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June 11, 2013

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Courier
Dr. Melanie Spann Dr.Terry Simmons Dr. Matt Torres Dr. Ron Rosnermanz
Li f el i ne
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health Center
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Saline
Chiropractic
501-315-3310
1200 Ferguson Dr.
Benton
501-847-7026
5920 Hwy. 5 N, Suite 7
Bryant
501-847-7246
23253 I-30
Bryant
501-778-2121
7307 Alcoa Road, Suite 6
Bryant
Get Chiropractic just
for the health of it!
Call Your Chiropractor
Today!
Volume 136
Number 163
1 Section 160 Pages
50¢
Home of Jerry Hearn
and Marcelina Davis
The Saline
www. bent oncouri er. com
Monday, June 10, 2013
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CONTACT US
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Email: news@bentoncourier.com
Write: P.O. Box 207,
Benton, AR 72018
INDEX
OBITUARIES .............................. 3
OPINIONS .................................. 4
SPORTS .................................. 5,6
CLASSIFIEDS ............................ 8
COMICS......................................9
SALINE COUNTY
WEATHER FORECAST
MONDAY NIGHT: Lows in the
lower 70s.
TUESDAY: Chance of rain with
highs in the upper 80s.
A portion of Boone
Road — from Tanglewood
Street West to Woodland
Park Road — will be closed
Tuesday between the hours
of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.
The Bryant Street
Department will be replac-
ing culverts during this
time.
Questions may be direct-
ed to the department at 501-
943-0468.
ROAD CLOSED:
The Saline Courier is spon-
soring a 2014 Pet Calendar
contest as a fundraiser for its
Newspapers in Education pro-
gram. The top-12 vote-getters
will be featured in our 2014 Pet
Calendar.
The contest entry period
runs through today. Entry fee
is $5 per pet. Entries will be
featured in the pages of the
Courier throughout the voting
period, with updated voting
totals.
The 2014 calendar will
feature the 12 pets who gain
the most votes. Each pet
will be professionally photo-
graphed for the calendar. The
calendars will be available by
Thanksgiving and will cost $2
each.
Saline Courier
accepting entries
for 2014 Pet
Calendar Contest
HITTING IT ON THE HEAD
WIL CHANDLER/The Saline Courier
Danny Lites hammers a nail into place at the construction of a Habitat for Humanity home. Other volunteers
included Lites’ daughter, Cassi Lites.
Quorum
meeting
moved to
East End
As part of its rotation system, Saline County
Quorum Court plans to hold its June 18 meet-
ing at the I CAN! Art and Resource Center in
the East End community.
The event is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. at that
facility, which is at 1040 Angel Court.
A recent meeting of the court was held in
Hot Springs Village.
Among the items to be considered in the
upcoming meeting is a resolution authoriz-
ing a grant application from the Arkansas
Department of Parks and Tourism’s Outdoor
Recreation Grant Program for a park facility at
the Angel Court site.
The funding the grant would provide report-
edly is necessary to develop and improve the
site for a recreation area.
The funding would be available on a 50/50
matching plan.
Saline County Quorum Court is agreeing to
provide the local portion of the development
cost of the entire project.
Justice of the Peace Pat Bisbee of District 1
is sponsoring the resolution.
Also in the upcoming meeting, the court
plans to vote on a resolution applying for a
criminal justice grant that will enhance Saline
County courtroom security.
The application will be made for an Edward
Byrne Memorial justice Assistance Grant
Program.
Justice of the Peace J.R. Walters of District
12 is the sponsor of the ordinance.
The meeting agenda also includes an
ordinance adding portions of county roads.
The locations are Ironstone Drive, Lodestone
Drive and Stonehill Drive.
Bisbee, the ordinance’s sponsor, serves
as chairman of the court’s Public Works and
Safety Committee.
The court also will consider an appropria-
tion ordinance that would add $20,871 in fund-
ing for the Circuit Court-Second Division.
Co-sponsors of the ordinance are JPs
Greg Thomas and Walters, chairman of the
Finance/Personnel Committee.
All meetings of the Quorum Court are open
to the public.
By Lynda Hollenbeck
lyndahol@yahoo.com
Benton splash pad
coming in early July;
Mills Park pool open
Construction of the splash pad at Tyndall
Park in Benton is under way, and park offi-
cials say it should be ready for public use in
about two-and-a-half weeks.
Splash pads provide a water play activity
area with several splashing, sprinkling and
dumping features and no standing water.
The splash pad at Bishop Park is open
Monday-Saturday, from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.,
and on Sunday from 12:30 to 8 p.m. Day
passes to The Center at Bishop Park are
available for non-members.
A day pass provides access to the splash
pad and also the pool. Fees are $4 for
youths and seniors and $6 for adults.
The Mills Park pool opened for the sea-
son on Saturday.
Its hours are Tuesday-Friday, from 11
a.m. to 6 p.m., and Saturday, from noon to 6
p.m. Admission is $3.
By Jennifer Joyner
jjoyner@bentoncourier.com
Annual Benton gospel event
to feature famed Florida Boys
One of Southern gospel
music’s most well-known
quartets, The Florida
Boys, will be performing
in Benton.
The group includes
Les Beasley of Pensacola,
Fla., formerly of Bauxite.
The quartet is slated
for a June 22 concert at
Benton’s First Assembly
of God.
The annual gospel
concert, normally held at
Butler Auditorium on the
Benton High School cam-
pus, is being relocated
this year because of reno-
vations under way at the
auditorium.
For more than 60
years, fans have sup-
ported The Florida Boys.
The group appeared at
the first gospel quartet
concert ever held in New
York’s Carnegie Hall.
To perform at Carnegie
Hall is recognized as the
zenith of one’s career, a
Florida Boys spokesman
noted.
The group became
a household name on
television every Sunday
morning while host-
ing the Gospel Singing
Jubilee. With No. 1 hits
like “Standing On The
Solid Rock,” “When He
Was On The Cross, I
Was On His Mind,” “Lead
Me To The Altar” and
“I Lean On You Lord,”
Florida Boys
By Lynda Hollenbeck
lyndahol@yahoo.com
FLORIDA BOYS, page 7
2 The Saline Courier
Monday, June 10, 2013
1205 Military , Benton • 909-2323 • Corner of Sutherlands Shopping Center
EAT MY
Attn: Members & Guests
Now Open 7 Days a Week
Mon-Sat 11-9pm • Sun 11-2pm
Thank You for voting us one of the
Best Catfish in Saline County
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•Allergen Cleaning Products
@AllergyStor
Living with allergies
just got a little easier
news across
-Associated Press
Saline county eventS
Review finds appropriate
response to Ark. storms
Email calendar items to news@bentoncourier.com or call 501-315-8228 ext. 234.
Calendar items are intended for nonprofit organizations.
Saline courier ScraPBook 1986
TODAY
LITTLE HORNETS CAMP: 9
a.m. Monday, June 10 in the
High School Gym. The three
day camp is for students
entering grades 3-7 and the
cost is $75 per camper.  All
campers will receive a
T-shirt. For information and
registration form.Contact
Mike Abrahamson mabraha-
mson@brayantschools.org
ARGH, PIRATES! SUMMER
READING PROGRAM
KICKOFF: Monday, June 10
at both library locations.
The Saline County Library
will kick off its 2013 Summer
Reading program with a
pirate-themed event geared
toward all ages and will take
place from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
at Boswell Library and from
4-7 p.m. at Herzfeld Library.
Children, tweens, teens and
adults are invited to attend
and sign up for their respec-
tive programs. No registra-
tion is required for teens.
Call 778-4766 or 847-2166
for more information.
BENTON BOOK CLUB: 5 p.m.,
Monday, June 10 at the
Herzfeld Library. The Benton
Book Club will meet to dis-
cuss its chosen title. The
group is open to adults 18
and older. Call 778-4766 for
more information. 
SALEM FIRE DISTRICT
BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS
MEETING: 7 p.m., Monday,
June 10 at Station #1 located
at 1785 Salem Road.
TUESDAY, JUNE 11
THEOS, A SUPPORT
GROUP FOR WIDOWS AND
WIDOWERS: 5 p.m. Tuesday,
June 11 for its regular
monthly meeting, entertain-
ment will be provided by
Alan Townsend.
BENTON PARKINSON’S
SUPPORT GROUP MEETING:
Noon, Tuesday, June 11,
in the hospitality room of
First Baptist Church for a
luncheon. Dr. Lajara, a move-
ment disorder specialist
from Bartlesville, Okla., will
be the guest speaker. For
more information call Karen
Garner at 778-1682 or visit
www.arparkinson.org.
THURSDAY, JUNE 13
AMERICAN LEGION
POST 263, SONS OF
THE AMERICAN LEGION
AND AMERICAN LEGION
AUXILIARY: 5 p.m.,
Thursday,  June 13 at
Traskwood City Hall. The
Auxiliary will meet at 5:00
P.M. followed by the Sons
of the American Legion at
6:00 P.M. then the American
Legion meets at 7:00
P.M.   We are requesting
all members and anyone
interested in joining us to
make an effort to attend. 
For information or ques-
tions contact Linda Hankins,
939-9823, email lhankins@
ymail.com for the auxiliary
meeting or Sonny Hankins
at 501-326-2882, email
sonny_72087@yahoo.com
or David Brewer, phone 501-
860-2854, email bentonfour-
square@att.net. 
SOUTHWEST WATER USERS
BOARD MEETING: 6 p.m.
Thursday, June 13, at 620
Airlane Drive in Benton.
ARKANSAS CONFEDERATE
CURRENCY AND SCRIPT:
6:30 p.m., Thursday, June
13, Mr. Ray Phillips of
Russellville will present a
program at the Bob Herzfeld
Memorial Library in Benton
on Arkansas Confederate
Currency and Script.  Mr.
Phillips has been collecting
Arkansas bank notes and
currency since an early age. 
You may call the library at
778-4766 for more informa-
tion.
FRIDAY, JUNE 14
ART RECEPTION: 2-4 p.m.
