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July 5, 2013

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Courier
Volume 136
Number 186
1 Section 10 Pages
50¢
Home of A.E Griffin
and Jack Elliott
The Saline
www. bent oncouri er. com
Friday, July 5, 2013
Join us on Facebook and Twitter
A tradition of
Excellence
A Reputation
for Results
ANGIE JOHNSON Executive Broker
GRI, GRLA,SRES
501-529-1584
KAREN CROWSON Principal Broker
ABR, CRS, GRI
501-860-3000
Saline County’S newS SourCe SinCe 1876
Recycling Issue Dropped
Curbside pickup tabled indefinitely
A proposed mandatory curbside
recycling and single-hauler trash
pickup plan that would affect resi-
dents of five Saline County cities
has been dropped for now, in light
of strong resistance from members
of the public and several city offi-
cials, and public hearings planned
on the proposal have been canceled.
In a special meeting Wednesday
of the Saline County Regional Solid
Waste Management District, Mayor
Jeff Arey, chairman of the district’s
board of directors, read a statement
expressing a division between the
intentions of the program and the
current plan.
Arey said the board began plans
for the program two years ago
because the members were under
the impression they must meet a
state-mandated goal of 40 percent
household waste reduction within
the district.
The board recently found
out, however, that the Arkansas
Department of Environmental
Quality never had such a goal
within the district, but had set a
statewide goal for household, com-
mercial and industrial waste that
was reached several years ago.
This was a miscommunication
between ADEQ and the district,
according to Michael Grappe, exec-
utive director of the district.
Although the mandate is no lon-
ger the driving force, the board still
plans to improve recycling participa-
tion, but the proposed plan will not
be the course taken.
The intention behind the pro-
posed program was to provide a
convenient, affordable recycling
service to residential customers,
Grappe said. A one-hauler system
and mandatory participation were
the means to a cheap service for the
public, he said.
These two aspects of the pro-
posed program, however, have prov-
en to be the most controversial.
Numerous community residents
and many trash haulers have
expressed outrage about the plan
to use an exclusive trash-hauler
and recycling system for more than
half of the county because it would
negatively affect the business for
the 30 haulers that serve the area
and likely would put some of them
out of business.
Major complaints also have been
raised about the “mandatory” aspect
By Jennifer Joyner
jjoyner@bentoncourier.com
CURBSIDE, page 6
GRAND FINALE
JOSH BRIGGS/The Saline Courier
Fireworks light up the sky over Holland Chapel Baptist Church during the finale of Benton’s fireworks show
Thursday. Many other communities in the county held shows in honor of the country’s independence.
14th annual
Taste of Bryant
set for July 30
Plans are under way for the 14th annual Bryant
Area Chamber of Commerce Taste of Bryant,
planned for Tuesday, July 30.
Thirty-four restaurants, caterers and chefs have
committed to serve tasting portions for the tailgat-
ing-themed event, according to Rae Ann Fields,
executive director of the Bryant Area Chamber of
Commerce.
“I think this is the best event we do,” Fields said.
“You can just come, eat what you want and enjoy
yourself.”
Everett Buick GMC is the primary sponsor for
the event, which this year is themed “Kickin’ It at
Bishop.”
This year, the Bryant Senior Activity Center also
will be open during the event, and its band, Steel
Kickin’, will perform.
By Jennifer Joyner
jjoyner@bentoncourier.com
Filing period open for
school board positions
The filing period for school
board candidates opened
Tuesday, July 2, and will con-
tinue until Tuesday, July 9.
To date, no one has filed
for open positions in Saline
County’s four school districts,
according to Saline County
Election Coordinator Darlene
Westbrook.
One position is open in the
Bryant, Bauxite and Harmony
Grove districts and two are
open in Benton, Westbrook
said.
Board members whose
terms are expiring are:
•Benton, Dr. Joe Felan and
Jeff Morrow.
•Bryant, Zone 4, currently
held by David L. Moore.
•Harmony Grove, Charles
“Buck” Burchfield.
•Bauxite, Mike Parsons.
If the election draws more
than one candidate in any
race, ballot positions will be
drawn on Wednesday, July 10,
Westbrook said.
The annual school election
is scheduled Tuesday, Sept.
17.
No district is seeking a
change in its current millage,
Westbrook noted.
By Lynda Hollenbeck
lyndahol@yahoo.com
Local resident elected
AQHYA director
Shelby Lane Ridgeway of Benton, Arkansas, has
been elected as a 2013-14 American Quarter Horse
Youth Association director.
The organization’s national officers
and regional directors play a major
role by planning association events,
participating in community service
projects and spreading the word about
American Quarter Horses, youth activi-
ties and the organization itself.
Ridgeway, 18, is the daughter of Ken
and Andi Ridgeway of Benton. She is a 1013 gradu-
ate of Benton High School and plans to attend
Pulaski Tech in the fall.
The AQHYA national officers and regional direc-
tors were elected by their peers at the 2013 Bank
of America Youth Excellence Seminar June 20-22
in Amarillo. Candidates elected for the national
officer and regional director positions will serve
from June 2013 through June 2014.
Each of AQHYA’s 11 regions can elect three
directors. From those directors, five national offi-
cers are elected by delegates from each state.
Ridgeway was elected as a director of Region 9,
which includes Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi,
Tennessee and Alabama.
Throughout the year, officers and directors net-
work with horse enthusiasts throughout the indus-
try to ensure a successful future for the industry.
MISSED PAPERS
CALL
(501) 317-6013
DURING THESE HOURS
5-7 p.m. Monday-Friday
7-9 a.m. Saturday-Sunday
CONTACT US
Phone: (501) 315-8228
Fax: (501) 315-1920
Email: news@bentoncourier.com
Write: P.O. Box 207,
Benton, AR 72018
INDEX
OBITUARIES .............................. 3
OPINIONS .................................. 4
SPORTS ..................................... 5
CLASSIFIEDS ......................... 7,8
COMICS......................................9
SALINE COUNTY
WEATHER FORECAST
FRIDAY NIGHT: Lows in the
upper 60s.
SATURDAY: Sunny of rain with
highs in the lower 90s.
SATURDAY NIGHT: Lows in the
lower 60s.
SUNDAY: Sunny of rain with
highs in the lower 90s.
SUNDAY NIGHT: Lows in the
lower 70s.
MONDAY: Sunny with highs in
the lower 90s.
MONDAY NIGHT: Lows in the
lower 70s.
TUESDAY: Sunny with highs in
the lower 90s.
TUESDAY NIGHT: Lows in the
lower 70s.
WEDNESDAY: Chance of rain
with highs in the lower 90s.
SCRAPBOOK
Bill Clinton 1976
PAGE 2
SLIGHT LEAD
McClendon’s falls 3-0
PAGE 5
BRYANT, page 6
RIDGEWAY, page 6
Ridgeway
By Lynda Hollenbeck
lyndahol@yahoo.com
2 The Saline Courier
Friday, July 5, 2013
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LITTLE ROCK — An
18-year-old Massachusetts
woman died after she was
injured when a car struck
a group of bicyclists travel-
ing through Arkansas on a
cross-country summer trip,
authorities said Thursday.
Merritt Levitan, of
Milton, Mass., was one of
13 cyclists traveling from
Charleston, S.C., to Santa
Monica, Calif., as part of a
six-week trip organized by a
Williamstown, Mass.-based
company called Overland.
Overland and Arkansas
State Police said Thursday
that Levitan died at the
Regional Medical Center
at Memphis, Tenn.
Nursing supervisor Jackie
Smartt said Levitan died
Wednesday afternoon.
Levitan and six others
were injured in the crash
Tuesday afternoon near
McCrory, Ark., about 90
miles northeast of Little
Rock.
Two people remained
hospitalized in stable condi-
tion on Thursday, Overland
director Jonathan Igoe said.
Prosecutors are consider-
ing filing charges against
the 21-year-old driver who
struck the cyclists, but
prosecutor John Bell said no
charges had been filed as of
Thursday.
Bell has said there wasn’t
any evidence of alcohol in
the driver’s bloodstream,
but he said authorities
were looking into whether
anything else, such as a cell-
phone, was involved in the
crash.
Arkansas State Police
spokesman Bill Sadler said
the agency will send an
investigative report to pros-
ecutors once it’s complete.
Overland founder and
director Tom Costley and
his wife, Liz, said in a state-
ment that Levitan died from
her injuries.
“Liz and I, and the entire
Overland community, are
heartsick by this tragic
loss,” Costley said in a state-
ment. “We extend our deep-
est condolences to Merritt’s
family, friends and loved
ones.”
The cyclists were on their
way to Newport, Ark., where
they planned to spend the
night Tuesday, when the
driver struck the group on
Arkansas State Highway 17.
Overland said the rest of
the trip will be canceled.
“At this point, we believe
that this is what needs
to be done to allow all
involved time to process
their thoughts and emotions
while surrounded by loved
ones,” the company said in
a statement. “We are work-
ing with families to make
arrangements for students
to return home.”
news across
-Associated Press
Saline county eventS
Hurt cyclist dies after
group hit by car in Ark.
Email calendar items to news@bentoncourier.com or call 501-315-8228 ext. 234.
Calendar items are intended for nonprofit organizations.
SATURDAY, JULY 6
LAKE NORRELL FIREWORKS:
9 p.m., Saturday, July 6 on
Lake Norrell. Celebrate the
Independence weekend at
Lake Norrell, the Lake Norrell
Area Association will sponsor
a boat parade at noon, the
dock and deck contest will be
at 3 p.m. and the free public
fireworks display will be at
9 p.m. For more information
call Barbara Howell 681-7577.
MONDAY, JULY 8
BENTON BOOK CLUB- The
Benton Book Club will meet
at 5 p.m. Monday, July 8 at
Herzfeld Library to discuss
its chosen title. The group is
open to adults 18 and older.
Call 778-4766 for more infor-
mation.
CIVIL WAR IN SALINE COUNTY
in 1863 will be presented
on Monday, July 8, 2013 at
6:30 pm at the Bob Herzfeld
Memorial Library, 1800
Smithers Drive in Benton. Mr.
Anthony Rushing, a local his-
torian and teacher at Bethel
Middle School in Bryant will
give the presentation.  Call
the library at 778-4766 for
more information.
TUESDAY, JULY 9
THEOS, A SUPPORT
GROUP FOR WIDOWS AND
WIDOWERS: 5 p.m. Tuesday,
July 9 for will be the 25th
Anniversary Banquet.
THURSDAY, JULY 11
URBAN FARMING/
SUSTAINABLE LIVING: 6 p.m.
Thursday, July 11 at Boswell
Library. The Saline County
Library will host a talk entitled
“The Joys of Urban Farming:
You Just Need a Patch of
Dirt!” by award-winning
author and urban farmer Dr.
Jody Grenga of Hot Springs.
The program is part of 2013
Summer Reading and is open
to all ages. The event will tie
together trends in home-
steading, past and present,
with a focus on urban farming
and sustainable living and a
return to homemade food,
frugalness and capturing rain
water. Call 778-4766 for more
information.
PAINT WITH HABITAT is set
for Thursday, July 11 from 6
to 8 p.m.at Dianne Roberts
Studio in the old Gingles
Department store. Join
Habitat as we continue our
art season festivities leading
up to our annual Home is
Where the Heart is art auc-
tion.
FRIDAY, JULY 12
TEEN LOCK-IN AT THE
LIBRARY- The Saline County
Library will host a lock-in for
teens as part of the Summer
Reading program from 9
p.m. Friday, July 12 to 7 a.m.
Saturday, July 13 at Herzfeld
Library in Benton. Contracts
to confirm attendance may
be picked up at either library
location and are due back
Friday, July 5. Call 778-4766
for more information.
CRAFT CLASS: Making
Memory Holders- Adults
18-year-old and older are
invited to attend a craft
workshop led by members
of the Cooperative Extension
Homemakers group at 10 a.m.
Friday, July 12 at Herzfeld
Library. Participants will make
a memory holder and magnet
to preserve special moments
in time using scrapbook-
ing techniques taken to the
next level. Attendance is first
come, first served. Call 778-
4766 for more information.
SATURDAY, JULY 13
ALEXANDER CITY
FIREFIGHTER AND POLICE
OFFICER APPRECIATION:
Alexander residents and busi-
nesses will be coming togeth-
er to host an event specifical-
ly for the Alexander firefight-
ers, police officers and their
families on Saturday, July 13
at 1 p.m. at the Alexander City
Park. All sponsors are wel-
come and appreciated.
Book-to-Movie Club- Ages
18-years-old and older are
invited to a movie viewing
followed by discussion of
the book “I Am Legend,” by
Richard Matheson at noon
Saturday, July 13 at Boswell
Library. No registration is
required. Call 778-4766 for
more information.
MONDAY, JULY 15
APPLICATION MEETING at
Herzfeld Library in Benton
on Monday, July 15 at 6
p.m. Anyone interested in
learning about the Habitat
Homeownership Program is
encouraged to attend.
