and Good
Cond. Good Tires
$3200 Call 213-5075
Autos For Sale
2002 HONDA
Accord V-6
Excellent
Condition!
Located i n
Benton
151K miles
$5,400 obo.
501-315-8228
580-559-6724
Autos Wanted
DONATE A CAR
Humane Society of
the United States
FREE Next-DAY
TOWING! Running or
Not. Tax Deductible.
Call Before Tax Year
Ends!
1-800-418-1562
I Buy Junk Cars
free pick-up &
Haul all types
of scrap metal
Call Jerry Toland
332-7202 • 840-6756
Houses For Sale
NEWER home for
lease or lease option.
4 BR, 2 BA, open
floor plan. $1,200 mo.
Cal l t o s ee.
501-804-4400
STREET APPEAL HOW-
ARD Perrin School Zone
1525 Jameson Open
House July 20,27 and 28
12.00-4:00 501-315-2325
Mobile Homes
For Sale
$$$ 0 DOWN $$$
with your Land!
Call 501-653-3201
FORECLOSED
DOUBLEWIDE on
Private Lot. Great
Schools, Great
Location, must sell!
501-653-3201
MUST SELL 3/2 MO-
BILE HOME - MOVE,
AC & APPLIANCES
I NCLUDED CALL
NOW: 501-407-9500
NEW 4 BR 2 BA
Home $39K includes
delivery to your prop-
erty. Call for Quick
Approval 653-3202
Lots & Acreage
20 ACRES FREE!
Buy 40 – Get 60
Acr es. $0- Down
$198/ mo. Money
Back Guarantee, NO
CREDIT CHECKS.
Beaut i f ul Vi ews.
Roads/Surveyed.
Near El Paso, Texas.
1-800-843-7537
www.Texaslandbuys.
com
33.5 WOODED Acres
5 minutes North of
Lake Degray on Hwy
347 Pl ease cal l
501-580-0358 for de-
tails Priced for Quick
Sale
Real Estate
CANCEL YOUR
TI MESHARE. NO
Risk Program STOP
Mortgage & Mainte-
nance Payments To-
day. 100% Money
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FREE Consultation.
Call Us NOW. We
C a n H e l p
1-888-356-5248
Page 8 – The Saline Courier
class@bentoncourier.com Tuesday, July 23, 2013
Check out the
Garage Sales
this week!
Classifieds
Page 10 – The Saline Courier
class@bentoncourier.com Wednesday, July 17, 2013
Wednesday, July 17, 2013
class@bentoncourier.com The Saline Courier – Page 9
Moderately Confused Herman
Crossword Challenge
Kit ‘n’ Carlyle
Celebrity Cipher
Here’s How It Works:
Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken
down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the
numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and
box. Each number can appear only once in each row,
column and box. You can figure out the order in which
the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues
already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you
name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!
Astro•graph
bernice bede osol
www.bernice4u.com.
Alley Oop
Big Nate
Born Loser
Thatababy
Frank and Ernest
Grizzwells
Monty
Arlo and Janis
Soup to Nutz
TUESDAY, JULY 23, 2013
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) --
Although you usually fare better
when you have lots of time to
ponder a decision, a snap judg-
ment will turn out quite well
today. Don’t second-guess your-
self.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
-- You are in a brief, favorable
cycle where your financial affairs
are concerned. Be alert and
ready to move quickly should an
unexpected, potentially profitable
development come your way.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) --
You might be more inclined to
think about pleasure than work.
Fortunately, you should be able to
enjoy yourself without it interfer-
ing with or distracting you from
your job.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
-- A number of little things that
you failed to finish will demand
some attention. However, you’ll
enjoy sweeping the deck clean.
Sometimes, it’s nice to have a
clean slate.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) -- Something quite fortuitous
could develop through a friend
you run into by chance. You and
this person have always been able
to help each other quite well.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) -- Although you’re usually
exceptionally lucky where your
material interests are concerned,
you’re not always necessarily so in
other areas. So, keep your mind
on making money, and don’t
worry about other things, today.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
-- Don’t be reluctant to discard
any old, unworkable methods in
favor of newer and better proce-
dures. This might be one of those
days when it pays to switch horses
in midstream.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) --
Someone you treated very consid-
erately in the past has been very
eager to repay you, and today
might bring that chance. Accept
this person’s attempt at reciproca-
tion with a glad heart and open
arms.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
-- It would behoove you to social-
ize with some progressive think-
ers today. You’ll easily recognize
clever ideas when you hear them,
and you’ll know exactly how to
put them to use.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
-- Be on the lookout for some
innovative ideas, especially some
that may apply to an area that has
been causing you concern. Make
your move quickly, however; time
may not be your ally.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
-- A person of foreign heritage
or one born in a distant place is
likely to play a constructive role
in your affairs. Be alert, so you
can take full advantage of this
person’s help.
CANCER (June 21-July
22) -- This could be an excit-
ing day, especially regarding a
joint endeavor of some kind. An
extraordinary happening might
develop that you’ll want to be a
part of.
Tuesday, July 23, 2013
news@bentoncourier.com The Saline Courier – Page 9
ComiCs
Page 10 – The Saline Courier
news@bentoncourier.com Tuesday, July 23, 2013
SCHOOL NEWS
Thank You for the gift of learning!
Our NIE Sponsors
S a l i n e C o u n t y ’ S n e w S S o u r C e S i n C e 1 8 7 6
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ADVANCED ALARM TECHNOLOGIES
BRINER LAW & TITLE
THE BRINER LAW FIRM
Fred E. Briner, P.A. • Since 1919
Saline County Farm Bureau
Womens Committee
Saline Audiology Associates
Austin Taylor Gray of
Benton has accepted mem-
bership in the National
Society of Collegiate Scholars.