Friday, June 14 at the
Herzfeld Library in Benton.
The reception is to honor
Tane Steed, Benton resident
and art teacher. For more
information Call 778-4766
for more information.
Notepad and Pencil Holder
Craft Class: 10 a.m. Friday,
June 14 at Herzfeld Library
Ages 18 and up are invited
to create an easy-to-make
notepad and pencil holder
that will be invaluable to
the kitchen for shopping
and to-do lists. The class
is led by members of the
Saline County Cooperative
Extension Homemakers
group, and attendance is
first come first served. Call
778-4766 for more informa-
tion.
 
SATURDAY, JUNE 15
LAKE NORRELL FIREWORKS
FUNDRAISER: 5 p.m.
Saturday, June 15 at the
Lake Norrell Community
Center. The Lake Norrell Area
Association will host their
firework fundraiser dinner
and quilt raffle. Barbecue
dinner will be $10 for adults.
Hot dogs for the kids is $5
(for ages 5-10), kids plates
for 4 and under are free. The
association is selling raffle
tickets for a queen size quilt,
tickets are $1 each or 6 for
$5. The drawing will be held
during the event. For more
information contact Barbara
Howell 681-7577.
BOOK TO MOVIE CLUB: noon,
Saturday, June 15 at Herzfeld
Library. All ages are invited
to a movie viewing followed
by a discussion of the book
“Holes,” by Louis Sachar.
Light refreshments will be
provided. Call 778-4766 for
more information.
THE KEATON FAMILY
REUNION: 11 a.m., Saturday,
June 15, at the Bauxite
Community Hall. Potluck
lunch begins at noon. All
family and friends are invit-
ed. For more information
call: Bob Keaton 501-778-
4240.
MONDAY, JUNE 17
HANDS OF HOPE CANCER
SUPPORT GROUP MEETING:
6:30 p.m., Monday, June 17
at Saline Memorial Hospital
Education Building, class-
room 2. This month in honor
of National Cancer Survivor
Month we are having a birth-
day party...another birthday
for us. If cancer has become
part of your life whether as
patient, survivor, caregiver
or family member we invite
and encourage you to join
us,  For information contact
Linda Hankins at 501-939-
9823, email lhankins@ymail.
com or Libby Aldridge at
501-412-5337.
ARKANSAS EDUCATIONAL
TELEVISION NETWORK: 6:30
p. m. Monday, June 17, at
the Bob Herzfeld Memorial
Library in Benton. Mr. David
Elmore of Benton and
the Arkansas Educational
Television Network will pres-
ent How to Do Oral Histories.
This program is open to the
public.  You may call the
library at 778-4766 for more
information. 
TUESDAY, JUNE 18
BIG MOVERS CONSTRUCTION
STORY TIME PARTY: 10:30
a.m. Tuesday, June 18 at
Boswell Library . Children
are invited to listen to con-
struction themed stories
and enjoy games, snacks,
and crafts. No registration
required. Call 778-4766 for
more information.
LITTLE ROCK — The
violent flash flood in west
Arkansas that killed a sheriff
and a wildlife officer as they
tried to rescue two women
forced the men to make a
series of split-second deci-
sions that no set of regula-
tions can anticipate, the
chief of enforcement for the
Arkansas Game and Fish
Commission said.
Rain from storms May
30-31 fell in such volume
that the runoff washed away
houses and other buildings.
Scott County Sheriff Cody
Carpenter and Arkansas
Game and Fish Commission
Wildlife Officer 1st Class
Joel Campora were attempt-
ing to save two women from
a home eventually ripped
apart by the flows. A review
has so far found the men
responded appropriately to
the threat.
Carpenter and Campora
were somehow swept into
the waters they traveled by
boat to the scene near Y City
along the raging Fourche
LaFave River. Both officers
died, as did both women,
Vivian Sue Reimer, 65, and
Regina Kay Shearn, 60.
The leader of the Game
and Fish Commission’s
enforcement division, Col.
Jack Crow, said Friday
before Campora’s funeral
that the battle with the water
was like facing a dangerous
suspect.
“It’s almost identical to
a use-of-force encounter
where they have incomplete
information and they have
a situation that is unfolding
rapidly and they have to
make snap decisions and
hope they are making the
best one to achieve a safe,
tactical, legal, professional
outcome,” Crow said.
“It’s just one of the
strange paradigms of law
enforcement work,” he said.
Carpenter and Campora
were hailed as heroes by
their agencies and mem-
bers of the public. Gov.
Mike Beebe ordered flags
to be flown at half-staff on
Wednesday, the day of
Carpenter’s funeral, and
again on Friday, the day of
Campora’s service, noting
their bravery and heroism.
Crow said agency policies
are geared toward keeping
the public safe, which can
put officers at risk.
“They understand that
sacrificial service that it
takes to be able to do your
job well. Joel certainly
understood that,” Crow said.
Game and Fish officers
are investigating the deaths.
Crow said he’s gotten no
indication that any policies
had been violated. Because
the investigation remains
open, Crow couldn’t go into
detail about what happened
the day the men died but
said they were up against a
natural event that was too
enormous for them to con-
trol their fate.
“It was a force of nature.
It was a formidable foe that
morning. It sure was,” Crow
said.
Officials said it appeared
that Carpenter and Campora
were first to the scene and
were among those respond-
ing to a tremendous crash-
ing sound that some people
at the scene thought indi-
cated a bridge had washed
away.
The sound was of a house
imploding.
It’s unclear what the
investigation will reveal
about how the victims met
their deaths. Campora’s
body was found about a mile
downstream from where
Carpenter and one of the
female victims were found.
Crow said it was gratify-
ing to see the work of other
wildlife officers during the
search.
“Our officers, from the
very moment this happened,
began searching for Joel
and the other victims of this
tragedy. And they searched
diligently all the way up
until the time they found
him Sunday morning (June
2),” he said. “And it was our
officers that found him. That
was our desire that our offi-
cers be the ones to find him
and return him to his family.
That was very important,”
Crow said.
Saline Courier photo
Striking members of the United States Steelworkers continue pickets outside the Alcoa plant near
Benton. The strike is in its 20th day. Alcoa and union members Thursday agreed to resume nego-
tiations in Florida next Friday.
ASU exploring opening
osteopathic school
JONESBORO —
Arkansas State University
officials are consider-
ing opening an osteo-
pathic medical school in
Jonesboro.
“An osteopathic medi-
cal school could be trans-
formative for our state and
our region,” ASU-Jonesboro
Chancellor Tim Hudson
told The Jonesboro Sun.
Hudson has been autho-
rized by ASU System
President Charles Welch to
work with Jonesboro offi-
cials and representatives of
existing osteopathic medi-
cal schools on a study into
the feasibility of establish-
ing the school. Hudson said
that he expects to compile
a report and make and rec-
ommendation to Welch and
the ASU Board of Trustees
before the end of the year.
The American
Osteopathic Association’s
website describes osteo-
pathic training as including
an emphasis on the entire
body and the connected-
ness of the muscular, skel-
etal and nervous systems.
The U.S. has 29 accred-
ited osteopathic medical
colleges, the nearest to
Jonesboro being in Tulsa,
Okla., and Hattiesburg,
Miss.
“There’s no doubt a
need for this in the state,”
said Frazier Edwards,
director of the Arkansas
Osteopathic Medical
Association. “It’s not just
in northeast Arkansas,”
he told the Arkansas
Democrat-Gazette.
The state’s only medi-
cal school is the University
of Arkansas for Medical
Sciences in Little Rock.
Medical officials in
Jonesboro agree that the
city and ASU would be ideal
for such a medical school.
“I am sure the profes-
sional medical community
would embrace this devel-
opment and work collabora-
tively to provide the clinical
rotations that are a vital
aspect of medical educa-
tion,” said Chris Barber,
president and chief execu-
tive officer of St. Bernards
Healthcare in Jonesboro.
NEA Baptist Clinic
CEO Darrell King, also in
Jonesboro, said his orga-
nization understands the
need for additional medical
professionals in northeast
Arkansas.
“A part of the rationale
for the investment we are
making in Jonesboro is to
meet the rising need for
primary care in our region,”
King said.
Under the proposal, ASU
would offer a four-year
program with two years
dedicated to coursework
and two years to internships
at physicians’ clinics around
the state.
The estimated annual
tuition would be $45,000 a
year.
The first step for
approval to create such
a school would come
from the Arkansas
Osteopathic Medical
Association and ASU offi-
cials have not yet sought
the approval, Edwards said.
Monday, June 10, 2013
The Saline Courier 3
New
Tillers
Brown’s
SMALL ENGINE, Inc.
704 Edison Ave. • 315-7120
Hours: Tues.-Fri. 8:30-5:30 • Sat. 8:30-1:00
Closed Sun. & Mon.