TUESDAY, JULY 16
SALINE CROSSING REGIONAL
PARK & RECREATION AREA,
INC will meet at 5:30,
Tuesday, July 16, in the Gene
Moss Building at Tyndall Park.
The public is invited to join us
as we plan for the bicenten-
nial celebration of the settle-
ment at Saline Crossing.
THURSDAY, JULY 18
AUTHOR/ILLUSTRATOR
PETER BROWN- The Saline
County Library will host
award-winning children’s
author/illustrator Peter Brown
Thursday, July 18 at both
library locations. Children’s
programs will occur at 10:30
a.m. at Boswell Library and
at 2 p.m. at Herzfeld Library.
A program for ages 18-years-
old and older will be held at
6 p.m. at Herzfeld Library. The
programs are free and open
to the public. Call 778-4766 or
847-2166 for more informa-
tion.
FRIDAY, JULY 19
TEEN MOVIE MARATHON:
11 a.m., FRIDAY, July 19 at
Herzfeld Library. Teens are
invited to watch newly-
released movies from 11
a.m. to 5 p.m. Pizza will be
provided for lunch. Call 778-
4766 or 847-2166 for more
information.
MONDAY, JULY 22
“GOVERNOR JEFF DAVIS and
Little Rock’s Second Baptist
Church” will be presented
on Monday, July 22, 2013
at Herzfeld Library, 1800
Smithers Drive, Benton,
Arkansas. Brian Irby on the
staff of the Arkansas History
Commission in Little Rock will
present this interesting story
about the turn of the century
morals.  Call the library at
778-4766 for more informa-
tion.
 
SATURDAY, JULY 27
THEOS, A SUPPORT
GROUP FOR WIDOWS AND
WIDOWERS, will meet for
lunch at 11:30 a.m. Saturday,
July 27 at at Dixie Cafe.
YOU CAN EAT FISH FRY: 3
to 7 p.m., Saturday, July 27,
at Congo Masonic Lodge.
Corner of Steel Bridge and
Thompson Dairy Road.
American raised catfish,
homemade hushpuppies,
beans with ham, river bank
fried taters and more. $12
for adults, $5 for children 9
to 12, 8 and under free. Last
Saturday of the month, April
through October, 3 - 7 pm.
Money raised goes to area
charities. Public invited.
SATURDAY, AUGUST 31
ALL YOU CAN EAT FISH FRY:
3 to 7 p.m. Saturday, August
31, at Congo Masonic Lodge.
Corner of Steel Bridge and
Thompson Dairy Road.
American raised catfish,
homemade hushpuppies,
beans with ham, river bank
fried taters and more. $12
for adults, $5 for children 9
to 12, 8 and under free. Last
Saturday of the month, April
through October, 3 - 7 pm.
Money raised goes to area
charities. Public invited.
Saline Courier photo
Bill Clinton, left, state coordinator for the Jimmy Carter campaign and the Arkansas attorney
general-elect, greets Ted Boswell after being introduced at Thursday night’s Charles O. Smithers
Appreciation Day dinner.
Saline courier ScraPBook 1976
LITTLE ROCK —
Arkansas’ attorney general
wants a judge to dismiss a
lawsuit from nine death row
inmates challenging the
state’s new execution law.
Attorney General Dustin
McDaniel’s office filed
paperwork in Pulaski
County Circuit Court on
Wednesday asking a judge
to dismiss the prisoners’
amended lawsuit. The
inmates argue that the
state’s new lethal injection
law is unconstitutional.
That law came about
after the state Supreme
Court struck down the pre-
vious law in 2012, saying
that legislators had ceded
too much control over exe-
cution procedures to correc-
tion officials. So, this year,
lawmakers enacted a new
law that says the state must
use a lethal dose of a barbi-
turate in lethal injections.
However, the new
law leaves it up to the
Department of Correction
to pick the drug.
The Associated Press
first reported in April that
Arkansas planned to use an
anti-seizure drug called phe-
nobarbital in executions,
even though that chemi-
cal has never been used
in a lethal injection in the
United States.
Inmates sued, challeng-
ing the state’s new lethal
injection law, along with the
procedure that spelled out
plans to use phenobarbital
and the anti-anxiety drug
lorazepam. The prisoners
have since amended their
lawsuit to limit their chal-
lenge to the new execution
law, not the procedure,
which the Department of
Correction has said it plans
to rewrite.
Department of Correction
spokeswoman Shea Wilson
said Thursday that the
agency doesn’t have a new
procedure yet.
A spokesman for the
attorney general’s office
didn’t respond to an
email on Thursday. Jeff
Rosenzweig, a lawyer for
the inmates, declined to
comment.
Arkansas last executed a
death row inmate in 2005.
Gov. Mike Beebe said last
month he doesn’t have any
immediate plans to sched-
ule execution dates for
seven death row inmates,
even though the attorney
general asked him to do so.
Beebe’s office has said
the governor’s decision to
hold off on setting execu-
tion dates comes as the
Department of Correction
plans to rewrite its lethal
injection protocol and as
the inmates challenge the
state’s new lethal injection
law.
Ark. AG wants judge to
dismiss execution lawsuit
Friday, July 5, 2013
The Saline Courier 3
My
Answer
By Doug
Hawkins
FUNERAL HOME & INSURANCE
NARROWAY & MAIN, BENTON, AR 72015
778-2544 • 847-3371
www.ashbyfuneralhome.com
Etched in Stone
If you visit older cemeteries,
you are likely to find
headstones engraved with
images of angels, lilies, lambs,
gates, olive branches, roses,
and other symbols that allude to
the deceased and the hereafter.
Today, some families still
look to the past for meaningful
symbols to personalize the
gravestones of loved ones, but
many of the old symbols have
lost their significance because
they haven’t been used for
decades. Therefore, some are
turning to new symbols, many
of which have very personal
meaning. Symbolism can
reveal heavenly aspirations,
occupations, familial and
fraternal associations, family
lineage, and more. Survivors of
the deceased are also choosing
to etch picture-like images
of loved ones on headstones,
which make grave visitations
all the more touching.
Regardless of how you intend
to adorn a burial site, the caring
staff at ASHBY FUNERAL
HOME is here to assure that
your requests will be honored.
We are here for you, 24 hours a
day, 7 days a week at
778-2544 (Benton), or 847-
3371 (Little Rock). You are
invited to tour our tastefully
appointed, family-owned and
operated facility, conveniently
located at 108 West Narroway.
No detail is too large or
too small for us to handle.
“Because We Care”
“Here lies Lester Moore; Four
slugs from a .44; No Les No
More.” Tombstone Arizona
epitaph
In this one week
adventure park kids
will learn to face
fears and trust God
through Bible stories
about Paul,
motivating music by
Jamie Grace, crafts,
and games.
July 8-12 • 5:30-8:30pm
Family Day • Sunday, July 14th • 6pm-8:30pm
[musical and water infatables]
Calvary Baptist Church
612 Valley View Road, Benton
(behind Summit Bank and Papa Johns)
Call 501-778-4762 for information or to register
U.S. economy adds 195K jobs; unemployment 7.6 pct.
WASHINGTON — U.S.
employers added a robust
195,000 jobs in June and
many more in April and May
than previously thought.
The job growth raises hopes
for a stronger economy in
the second half of 2013.
The unemployment rate
remained 7.6 percent. That
was because more people
started looking for work
in June — a healthy sign.
Once people without jobs
start looking for one, the
government counts them as
unemployed.
Pay also rose sharply
last month, the Labor
Department’s monthly jobs
report Friday showed. Pay
has now outpaced inflation
over the past year.
Stock index futures rose
shortly after the report was
released at 8:30 a.m. EDT
before slipping from their
highs 30 minutes later.
The yield on the 10-year
Treasury note jumped from
2.56 percent to 2.65 per-
cent, its highest level since
August 2011. That’s a sign
that investors think the
economy is improving.
Further job growth could
lower the unemployment
rate and help the economy
rebound after a weak start
this year. If growth acceler-
ates and unemployment
falls, the Federal Reserve
is likely to slow its bond
purchases before year’s end.
The bond purchases have
kept long-term interest rates
low. A pullback in the bond
buying would likely send
rates up.
Job growth “continues
to look more than strong
enough to keep unemploy-
ment trending down ... and
probably more than strong
enough to lead to Fed taper-
ing starting in September,”
said Jim O’Sullivan, chief
U.S. economist at High
Frequency Economics.
The economy has added
an average 202,000 jobs
a month for the past six
months, up from 180,000 in
the previous six. Hiring and
consumer confidence have
risen despite higher taxes
and federal spending cuts
that kicked in this year.
Friday’s report showed
the economy added 70,000
more jobs in April and May
than the government had
previously estimated —
50,000 in April and 20,000
in May. Average hourly pay
rose 10 cents to $24.01, 2.2
percent higher than a year
ago.
The hotels, restaurants
and entertainment indus-
try added 75,000 jobs last
month. Retailers added
37,000.
The health care industry
added 20,000, construction
13,000. Temporary jobs rose
10,000. But manufacturing
shed 6,000.
Many of the new jobs
were part time. The number
of Americans who said they
were working part time but
would prefer full-time work
jumped 322,000 to 8.2 mil-
lion — the most in eight
months.
Despite the solid pace
of hiring, the economy is
growing only sluggishly. It
expanded at a 1.8 percent
annual rate in the January-
March quarter. Most
analysts expect growth at
roughly the same subpar
rate in the April-June quar-
ter.
Weak economies overseas
cut demand for U.S. exports
in May. That led some econ-
omists to predict that growth
in the second quarter might
be slower than forecast.
Still, many areas of the
economy are improving.
The Fed’s low-rate policies
have led more Americans to
buy homes and cars. They
also helped boost stock
and home prices in the first
half of the year, increasing
wealth and lifting consum-
ers’ confidence to its highest
level in 5½ years.
Auto sales in the January-
June period topped 7.8
million, their best first half
since 2007, according to
Autodata Corp. and Ward’s
AutoInfoBank. Sales of
previously occupied homes
exceeded 5 million in May,
the first time that’s hap-
pened since November
2009. New-home sales rose
at their fastest pace in five
years.
Though fewer exports
have hurt manufacturing,
factories fielded more orders
in May. And a measure of
business investment rose for
a third straight month.
Chairman Ben Bernanke
said last month that the
Fed would slow its bond
purchases later this year
and end them next year if
the economy continued to
strengthen.
But Bernanke added that
if the economy weakens, the
Fed could delay its pullback
or even step up its bond pur-
chases again. Several Fed
members have since tried to
clarify Bernanke’s remarks
by saying any tapering of
the bond purchases would
depend on the strength of
the economy.
Associated Press
Bryant Fest draws big crowds for holiday event
WIL CHANDLER/The Saline Courier
Brody Engle, 5, zip-lines to the ground at Bryant Fest on Wednesday afternoon. The two-day celebration
at Bishop Park featured concerts, games, barbecue, fishing, fireworks, and other activities.
WIL CHANDLER/The Saline Courier
Courtney Scott looks for her next move in an inflatable obstacle course at Bryant Fest on Wednesday
afternoon.
WIL CHANDLER/The Saline Courier
Jett Smith bounces to the edge of an inflatable bounce house in front of his mother, Georgia Smith. A
children’s area filled one of Bishop Park’s baseball fields with its inflatable slides, obstacle courses, a
zip-line, and a train.
WIL CHANDLER/The Saline Courier
Country music singer Mark Chesnutt performs at dusk in Bryant on
Wednesday. Chesnutt delivered an array of hits from a bar stool due
to an injury he suffered while fishing.
WIL CHANDLER/The Saline Courier
Brennan Horne waves his prize fluorescent wand with his mother,
Erica Horne. Brennan popped several balloons with darts to win.
State Sen. Jeremy Hutchinson, District 33,
201 E. North St., Benton, AR 72015, (501) 773-
3760, jeremy.hutchinson@senate.ar.gov.
State Sen. David Sanders, District 27 Room
320 State Capitol, Little Rock, AR 72201, (501)
682-6107, davidjamessanders@gmail.com.
State Sen. Alan Clark, District 13 P.O. Box
211, Lonsdale, AR 72087, (501) 262-3360, alan.
clark@senate.ar.gov.
State Rep. Ann Clemmer, District 23, 7415
Camille Drive, Benton, AR 72015, (501) 316-
0364, avclemmer@sbcglobal.net.
State Rep. Andy Davis, District 31 P.O. Box
30248, Little Rock, AR 72260, (501) 837-5109,
andy.davis@arkansashouse.org.
State Rep. Andy Mayberry, District 27 3022
E. Woodson Lateral Road, Hensley, AR 72065,
(501) 888-3522, andymayberry@windstream.net.
State Rep. Kim Hammer, District 28, 1411
Edgehill Dr., Benton, AR 72015, (501) 840-3841,
kimdhammer@yahoo.com.
Circuit Judge Bobby McCallister, 22nd
Judicial District, Division 1, Saline County
Courthouse, 200 N. Main St., Benton, AR 72015,
(501) 303-5635.