NSCS is part of the
Association of College Honor
Societies and is an interdisci-
plinary honors organization
for first-year and second-year
college students.
Membership is by invita-
tion only, based
on GPA and
class standing.
Membership
gives students
access to a num-
ber of benefits,
including career
and network-
ing resources, scholarships,
travel and service projects
both on campus and in the
community.
Gray is the son of Dr.
Leonard and Shana Gray. He
is a 2011 graduate of Benton
High School and has just fin-
ished his sophomore year at
Arkansas Tech University in
Russellville.
He is majoring in electrical
engineering.
Special to The Saline Courier
Howard Perrin Library Birthday Book Club’s newest members
are, in front row, from left: Andrew Eidt, Zaelyn Williams, Carson
Rowan, Cole Nelson, Lilly Tackett, Loren Caradine, Drew Hudspeth
and Evie Hendrix. Second row: Aidan Ngueyen, Braden Dominguez,
Parker Lambert, Megan Bohanan, Brady Roberts, Kyle Hudgens,
Makayla Valdez and Cole Blankenship. Third Row: Caleb Collum,
Lauren Bond, Emily Richardson, Jade Sparks, Luke Tolbert, Kayla
Henthorne, Alexis Mahan and Becca Thomas. Back Row: Hayden
Hinojosa, Kylee Hobbs, Eli Williams, Chase Ramsey, Abby Grace
Lambert, Nathan Bond, Emma Schiltz, Shelby WIlliams, Grayson
Thomas, Zac Benham and Laci Bohanan. Not pictured is Clayton
Andrews.
Jon Edgin of Benton was
named to the
Chancellor’s
list and the
Dean’s list from
the University
of Arkansas at
Little Rock with
a perfect 4.0 GPA
for the 2012-13
school year.
Jerrica Michelle James of
Benton has been selected to
participate in the Emerging
Leaders Program at the
University of Memphis.
The Emerging Leaders
Program is a four-year leader-
ship and academic scholar-
ship program designed to
contribute significantly to a
balanced, well-rounded col-
lege experience. Students
participate in intensive leader-
ship training, including class-
room instruction, workshops
and community projects, and
active engagement in campus
and community organizations.
Rachel Nard of Bryant is
one of 63 students to join the
12th class of the University
of Arkansas Honors College
Fellows. The new class
is drawn from a field of
more than 500 applicants
throughout the region and
includes 17 National Merit
Scholars and two students
who achieved a perfect score
of 36 on the ACT college
entrance exam.
The Honors College fel-
lowship of $50,000 largely
covers tuition, books, room
and board, and registration
throughout four years, grant-
ing these students the free-
dom to pursue their academ-
ic interests. The fellowship
funds can also be combined
with other scholarships and
grants, such as the $500,000
to $1 million in study abroad
and research grants that the
Honors College awards to
students each year.
Katelyn Fox and Alyx
Ramsey, both of Benton, have
been awarded scholarships
from the College of Education
and Health Professions at the
University of Arkansas. Fox
and Ramsey both received
Dr. Fred A. and M. Mozelle
Taylor Endowed scholarships.
Fox is a senior early child-
hood education major and
plans to graduate in May
2014. She is the daughter of
Alan and Traci Fox and is
a graduate of Bryant High
School.
Ramsey is a senior early
childhood education major
and plans to graduate in May
2014. She is the daughter of
Chuck and Allison Ramsey,
and is a graduate of Bryant
High School.
Fox, Ramsey and other
scholarship winners will be
honored at a luncheon on
campus in the fall.
Former Benton student accepted into NSCS
Gray
Local makes
Chancellor’s
List at UALR
Edgin
Local students receive U of A scholarships
Ryan W. Mallaby of Benton
has been selected to receive a
National Merit Scholarship.
Mallaby is a student
at Arkansas School for
Mathematics, Sciences and
the Arts.
He plans to attend
Northeastern University in
Boston and major in interna-
tional relations.
Hogan Anya of Bryant
was named to the Black
River Technical College
President’s List. The
President’s List includents
students who have earned a
4.0 GPA.
Andrew Lewis of Benton
was named to the school’s
Dean’s List. The Dean’s List
includents who have earned
a GPA of 3.5 or higher.
Saline Co. students achieve
honors at Black River Tech
Prestigious
UM program
accepts local
Former BHS
student is UA
honors fellow
Local student
is National
Merit Scholar
Special to The Saline Courier
Benton and Bryant teachers who recently attended Arkansas
Department of Education diversity training are shown here. Front
row, from left are: Aaron Bagwell, Mona Starr and Kim Russell;
back row: Andrea Adcock, Jonica Curtis, Kristi Newman, Kathryn
McCoy, Pam Cummings, Helen Ballard, Michelle Alverio, Jamir
Sheffield and Arkansas Junenile Assessment Center educator Debra
TEACHERS RECEIVE DIVERSITY TRAINING
Special to The Saline Courier
Other local teachers who attended diversity training are, from left:
English as Second Langauge board member Andrea Willis and
Dana Hotho, both with Bryant schools, Melanie Sams, Ann Barnett,
Chris Koch and Jan Hodges, all with Benton Schools.
BIRTHDAY BOOK CLUB
Special to The Saline Courier
Brett Caple, left, of Bryant, Timmon King (center) and Olive McClure,
both of Benton, participate in the 40th annual Arkansas Farm Bureau
Teen Challenge Camp.
TEEN CHALLENGE CAMP
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