Serving Saline County for over 21 years
Parts
ParTs and service
specializing in
501-847-1889 501-847-1889
W Gene Howard DDS
Sam Wright DMD
W Gene Howard DDS
Sam Wright DMD
New Patients &
Emergencies Welcome
New Patients &
Emergencies Welcome
General Dentistry
Orthodontics
General Dentistry
Orthodontics
22450 Hwy I-30 N
Bryant, AR 72022
Complete Dental Care
for your Entire Family
Monday - Friday
8AM - 5PM
AdId: S 3200004806315 - 04
CustId: 1304963202
Dir/Iss: BTNAR YP1 02/2013
UDAC: DHC - CIP
ATTUID: gj5981
Date: 11/30/2012 12:12:PM
YPH: 101706
Dentists
YPSH:
Rep: 16008 - rc6252
CURTIS RONDA
501-847-1889 501-847-1889
W Gene Howard DDS
Sam Wright DMD
W Gene Howard DDS
Sam Wright DMD
New Patients &
Emergencies Welcome
New Patients &
Emergencies Welcome
General Dentistry
Orthodontics
General Dentistry
Orthodontics
22450 Hwy I-30 N
Bryant, AR 72022
Complete Dental Care
for your Entire Family
Monday - Friday
8AM - 5PM
AdId: S 3200004806315 - 04
CustId: 1304963202
Dir/Iss: BTNAR YP1 02/2013
UDAC: DHC - CIP
ATTUID: gj5981
Date: 11/30/2012 12:12:PM
YPH: 101706
Dentists
YPSH:
Rep: 16008 - rc6252
CURTIS RONDA
501-847-1889 501-847-1889
W Gene Howard DDS
Sam Wright DMD
W Gene Howard DDS
Sam Wright DMD
New Patients &
Emergencies Welcome
New Patients &
Emergencies Welcome
General Dentistry
Orthodontics
General Dentistry
Orthodontics
22450 Hwy I-30 N
Bryant, AR 72022
Complete Dental Care
for your Entire Family
Monday - Friday
8AM - 5PM
AdId: S 3200004806315 - 04
CustId: 1304963202
Dir/Iss: BTNAR YP1 02/2013
UDAC: DHC - CIP
ATTUID: gj5981
Date: 11/30/2012 12:12:PM
YPH: 101706
Dentists
YPSH:
Rep: 16008 - rc6252
CURTIS RONDA
Sam Wright, D.M.D
W Gene Howard, D.D.S
• Complete Dental Care
for the whole family
• Orthodontics
• New patients and
emergencies welcome
501-847-1889
22450 Hwy I-30 North
Bryant, AR 72022
1313 Al coa Road • Bent on, AR
501- 860- 7335
www. abbysbl uemoonsal on. com
Gift
Certifcates
Available
Foil Highlites and Pedicure
Combo Special for Summer
Pamper yourself from Head to Toes!
Call 501-860-7335
or 870-820-0384
Walk-Ins Welcome
Benton Animal Control
Pet of the Week
Special to The Saline Courier
This week’s featured pet of the week for Benton Animal Control &
Adoption Center is Naomi, an adult female cat. Her reduced adop-
tion fee is $21 and includes sterilization and vaccination against
rabies. (The regular adoption fees are $61-$81.) Pet owners are
encouraged to do their part to stop the killing of healthy family pets
in local shelters by having their dogs and cats sterilized now. Please
schedule an appointment with a veterinarian or call one of the
local low-cost spay/neuter clinics: Saline County Humane Society,
501-557-5518; Arkansans for Animals, Operation SAVE, 501-455-
5400; or CARE for Animals, Spay/Neuter Hotline, 501-680-7729.
Visit benton.petfinder.com to view all of the great pets currently
available for adoption. Hours of operation at the city shelter are
Monday-Saturday, from noon to 4:30 p.m. The shelter is located at
the intersection of South Market and Willow streets, less than a mile
south of the courthouse square and C.W. Lewis Stadium. For more
information, call 501-776-5972.
JUST ABOUT THREE AND A QUARTER
WIL CHANDLER/The Saline Courier
Tom Spann measures and marks a component for the construction of a Habitat for Humanity home Saturday morning.
Jury selection begins in Zimmerman’s trial
SANFORD, Fla. — In the
first order of business in
the trial of a Florida neigh-
borhood watch volunteer
charged in the fatal shooting
of an unarmed teen, a judge
Monday denied a defense
request to delay the trial’s
start.
Circuit Judge Debra
Nelson rejected the
delay request in George
Zimmerman’s second-
degree murder trial after
lead defense attorney Mark
O’Mara told the judge his
defense team needed several
more weeks to prepare.
O’Mara blamed prosecu-
tors for a delay in turning
over evidence and said he
needs time to interview an
attorney for Martin’s family.
Prosecutors opposed the
request for a delay.
“We’re not fully ready and
need more time,” O’Mara
said. Jury selection began
Monday in the Orlando
suburb of Sanford, Fla., the
scene of massive protests by
people who were angered
that police waited 44 days
before charging Zimmerman
with second-degree murder.
Other demonstrations were
held around the country,
and the case drew world-
wide attention as it fanned
a debate about race, equal
justice under the law and gun
control.
There is no dispute
Zimmerman shot an
unarmed Trayvon Martin,
17, during a fight on a rainy
night in February 2012.
Prosecutors will try to show
the neighborhood watch
volunteer racially profiled
the black teenager, while
Zimmerman’s attorney must
convince jurors Zimmerman
pulled his 9 mm handgun
and fired a bullet into the
high school student’s chest
because he feared for his life.
Zimmerman is charged
with second-degree murder.
He says he shot Martin in
self-defense. If convicted,
Zimmerman, who identifies
himself as Hispanic, could
get a life sentence.
Under Florida law,
Zimmerman, 29, could shoot
Martin in self-defense if it
was necessary to prevent
death or great bodily harm.
Law enforcement officials
at the Seminole County
Courthouse had been antici-
pating scores of protesters
supporting either Martin’s
family or Zimmerman. But
the crowds stayed away
on the first day of the trial.
Tierrel Mathis, a Florida
A&M law student, was the
sole person in a fenced off
area designated for protests
in the hours before the hear-
ing started and she didn’t
even describe herself as
a protester. She said she
merely wanted to observe
the starts to one of the high-
est-profile trials in central
Florida.
“I thought there would be
mobs of people,” Mathis said.
About a dozen protesters
showed up a few minutes
after jury selection started.
Some carried signs that said
“We Say No More.”
Talking to reporters,
Martin’s father, Tracy
Martin, expressed relief that
the trial was starting.
“We seek a fair and impar-
tial trial,” Tracy Martin said.
“We ask that the community
continue to stay peaceful as
we place our faith in the jus-
tice system.”
O’Mara, has to be careful
how he characterizes Martin,
said Randy McClean, an
Orlando-area defense attor-
ney.
“Mr. O’Mara’s challenge is
to show Trayvon wasn’t pro-
filed, that Zimmerman either
saw something that looked
suspicious or something else
that caused him to make con-
tact with Trayvon.”
McClean and another
Orlando defense attor-
ney, David Hill, predicted
prosecutors will attack
Zimmerman as a frustrated,
would-be police officer who
had a chip on his shoulder.
Zimmerman was employed at
a mortgage risk management
firm. He had studied criminal
justice at a community col-
lege and had volunteered to
run his community’s neigh-
borhood watch program.
“The state’s narrative is
going to be ... Zimmerman
was a powerful neighborhood
watchman, a wannabe officer
who liked to use his author-
ity,” McClean said.
The Feb. 26, 2012, con-
frontation began when
Zimmerman spotted Martin,
whom he did not recognize,
walking in the Retreat at
Twin Lakes, the gated town-
home community where
Zimmerman lived and the
fiancee of Martin’s father
also resided. There had been
a rash of recent break-ins at
the Retreat, and Zimmerman
was wary of strangers walk-
ing through the complex. He
was well-known to police dis-
patchers for his regular calls
reporting suspicious people
and events.
Martin was walking back
from a convenience store
after buying ice tea and
Skittles. It was raining, and
he was wearing a hoodie.
Zimmerman called 911,
got out of his vehicle and
followed Martin behind
the townhomes despite
being told not to by a police
dispatcher. “These a-----
-s, they always get away,”
Zimmerman said on the call.
Zimmerman, who had a con-
cealed weapons permit, was
armed.
The two then got into a
struggle. Zimmerman told
police he had lost sight of
Martin, and that Martin
circled back and attacked
him as he walked back to
his truck. Prosecutors say
he tracked down Martin and
started the fight.
Zimmerman told police
Martin punched him in
the nose, knocking him
down, and then got on top
of him and began banging
Zimmerman’s head on the
sidewalk. Photos taken after
the fight show Zimmerman
with a broken nose, bruises
and bloody cuts on the back
of his head. He said that
when Martin spotted his
gun holstered around his
waist under his clothes, he
said, “You are going to die
tonight.” Zimmerman said
he grabbed the gun first
and fired. Martin died at the
scene. Given the low visibil-
ity on the dark, rainy night of
the shooting, few residents
of the Retreat at Twin Lakes
were able to give investiga-
tors a good description of
what happened, and several
offered conflicting accounts
of who was on top of whom
during the struggle.
But 911 calls made by
neighbors captured cries for
help during the fight and
then the gunshot. Martin’s
parents say the cries for help
were from their son, while
Zimmerman’s father has tes-
tified they were from his son.
Voice-recognition experts
could play an important role
in helping jurors decide who
was screaming, provided
they are allowed to testify.
O’Mara had raised questions
about whether such prosecu-
tion experts would mislead
jurors and Circuit Judge
Debra Nelson has yet to rule.
The shooting received
little initial attention, but that
changed after Martin’s par-
ents hired Benjamin Crump,
a prominent civil rights attor-
ney. He began complaining
to the news media, accusing
the police and prosecutors
of letting the murderer of a
black child go free, and con-
tacting other civil rights lead-
ers, including the Revs. Jesse
Jackson and Al Sharpton, to
get their support.
Gov. Rick Scott appointed
State Attorney Angela B.
Corey from the nearby
Jacksonville district to re-
examine the case. She decid-
ed to charge Zimmerman.
For the past year,
Zimmerman has been free on
$1 million bond and living in
seclusion.
O’Mara earlier decided
not to invoke a “stand your
ground” hearing in which
a judge alone would decide
whether to dismiss the case
or allow it to proceed to trial.
It’s not clear whether
Zimmerman will take the
stand, but he has already tes-
tified in pretrial hearings.
Another crucial witness
will be a Miami-area female
friend of Martin’s who
was talking to the teen by
cellphone as he was walk-
ing through the Retreat at
Twin Lakes followed by
Zimmerman. She says Martin
told her during that conver-
sation that someone was
following him and that she
also heard a brief exchange
between him and someone
before the phone was cut off.
Martin was shot shortly after-
ward. But O’Mara already
has called into question her
credibility, accusing her of
lying about missing Martin’s
funeral because she was in
the hospital.
Prosecutors have refused
to comment about the case
outside the courtroom. Areas
near the courthouse have
been designated for expected
protests.