Circuit Judge Gary Arnold, 22nd Judicial
District, Division 2, Saline County Courthouse,
200 N. Main St., Benton, AR 72015, (501) 303-
5664.
Circuit Judge Grisham Phillips, 22nd
Judicial District, Division 3, Saline County
Courthouse, 200 N. Main St., Benton, AR 72015,
(501) 303-5628.
Circuit Judge Robert Herzfeld, 22nd
Judicial District, Division 4, Saline County Annex,
321 N. Main St., Benton, AR 72015, (501) 303-
1584.
District Judge Michael Robinson, Benton
District, 1605 Edison Ave., Benton, AR 72019,
(501) 303-5670.
District Judge Stephanie Casady, Bryant
District (Bryant, Alexander, Bauxite, Haskell,
Shannon Hills), Boswell Municipal Complex, 210
SW Third St., Bryant, AR 72022, (501) 847-5223.
Saline County Judge Lanny Fite,
Courthouse 200 N. Main St., Benton, AR 72015,
(501) 303-5640.
Prosecuting Attorney Ken Casady, 22nd
Juicial District, 102 S. Main St., Benton, AR
72015, (501) 315-7767.
Saline County Sheriff Bruce Pennington,
Saline County Detention Center, 735 S. Neeley
St., Benton, AR 72015; (501) 303-5609.
news@bentoncourier.com
HOW TO REACH YOUR ELECTED OFFICIALS
“Congress shall make no law ... abridging the freedom
of speech, or of the press ... .”
— From the First Amendment to Constitution
D
on’t read any further if you plan to go to
a movie this summer. I’m going to give
away the ending to all of them. Stop read-
ing NOW if you don’t want to know. Here it comes.
STOP!
Here’s what will happen at the end of any movie
you see with your spouse this summer: You will
look at each other and say, “We should have waited
until it came out on DVD.”
It’s been months since Sue and I
went to a movie. We went to something
around Christmas, but afterwards, we
couldn’t figure out why the morn-
ing and afternoon talk-show hosts
had been so giddy about it. Probably
because the stars of the movie had
shown up on their shows to push the
film.
Summertime is when the studios
release the blockbusters, the cream
of the crop, the best they have to
offer. So we figure it’s time to try
again. We man up and leave the house -- braving
freeway traffic, texting drivers, inconvenient timing
(why do movies start at 4:40 instead of 5?), barely
lit multi-story parking garages, and roving gangs
of cellphone-addicted teenage mall rats -- to sit in a
theater that smells of carpet cleaner, fake butter and
Febreze and watch a talkie.
The couple behind us thinks no one can hear
them. They are talking in an absolutely normal tone
of voice, as if the rest of us are invisible and there is
no one else in the theater.
“At five minutes to 5, she asks me to type this
report. Can you believe it? She knew I was going out
tonight, too.”
“Yeah,” says her partner, “you give someone a
Harvard degree, a Rhodes scholarship and a Nobel
Prize and they think they know everything. Where
does she get off?”
In front of us, two high school kids are necking.
The guy is scraping the back of her throat with his
tongue stud. It looks like he’s trying to reach some-
thing she had for lunch. Yesterday.
“It’s right out of a Fred Astaire/Ginger Rogers
movie, isn’t it?” Sue says. I wonder what the proper
etiquette is. Is it rude to ask another paying cus-
tomer to please stop making us sick?
Finally, blessedly, the lights go down. A notice
appears that this preview has been approved for
all audiences. Then, in Dolbyized quadraphonic
sound, we hear an agonizing human scream and
see a shiny carving knife plowing through a chest.
The movie we have come to see is a lighthearted
romantic comedy. A filthy hand reaches into the
blood-pulsing body cavity and pulls out a still-beat-
ing human heart. The hand throws the heart on the
floor and a large black boot stomps it flat then kicks
it away. A voice announces, “You’ve never seen
anything like it!” Like that would be a bad thing?
I’ve never seen a man fall into a wood chipper. That
doesn’t mean I want to.
Once again, the green notice: “This preview
has been approved for all audiences.” Then: “He’s
unpleasant and stupid! She’s topless most of the
time! Lots of body-part jokes! From the man that
directed ‘Straight to Cable’ and the producers of
‘Expensive, Celebrity-Filled Crap’ comes the laugh-
free comedy, ‘Obscene Gesture!’ It’s the movie your
whole middle school will be talking about!”
Will the movie we paid to watch ever start?
Remind me to come 10 minutes late next time. The
two in front of us finish necking and light up a joint.
“Isn’t this a no-smoking theater?” I ask Sue in a
stage whisper.
The guy in front of us turns around and says,
“They mean cigarettes, dude.”
“We’ve really got to do this more often,” I say.
“Do you mind?” says one of the women behind
us. “We’re trying to watch a movie here!”
“Some people are so inconsiderate,” says her
friend.
Even before the film we’d come to see starts, Sue
says, “We should have waited for the DVD.”
It spoiled the whole ending for me.
Contact Jim Mullen at JimMullenBooks.com.
I
n my experience, whenever
criminal cases turn into symbol-
ic melodramas, reason goes out
the door. Almost needless to say, I’m
referring to the George Zimmerman/
Trayvon Martin murder trial currently
dominating cable TV news channels.
Starting last February, what began as
a lamentable tragedy was promoted
as a multimedia morality play on
the theme of racist
brute vs. innocent
child.
In conse-
quence, millions of
Americans gullible
enough to believe
what they see on
TV developed pas-
sionate beliefs
about the case
shaped by tenden-
tious and slipshod
reporting. Even the
most thoughtful
citizens are vulnerable to the kind of
disinformation promulgated by the
Mighty MSNBC Art Players and oth-
ers whose zeal for ratings-building
melodrama trumps their commitment
to facts.
During a recent online colloquy,
a woman identifying herself as a
Seattle criminal defense attorney (you
never really know on the Internet)
opined that the only reason George
Zimmerman hadn’t been forced to
plead guilty was that “the police did
not do a proper investigation, and
handled the case poorly (seriously,
Martin is found with a cellphone on
him, and they decide they can’t ID
him and let his body sit in the morgue
for a week?? That alone is unbeliev-
able) ... I find it appalling that a small
town police agency thought they
themselves could make a legal finding
that a homicide was justified.”
Unbelievable indeed. Also categori-
cally false, although MSNBC reported
it many times. According to the case
file released last May 18, Sanford,
Fla. police notified Trayvon’s father
of his death early the next morning.
MSNBC personalities Al Sharpton,
Melissa Harris-Perry, Lawrence
O’Donnell and others also repeat-
edly alleged that indifferent local
cops let George Zimmerman take
his gun home, and failed to collect
his clothing for forensic examination
-- also untrue. Indeed, the detective
who handled the initial investigation
recommended filing manslaughter
charges March 13, 2012.
For reasons gradually becoming
clearer at trial, the state prosecutor
declined, urging police to keep inves-
tigating.
But that’s not all. For weeks last
spring, MSNBC broadcast dozens of
segments on its primetime “news”
programs ridiculing the idea that
Zimmerman had been injured dur-
ing his fatal encounter with Martin.
Grainy video of the handcuffed sus-
pect being escorted into the Sanford
police department was shown repeat-
edly. Lawrence O’Donnell and New
York Times columnist Charles Blow
in particular made many scathing
comments.
Then, after the prosecution file
was released on May 18, 2012 with
contemporaneous photographs and
EMS reports detailing Zimmerman’s
broken nose and scalp lacerations,
something remarkable happened. Or
rather, failed to happen. Instead of
correcting manifest errors in its cov-
erage -- of which the above are but a
sample -- MSNBC went radio-silent.
As documented by my friend and
mentor Bob Somerby on his Daily
Howler website, no further mention
of Martin or Zimmerman appeared
on the network for weeks. It was a
performance worthy of the Chinese
People’s Daily or Fox News, which-
ever strikes you as the worse insult.
Now that Zimmerman’s trial is
underway, it’s commendable to see
Charles Blow acting like a journalist
again. After the first week’s testimo-
ny, he wrote a column which, if overly
reliant upon rhetorical questions
with obvious answers he might not
want to hear, concluded that, while
Zimmerman bears undoubted moral
responsibility for killing Trayvon
Martin, “[l]egally, it remains to be
seen whether he will be found guilty
of second-degree murder.”
So did Zimmerman “profile”
Trayvon Martin? Here’s an explana-
tion deemed inadmissible by True
Believers in the racist brute version
of the story. An African-American
neighbor explained it to Reuters soon
after the crime. “There were black
boys robbing houses in this neighbor-
hood,” she said. “That’s why George
was suspicious of Trayvon Martin.”
Indeed, there had been a rash of
burglaries and break-ins in the (multi-
racial) Twin Lakes community in the
months preceding the fatal confronta-
tion. Most of the suspects were young
black men, and most did, in fact, get
away. Had he known that, maybe
young Martin might have acted differ-
ently when he felt himself followed by
a “creepy ass cracker.”
But it’s impossible to know, partly
because nobody knows exactly how
he DID act.
Not that believers in the racial
morality play have any doubt. Reading
comments to Blow’s column and else-
where, it’s striking how many seers
and mind-readers affect to know not
only precisely what happened on that
terrible night, but the exact motives
of everybody involved. Skeptics get
attacked for their apostasy, with the
dread “r-word” frequently employed.
People even speculate that the defen-
dant broke his own nose in the rough-
ly 30 seconds before the Sanford
police arrived.
Arkansas Times columnist Gene Lyons
is a National Magazine Award win-
ner and co-author of “The Hunting
of the President” (St. Martin’s Press,
2000). You can email Lyons at
eugenelyons2@yahoo.com
Facts versus melodrama
in Zimmerman trial
EDITORIAL CARTOON
T
he other day I read an article
talking about the amount of
money advertisers pay to have
commercial spots on Oprah’s network.
Trust me, the amounts would astound
you. Commercials on
Oprah’s last show ran in
the million-dollar range,
almost as much as a com-
mercial spot on the Super
Bowl. That much money
for a one-minute spot!
I also heard quite
recently that Ashton
Kutcher was “re-negoti-
ating” his contract and
“complaining” because
he’s only getting approxi-
mately $750,000 per
episode of “Two and a
Half Men” whereas Charlie Sheen was
getting close to $2 million. Awww, the
POOR guy! Give me a break.
These types of figures make me
wonder just where our brains were
when the standards were set for actors’
salaries. Who was it that decided years
ago that acting was SO much more
important than anything else anyone
ever worked at? I’ve never been able to
understand it.
And it’s not just the United States
either. Take Great Britain, for example.
When Kate and Prince Harry got mar-
ried, the country helped foot the bill for
their $100 million wedding . And that
country isn’t even a monarchy anymore
and hasn’t been for more than 100
years.
I’m sure they have just as many
unemployed, homeless people and starv-
ing children as we do. So why didn’t the
“royals” have a normal wedding like the
rest of us and donate that money to the
needs of their country instead? Oh well.
My husband tried to explain the
actor/salary issue to me — the whole
“supply and demand” thing. But it still
makes no sense. OK, movies and televi-
sion are in high demand, so we pay the
actors ungodly amounts of money. Well,
the burgers at McDonald’s are in high
demand, too, but I don’t see anyone
paying the poor fry cook who stands on
his feet all day long any million-dollar
salary.
And what about the policemen, fire-
men and military people who put them-
selves in harm’s way on a daily basis for
our protection? Or the teachers who are
educating our future generations? What
about their salaries?
These people are lucky to make
$35,000 a YEAR, but we’re paying actors
$2 million an EPISODE? How come
entertainers get to rate so much higher
than these individuals, who work so
much harder and deserve so much
more credit? Why don’t we spread those
salaries out a little more evenly?
And seriously, if there are businesses
out there that can afford to pay millions
of dollars for a single commercial spot,
I’d like to know why we have ANY starv-
ing children left in the world. Why don’t
they donate a million to Africa instead?
Just the other day I was watching a
“Feed the Children” commercial, which
explained how just $15 a month can
feed a child and provide medical care.
That’s just $180 a year for one child.
Think of what $1 million could do!
Hey, Nike and Coca-Cola, spend your
money on THAT instead of your com-
mercial spot! Let’s face it, we all know
who you are; we surely don’t need a
commercial in the middle of the Oprah
Show to remind us to buy your prod-
ucts.
I know it’s way too late in the game
to fix this mess we’ve gotten ourselves
into and I’m sure we’ll be paying the
actors, comedians and football players
of the world these exorbitant amounts
of money until the end of time. I just
wish, somehow, we could come up with
a better distribution of the wealth and
a better salary schedule for those who
truly deserve it.
Or maybe we could write it into law
that anyone who makes these ridiculous
figures is required to give a certain per-
centage of it to charities, or to aid with
natural disasters like the tornados that
just ravaged Oklahoma. Think of all the
good $2 million could do in Moore right
now, instead of paying one single actor
for a day’s work.
I think we’d all gladly miss one epi-
sode of “Two and a Half Men” for that.
Camille Nesler is a resident of Saline
County. Her column appears each Friday in
The Saline Courier.
What exactly
are we
paying for?