“We want to make sure
this trial is tried in a court-
room and not outside a
courtroom,” lead prosecutor
Bernie de la Rionda said.
Associated Press
Gun control advocates mark
6 months since shooting
WASHINGTON — Six
months after the Sandy
Hook Elementary School
shooting, some of the vic-
tims’ families are heading to
Capitol Hill to remind law-
makers they are painfully
waiting for action, while
some of the president’s
allies are asking him to
do more without any new
prospects of legislation to
toughen gun laws.
The lobbying visit
Tuesday and Wednesday is
one of several observances
gun control proponents are
planning for the half-year
anniversary of the Dec. 14
massacre of 20 first graders
and six staff in Newtown,
Conn. The Sandy Hook
families and other activists
are keeping pressure on
lawmakers to expand back-
ground purchases for fire-
arm sales, despite Senate
rejection of the measure
in April and no indication
votes have shifted.
Nicole Hockley, who lost
6-year-old Dylan at Sandy
Hook, said their family’s
pain has only gotten worse
as time goes by without the
younger of their two sons
at home. She says the fight
for new laws, which they’ve
also taken to several states,
has left them emotionally
exhausted, but they won’t
give up “no matter how long
it takes.”
“It is very disappoint-
ing that six months have
passed, and although we
are making progress in
individual states, we aren’t
making progress on the
federal level when it comes
to background checks when
an overwhelming number of
Americans support it,” she
said in a telephone inter-
view.
Gun control advocates
also are anticipating fur-
ther action from President
Barack Obama, who said
he would do everything he
could to stem gun violence
even without Congress.
The Center for American
Progress, a Washington
think tank with close ties
to the White House, is
asking Obama to issue
a dozen more executive
actions they say are within
his power to reduce gun
crimes. The group has been
pushing those measures in
meetings with the White
House, where point man
Vice President Joe Biden
declared in an email to sup-
porters Friday, “This fight
is far from over.”
Obama issued 23 execu-
tive actions in the aftermath
of Sandy Hook and hasn’t
ruled out doing more. His
aides say he isn’t planning
to announce any new initia-
tives or hold a gun-related
event this week but will
likely acknowledge the
anniversary.
Arkadi Gerney, a senior
fellow at the Center for
American Progress, said
their recommendations
build on Obama’s earlier
actions with more specific
measures to vigorously
prosecute gun crimes. The
center’s suggestions include
a system to alert local police
when felons attempt to buy
guns, allowing firearms
dealers to run the same
background checks on their
own employees as they do
for customers, penalizing
states that don’t provide
mental health data to the
background check system
and confiscating firearms
from domestic abusers.
Gerney said one recom-
mendation grew out of
the Boston bombing case,
after the suspects report-
edly scratched off the
serial number on a handgun
used in a firefight with
police to prevent tracking.
He says Obama’s Justice
Department could require
manufacturers to place a
second serial number inside
the barrel or another hid-
den location.
“What you want is a
whole series of laws that
makes it harder for danger-
ous people to get guns and
holds them accountable
when they do get guns,”
Gerney said. “Most are
about enforcing the laws
that already are on the
books and that’s something
the NRA and the gun lobby
has said it supports.”
But the National Rifle
Association, which has suc-
cessfully helped block any
new guns laws, says it sees
no further need for execu-
tive action. “The problem
we have is lack of enforce-
ment and lack of prosecu-
tion,” said NRA spokesman
Andrew Arulanandam.
Mark Glaze, director
of Mayors Against Illegal
Guns, said there’s plenty
more that the president can
do to stem gun violence.
But he argued the most
meaningful difference has
to come from Congress
passing a law to make the
background checks that are
currently required for sales
in stores to apply to online
and gun show purchases.
Associated Press
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LETTER TO THE EDITOR POLICY
State Sen. Jeremy Hutchinson, District 33,
201 E. North St., Benton, AR 72015, (501) 773-
3760, jeremy.hutchinson@senate.ar.gov.
State Sen. David Sanders, District 27 Room
320 State Capitol, Little Rock, AR 72201, (501)
682-6107, davidjamessanders@gmail.com.
State Sen. Alan Clark, District 13 P.O. Box
211, Lonsdale, AR 72087, (501) 262-3360, alan.
clark@senate.ar.gov.
State Rep. Ann Clemmer, District 23, 7415
Camille Drive, Benton, AR 72015, (501) 316-
0364, avclemmer@sbcglobal.net.
State Rep. Andy Davis, District 31 P.O. Box
30248, Little Rock, AR 72260, (501) 837-5109,
andy.davis@arkansashouse.org.
State Rep. Andy Mayberry, District 27 3022
E. Woodson Lateral Road, Hensley, AR 72065,
(501) 888-3522, andymayberry@windstream.net.
State Rep. Kim Hammer, District 28, 1411
Edgehill Dr., Benton, AR 72015, (501) 840-3841,
kimdhammer@yahoo.com.
Circuit Judge Bobby McCallister, 22nd
Judicial District, Division 1, Saline County
Courthouse, 200 N. Main St., Benton, AR 72015,
(501) 303-5635.
Circuit Judge Gary Arnold, 22nd Judicial
District, Division 2, Saline County Courthouse,
200 N. Main St., Benton, AR 72015, (501) 303-
5664.
Circuit Judge Grisham Phillips, 22nd
Judicial District, Division 3, Saline County
Courthouse, 200 N. Main St., Benton, AR 72015,
(501) 303-5628.
Circuit Judge Robert Herzfeld, 22nd
Judicial District, Division 4, Saline County Annex,
321 N. Main St., Benton, AR 72015, (501) 303-
1584.
District Judge Michael Robinson, Benton
District, 1605 Edison Ave., Benton, AR 72019,
(501) 303-5670.
District Judge Stephanie Casady, Bryant
District (Bryant, Alexander, Bauxite, Haskell,
Shannon Hills), Boswell Municipal Complex, 210
SW Third St., Bryant, AR 72022, (501) 847-5223.
Saline County Judge Lanny Fite,
Courthouse 200 N. Main St., Benton, AR 72015,
(501) 303-5640.
Prosecuting Attorney Ken Casady, 22nd
Juicial District, 102 S. Main St., Benton, AR
72015, (501) 315-7767.
Saline County Sheriff Bruce Pennington,
Saline County Detention Center, 735 S. Neeley
St., Benton, AR 72015; (501) 303-5609.
news@bentoncourier.com
HOW TO REACH YOUR ELECTED OFFICIALS
“Congress shall make no law ... abridging the freedom
of speech, or of the press ... .”
— From the First Amendment to Constitution
I
think it’s without question that pregnancy to a
woman can completely disrupt her life.
In 1971, Sarah Weddington argued in front
of the Supreme Court that pregnancy is a burden
women ought to have the legal option to be freed
from. In New York City today, the most recent num-
bers available show that two in five pregnancies end
in abortion; the rate is 60 percent if
the child in the womb happens to
be black. Statewide they are lower,
but still execrably high. In the midst
of this abysmal culture of death,
Weddington recently joined the
Empire State’s governor in insisting
that abortion access be expanded
there.
Which leads to a question -- do
we, as a culture and as people, actu-
ally prefer abortion? Has the rhetoric
shifted from “safe, legal and rare” to
“safe, legal and frequent ... even expected”?
That sounds quite miserable. If we don’t actively
prefer abortion, it seems that we too often have come
to accept that abortion is a necessary problem-solver,
whatever the cost. We’ve come to ignore or simply
erase life and its inherent dignity, its potential and
endless possibilities for redemption.
Americans have deep empathy for a woman who
finds herself in a difficult situation, and they want
to know that she’ll be safe. And so stories like the
recent one in El Salvador, where a woman sought an
abortion and wound up instead giving birth to a child
who could not survive on her own, or the tragic tale
of Savita Halappanavar, the Indian woman who died
in Ireland, get international attention. Savita, it was
claimed, died because she could not obtain an abor-
tion. In truth, the investigation made clear, she died
of an infection, and not because an abortion was not
performed on her.
This verdict did not receive as much press as her
death did, of course. All too often, we form opinions
without knowing the facts of the matter.
What is never made clear is that being pro-life
does not mean that a woman loses her right to life.
It is an abortion regime that insists that there are
not two patients in the equation: the mother and the
unborn child.
In arguing for what would become the right to
legal abortion, Weddington went on to say: “If the
pregnancy would result in the birth of a deformed or
defective child, she has no relief. Regardless of the
circumstances of conception, whether it was because
of rape, incest, whether she is extremely immature,
she has no relief.”
Marriage and babies can actually help mature
us! Great sacrificial experiences build character and
make heroes of everyday women and men. There’s
relief there, if we look for it. There is sacrifice but
there is also joy. What is the purpose of our lives,
anyway? With all our “progress” in medicating fertil-
ity, not only is it not foolproof, leading to heartache
and tremendous expense, we still die, after all.
Science, like life, has its limits. In facing our chal-
lenges, we can learn and live and love more fully.
Serrin Foster of Feminists for Life views
Weddington’s posture an unintentional betrayal of
women. “As her arguments for abortion before the
Supreme Court made clear, Weddington saw the
discrimination and other injustices faced by pregnant
women,” Foster says. “But she did not demand that
these injustices be remedied. Instead, she demanded
for women the ‘right’ to submit to these injustices by
destroying their pregnancies.”
Weddington, and the feminist movement that
has long embraced legal abortion, “discounted the
strength of women to overcome obstacles, and the
resolution of society to support mothers,” Foster
argues.
Supporting Andrew Cuomo’s “Women’s Equality
Act,” which, among other things, would allow
non-doctors to perform abortions in the state,
Weddington said: “New York was the state we looked
to. Around the country, women always said, ‘If you
can, just make it to New York ...’”
Real leadership would march us out of this
morass. Women deserve better than believing they
have a right to escape pregnancy through murder.
Women and men need support in embracing life in
all its challenges and fruitful operations.
Kathryn Lopez is the editor-at-large of National Review
Online www.nationalreview.com. She can be contacted
at klopez@nationalreview.com.
G
et a cheaper haircut or
various other salon services
from students at a beauty
school. Visit beautyschoolsdirectory.
com to find one close to you. Along
the same lines, you can find cheaper
dental services at dental schools
and auto repair at
vocational schools,
too. Quality isn’t com-
promised because
professional faculty
members are on-site.
The first reader tip
shares another ser-
vice you can find for
less:
Lower-cost chi-
ropractic care: After
putting it off for far
too long, I called the clinic associ-
ated with the chiropractic school
near me. A visit is $25, and I had five
X-rays for just $125. For people with
very low incomes, it can be free. It’s
a teaching facility, so I had a “real”
chiropractor, an intern and a student
all helping me. I feel 100 percent bet-
ter after just two treatments. -- R.N.,
Florida
Remove labels: I would like to
offer another idea for removing
gooey labels and other substances:
mineral spirits. I find that it quickly
and easily removes all sorts of sub-
stances, including the remaining wax
in a candleholder. I buy the unscent-
ed mineral spirits at the hardware
store. It never fails. You just have to
be sure to let the used rag or paper
towel dry out completely before put-
ting it in the trash, in order to avoid
a possible fire hazard. -- Janet Q.,
Arizona
A friend shared this with me years
ago and it does work well, espe-
cially on tricky surfaces with a label
attached. Use a hair dryer over the
label, making circular movements
over the whole thing. When you can
work an edge loose, gently pull up
and keep using the heat on the glue
side to loosen it bit by bit. Do be
careful of your fingertips, however.
-- Donna S., email
Coat with Best Foods mayo and
let stand at least 20 minutes. It
removes even what Goo Gone leaves
behind. -- Norma, email
Shine old wood furniture: Mix 3
parts oil to 1 part vinegar. Store in a
jar. Apply mixture to furniture with a
soft cloth. -- Sheri, Indiana
Chocolate stain on carpet: To
get the stain off of carpet, wet a Mr.
Clean Magic Eraser and rub on the
stain, then blot with a dry towel. --
Piney, email
Summer craft: Have kids draw
on wax paper with Sharpie mark-
ers of various colors. Hang their
work in the window. It’s bright and
colorful and looks like stained glass.
-- Marnie, Florida
Stain remover: I mix equal
amounts of automatic dishwasher
detergent (Cascade) and laundry
detergent together with the hottest
water the fabric can take in a big
bucket. I put all the clothes that need
stains removed in the bucket and let
them sit overnight. In the morning, I
just dump the whole bucket into the
washer and run it. Gets out all the
stains! -- Tracy, California
Spaghetti sauce on plastic: I used
Windex on a spaghetti sauce stain
on a plastic plate, and it took the red
color out almost immediately. I could
still see where it was, but after wash-
ing, it was completely gone. -- M.B.,
Wisconsin
Note from Sara: Sometimes a
denture-cleaning tablet like Efferdent
will work, too.
Sara Noel is the owner of Frugal
Village (www.frugalvillage.com), a
website that offers practical, money-
saving strategies for everyday living.
To send tips, comments or questions,
write to Sara Noel, c/o Universal
Uclick, 1130 Walnut Street, Kansas
City, MO, 64106, or email sara@fru-
galvillage.com.
Pay less at
learning centers
EDITORIAL CARTOON
L
ess than half a year into a term
representing south Arkansas,
Republican U.S. Rep. Tom Cotton
is turning into a hero among conservative
activists who view him as the best hope
for toppling the state’s lone Democratic
senator. Democrats, how-
ever, are just as eager to
take on a candidate they
believe they can cast as
too extreme.
The 36-year-old fresh-
man lawmaker is widely
viewed as the most likely
challenger to Democratic
U.S. Sen. Mark Pryor in
next year’s election, yet
he’s offered few clues on
his plans.
“I wouldn’t say I’m
really taking a look at
anything right now, just
because it’s so early in the campaign
cycle,” Cotton said last week. “I’m just try-
ing to focus on my legislative work here
and serving the people of Arkansas.”
Despite his reticence, Cotton is enjoy-
ing a higher profile nationally than
any of the state’s other Republicans in
Washington. From appearing on “Meet
the Press” to denouncing the Obama
administration’s counterterrorism efforts
on the House floor, Cotton has taken a
series of steps that leave many wondering
about his political future.
The steps include his proposal last
week to reduce the number of federal
appeals judges for the District of Columbia
circuit from 11 to eight. Cotton unveiled
the proposal — dubbed the “Stop Court
Packing Act” — the same day President
Barack Obama nominated three judges
to the circuit and challenged Senate
Republicans to confirm them.
“I think it’s pretty clear that the presi-
dent is trying to add three new judges to
the court because he’s worried they’re not
just a rubber stamp for his out of control
regulatory agenda,” Cotton said.
The move was the latest jab Cotton has
taken at the Obama administration. In
April, he criticized it from the House floor
for “failing in its mission to stop terrorism
before reaching its targets in the United
States” since the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.
Democrats roundly criticized the remarks,
saying he ignored post-9/11 incidents
under the Bush administration such as
mailing of anthrax-laced letters and the
attempted shoe bombing of an airliner in
2001.
Cotton’s also come under fire for a
recent proposal that would have extended
sanctions on Iranian human rights viola-
tors to their families — an idea that has
been criticized as eliminating due process.
Cotton, who withdrew the proposal, has
defended the idea and said it would only
apply to sanctions on Iranians — not any
American citizens.
“I’m very surprised the president’s own
party seems to be going soft on Iran,”
Cotton said.
One reason for Cotton’s appeal to con-
servative activists is that he’s not a fan
of understatement. When he joined with
House Republicans to vote for the federal
health overhaul’s repeal, he compared the
unsuccessful effort to defeat the law to
an ancient Roman senator’s ongoing call
to destroy Carthage. When Venezuelan
President Hugo Chavez died in March,
Cotton responded with “Sic semper tyran-
nis,” or Latin for “thus always to tyrants.”
John Wilkes Booth uttered the same after
assassinating President Lincoln.
The rhetoric and Cotton’s resume — a
Harvard-educated lawyer who served in
the Army in Iraq and Afghanistan — is
what’s prompting many within his party to
urge him to challenge Pryor.
“He’s a conservative. This is a conser-
vative state. I think he would represent
us well,” said Republican U.S. Rep. Tim
Griffin, who’s been publicly encouraging
Cotton to run. “He has shown he has the
political ability to put an effective cam-
paign together and to communicate effec-
tively. All of those things are important in
a political campaign. I think that he’d be
excellent.”
Griffin, who last year ruled out his own
run against Pryor, said he doesn’t know if
Cotton will run. But he added: “I wouldn’t
continue encouraging him if I thought I
was wasting my time.”
Cotton’s proposals and rhetoric are
just as encouraging to Democrats who
say they believe the freshman lawmaker
would be rejected as too ideologically
extreme in a statewide contest. With no
announced challenger against Pryor,
the Democratic Senatorial Campaign
Committee has already targeted Cotton
with a steady stream of news releases
portraying his stances on issues such as
health care and his sanctions proposal as
out of step with Arkansas.
Democrats also view the involvement
of conservative groups that are already
airing ads targeting Pryor more than 17
months away from the election as a sign
that Cotton’s in.
“He commands a lot of loyalty and a
lot of cash from special interests in D.C.
They’re clearly going to spend the cash
on his behalf,” said Matt Canter, DSCC’s
deputy director. “The problem for Tom
Cotton is his arrogance and his dangerous
positions on issues that matter to people.”
Analysis: Cotton
raises profile in
Washington D.C. Women deserve
better in life
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news@bentoncourier.com Monday, June 10, 2013
OpiniOn
Kathryn
Lopez
andrew
deMiLLo
ARKANSAS
PERSPECTIVE
Sara
noeL
Page 5 – The Saline Courier
sports@bentoncourier.com Monday, June 10, 2013
SportS
saline
scoreboard
June 10-13 in the High
School Gym from 9 a.m.
- noon. The camp is for
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basketball camp
american legion
TODAY
Ben. Sport Shop vs. Sheridan, 6
McClendon’s vs. Sheridan, 8 p.m
Black Sox vs. Russellville,5 and 7
TueSDAY
Benton everett at Cabot, 6 and 8
Bry. Sport Shop at NLR, 6 and 8
WeDNeSDAY
McClendon’s at Mt. Home Tourn.
THuRSDAY
Ben. Sport Shop at Ar Bapt., 6
Benton everett at Ar. Bapt., 8 pm
Black Sox at Jonesboro Tourn.
Bryant everett at Omaha Tourn.
fRiDAY
Ben. Sprt Shp vs. NLR, 6 p.m.
Benton everett vs. NLR, 8 p.m.
Bry. Sprt Shp vs. HS Vill, 6 and 8
SATuRDAY
Ben. Sprt Shop vs. Syl. Hills, 2&4
ATTENTION youth base-
ball and softball coaches in
Saline County. The Saline
Courier will be printing team
pictures on Sunday, June
30. If your team has not
sent pictures to The Saline
Courier, please send them
to tonylenahan@yahoo.
com by Tuesday, June 25.
You may also bring picture
to the Saline Courier to be
scanned. Please provide
players and coaches names,
team name, age group and
league.
saline county
youtH baseball/
softball team
pictures
The 1st Annual Cardinal
Fest Baseball Tournament
will be held on June 14-15
at the Haskell Ball Park.
There is a 3-game guaran-
tee format and is open to all
age groups (Tee ball, 7/8,
9/10, 14U and 16U) Entry
fee is $50, Little League
Rules, team and individual
awards will be presented.
Contact Brian Johnson
at 501-249-0530 or bjohn-
son1204@gmail.com to reg-
ister your team.
cardinal fest
baseball
mlb
TODAY
Boston at Tampa Bay, 6 p.m.
Angels at Baltimore, 6:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at Miami, 6:10 p.m.
Cincinnati at Cubs, 7:05 p.m.
Cleveland at Texas, 7:05 p.m.