Spoiler alert! Stop
reading now!
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without liability. Publisher’s liability for error is limited to amount paid for advertising.
©Copyright 2006 Horizon Publishing Co.
Columns and cartoons on the opinion page do not necessarily reflect
opinions of The Saline Courier. Weekend delivery times are no later than
7 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. The circulation department has re-delivery
scheduled from 5 to 7 p.m. Monday-Friday and from 7 to 9 a.m. Saturday
and Sunday. Call 501-317-6013 or 501-315-8228 during business hours.
The Saline Courier
Founded in 1876
Phone: (501) 315-8228 • Fax: (501) 315-1230 • Email: news@bentoncourier.com
Vicki J. Dorsch
Business Manager
vdorsch@bentoncourier.com
DaViD Wills
advertising director
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anDreW stoVall
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coMposing director
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ricky Walters
press ForeMan
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steVe Boggs • Publisher
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Camille
Nesler
OUTSIDE
THE BOX
Jim
mulleN
THE VILLAGE
IDIOT
Page 4 – The Saline Courier
news@bentoncourier.com Friday, July 5, 2013
OpiniOn
GeNe
lyoNs
Friday, July 5, 2013
sports@bentoncourier.com The Saline Courier –Page 5
SPORTS
SALINE
SCOREBOARD
ATTENTION youth base-
ball and softball coaches in
Saline County.
The Saline Courier will
be printing team pictures on
Thursday, July 18. If your
team has not sent pictures
to The Saline Courier,
please send them to tonyl-
enahan@yahoo.com by
Monday, July 15.
You may also bring pic-
ture to the Saline Courier to
be scanned.
Please provide play-
ers and coaches names,
team name, age group and
league.
SALINE COUNTY
YOUTH BASEBALL/
SOFTBALL TEAM
PICTURES
The Bryant Soccer Club
is offering a speed, agil-
ity, quickness and flex-
ibility training schedule
camp instructed by certi-
fied professionals from
the University of Central
Arkansas.
The camp costs $80 and
will be July 8-11 and/or July
22-25. It will be from 5:30-8
p.m. at Bryant High School
Track and the lead instructor
is Kim Eskola.
Team camps are avail-
able for any BSC coach who
would like to schedule a
team camp at $50 per player
for a four-day camp. Private
skills training lessons are
also available at $30-$50 an
hour.
Contact Kim Eskola at 501
690 0332 or Kim Eskola@
yahoo.com to schedule a
team camp or skills trainer.
BRYANT SOCCER
CLUB
The Saline County
Razorback Club is planning
a bus trip to the Arkansas
vs. Ole Miss game on
November 9 in Oxford,
Miss.
There are currently 30
seats still available and they
are $150 each.
That includes a game
ticket, transportation to and
from the game and a box
lunch. For more information
call Phillip Montalvo at 501-
353-6357.
SALINE COUNTY
RAZORBACK CLUB
MLB
TODAY
Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs, 3:05
Detroit at Cleveland, 6:05 p.m.
Baltimore at Yankees, 6:05 p.m.
San Diego at Washington, 6:05
Atlanta at Philly, 6:05 p.m.
Minnesota aty Toronto, 6:07
Seattle at Cincy, 6:10 p.m.
White Sox at Tampa Bay, 6:10
Houston at Texas, 7:05 p.m.
Oakland at KC Royals, 7:10 p.m.
Mets at Miwaukee, 7:10 p.m.
Miami at St. Louis, 7:15 p.m.
Colorado at Arizona, 8:40 p.m.
Boston at LA Angels, 9:05 p.m.
Dodgers at Giants, 9:15 p.m.
AMERICAN LEGION
TODAY
Ben. Sprt Shp vs. Cabot, 6 pm
McClendon’s vs. Cabot, 8 p.m.
SATURDAY
Ben. Sprt Shp vs. Jax., 2 p.m.
Bry. Everett vs. Lakeside, 2 & 4
pm
McClendon’s vs. Jacksonville, 4
p.m.
SUNDAY
Bry. Sprt Shp vs. Cabot, 2 & 4 pm
McClendon’s at Sheridan, 4 p.m.
On a weekend where
families come together to
celebrate our great nation’s
independence, I am running
the risk of being ostracized
by my own family.
There are several differ-
ences between Arkansas
and Missouri in the sports
worlds.
Missouri is home to six
professional sports teams.
Arkansas is home to zero.
The Show-Me State
is home to a few varia-
tions of baseball that few
Arkansan’s are even aware
of. I grew up playing the
game “fuzzball” with my
cousins Matt, Tim and Josh.
My dad grew up playing it
with his cousins before us.
Fuzzball is similar to both
wiffle ball and Indian ball,
except played with a tennis
ball.
To play the game you
simply take a standard, yel-
low wiffle ball bat, throw
about 5 pounds of duct tape
around the barrell and then
mash tennis balls over a
couple neighboring fences
until all tennis balls are lost
into the woods. At least,
that’s how we did it in the
Enloe/Raye family.
Being an Arkansan, I was
inherently better at any-
thing using duct tape, not to
mention Arkansas produces
better athletes, so I thor-
oughly owned my cousins
in fuzzball growing up.
Baseball is big in
Missouri. Really big, in
fact. Being home to the
greatest baseball franchise
this world has seen, the
St. Louis Cardinals, base-
ball is king in the state of
Missouri.
However, for the sake of
starting a family feud, the
biggest difference between
Arkansas and Missouri
comes in the form of a dif-
ferent sport.
You see, unlike Missouri,
we here in Arkansas play
real football. Missouri
thinks they play football,
but they would be wrong.
When the Missouri
Tigers decided to join the
SEC, I made it known to
my family that the Tigers
were now the enemy. Even
though my entire family
consists of Mizzou fans,
with several members of my
family being Mizzou gradu-
ates, I had to make it clear
that Missouri football and
Arkansas football are not
on the same level. Not even
close, to be real honest.
There’s a nice little
Arkansas/Missouri rivalry
in my family. And, guess
what? You’re getting
dragged into a rivalry with
Missouri whether you like
it or not.
You see, the SEC in all
it’s wisdom is basically
force-feeding this rivalry
to us. The SEC knows
the “rivalry” between the
Hogs and South Carolina
Gamecocks just never took
off. Despite the fact we play
them every year, there just
isn’t a rivalry there.
The SEC has decided
that the Gamecocks will
no longer be our “every
year” team out of the SEC
East. That team will now be
Missouri. I believe that is
a good decision. Arkansas
and Missouri are bordering
states. With such a close
proximity, surely this will
create a better matchup
year-in and year-out.
However, this “rivalry”
is being forced onto the
Razorbacks at a cost.
Moving forward, the SEC
plans to make the Arkansas
versus Missouri game the
last on our schedule. No
longer will the LSU match-
up following Thanksgiving
Day be our final game.
Do you see what’s hap-
pening?
As is stands now, the
Friday after Thanksgiving,
the Hogs are the only
show in town. There is
one football game on that
day and it features the
Arkansas Razorbacks taking
on a national power in LSU.
The exposure this game
generates for the Hogs is
invaluable.
All eyes are on the
Razorbacks on that day.
Not for long if the SEC
has their way, which I
assure you they will.
A prominent game on
national television is not
what is in store for the
Hogs any longer.
Now, we get the Missouri
Tigers. A delusional fanbase
who believes they can com-
pete with the powers of the
SEC despite being unable
to top the “mighty” Big 12.
That is what we get to put
up with now.
This coming November
29, enjoy watching the
Hogs take the field against
the LSU Tigers with the
entire nation watching one
last time. Most likely, it will
not be happening again.
What the SEC wants, the
SEC gets. And, the SEC
wants an Arkansas versus
Missouri rivalry.
If you ask me, both
schools are set to lose in
this deal.
Missouri, you’re great at
baseball. Congrats on that.
Football is our sport.
Over the next several
decades, we will make that
painfully obvious to you.
The SEC gets what it wants
By Craig Enloe
Special to the Courier
McClendon’s fall at ATU
RUSSELLVILLE – The
Benton McClendon’s
Appliances hit into four
double plays in a 3-0
loss to Russellville Post
20 at Arkansas Tech
University in Russellville on
Wednesday. The loss sets the
McClendon’s down to 7-12 on
the year.
Russellville scored just one
run in the first inning despite
three walks and two hits
issued by starter Trey Bishop.
Post 20 would score just two
unearned runs in the bottom
of the third to take a 3-0 lead
which would hold up for the
rest of the game.
Benton’s best chance to
score came in the top of the
third when Jack James hit a
one-out single and made it to
third base on a ground out
and wild pitch, but a strikeout
would end the McClendon’s
only threat. It was the only
time Benton made it to third
base.
James, Wesley Ramsey,
Bishop and Shawn Beesley
each went 1 for 3, and Hunter
Wray went 1 for 2. The
McClendon’s will host Cabot
tonight at Bernard Holland
Park at 8 p.m. Benton Sport
Shop will play the 6 p.m.
game.
DALLAS — The Dallas
County district attorney
says he’s not surprised that
Cowboys defensive tackle
Josh Brent failed two drug
tests while out on bond
facing an intoxication man-
slaughter charge.
Brent was charged after
a December car crash that
killed practice squad player
Jerry Brown. Court records
show his bond was revoked
after he tested positive
twice for marijuana.
District Attorney Craig
Watkins told KRLD-FM last
week that it’s clear to him
that Brent is struggling
with addiction. Watkins
says that Brent “still uses
alcohol and illicit drugs,”
and he wants him jailed for
the crash.
Those comments drew
protests from Brent’s attor-
ney, George Milner, who
on Tuesday called them
inappropriate. Milner says
he’ll ask a judge to force
Watkins to comply with eth-
ics rules.
Dallas DA:
Brent’s failed
drug tests
unsurprising
Associated Press
By Tony Lenahan
tlenahan@bentoncourier.com
TONY LENAHAN/The Saline Courier
Benton McClendon’s player Hunter McDade, 16, takes a lead in a game earlier in the season. The
McClendon’s lost 3-0 to Russellville at Arkansas Tech University in Russellville on Wednesday.
Cardinals can’t finish for Waino’s 12th
ANAHEIM, Calif. —
Edward Mujica’s season-
opening save streak ended
in dramatic fashion with
one powerful swing by Josh
Hamilton.
Hamilton greeted the
St. Louis Cardinals’ right-
hander with a tying two-run
homer in the ninth inning
and Erick Aybar delivered
an RBI single against Mujica
five batters later, sending the
Cards to a stunning 6-5 loss
Thursday night in the rubber
game of their first series at
Angel Stadium.
Adam Wainwright, the
NL pitcher of the month for
June, took a 5-3 lead into the
ninth before giving up a lead-
off single by Albert Pujols.
The three-time NL MVP was
1 for 11 in his first series
against the team he spent his
first 11 big league seasons
with before signing a 10-year,
$240 million contract with the
Angels in December 2011.
“I tried to get it down
and away right there,”
Wainwright said. “Albert was
creeping in on the plate a
little bit, and I made a good
pitch. It was exactly what I
was trying to do and I broke
his bat. He’s a great hitter for
a reason. It’s hard to keep
a man like that hitless for a
series. He’s going to get one
eventually.”
Manager Mike Matheny
then brought in Mujica, and
Hamilton drove his second
pitch into the center field
trees for his 11th home run.
Howie Kendrick and Mark
Trumbo followed with sin-
gles, and Mujica (0-1) retired
the next two batters before
Aybar poked an opposite-field
single to left on a 2-1 pitch.
Mujica acknowledged that
he shook off batterymate
Yadier Molina on the ill-fated
pitches to Hamilton and
Aybar.
“I made two big mistakes.
I didn’t follow Yadier on a
couple of pitches, and that
was the ball game,” Mujica
said. “He called for a fastball
on Hamilton and I threw
the changeup. On Aybar,
he called for a fastball again
and I decided to throw my
changeup. I threw a couple
good changeups and got two
popups so I figured I’d go
with my best pitch.”
The homer extended
Hamilton’s hitting streak to
nine games, and raised his
average to .226
“It was just a good feeling
to hear that sound come off
your bat,” he said. “Most
of the time, you know. So I
figured it had a good chance
when I hit it. It couldn’t
happen on a better day for
the crowd on the Fourth of
July. They got a little more
fireworks and a little more
bang for their buck than they
thought they were going to
get.”
Wainwright, the only
Cardinals pitcher averaging
at least seven innings per
start, defended Matheny’s
decision to take him out after
104 pitches. His season high
is 120, on May 11 in a two-hit
shutout against Colorado.
“We’ve always liked that
situation. He’s the right guy
in that situation,” Wainwright
said of Mujica. “He’s been
great all year. That’s what
happens when you let a lead-
off guy on in the last inning.
That’s on me, right there. I
have to go out and get that
guy out.”
Scott Downs (2-2) got the
victory with scoreless ninth.
Angels starter Joe Blanton
gave up five runs — four
earned — and nine hits in 5
2-3 innings. The right-hander
remained 0-4 with a 5.17 ERA
in his nine starts at Angel
Stadium.