Toronto at White Sox, 7:10 p.m.
Detroit at Kansas City, 7:10 p.m.
Arizona at Dodgers, 9:10 p.m.
Atlanta at San Diego, 9:10 p.m.
Houston at Seattle, 9:10 p.m.
TueSDAY
Angels at Baltimore, 6:05 p.m.
Giants at Pittsburgh, 6:05 p.m.
Boston at Tampa Bay, 6:10 p.m.
St. Louis at Mets, 6:10 p.m.
Milwaukee at Miami, 6:10 p.m.
Cleveland at Texas, 7:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at Cubs, 7:05 p.m.
Toronto at White Sox, 7:10 p.m.
Detroit at Kansas City, 7:10 p.m.
Philly at Minnesota, 7:10 p.m.
Wash. at Colorado, 7:40 p.m.
Yankees at Oakland, 9:05 p.m.
Arizona at Dodgers, 9:10 p.m.
Atlanta at San Diego, 9:10 p.m.
Houston at Seattle, 9:10 p.m.
TueSDAY
GAMe 3 (Series tied 1-1)
Miami at San Antonio, 8 p.m.
THuRSDAY
GAMe 4
Miami at San Antonio, 8 p.m.
nba finals
Sport Shop cleans
up act for 1st win
BENTON – It didn’t start
well for Benton Sport Shop,
but the team cleaned up
their play and ended up with
their first win of the season
in an 11-3 decision over
Malvern National Bank on
Saturday at Bernard Holland
Park.
Benton starter Jay Davies
walked the first four batters
of the game, the last one
resulting in the first run of
the game, but settled down
and ended up giving a very
solid performance. Davies
would get out of the inning
when Ethan Hendrix forced
a man out at home and
Davies would strike the next
two batters out to get out of
the inning.
“Davies pitched really well
and had to overcome some
early control problems,”
Sport Shop Assistant Coach
Steven Tew said.
Malvern would pick up
two more runs in the second
inning for the 3-0 lead, but
Davies’ strikeout to end the
top of the second would start
a string of six consecutive
strikeouts. Davies would fin-
ish giving up three runs on
four hits in 5.1 innings, walk-
ing five and striking out 10.
Sport Shop would get all
three of those runs back and
more in the bottom of the
third. Down 3-0, last-place
batter Austin Sheridan sin-
gled, Peyton Like sacrifice
bunted him to second base,
and Alex Wilcox scored
Sheridan with a double.
Jeffrey Storment would trade
places with Wilcox for an
RBI and 3-2 Benton deficit.
Benton would add three
TONY LENAHAN/The Saline Courier
Benton Sport Shop pitcher Jay Davies throws a pitch in an 11-3
win over Malvern on Saturday at Bernard Holland Park in Benton.
Davies struck out 10, including six in a row, and walked five in 5.1
innings for the win.
by tony lenahan
tlenahan@bentoncourier.com
BENTON, page 6
McClendon’s
win sloppy
battle 9-8
BENTON – It wasn’t
pretty, but the Benton
McClendon’s Appliances
came away with a 9-8 win
over Malvern National Bank
on Saturday at Bernard
Holland Park in Benton. It
was the first win of the sea-
son for Benton.
With the game tied at
8-apiece going into the bot-
tom of the seventh, Clay
Holicer hit a one-out, pinch-
hit single. He was courtesy
ran for and the pinch runner
went to second on a passed
ball. Malvern would walk the
bases loaded before Trey
Bishop hit the game-winning
sacrifice fly to centerfield.
“We didn’t play real well,”
McClendon’s Coach Brandon
Wake said. “We played
sloppy, didn’t swing the bat
by tony lenahan
tlenahan@bentoncourier.com
MCCLENDON’S, page 6
Rally Caps
Holliday’s slam powers Cards past Reds
CINCINNATI — The St.
Louis Cardinals passed two
tests with their first extra-
innning win of the season.
With the best offense in
the National League and the
second best team pitching
staff, the Cardinals have rare-
ly had to play from behind.
They erased a pair of two-run
deficits in a 10-inning, 11-4
win.
“We’ve has some of those
(extra inning) games go the
wrong way,” Cardinal man-
ager Mike Matheny said.
“There have been quite a few
times we’ve come back but
not all the way.”
Matt Holliday’s grand
slam capped a seven-run
10th inning to help the St.
Louis Cardinals beat the
Cincinnati Reds 11-4 on
Sunday night.
J.J. Hoover (0-5) walked
Allen Craig to lead off the
10th. One out later, David
Freese singled Craig to
second, extending his
career-best hitting streak
to 19 games, tied with San
Francisco’s Marco Scutaro
for the longest in the
National League this season.
Daniel Descalso followed
with his RBI double off the
left field wall. Matt Carpenter
added two insurance runs
with a bases-loaded single
No. 7 Arkansas takes 8th, 4x400 title
EUGENE, Ore. – The No.
7 University of Arkansas
women’s track and field
team capped its 2013 NCAA
Outdoor Championships
with the program’s first-ever
national title in the 4x400-
meter relay. The Razorbacks
finished the weekend in
eighth place overall with 30
points on the scoreboard.
Arkansas tallied three school-
record performances at the
national meet, two coming
Saturday in the 4x400-meter
relay and in the 3,000-meter
steeplechase by Grace
Heymsfield.
“I think that the idea that
you can have those types
of quality performances at
this meet at this point in
the season is a tribute not
only to the athlete but also
to the program as far as the
way the training has been
designed is to get them ulti-
mately ready,” Head Coach
Lance Harter said following
the meet. “We are getting
PR performances at the
right time of year which is a
confirmation to the staff that
our plan and program works
and it works in the right
format because it’s really
tough to have a peak indoors
and carry another outdoors
and add to that cross coun-
try. Most physiologists tell
you that you can’t do it, it’s
impossible, so maybe we
are defying some science,
but the end result speaks for
itself.”
With Saturday’s final
result, the Razorback women
now have five top-10 NCAA
finishes at the outdoor, and
the program’s first since the
2004 season.
Arkansas’ 30 points rep-
resents the program’s third-
highest NCAA total and the
most scored by a Razorback
team since a 31-point show-
ing in 2001. The NCAA title
in the 4x400-meter relay is
the program’s 15th national
event win overall, and fifth at
the outdoor meet.
In the final event of the
week, the 4x400-meter
relay team of Chrishuna
Williams, Sparkle McKnight,
Gwendolyn Flowers and
Regina George teamed up for
a school-record performance
worthy of the NCAA title it
produced. George took the
baton on the anchor leg and
surpassed Kendra Chambers
to anchor the Razorbacks to
a time of 3:27.09, knocking
more than a second off the
school record of 3:28.42 set
by the same foursome in
March at the Texas Relays.
Saturday’s showing
also made Arkansas the
seventh-fastest team out-
doors in collegiate his-
tory. The NCAA title is the
Razorbacks’ first outdoor
win since Aneita Denton won
at 800 meters at the 2005
NCAA Championships in
Sacramento, Calif. Flowers
and George win an NCAA
title in the final race of
their Razorback careers.
McKnight is a junior and
Williams is a sophomore.
Having threatened the
school record earlier this
season, Heymsfield finally
claimed the mark as her own
with a run of 9:57.18 in the
event final of the 3,000-meter
steeplechase. She finished
in seventh place in the race
to give Arkansas two team
points. The Razorback junior
is the first runner in program
history to dip below 10 min-
utes, replacing the previous
school mark of 10:01.52 set
by Lilli Kleinmann in 2001.
Heymsfield was making
her NCAA outdoor debut
appearance.,Stephanie Brown
earned the team’s first points
of the day with a sixth-place
finish in the event final of the
1,500 meters. The Razorback
junior established a new
personal best with her time
of 4:14.58 to secure three
points toward the team’s
total. With Saturday’s effort,
she eclipsed her previous
best by just .02 with the time
of 4:14.60 she ran earlier this
year at the Mt. SAC Relays.
It was Brown’s first NCAA
appearance at 1,500 meters.
A day after completing a
school-record performance
in the heptathlon, Makeba
Alcide was back on the
track with teammate Kirsten
Hesseltine for the high jump.
Alcide finished 12th overall
with a final clearance of
1.80m/5-10.75. In her NCAA
debut appearance, Hesseltine
established an outdoor PR
with a final clearance of
1.77m/5-9.75.
With the collegiate sea-
son now complete, several
Razorbacks will go on to
represent their countries this
summer at national meets
with hopes of qualifying for
the World Championships in
Moscow, Russia. The USA
Outdoor Track and Field
Championships will be con-
tested June 19-23 at Drake
Stadium in Des Moines,
Iowa.
special to the saline courier
AP
St. Louis superstar Matt Holliday turns on a pitch and drives it for a home run during a game earlier
this season. Holliday roped a grand slam in the 10th inning to help the Cardinals to a 11-4 win Sunday.
associated press
CARDINALS, page 6
Razorbacks
finish 3rd at
champ meet
EUGENE, Ore. – The No.
2 University of Arkansas
men’s track and field team
finished in third place at
the 2013 NCAA Outdoor
Championships, which came
to a conclusion Saturday
at Historic Hayward Field
in Eugene, Ore. The
Razorbacks finished the
four-day meet with 46.5
points and capped their
weekend with a national
runner-up finish in the
4x400-meter relay. The fin-
ish marked Arkansas’ high-
est NCAA outdoor finish
under fifth-year head coach
Chris Bucknam.
“I’m proud of my team
for the way they competed
today,” Bucknam said. “It
looked dim after Thursday
and we came back and did
a great job on Friday and
Saturday and that “Never
Yield” saying is what it’s all
about for us. We are going
to be back here and our
goal is to win an outdoor
national championship.
We think we have the ball
rolling for that and we are
going to keep trying.”