Blanton averaged 13
pitches through the first
three innings while retiring
nine of his first 10 batters.
But just three batters into the
fourth, the Cardinals pulled
ahead 3-2 on a single by
Carlos Beltran, a walk to Matt
Holliday and Allen Craig’s
homer to dead center field
on a 1-1 pitch. Craig leads
the majors with a .469 aver-
age with runners in scoring
position.
It was the seventh straight
start in which Blanton gave
up a home run.
By Joe Resnick
AP Writer
AP
Cardinals’ pitcher Adam Wainwright throws a pitch in a game
last season. Wainwright got the no-decision after St. Louis closer
Edward Mujica blew his first save of the year in a 6-5 loss to the
6 The Saline Courier
Friday, July 5, 2013
The Saline Courier & Benton Chamber
Congratulate & Welcome
ExcePTional Physical Therapy
Marla Murphy, Carrie Johnson and Judith Martinez of Exceptional Physical Therapy are joined at their ribbon
cutting by family members and representatives from Abe’s Ole Feed House, Bank of the Ozarks, KVRE
Radio, Everett Buick-GMC, Civitan Services, Yoga For The Road, Saline Memorial Hospital, Baxley-Penfeld-
Moudy Realtors, First Security Bank, The Gann Agency, CWAC Media, First Staff, Farmers Bank & Trust, GC
Computers and the Benton Area Chamber of Commerce.
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of the recycling program
and the fact that a lien could
be placed on property if an
individual’s trash bill were
not paid.
“We have a responsibil-
ity to continue to develop
innovative solutions in
partnership with our towns
and citizens toward the best
practices in waste manage-
ment and recycling,” Arey
said. “The key word in that
last sentence was ‘partner-
ship.’”
In addition to county resi-
dents and waste companies,
several city leaders have
spoken out publicly against
the plan during the last few
weeks.
Many city officials say
they were unaware of the
district’s plans until recently,
speaking to a lack of com-
munication between the
board and the city govern-
ments.
“I’m sure that no one on
this board would ever want
to force a city to do anything
without the support of its
elected and appointed lead-
ers,” Arey said.
“It is in the best interest of
our board and our communi-
ties for cooperation, commu-
nication and coordination to
be the standard as we move
forward together,” he added.
Arey said the board
should now explore “broader
options” in “direct coop-
eration” with individual
cities that are interested in
developing a program. The
district also is willing to aid
cities that are interested in
creating a program on their
own, he said.
After Arey’s remarks, the
board unanimously voted to
drop the curbside recycling
project, which was set to go
out for bids later this sum-
mer.
As a result, the July 9
and July 23 public meetings
scheduled in Benton and
Bryant will not be taking
place.
Curbside
From page 1
Food samples will be
available between 6:30 and
8:30 p.m.
Several unique options
will be available for tasting,
including red velvet pan-
cakes from IHOP, Fields
said.
Abe’s Ole Feed House will
serve chicken cordon bleu.
A silent auction, featur-
ing goods and services from
local businesses, will begin
at 5:30 p.m., prior to the tast-
ing event.
Many of the auction items
— including several portable
barbecue grills — fit the tail-
gating theme, Fields said.
A model will wear jewelry
from Baker’s that is up for
bid.
Tickets are $15 in advance
and $20 at the door for ages
12 and up. Children’s tickets
(ages 7-12) are $5. The event
is free for children ages 6
and younger.
Bryant
From page 1
AQHYA national officers
and regional directors
reportedly set goals to grow
youth involvement in every
aspect of the equine world,
uphold the integrity of the
breed and work toward
ensuring the future of the
industry.
AQHYA is designed for
American Quarter Horse
enthusiasts 18 years of age
and younger and estab-
lished to expand youth
participation with and
knowledge of the American
Quarter Horse. It has more
than 27,000 youth members
around the world.
For more news from the
American Quarter Horse
Association, visit www.aqha.
com.
Founded in 1940, the
American Quarter Horse
Association is the largest
equine breed organization
in the world. With head-
quarters in Amarillo, Texas,
it has a membership of
more than 280,000 people in
86 countries and has regis-
tered more than five million
horses in 95 countries.
Ridgeway
From page 1
Egypt troops open fre on pro-Morsi protesters
CAIRO — Egyptian
troops opened fire on sup-
porters of ousted President
Mohammed Morsi who
were marching on a head-
quarters of the Republican
Guard on Friday, leaving at
least one severely wounded,
as tens of thousands chant-
ing “down with military
rule” protested around the
country voting to return the
Islamist leader to office.
The shooting came when
hundreds of Morsi support-
ers marched on the Guard
building, where Morsi was
staying at the time of his
ouster, before being taken
into military custody in
an unknown location. The
crowd approached a barbed
wire barrier where troops
were standing guard around
the building.
When one supporter
hung a sign of Morsi on
the barrier, the troops tore
it down and told the crowd
to stay back. A protester
hung a second sign and the
soldiers opened fire on the
crowd, an Associated Press
photographer at the scene
said. Several protesters fell
bloodied to the ground. At
least one had what appeared
to be a severe, bleeding
wound to the head.
The shooting risks to
escalate Egypt’s confronta-
tion, with supporters of
Morsi — largely Islamists
— rejecting the army’s
ousting of the country’s
first freely elected presi-
dent Wednesday night and
installation of a new civilian
administration. The pro-
tester casualties are likely
to further fuel calls by some
in the Islamist movement
for violent retaliation.
The first major Islamic
militant attack came before
dawn Friday in the tumultu-
ous Sinai Peninsula, killing
at least one soldier. Masked
assailants launched a coor-
dinated attack with rockets,
rocket-propelled grenades
and anti-aircraft guns on the
airport in el-Arish, the pro-
vincial capital of northern
Sinai, as well as a security
forces camp in Rafah on the
border with Gaza and five
other military and police
posts, sparking nearly four
hours of clashes.
The Brotherhood called
for Friday’s protests, which
took place at several sites
around the capital and in
other cities. Brotherhood
officials underlined strongly
to their followers that their
rallies should be peaceful.
A crowd of tens of thou-
sands of Morsi support-
ers filled much of a broad
boulevard outside a Cairo
mosque several blocks away
from the Republican Guard
headquarters, vowing to
remain in place until Morsi
is restored. The protesters
railed against what they
called the return of the
regime of autocrat Hosni
Mubarak, ousted in early
2011.
“The old regime has
come back ... worse than
before,” said Ismail Abdel-
Mohsen, an 18-year old
student among the crowds
outside the Rabia al-Adawi-
ya Mosque. He dismissed
the new interim head of
state sworn in a day earlier,
senior judge Adly Mansour,
as “the military puppet.”
The crowd began to
march on the headquarters
of the Republican Guard,
many chanting, “After sun-
set, President Morsi will be
back in the palace.”
The military forced Morsi
out Wednesday after mil-
lions of Egyptians turned
out in four days of protests
demanding his removal
and saying he had squan-
dered his electoral mandate
by putting power in the
hands of his own Muslim
Brotherhood and other,
harder-line Islamists. In the
48 hours since, the military
has moved against the
Brotherhood’s senior lead-
ership, putting Morsi under
detention and arresting the
group’s supreme leader and
a string of other figures.
Morsi supporters say
the military has wrecked
Egypt’s democracy by car-
rying out a coup against an
elected leader. They accuse
Mubarak loyalists and lib-
eral and secular opposition
parties of turning to the
army for help because they
lost at the polls to Islamists.
But many supporters
have equally seen it as a
conspiracy against Islam.
Many at Friday’s protests
held copies of the Quran
in the air, and much of the
crowd had the long beards
of ultraconservative men or
encompassing black robes
and veils worn by women,
leaving only the eyes vis-
ible. One protester shouted
that the sheik of Al-Azhar
— Egypt’s top Muslim
cleric who backed the
military’s move — was “an
agent of the Christians” —
reflecting a sentiment that
the Christian minority was
behind Morsi’s ouster.
The protesters set up
“self-defense” teams, with
men staffing checkpoints
touting sticks and home-
made body shields. There
was no significant presence
of military forces near the
protests.
Extremist groups who
gained considerable influ-
ence during Morsi’s year
in office have threatened to
lash out with a campaign of
violence.
Islamic militants hold a
powerful sway in the law-
less and chaotic northern
Sinai. They are heavily
armed with weapons smug-
gled from Libya and have
links with militants in the
neighboring Gaza Strip, run
by Hamas. After the attack,
Egypt indefinitely closed its
border crossing into Gaza,
sending 200 Palestinians
back into the territory, said
Gen. Sami Metwali, director
of Rafah passage.
The night before,
the military spokesman
issued a statement urging
all protesters to remain
peaceful. In a message to
Morsi’s opponents, Col.
Ahmed Mohammed Ali
warned against “gloating,”
vengeance or attacks on
Brotherhood offices, saying
there must not be an “end-
less cycle of revenge.”
The military has a
“strong will to ensure
national reconciliation,
constructive justice and
tolerance,” he wrote in
an official Facebook post-
ing. He said the army and
security forces will not take
“any exceptional or arbi-
trary measures” against any
political group.
But the Brotherhood
has been furious over the
arrests of its top leaders,
as well as the closure of
its TV station Misr25, its
newspaper, and three other
Islamist television stations.
It called to move a return
to Egypt’s “ dark, repres-
sive, dictatorial and corrupt
ages.”
“We refuse to participate
in any activities with the
usurping authorities,” the
Brotherhood said in a state-
ment, read Thursday by
senior cleric Abdel-Rahman
el-Barr to the crowd out-
side the Rabia al-Adawiya
Mosque.
The first steps for creat-
ing a post-Morsi govern-
ment were taken Thursday,
when Mansour, the 67-year-
old chief justice of the
Supreme Constitutional
Court, was sworn in by fel-
low judges as interim presi-
dent. A Cabinet of techno-
crats is to be formed to run
the country for an interim
period until new elections
can be held — though offi-
cials have not said how long
that will be. In the mean-
time, the Islamist-written
constitution has been sus-
pended.
Morsi has been under
detention in an unknown
location since Wednesday
night, and at least a dozen
of his top aides and advisers
have been under what is
described as “house arrest,”
though their locations are
also unknown.
Besides the
Brotherhood’s top leader,
General Guide Mohammed
Badie, security officials
have also arrested his pre-
decessor, Mahdi Akef, and
one of his two deputies,
Rashad Bayoumi, as well
as Saad el-Katatni, head of
the Brotherhood’s Freedom
and Justice Party, and ultra-
conservative Salafi figure
Hazem Abu Ismail, who
has a considerable street
following. Authorities have
also issued a wanted list for
more than 200 Brotherhood
members and leaders of
other Islamist groups.
Among them is Khairat
el-Shater, another deputy
of the general guide who
is widely considered the
most powerful figure in the
Brotherhood.
The arrest of Badie was
a dramatic step, since even
Mubarak and his predeces-
sors had been reluctant to
move against the group’s
top leader. The ranks of
Brotherhood members
across the country swear a
strict oath of unquestioning
allegiance to the general
guide, vowing to “hear and
obey.” It has been decades
since a Brotherhood gener-
al guide was put in a prison.
Badie and el-Shater
were widely believed by
the opposition to be the
real power in Egypt during
Morsi’s term.
The National Salvation
Front, the top opposition
political group during
Morsi’s presidency and a
key member of the coali-
tion that worked with the
military in his removal,
criticized the moves, saying,
“We totally reject excluding
any party, particularly politi-
cal Islamic groups.”
The Front has proposed
one of its top leaders,
Mohammed ElBaradei, to
become prime minister of
the interim Cabinet, a post
that will hold strong powers
since Mansour’s presidency
post is considered symbolic.
ElBaradei, a Nobel Peace
laureate who once headed
the U.N. nuclear watch-
dog agency, is considered
Egypt’s top reform advo-
cate.
“Reconciliation is the
name of the game, including
the Muslim Brotherhood.
We need to be inclusive,”
Munir Fakhry Abdel-Nour,
a leading member of the
group, told The Associated
Press. “The detentions are a
mistake.”
Associated Press
Same-sex ruling has many
employers tweaking benefits
WASHINGTON — The
Supreme Court’s landmark
ruling on same-sex mar-
riage has private employers
around the country scram-
bling to make sure their
employee benefit plans com-
ply with the law.
The impact of the decision
striking down part of the
federal Defense of Marriage
Act is clear in the 13 states
and the District of Columbia
where gay marriage is cur-
rently legal, or soon will be:
Same-sex married couples
must be treated the same as
other spouses under federal
laws governing tax, health
care, pensions and other fed-
eral benefits.
But employee benefit
experts say the effect of the
ruling remains murky in the
other 37 states. The court
left intact another provi-
sion of the federal anti-gay
marriage law that allows
one state not to recognize
a same-sex marriage per-
formed elsewhere.
“What’s the federal gov-
ernment going to do when
you have a valid marriage
in New York and the couple
moves to Texas? We don’t
know the answer to that,”
said Scott Macey, presi-
dent of the ERISA Industry
Committee that represents
large employers.