Coupled with its NCAA
finish outdoors, Arkansas
ends its 2012-13 campaign
with top-10 national finishes
from all three aspects of the
program. The Razorbacks
won the NCAA Indoor
Championships in March
for the program’s 41st over-
all national title, and last fall,
Arkansas ran to a 10th-place
finish at the NCAA Cross
special to the saline courier
HOGS, page 6
6 The Saline Courier
Monday, June 10, 2013
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good, the pitcher kept us
off-balance. I didn’t know
what the problem was. We
didn’t look real sharp, but we
finally got one under our belt
anyway.”
Jack James started for
Benton (1-5), left-hander
Hunter McDade went an
inning, Tyler Turbyfill went
part of an inning before
Bishop went the rest of the
way for the win.
Despite the game’s sloppi-
ness, Benton responded each
time Malvern scored match-
ing National Bank’s three in
the first. McClendon’s would
take a 4-3 lead after three
before Malvern tied it up at
4-4 in the top of the fourth.
Benton would lead 5-4 after
four and 6-5 after five before
Malvern took an 8-6 lead.
But Benton would respond
again, tying it up at the end
of six before Bishop’s game-
winner.
The McClendon’s will host
Sheridan on Monday night
at 8 p.m. at Bernard Holland
Park. Benton Sport Shop
plays at 6 p.m.
McClendon’s
From page 5
more to take a two-run lead
at 5-3.
Sport Shop would add
two in the fourth to take a
7-3 lead and blow the game
open in the sixth. Storment
walked to start the bottom of
the sixth and he would score
on Joe Reynolds’ triple.
After Hendrix was hit by a
pitch, Nick Murray knocked
Reynolds in with a single.
Davies’ double would score
two more for the final eight-
run win.
“A big difference between
today’s games and others
was our confidence level,
timely hits and our aggres-
sive level of play,” Tew said.
“Every aspect of the game
today we were aggressive
– on the base paths, up to
bat, on the mound and in
the field. It was a very nice
win and I hope we can build
off it.”
Storment went 3 for 3
with a double, two runs and
an RBI, Davies went 2 for 3
with 2 RBI, Reynolds went 1
for 1 with a triple and RBI,
Sheridan went 1 for 1 with a
run and Wilcox went 1 for 2
with a double, two runs and
a RBI.
Benton
From page 5
TONY LENAHAN/The Saline Courier
Benton Sport Shop first baseman Ethan Hendrix takes a lead from third base in Benton’s 11-3 win over
Malvern at Bernard Holland Park on Saturday. Sport Shop Head Coach Zach Sparks is to his right.
before Holliday hit his
homer — a 464-foot shot into
the left field seats off Curtis
Partch, who was making
his major league debut. The
homer was Holliday’s 10th of
the season.
“It’s hard not to be disap-
pointed,” Cincinnati manager
Dusty Baker said. “We have
a lead in the late innings. We
have to find a way to hold
them.”
“These guys are never out
of a ballgame,” said Arroyo,
who started and went six
innings before leaving after
his right leg stiffened up, the
result of getting smacked
on the knee by Descalso’s
sharp one-hopper to end
the fourth. “Against some
teams, when you lead, 4-2,
in the late innings, you feel
like the game’s over. This
team fights you — the whole
lineup. Every guy in the
lineup has a hitting streak.
It’s not easy to navigate nine
innings.”
Descalso was in the game
to give Pete Kozma a breath-
er but he’s managed some
big hits for St. Louis.
“Descalso has been hit-
ting the ball well,” Matheny
said. “It’s hard to do for a
guy who isn’t getting regular
at bats.”
His clutch hit put the
Cardinals on top for the first
time in the game.
“We haven’t had to come
back much this year,”
Descalso said. “Most of
these guys have been
around when we’ve had to
come back. I don’t hit many
that far, that way. I was just
hoping I got enough of it.”
Trevor Rosenthal (1-0)
had four strikeouts in two
perfect innings to get the
win. The victory meant
that the Cardinals have
now either won or split 13
straight series.
The Reds grabbed a quick
2-0 lead in the first. Shin-Soo
Choo led off with an oppo-
site-field double into the left-
field corner and moved to
third on Derrick Robinson’s
sacrifice bunt. After Joey
Votto walked, Brandon
Phillips nudged a half-swing
bloop single into short right
field to drive in Choo and
send Votto to third. Votto
scored on Jay Bruce’s sacri-
fice fly.
St. Louis tied it in the
fourth. Carlos Beltran led
off with his 14th home run
of the season, a 409-foot
blast to center field on a 3-1
pitch. Holliday followed with
a double and scored one
out later on Yadier Molina’s
opposite-field double into the
right-field corner.
A two-run fifth gave the
Reds a 4-2 lead. Choo led
off with a single to right and
Robinson was nicked by a
pitch while squaring to bunt.
Votto struck out and Choo
moved to third on Phillips’s
fly ball to center field before
Bruce lined a two-run double
into the right-field corner.
“I felt the first guy got on
every inning,” said Lance
Lynn, who would have tied
teammate Adam Wainright
for the team and league lead
in wins. “It was a grind. I
threw everything to Bruce. I
put the fastball inside where
I wanted but he got the bat
on it somehow. It was a
good piece of hitting.”
The Cardinals jumped all
over reliever Sam LeCure
to tie the score again in the
seventh. Jon Jay led off with
a single, his third hit of the
game, and went to third on
pinch-hitter Matt Adams’s
double to center that Choo
got a glove on but couldn’t
hold. Jay scored and pinch-
runner Shane Robinson went
to third on Carpenter’s sin-
gle. Beltran greeted reliever
Alfredo Simon with a game-
tying sacrifice fly.
Carpenter extended his
career-high hitting streak to
18 games.
Cardinals
From page 5
Country Championships in
Louisville, Ky. At the confer-
ence level, the Razorbacks
claimed its second-consecu-
tive SEC Triple Crown.
Arkansas’ first points
of the day came from its
4x100-meter relay team
of Caleb Cross, Jarrion
Lawson, Akheem Gauntlett
and Neil Braddy. The
Razorbacks passed the
baton around the track in
a time of 39.49, good for
fifth place and four points
toward the team’s total. The
foursome qualified for the
final with a season-best run
Wednesday of 39.25, the
No. 5 relay performance in
school history.
Braddy, Cross and
Gauntlett were back on
the track to close the meet
along with Anton Kokorin in
the 4x400-meter relay. The
Razorbacks posted a sec-
ond-place finish in the event
final with a season-best time
of 3:02.89 which moves the
relay quartet into fourth
place on the Arkansas
all-time performance list.
Saturday’s race marked just
the fourth time in school
history for a 4x400-meter
relay to dip below 3:03.
“I had six races this
weekend but I knew it had
to be done for us to contend
for a national champion-
ship,” Cross said following
the meet.
“It’s my senior year and
it’s what I had to do for the
team. We came close, but
I’m still glad about the way
it turned out. I’m just happy
to be a Razorback right
now.”
Kemoy Campbell was
the team’s lone individual
scorer Saturday, running
to a fifth-place finish in
the event final of the 5,000
meters. After three days of
watching the meet until his
race, Campbell added four
points to the team’s total
with a time of 13:47.70. The
finish is his second top-five
NCAA showing of the year
to go along with his runner-
up finish at 3,000 meters at
the NCAA indoor meet.
Senior Tarik Batchelor
completed his Razorback
career Saturday with
competition in the triple
jump. He was forced into
adjusting his technique—
jumping off the opposite
leg—to overcome an injury.
Batchelor finished the day
in 17th place overall with
a day’s best of 15.55m/51-
0.25.
With the collegiate
season now complete,
several Razorbacks will
go on to represent their
countries this summer at
national meets with hopes
of qualifying for the World
Championships in Moscow,
Russia.
The USA Outdoor Track
and Field Championships
will be contested June 19-23
at Drake Stadium in Des
Moines, Iowa.
1. Florida – 53
1. Texas A&M – 53
3. ARKANSAS – 46.5
4. Oregon – 44
5. USC – 42
6. Texas – 32
7. LSU – 27
8. Ole Miss – 24
9. Florida State – 22.5
10. Arizona – 20.5
Hogs
From page 5
TONY LENAHAN/The Saline Courier
Benton Sport Shop catcher Jeffrey Storment waits for a ball in Sport Shop’s 11-3 win over Malvern at
Bernard Holland Park on Saturday. Storment led Benton at the plate going 3 for 3 with an RBI and two
runs scored.
Monday, June 10, 2013
The Saline Courier 7
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Junk hauling
Decks
Flower Bed
clean out
Block
Stump Grinding
Leaf Blowing
Painting
Any Yard Work!
FREE
ESTIMATES!
Owner
Deanna Massey
One Call Does It
All Lawncare!
501-326-2839
and ask for
Damon Massey
Home Inspections
Diamond R
Home Inspections
Russell Richmond
diamondrhomeinspections
@gmail.com
501-362-8160
mention ad for discount
Horses
Clinic’s Certified
HOLTZMAN
Riding Academy, LLC
BIRTHDAY PARTIES
10 & UNDER
SUMMER HORSE CAMP
316-1141
House Leveling
HOUSE
Leveling/Foundation
REPAIR
Concrete Foundations
or Pier & Beam
• Shaky floors
• Rotten wood
• Cracked brick
• French drains, etc.
~ Free Estimates ~
501-304-2040
Insulation
Southern
Southern
INSULATION &
GUTTERS, Inc.
INSULATION &
GUTTERS, Inc.
INSULATION &
GUTTERS, Inc.
INSULATION &
GUTTERS, Inc.
Family Owned & Operated
for 33 Years
ª Residential & Commercial
ª Seamless ßutters
ª Leal Frool System
ª Fiberqlass, Batts & Blown
ª Stabili/ed Cellulose
ª ínsulation Removal
FREE ESTIMATES
Licensed - ínsured - Bonded
FINANCING AVAILABLE
315-2306
Toll Free. 888·278·7GOG
Landscaping
L.W. Lawn &
Landscaping
SERVICES, LLC
501-350-9137
870-942-9641
But my God shall supply all your needs according
to his riches in glory by Christ Jesus. Phil. 4:19
Call
Today!