The confusion is creating
uncertainty for many compa-
nies that operate nationwide
and want to administer
benefit plans in a uniform
manner.
“My members are all
across the country,” Macey
said. “Most, if not all of
them, would prefer to have
a consistent rule across the
country. They don’t want to
worry about changing things
from state to state.”
For workers living in
states that have legalized
same-sex marriage, the
Supreme Court’s decision
means gay spouses are enti-
tled to a host of benefits they
were denied previously.
Associated Press
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Employment
INSIDE SALES REPRESENTATIVE
$40k-$60k per year PatientPoint Hospital Solutions is a com-
munications partner to over 500 hospitals across the country
through it’s custom Healthcare Media Products which are
subsidized through local advertising for which PatientPoint is
searching for a Healthcare Media Specialist to join our growing
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INSIDE SALES
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$40k-$60k per year PatientPoint
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partner to over 500 hospitals across the
country through it’s custom Healthcare
Media Products which are subsidized
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Employment
CITY COUNCIL Opening
The City of Benton is currently accepting re-
sumes from citizens who reside in Ward 2
who are interested in serving on the City
Council to fill an opening that will expire De-
cember 31, 2014. A Ward Map is available
on the City of Benton website at
www.bentonar.org The position will be filled
by a majority vote of the active Council
members. Compensation is $9,000 per year.
Deadline for response is 5:00 P.M.,
Wednesday, July 10th, 2013. Please submit
resume and letter of interest to Human Re-
sources, P. O. Box 607, Benton, AR
72018-0607 or deliver to 114 S. East Street.
Legal Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF SALINE COUNTY, ARKANSAS
PROBATE DIVISION, DIVISION 4
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF
BARBARA GILBERT SEIBERT, DECEASED NO. PR2012-326-4
NOTICE
ADDRESS OF DECEDENT: 14 Suspiro Lane
Hot Springs Village, AR 71909
DATE OF DEATH OF DECEDENT: July 16, 2012
An instrument dated the 28th day of March, 1994, was, on the
24th day of July, 2012, admitted to probate as the Last Will and
Testament of BARBARA GILBERT SEIBERT, Deceased, and
THOMAS M. GILBERT has been appointed Personal Representative
thereunder. A contest of the probate of the Will can be affected only
by filing a Petition within the time provided by law.
All persons having claims against the estate must exhibit them,
duly verified, to the undersigned within six (6) months from the date
of the first publication of this Notice, or they shall be forever barred
and precluded from any benefit in the estate. Provided, that claims
for injury or death caused by the negligence of the Decedent shall be
filed within six (6) months from the date of first publication of the
notice, or they shall be forever barred and precluded from any bene-
fit in such estate.
THIS NOTICE first published on the 5th day of July, 2013.
THOMAS M. GILBERT, PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF
THE ESTATE OF BARBARA GILBERT SEIBERT, DECEASED
20467 Maplewood, Riverview, MI 48193
Friday, July 5, 2013
class@bentoncourier.com The Saline Courier – Page 7
Garage Sales
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nance part-time posi-
tion: Experience in
general el ectri cal ,
plumbing, painting
and building repairs
required. Hours will
be flexible including
some holidays and
some weekends. Ap-
ply in person at 2000
Country Club Drive,
Hot Springs Village.
COMMERCIAL/RES
EDENTIAL Over-
head Door Installer
needed. MUST have
experience and good
driving record! Call
501-315-9800
HEAVY EQUIPMENT
Operator Career! 3
Week Hands On
Training School. Bull-
dozers, Backhoes,
Excavators. National
Certifications. Lifetime
Job Placement Assis-
tance. VA Benefits
Eligible!
1-866-362-6497.
Employment
DRIVERS - Freight
Systems, a Celadon
co., 6 mo. to 3 yrs.
OTR exp. start at
$.33/mi.! More for 3
yrs + exp., special in-
centives for TRAIN-
ERS and TEAMS.
Bl ue Cross Bl ue
Shield-Major Medical,
New Equipment and
401k! Great Miles
year round. Lanes in-
clude Midwest, South-
east, and TX. Drivers
or TRAINEES, Call
888-202-3569
DRIVERS - Freight
Up = More $ Class A
CDL Requi r ed.
877-258-8782.
www.Ad-Drivers.com
DRIVERS - Want to
be part of a team, not
a number? Good
home time, pay & ex-
cellent benefi ts. Mini-
mum of 1 year OTR
flatbed experience.
Diamond State Truck-
i ng, I nc. Cal l
1-800-332-5551
DRIVERS-CRST of-
fers the Best Lease
Purchase Program!
SIGN ON BONUS.
No Down Payment or
Credit Check. Great
Pay. Class-A CDL re-
quired. Owner Opera-
tors Welcome! Call:
866-261-6532.
EXPERIENCED
COOK/WAITSTAFF
CALL HOME PLATE
DINER ASK FOR
RICK 813-4423
FOUR SEASONS
2408 Military Hiring
For ALL Positions
Now Hiring LPN!s &
CNA!s Must pass
drug/background
check & be able to
work all shifts & any
days Benefits Avail-
able Apply in Person
HELP WANTED!!!
Make $1000 weekly
mai l i ng brochures
from HOME! NO ex-
perience required-
Start Immediately!
www.TheMailingHub.com
Cleo’s Furniture
SALES ASSOCIATE
Arkansas’ fastest growing furniture
company with over 25 years in the
business is looking to fill a sales
position in our Benton location.
LIFTING AND MOVING
FURNITURE IS REQUIRED
Health and Life Insurance,
Retirement, Vacations,
No Sundays, Excellent Pay,
Advancement Available
Must apply in person Monday thru
Friday 10:00 am to 6:00pm
201 N. Main St. Benton, AR
Classifieds Work!
MAKE UP to $1000 a
week mailing bro-
chures from home!
Genuine Opportunity!
NO Experience Re-
quired. Start Immedi-
ately, www.Brochure-
mailers.com
NOW HIRING
Experienced Irriga-
tion Technicians
Immediate Openings
Call 501-455-9779
NOW HIRING Dough-
nut Cooks Exp. Pre-
ferred Apply at 6650
Alcoa Rd.(Benton)
OFFICE POSITION -
Real Estate Related.!
Please send resume
to Blind Box 500,
Benton Courier, P.O.
Box 207, Benton, Ar-
kansas! 72018
OTR DRI VERS -
Need more home
time? Home weekly.
Good Pay! Good
Benefi ts! Vacati on
Pay. Regular Re-
views. Call Tony To-
day! COMSTAR EN-
TERPRISES, INC.
800-533-2343.
www.comstar-inc.com
Receptionist & Assis-
tant positions at busy
veterinary practice.
Send resume / salary
req to: PO Box 268
Benton 72018
RI SK MANAGER
needed for a long
term care company.
Must hold an RN li-
cense. Must possess
the ability to make in-
dependent decisions.
Must have great com-
munication skills as
you will be speaking
with doctors and fami-
lies of patients. Will
assist in educating
staff and staff devel-
opment. Must be or-
ganized and possess
l eadershi p ski l l s.
Health and dental
benefits offered. If in-
terested apply in per-
son at 105 Russell-
ville Rd., Malvern, AR
72104. No phone
calls please.
Ready to take the
Real Estate Plunge?
Check out the Homes
for Sale in the Classi-
fieds daily.
Employment
TERRY!S WASTE is
now accepting appli-
cations for Labor!s &
CDL Driver. Apply in
person: 16723 W.
Sardis Rd 8am-3pm
Must pass drug
screen EOE
TRUCK DRIVERS
Wanted Best Pay and
Home Time! Apply
Online Today over
750 Companies! One
Application, Hundreds
of Offers!
www.HammerLaneJobs.com
TRUCK SALESPER-
SON. - MHC Ken-
worth in Little Rock.
We offer the BEST
benefits, BEST com-
pensation and BEST
training. Apply at
www.mhctruck.com/jo
bs or send resume to
kevin.tackett@mhctru
ck.com
Instruction
X-RAY MEDI CAL
TECHNICIAN®
MEDICAL ASSIS-
TANT Trai ni ng –
www.changelives.co
m, 1- 800-449-4802,
1309 Forge Rd, LR, *
www.bls.gov/ooh/heal
thcare/medical-assis-
tants.htm, For local-
ized employment and
wages:
www.bls.gov/oes For
important program
i nfo, pl ease vi si t
www.heritage-educa-
tion.com/disclosures
ABHES Accredited ,
Lic. by SBPCE | Fi-
nancial Aid for Those
who Qualify
Child Care
IN-HOME DAYCARE
Spotless - Non-smoking
Drop-ins Welcome!
778-2920
LICENSED CHILDCARE
Infants to 8 B •L• S
Vouchers • Drop-Ins
562-0691 • 951-2923
Services
*REDUCE YOUR CA-
BLE BILL! Get a
4-Room Al l -Di gi tal
Satellite system in-
stalled FREE Pro-
gramming starting at
$24.99/mo. FREE
HD/DVR Upgrade to
new callers, SO CALL
NOW (800) 799-4935
HOUSE CLEANING
AND MORE! Whole
or Partial Dependable
501-282-8836
SEE THE SATELLITE
TV Difference Pack-
ages as LOW as
$19.99/month! FREE
DVR Upgrade. FREE
HD Upgrade. FREE
Professional Installa-
tion! Call NOW and
Start SAVING!
1-866-725-5135
Apartments
Unfurnished
2 BR Apts, kit. appl.,
W&D conn., $500 &
up. Handicap access.
317-5190 / 317-5192
2 BR, 1 BA, $500
mo., No Pets, 6 mo.
l ease @ 204 N.
Fourth St. Benton,
Call 501-778-3324
Time to get your own
place? Check out the
Rental Section in to-
day!s Classifieds...
Apartments
Unfurnished
CAMRY COURT
Now Open
in Bryant
New Construction
2 BR, 2 BA or 2.5 BA
off Wilkerson Rd.
on Sadie Dr.
(By Hill Farm Elem.)
Call Terri the on-site
manager for appt.
501-804-0125
Bldg. 1225 #2
or call Dale King
501-539-1935
Visit our web-site
www.arkansas
apartments.net
Let the
Courier Classifieds
work for you.
Call Cathy or Kim
to place your
Classified Ad.
Mon.-Fri. 8am-5pm
315-8228
or come by
321 N. Market St.
SEEK AND YOU
SHALL FIND
Great deals in the
Courier Classifieds.
Yard Sales, Jobs,
Homes for Sale or
Rent. Check them out
daily. Call to sub-
scribe at 315-8228.
Apartments
Unfurnished
NOTICE: All real es-
tate advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to the Fair Housing
Act which makes it il-
legal to advertise any
preference, limitation
or di scr i mi nat i on
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or in-
tention to make any
such preference. We
will not knowingly ac-
cept any advertising
for real estate which
is in violation of the
law. All persons are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis.
Apartments Fur-
1 BR, 1 BA apartment
$300 mo. No Pets, 6
mo lease @ 204 N.
Fourth St. Benton.
Call 501-778-3324.
Houses for Rent
2 BR, 2 ba on 1 acre.
Central Heat and Air.
$495mo+dep. Bryant
School . No pets.
501-847-1789
3 & 4 BEDROOM
$825 -$1400 mo.,
Haskell, Benton &
Bryant. 315-9370
3 BR, 1 ba , CH/A,
kitchen appli.$675 mo
+ $500 dep. 1502
Sorrell. 612-8848
3 BR, 2 BA, 2 story, 1
acre, no pets, Salem
area, $950 mo., $950
dep., 501-909-2804
3BR 1BA House,
$595 mo., 6mo. lease
No Pet s, Cal l
501-778-3324
3BR 2BA, Beautiful
new home, Bryant,
affordablepropertiesark.
com 501-672-0407
4 BR, 2 bath, stained
concrete floors, 2 car
garage, great loca-
tion, Benton Schools.
For mor e i nf o.
501-778-4402
519 PEARSON 2Br
1BA $625mo + 400
Dep. No Pet s
326-3907
921 CANTERBURY,
3 BR, 1 BA, remod-
eled $700mo + Dep.
No pet s. Cal l
501-317-8622.
Eagle Properties
LLC
315–2075
Nice 2 & 3 BR Homes
from $500 to $925
Apartments
1 BR’s from $415
2 BR’s from $475
*based on availability
Deposit & References
Required
eaglepropsaline.com
FOR LEASE/SALE
New 3 & 4 BR, 2 BA,
brick, FP, ceiling fans,
carpet, 2 car garage,
patio. Go to: www.
catalyst-residential.com
or 501-697-6342
HASKELL 209
GLENN OAK 3BR, 2
BA, 2 car garage.
Nice. $790 mo. $600
dep. 501-847-5377
Houses for Rent
IN BRYANT 3Br 2
Full Baths Double Car
Garage Fenced Back-
yard $950mo+Dep.
Call 501-315-4110
Mobile Homes
For Rent
2 BR, 1 BA, Quiet
park, Benton Schools.
No Pets! Call any-
time. 501-315-1281
RENTERS WANTED
CALL 501-407-9500
Mobile Homesites
For Rent
MOBI LE HOME
Space for Rent Glen
Rose $150mo Please
call 501-332-2092
Business Property
For Rent
BUSINESS PROP-
ERTY For Lease 608
S. East Street Office
with large parking
area Call 315-9337
between 9a&8p
Miscellaneous
For Rent
*REDUCE YOUR CA-
BLE BILL! Get a
4-Room Al l -Di gi tal
Satellite system in-
stalled FREE Pro-
gramming starting at
$24.99/mo. FREE
HD/DVR Upgrade to
new callers, SO CALL
NOW (800) 795-6129
SEE THE SATELLITE
TV Difference Pack-
ages as LOW as
$19.99/month! FREE
DVR Upgrade. FREE
HD Upgrade. FREE
Professional Installa-
tion! Call NOW and
Start SAVING!
1-866-795-9295
Musical
Merchandise
Cushing
Piano Service
Tune • Repair
Player Pianos & Pump Organs
778-6584
Pets & Supplies
BENTON ANIMAL
Control & Adoption
501-776-5972
benton.petfinder.com
BRYANT ANIMAL
Control & Adoption
www.bryant.petfinder.com
www.1-800-save-a-pet.com
www.1888pets911.org
Produce
OKRA &
BLUEBERRIES
Home grown
501-794-2337
Produce 840-4076
Tomatoes, Peas, AR Wa-
termelons, Cantaloupes,
Squash, Okra
Boats & Marine
Equipment
1997 BASS tracker,
runs great, 40hp, fish
graph, troll motor,
$3200 firm 326-0498
Autos For Sale
2002 HONDA
Accord V-6
Excellent
condition
151K miles
$5,400 obo.
580-559-6724
Trucks / Vans
For Sale
2011 CHEVROLET
Si l verado 2500HD
Crewcab Work Truck
V8 4x4 58k miles
501-778-7412
Sport Utility
Vehicles
NISSAN 2009, Path-
fi nder 4x4 bl ack,
93,000 miles, $15,500
call 501-517-6102
Autos Wanted
DONATE A CAR
Humane Society of
the United States
FREE Next-DAY
TOWING! Running or
Not. Tax Deductible.
Call Before Tax Year
Ends!
1-800-418-1562
Recreational
Vehicles
88 ALJO Camper 28”
Fifth Wheel with hitch
Good Cond. $3500
OBO Call 794-0698
WE BUY used travel
trailers and class C
motor homes. Cash
pai d $$$. Cal l
1-800-578-2489
Houses For Sale
BENTON, 910
Lyledale, recently up-
dated, 3700 sf, 4BR,
3BA. 501-860-9194.
HOUSE FOR Sale By
Owner 3BR 2BA 3003
Wi l d Berry Dri ve
Benton Priced To Sell
Great Fi rst Ti me
Buyer Home Cal l
479-886-0276
OPEN HOUSE Sun-
day 1p-4p 1010
Shangri La Cove
(Benton) Beauti ful
Brick Home on Pond
Approx. 2000 Sq.Ft.
3Br 2Ba Dining Room
Hardwood, Fireplace,
Extras! Great loca-
tion, neighborhood, &
school s $186,000
Please call 868-8473
or 778-7544
WHIPPOORWILL
ROAD (BAUXITE)
Newl y Remodel ed
Country Home on 1.5
acres off W. Sardis
Rd. 4Br 2BA 1960 Sq.
ft. 2 Car Garage, &
Shop $156,900 Call
501-749-5714
Mobile Homes
For Sale
RENT TO OWN
‘95 16x72 2BR $530-6yrs
‘99 16x80 3BR $550-6yrs
Includes lot Rent & Ins
Lake • Fish • Walk Trail
Sunset Lake • 951-2842
$$$ 0 DOWN $$$
with your Land!
Call 501-653-3201
FORECLOSED
DOUBLEWIDE on
Private Lot. Great
Schools, Great
Location, must sell!
501-653-3201
NEW 4 BR 2 BA
Home $39K includes
delivery to your prop-
erty. Call for Quick
Approval 653-3202
Lots & Acreage
6.19 ACRES Tony
Beaty Property at
1115 Mountain View
Rd. to sell at Public
Sale to highest Bidder
at East Door or en-
trance of The Saline
County Courthouse
on the 16th day of
July 2013 at 11:00 am
Real Estate
CANCEL YOUR
TI MESHARE. NO
Risk Program STOP
Mortgage & Mainte-
nance Payments To-
day. 100% Money
Back Guarant ee.
FREE Consultation.
Call Us NOW. We
C a n H e l p
1-888-356-5248
Check out the
Garage Sales
this week!
Employment
Saline County’S newS SourCe SinCe 1876
C
o
u
r
i
e
r
T
h
e S
a
lin
e
Saline County’S newS SourCe SinCe 1876
Courier
The Saline
Looking for a Job?
A Second Job?
Want to work just a
couple hours a day?
The Saline Courier is
accepting applications
for independent
contract carriers and
substitute carriers in
home delivery areas.
• Excellent part time
income
• Afternoon delivery
Mon–Fri and early
AM on weekends
• Must have a valid
Arkansas drivers
license with proof of
(at least) state min.
auto insurance
ROUTE 78 - Hwy 70
Interested
candidates
apply in person at
The Saline Courier
321 N. Market St.,
Benton or e-mail
astovall@
bentoncourier.com
14828 CHILDRESS
ROAD BAUX-
ITE Schools, 1 BR, 1
BA, all appl., CH/A, 1
acre, no pets, $700
mo., $350 dep., cov-
ered deck & double
carport 602-6161
Classifieds
Page 8 – The Saline Courier
class@bentoncourier.com Friday, July 5, 2013
Service Directory
Air Conditioning
HEATING AND
AIR CONDITIONING
Installation,
Maintenance and
24 Hour Service
501-425-3796
Residential &
Commerical
Attorneys
David Heasley
attorney at law
Divorce &
Family Law
Free phone consultation
Payment Plan
681-4452
622 Alcoa Road,
in Benton
Backhoe & Dozer
315-2343
Peas
Gravel
Fill
SB-2
Topsoil
Sandy Loam
Sands
Donnafill
Pick-Up
or
Delivery
Build & Remodel
Buy • Sell • Trade
in the Classifieds
Build & Remodel
Parish 
Construction
BUILDING AND
REMODELING
*31 yrs experience
Small or Large
Jobs Done to
Your Satisfaction
tFree Estimates
tReasonable
Prices
Licensed
501-231-9230
501-316-2994
Carpentry
EXPERIENCED
CARPENTER
- Out of Work -
Home Maintenance
& Remodeling
of All Kinds
Vinyl Siding Installation
Call TIM
778-5171
OVER 30 YEARS
EXPERIENCE
- Free Estimates -
No job too LARGE
or small
Satisfaction Guaranteed!
DAVID BURTON, SR.
794-2563
Cleaning Services
Double A’s
Cleaning
• Competitive &
Affordable Pricing
• Satisfaction
Guarantied
• Detail Oriented
• I Provide Supplies
Call For Free Estimate
Alexis
501-794-7236
lexi92981@hotmail.com
Residential &
Commercial Cleaning
References
Available
Call
Laurie
501-380-5748
Looking for a good
deal? Search the
Courier Classifieds!!
Computer Services
A-1 COMPUTER
REPAIR
A+
Certified
Repair
Technician
•Desktop /Laptop
Repairs & Cleanup
•Virus-Spyware Removal-
Starting at $80.
1200 Ferguson Dr.
Ste. 5 • Benton
501-776-7577
Drywall Repair
DRYWALL
REPAIR
SERVICE
• Cracks & Holes
• Discolored Ceilings
• Water Stains
• Small Remodels
Valid References
40 Yrs. Experience
!!!!!!
Steve Burrow - Owner
337–4525
Handgun Classes
CONCEALED
HANDGUN
CLASSES
Course completed
in one day.
All
paperwork
provided.
Tim Bragg, Instructor
#95-055
501-776-7419
Arkansas
Concealed
Permit Class
George Brooks, Instructor
License No. 12-763
501.413.2393
email:
georgebrookstheshooter@gmail.com
website:
www.georgebrookstheshooter.com
3470 Quapaw Rd., Benton
Advanced Shooting instruction available
Let the
Courier Classifieds
work for you.
Call Cathy or Kim
to place your
Classified Ad.
Mon.-Fri. 8am-5pm
315-8228
or come by
321 N. Market St.
SEEK AND YOU
SHALL FIND
Great deals in the
Courier Classifieds.
Yard Sales, Jobs,
Homes for Sale or
Rent. Check them out
daily. Call to sub-
scribe at 315-8228.
Handyman
W::: ur
Hz×nvmz×
Tree trimming
!""#$%&
Bush & garden
trim & clean up
Brick
Junk hauling
Decks
Flower Bed
clean out
Block
Stump Grinding
Leaf Blowing
Painting
Any Yard Work!
FREE
ESTIMATES!
Owner
Deanna Massey
O×r Cz:: Dors I1
A:: Lzw×cznrt
501-326-2839
and ask for
Damon Massey
Home Inspections
Diamond R
Home Inspections
Russell Richmond
diamondrhomeinspections
@gmail.com
501-362-8160
mention ad for discount
Horses
Clinic’s Certified
HOLTZMAN
Riding Academy, LLC
BIRTHDAY PARTIES
10 & UNDER
SUMMER HORSE CAMP
316-1141
Looking for love in all
the wrong places????
Check out the Freebie
section in today!s
classifieds. You will
fi nd uncondi ti onal
love there FREE!
Furry & Free!!
Classifieds Work!
Classifieds Work!
House Leveling
HOUSE
Leveling/Foundation
REPAIR
Concrete Foundations
or Pier & Beam
• Shaky floors
• Rotten wood
• Cracked brick
• French drains, etc.
~ Free Estimates ~
501-304-2040
Insulation
Southern Southern
INSULATION &
GUTTERS, Inc.
INSULATION &
GUTTERS, Inc.
INSULATION &
GUTTERS, Inc.
INSULATION &
GUTTERS, Inc.
Family Owned & Operated
for 33 Years
ª Residential & Commercial
ª Seamless ßutters
ª Leal Frool System
ª Fiberqlass, Batts & Blown
ª Stabili/ed Cellulose
ª ínsulation Removal
FREE ESTIMATES
Licensed - ínsured - Bonded
FINANCING AVAILABLE
315-2306
Toll Free. 888·278·7GOG
Landscaping
L.W. Lawn &
Landscaping
SERVICES, LLC
501-350-9137
870-942-9641
But my God shall supply all your needs according
to his riches in glory by Christ Jesus. Phil. 4:19
Call
Today!
Located in Bryant
Lawn Maintenance, Trimming,
Sprinkler Installation, French
Drains, Shrub & Tree Pruning,
Leaf Removal, Landscaping,
Gutter Maintenance and more
www.lwlawnandlandscaping.com
lwlawnandlandscaping@yahoo.com
VETERAN & SENIOR
DISCOUNT
Lawn Care
Flawless
Lawns
Flawless
Lawns
Spring Clean-Up
Leaves, Beds & Mulch
Mowing, Trimming, Edging
Odd Jobs and Light Hauling
Ryan Harmon 860-8789
MaRK 8:36
Buy • Sell • Trade
in the Classifieds
Lawn Care
Richard
May’s
Lawn Care
10 years Local
Experience
Average yard:
Cut & Weed
Eat $25-$30
317-8966
316-6655
Painting
SUPERIOR
PAINTING
• Residential & Small
Commercial
• Drywall Finish
& Repair
• Interior & Exterior
• Texture
• Pressure Washing
INSURED
Kelly Hill – Owner
501-316-3328
501-840-1470
Bull Painting Co.
“Where Quality
Meets Aordability”
Darrel Bull, Owner
Quality Work GUARANTEED
Interior/Exterior
Painting
Cabinet Painting
& Renishing
Wallpaper & Popcorn
Removal
Deck & Fence Restoration
Wood Repair
Pressure Washing
2nd Generation Painter
.
Insured
.
References Available
.
Free Estimates
AR Lic #307430813
501.860.2442
Experienced
Painter
NEEDS WORK
Call Phil 249-1657
leave message
Interior & Exterior
30 yrs experience
All types of Home Maintenance
SCHAY PAINTING CO
Interior/Exterior
20 Years Experience
References Provided
Steve Schay
501-425-4492
Ready to take the
Real Estate Plunge?
Check out the Homes
for Sale in the Classi-
fieds daily.
Pet Care
Absolute
All breed mobile
dog grooming
501.732.6850
Kim McWhirter
kimmcwhirter
@ymail.com
Pressure Wash-
Royal
Flush
Servicing
Central Arkansas
since 1988
316-1536
Pressure Wash & Seal
specializing in
!"#$%&'&()(*""+
,-#./(0(1'&&/(1-+-#2
3-/+&4(0(*5'&%(1'5-#6
JG’s
Pressure Wash & More
Deck Repair
Fences
Gutter Cleaning
Lawn Service
and More
501-249-4715
Roofng
ROOFING
Wagner
Residential
Commercial
&
VOTED
“Best of the Best”
2009
Free Estimates
847-6630
K & L
ROOFING
• Don’t Wait For
Roofing Repair
• All Insurance
Claims Welcome
• 40 years exp.
• Financing Avail.
w/approved credit
Upgrade to a metal roof with
a class 4 fire rating & you
may qualify for a discount on
your homeowners insurance
501-249-7735
501-778-7600
210 W. SEVIER
ST. • BENTON
Looking for a good
deal? Search the
Courier Classifieds!!
Roofng
Action
Roofing Co
ROOFING AND
REPAIR!
Free Estimates
No job too large
or too small.
30 yrs. experience
501-225-4444
ARKANSAS SERVICE CO.
Roofng & Waterproofng
33 yrs. Experience • FREE Estimates
501.425.2995
Toll Free 877.942.1977
Senior & Veteran Discounts
Tree Service
M00ߣ
ñFF0ßßñ8l£
Tߣ£ 5£ß¥l8£
501-778-8071
501-860-5911
28-Years
Experience
Insured &
Licensed
*Stump Grinding
*Take Downs
*Trimming
*Pruning
*Storm Cleanup
Parsons & Son
Tree Service LLC
“The Total Package”
Call us about
Tree Health Care
º 1rinning
º 1ake Lowns
º Pruning
º Renovals
º Stunp Renoval
º lirewood
º Oreen vaste lauling
Conplete
lnsuranoe Coverage
Owned 8 Operated
by an
lSA Lioensed Arborist
SO·L"PGA
840-1436
602-2959
Tree Service
CRITES
& TACKETT
TREE SERVICE
~ Free Estimates ~
Workman's Comp
& Liability Insured
•Stump Removal
501-337–1565
501-337-9094
501.317.6788
ROCKIN B
TREE SERVICE
B
TRIMMING
PRUNING
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Legal Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF SALINE COUNTY, ARKANSAS
ARVEST MORTGAGE COMPANY PLAINTIFF
vs. No. 63CV-13-151-2
LANCE F. DUNAVANT; SPOUSE OF LANCE F. DUNAVANT, if any;
CAPITAL ONE BANK (USA),; AND TENANTS OF
10306 LOWE LANE, MABLEVALE, AR, 72103, DEFENDANTS
COMMISSIONER!S SALE
NOTICE IS GIVEN that in pursuance of the authority contained in
the decretal order of the Saline County Circuit Court entered on the
20th day of June, 2013, in Case No. 63CV-13-151-2 then pending
herein between Arvest Mortgage Company, Plaintiff, and LANCE F.
DUNAVANT, et al., Defendants, the undersigned, as Commissioner
of said Court, will offer for sale at public venue to the highest bidder,
at the Main Entrance of the County Courthouse, 200 N. Main St.,
Benton, AR 72015, in which said Court is held, in the County of Sa-
line, City of Benton, Arkansas, within the hours prescribed by law for
judicial sales at 11:00 a.m. on Tuesday the 13th day of AUGUST,
2013, the following described real estate, situated in Saline County,
Arkansas, to wit:
TRACT #1 IN THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTH-
WEST QUARTER, SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE
13 WEST, SALINE COUNTY, ARKANSAS, MORE PARTICU-
LARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT THE
SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID SE 1/4 OF NW 1/4; THENCE
NORTH 0 DEG. 22 MIN. EAST 299.8 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89
DEG. 36 MIN. WEST 935.0 FEET TO THE POINT BEGINNING;
THENCE CONTINUING SOUTH 89 DEG. 36 MIN. WEST 85.0
FEET; THENCE SOUTH 0 DEG. 22 MIN. WEST 247.8 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 89 DEG. 36 MIN. EAST 85.0 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 0 DEG. 22 MIN. EAST 247.8 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING.
TERMS OF SALE: On a credit of three months, the purchaser
being required to execute a bond as required by law and the order
and decree of said Court in said cause, with approved security, bear-
ing interest at the rate of 10.0 percent per annum from date of sale
until paid, and a lien being retained on the premises sold to secure
the payment of the purchase money.
Given under my hand this 2 day of July, 2013.
Dennis Milligan, COMMISSIONER IN CIRCUIT COURT
By: Lana Davis
Burton E. Stacy, Jr., Hood & Stacy, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff
Legal Notices
WARNING ORDER
STATE OF ARKANSAS ) IN THE SALINE
) ss. COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT
COUNTY OF SALINE )
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF SALINE COUNTY, ARKANSAS
2nd DIVISION
ARVEST MORTGAGE COMPANY PLAINTIFF
VS. CASE NO. 63CV-13-331-2
UNKNOWN HEIRS OF RICHARD A . PATTERSON;
DEFENDANTS
SURVIVING SPOUSE OF RICHARD A PATTERSON;
OCCUPANTS OF 408 BRYANT MEADOWS DRIVE, BRYANT, AR
72022-3776
A description of the property or res to be affected: Lot 26, Bryant
Meadows Subdivision, Phase II, in the city of Bryant, Saline
County, Arkansas.
The Defendants, Unknown Heirs of Richard A. Patterson and
Surviving Spouse of Richard A. Patterson, unserved, are warned
to appear and answer the Complaint of the Plaintiff in this Court
within 30 days from the date of first publication of this warning order
or face entry of judgment by default or be otherwise barred from as-
serting his or her or its interest.
Failure of the Defendants to answer within 30 days from the date of
first publication of this warning order could result in judgment against
the Defendants.
Dated: June 20, 2013. DENNIS MILLIGAN, Circuit Clerk
BY: Elizabeth Alvarado, Deputy Clerk
Dyke, Goldsholl & Winzerling, P.L.C.,
Attorneys for Plaintiff
415 N. McKinley, Ste 1177 • Little Rock, AR 72205 • (501) 661-1000
Legal Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF SALINE COUNTY, ARKANSAS
PROBATE DIVISION
IN THE MATTER OF
THE ESTATE OF
WILLIS WAYNE FELTON, DECEASED NO.63PR-13-300-4
NOTICE
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS OF DECEDENT:
908 North Richardson Place; Bryant, Arkansas 72022
DATE OF DEATH: February 1, 2013
An instrument dated March 29, 1983, was on the 24th day
of June, 2013, admitted to probate as the Last Will of the
above-named decedent and the undersigned has been appointed
Executrix thereunder. Contest of the probate of the will can be ef-
fected only by filing a petition within the time provided by law.
All persons having claims against the estate must exhibit
them, duly verified, to the undersigned within six (6) months from the
date of the first publication of this notice, or they shall be forever
barred and precluded from any benefit in the estate. Claims for in-
jury or death caused by the negligence of the decedent shall be filed
within six (6) months from the date of first publication of the notice, or
they shall be forever barred and precluded from any benefit in the
estate.
This notice first published the 28th day of June, 2013.
Deborah J. Felton, Executrix
908 North Richardson Place
Bryant, Arkansas 72022
Law Office of Paul D. White, P.A.
301 Roya Lane, Suite 4, P. O. Box 710
Bryant, Arkansas 72089-0710
(Ark. Bar No. 92198), Attorney for the Estate
Legal Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF SALINE COUNTY, ARKANSAS
PROBATE DIVISION
IN THE MATTER OF
THE ESTATE OF
LINES DALE BACON, DECEASED NO. 63PR-13-301-4
NOTICE
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS OF DECEDENT:
2609 Mills Park Road; Bryant, Arkansas 72022
DATE OF DEATH: April 26, 2013
An instrument dated September 16, 2005, was on the 24th
day of June, 2013, admitted to probate as the Last Will of the
above-named decedent and the undersigned has been appointed
Executrix thereunder. Contest of the probate of the will can be ef-
fected only by filing a petition within the time provided by law.
All persons having claims against the estate must exhibit
them, duly verified, to the undersigned within six (6) months from the
date of the first publication of this notice, or they shall be forever
barred and precluded from any benefit in the estate. Claims for in-
jury or death caused by the negligence of the decedent shall be filed
within six (6) months from the date of first publication of the notice, or
they shall be forever barred and precluded from any benefit in the
estate.
This notice first published the 28th day of June, 2013.
Lisa Pickett, Executrix
2609 Mills Park Road
Bryant, Arkansas 72022
Law Office of Paul D. White, P.A.
301 Roya Lane, Suite 4, P. O. Box 710
Bryant, Arkansas 72089-0710
(Ark. Bar No. 92198), Attorney for the Estate
Legal Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF SALINE COUNTY, ARKANSAS
PROBATE DIVISION
IN THE MATTER OF
THE ESTATE OF
JACK E. SEXSON, DECEASED NO. 63PR-13-307-4
NOTICE
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS OF DECEDENT:
412 Estates Drive; Benton, Arkansas 72019
DATE OF DEATH: June 8, 2012
An instrument dated June 29, 2010, was on the 24th day
of June, 2013, admitted to probate as the Last Will of the
above-named decedent and the undersigned has been appointed
Executrix thereunder. Contest of the probate of the will can be ef-
fected only by filing a petition within the time provided by law.
All persons having claims against the estate must exhibit
them, duly verified, to the undersigned within six (6) months from the
date of the first publication of this notice, or they shall be forever
barred and precluded from any benefit in the estate. Claims for in-
jury or death caused by the negligence of the decedent shall be filed
within six (6) months from the date of first publication of the notice, or
they shall be forever barred and precluded from any benefit in the
estate.
This notice first published the 28th day of June, 2013.
Jackie Ann Sexson, Executrix
3412 Estates Drive
Benton, Arkansas 72019
Law Office of Paul D. White, P.A.
301 Roya Lane, Suite 4, P. O. Box 710
Bryant, Arkansas 72089-0710
(Ark. Bar No. 92198), Attorney for the Estate
See Saline M A G A Z I N E
S P R I N G 2 0 1 2 I S S U E
MAKING
WAVES
MAKING
WAVES
THERE ARE MANY DIFFERENT SPOTS
IN SALINE COUNTY FOR ONE TO ENJOY
A NICE SWIM, A DAY OF FISHING OR
EVEN A COMPETITIVE CANOE RACE ON
THE SALINE RIVER
MORE INSIDE ON:
Where to golf in Saline
Where to vote
Local elected o cials
Museums, libraries and more
Fishing hole secrets
The Saline Courier along with the
entire media industry has experienced
numerous changes since its inception.
Over the years many predictions have
included the demise of print media. First
there was radio, then television and now
the Internet. Yet, through them all, The
Saline Courier remains an award winning
daily newspaper reporting the local news
Saline county residents seek. We are
proud to be a part of Saline County as its
oldest, continuously operated business.
321 N. Market St., Benton • 501-315-8228
Moderately Confused Herman
Crossword Challenge
Kit ‘n’ Carlyle
Celebrity Cipher
Here’s How It Works:
Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken
down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the
numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and
box. Each number can appear only once in each row,
column and box. You can figure out the order in which
the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues
already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you
name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!
Astro•graph
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Alley Oop
Big Nate
Born Loser
Thatababy
Frank and Ernest
Grizzwells
Monty
Arlo and Janis
Soup to Nutz
JULY 5, 2013
A number of opportunities are
likely to develop for in the year
ahead that could make it possible for
you to generate income from more
than one source. It’s a condition you
always wanted to happen, but never
thought possible.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
-- A friend is anxious to talk about a
personal issue, but is hesitant to do
so. It might be up to you to put your
pal at ease.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) --
Although you might not be too
lucky with intangible involvements,
all the good will you’re able to gen-
erate will end up being more valu-
able than money.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
-- It’ll be important to be flexible
where your important objectives are
concerned. Circumstances are likely
to necessitate changing your tactics
at a moment’s notice.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
-- Your best ideas are apt to come
when reviewing situations that you
successfully handled in past, which
are similar to what you’re facing
now. Trade on experience.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
-- A couple of rewarding situations
could develop from two separate
involvements. Both will involve
distinctly different groups or organi-
zations.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) -- You shouldn’t have too much
trouble finding several solutions to a
critical issue. The only problem you
might have is deciding which one to
use.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
-- Try to use your free time as pro-
ductively as possible. If you don’t,
you might end up writing today off
as wasted.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
-- It’s OK to enjoy yourself as much
as possible, but be sure to seek both
mental and physical stimulation.
Relax and have fun while improving
your mind and body.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) --
Do your best to keep your priorities
in good order. First, attend to your
important obligations so that they’re
not hanging over your head the
entire day.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) --
You might be surprised by what you
can learn simply by spending some
quality time with a few bright pals.
Additionally, it would be smart to
ask a lot of questions.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
-- Don’t hesitate to spend some time
with a friend who has been indebted
to you for some time. You could be
in for a pleasant surprise when he or
she picks up the tab.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
-- This is likely to be an extremely
busy day in which you might have
to handle several problems simulta-
neously. Fortunately, you’ll be able
do so with grace and aplomb.
Friday, July 5, 2013
news@bentoncourier.com The Saline Courier – Page 9
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10 The Saline Courier
Friday, July 5, 2013
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