Located in Bryant
Lawn Maintenance, Trimming,
Sprinkler Installation, French
Drains, Shrub & Tree Pruning,
Leaf Removal, Landscaping,
Gutter Maintenance and more
www.lwlawnandlandscaping.com
lwlawnandlandscaping@yahoo.com
VETERAN & SENIOR
DISCOUNT
Lawn Care
Richard
May’s
Lawn Care
10 years Local
Experience
Average yard:
Cut & Weed
Eat $25-$30
317-8966
316-6655
Flawless
Lawns
Flawless
Lawns
Spring Clean-Up
Leaves, Beds & Mulch
Mowing, Trimming, Edging
Odd Jobs and Light Hauling
Ryan Harmon 860-8789
Mark 8:36
Classifieds Work!
Painting
SUPERIOR
PAINTING
• Residential & Small
Commercial
• Drywall Finish
& Repair
• Interior & Exterior
• Texture
• Pressure Washing
INSURED
Kelly Hill – Owner
501-316-3328
501-840-1470
Experienced
Painter
NEEDS WORK
Call Phil 249-1657
leave message
Interior & Exterior
30 yrs experience
All types of Home Maintenance
SCHAY PAINTING CO
Interior/Exterior
20 Years Experience
References Provided
Steve Schay
501-425-4492
Pet Care
Absolute
All breed mobile
dog grooming
501.732.6850
Kim McWhirter
kimmcwhirter
@ymail.com
SEEK AND YOU
SHALL FIND
Great deals in the
Courier Classifieds.
Yard Sales, Jobs,
Homes for Sale or
Rent. Check them out
daily. Call to sub-
scribe at 315-8228.
Classifieds Work!
Pressure Washing
Royal
Flush
Servicing
Central Arkansas
since 1988
316-1536
Pressure Wash & Seal
specializing in
!"#$%&'&()(*""+
,-#./(0(1'&&/(1-+-#2
3-/+&4(0(*5'&%(1'5-#6
JG’s
Pressure Wash & More
Deck Repair
Fences
Gutter Cleaning
Lawn Service
and More
501-249-4715
Roofng
ROOFING
Wagner
Residential
Commercial
&
VOTED
“Best of the Best”
2009
Free Estimates
847-6630
K & L
ROOFING
• Don’t Wait For
Roofing Repair
• All Insurance
Claims Welcome
• 40 years exp.
• Financing Avail.
w/approved credit
Upgrade to a metal roof with
a class 4 fire rating & you
may qualify for a discount on
your homeowners insurance
501-249-7735
501-778-7600
210 W. SEVIER
ST. • BENTON
Looking for love in all
the wrong places????
Check out the Freebie
section in today!s
classifieds. You will
fi nd uncondi ti onal
love there FREE!
Furry & Free!!
Buy • Sell • Trade
in the Classifieds
Tree Service
M00ߣ
ñFF0ßßñ8l£
Tߣ£ 5£ß¥l8£
501-778-8071
501-860-5911
28-Years
Experience
Insured &
Licensed
*Stump Grinding
*Take Downs
*Trimming
*Pruning
*Storm Cleanup
Parsons & Son
Tree Service LLC
“The Total Package”
Call us about
Tree Health Care
º 1rinning
º 1ake Lowns
º Pruning
º Renovals
º Stunp Renoval
º lirewood
º Oreen vaste lauling
Conplete
lnsuranoe Coverage
Owned 8 Operated
by an
lSA Lioensed Arborist
SO·L"PGA
840-1436
602-2959
CRITES
& TACKETT
TREE SERVICE
~ Free Estimates ~
Workman's Comp
& Liability Insured
•Stump Removal
501-337–1565
501-337-9094
Ready to graduate
from particle board?
1000!s of Courier
Classifieds will read
your ad daily. Call
Mary or Shawna to
place your ad today!
Tree Service
501.317.6788
ROCKIN B
TREE SERVICE
B
TRIMMING
PRUNING
STUMP GRINDING
REMOVALS
large & small
FREE ESTIMATES
Insured for
Your Protection
Excellent Clean up
Senior and
Military Discounts
available
Want to Downsize
Your Gas Guzzler?
Sell it in the Courier
Classifieds. Call to
place your ad today!
315-8228
Ready to take the
Real Estate Plunge?
Check out the Homes
for Sale in the Classi-
fieds daily.
Time to get your own
place? Check out the
Rental Section in to-
day!s Classifieds...
Using the Courier
Classifieds is just a
smart thing to do!
Subscribe Today!!!
Classifieds Work!
Check out the
Garage Sales
this week!
Service Directory
this legendary group has
made around 105 recordings
and attained a following of
devoted listeners, including
the late Elvis Presley.
The Florida Boys appear
weekly on the Great
American Gospel television
show, which airs at 4 p.m.
Friday and Saturday on the
DayStar network and at 8:30
p.m. Saturday on KVTV.
Florida Boys manager
Charlie Waller stated, “We
do a variety of songs every-
one seems to enjoy. Benton
is one of our favorite places
to perform. Arkansas folks
are just great to sing to.
“We are proud to have
our predecessor and gospel
music legend, Les Beasley,
joining us on this tour,” he
said. “Les lived in Bauxite
as a boy while his father
pastored a church there. He
is now 84 and enjoys see-
ing his many friends he has
gained over the years.”
Special guests on the
show will be the clas-
sic Melody Boys (Gerald
Williams, Doug Cramer,
Jonathan Sawrie and Mike
Franklin).
Show time is 7 p.m.
Advance tickets are avail-
able at Finley Pharmacy and
all Big Red stores in Saline
County. Tickets also may be
purchased at the door. For
more information, call 864-
421-3889.
Florida Boys
From page 1
STOP! HAMMER TIME
MARIBETH BUECHE/The Saline Courier
Realtors from Coldwell Bankers in Bryant have hammers in hand for the Arkansas Realtors build that
took place Friday at Habitat’s Partnerhip Village in Benton. From left, in the top row, are Patti Airoldi,
Paulette Richie, Ava Brown and Tonya Smith; bottom row, Johnnie Wynn, Andrea Morehead, Susan
Sumners and Brooke Sandlin.This was the 56th home to be built in the village.
S&P upgrades United States
outlook, investors yawn
NEW YORK — A better
outlook for the U.S. govern-
ment’s credit rating did
little to impress investors
Monday.
The U.S. stock market
edged higher in early trading
Monday after the Standard &
Poor’s ratings agency raised
its outlook for U.S. govern-
ment debt and predicted an
improving economy. Stocks
rose in the first 15 minutes
after trading opened at 9:30
a.m. Eastern Daylight Time,
then moved between small
gains and losses. By 10 a.m.,
all the major U.S. indexes
were down.
The S&P Ratings Service
had downgraded the U.S.
government’s long-term
credit rating in 2011 because
of a contentious fight in
Congress over raising gov-
ernment spending limits.
The downgrade, an embar-
rassment to the U.S., also
sent the stock market into
a tailspin. The Dow Jones
industrial average plunged
634 points, or more than 5
percent, on the first trading
day after the downgrade.
The market suffered through
big triple-digit swings for the
rest of the fall.
On Monday, S&P upgrad-
ed its outlook on the U.S.
debt rating to “Stable” from
“Negative.” It said that the
U.S. economy has started
to improve. The agency
cited the budget deal that
Congress brokered late last
year, which is meant to raise
tax revenue and cut govern-
ment spending.
The Dow Jones industrial
average was down 36 points
at 15,211, a loss of 0.1 per-
cent, as of 10:15 a.m. The
S&P 500 index was down
four to 1,639. The Nasdaq
composite index was down
three to 3,466.
The yield on the 10-year
Treasury note rose to 2.20
percent from 2.18 percent
late Friday. In commodities
trading, the price of crude
oil fell 28 cents to $95.75 and
gold edged up 30 cents to
$1,383 an ounce.
On a day short on U.S.
economic news, the S&P
upgrade was the center of
traders’ attention. There
were no major government
reports on the U.S. economy,
and no big companies
announced earnings.
Outside the U.S., Japan’s
Nikkei stock index soared
5 percent after a report that
the world’s No. 3 economy
is growing faster than
expected. But there were
also reminders that the
global economy is far from
cured. In the Netherlands,
the central bank warned that
the government needs to cut
spending.
Associated Press
Classifieds
Announcements
Health Services
2x2 ad
Employment
We are seeking dynamic, aggressive
salespeople with a stable work history,
to be part of our team in a fast-paced
work environment. B2B or media sales
experience is a plus.
If you can. . .
•achievemonthlysalesgoals
•workprofessionallywithclients
•enjoyprospectingandcoldcalling
•haveexcellentoralandwrittenskills
•canresolveproblemseffciently
You may be the one we’re looking for!
We offer base account list in central Arkansas,
base salary, plus commission, frequent bonus
plans, 401k available, health insurance, vacation
and sick leave.
Saline County’S newS SourCe SinCe 1876
Courier
The Saline
Please forward resume to: The Saline Courier
P.O. Box 207, Benton, AR 72018
fax to 501-315-1920 or email to:
dwills@bentoncourier.com
Advertising
Account
Executive
Employment
Alternative Community Services – Waiver
Direct Care Worker
job opening in the Benton area for full-time
energetic and skilled person to work with individual
with disabilities. Experience a must.
Competitive Salary and Benefits, including paid
leave, health and dental insurance, and retirement
We are an Equal Opportunity Employer
United Cerebral Palsy
9720 N. Rodney Parham • Little Rock, AR • 72227
E-mail resumes to hr@ucpcark.org,
fax to (501) 228-3849 or
submit application online at www.ucpark.org
Miscellaneous
For Rent
Tired of
High Cable Bills?
$19
99
$19
99
Garage Sales
3BR2BA, 5764 John
Hancock, Benton, Ga-
rage $1,100mo + dep,
317-2092 / 249-1343.
EARLY BIRD SANITATION
Once a week pick up
+ Rolloff Dumpsters
332-7202 • 840-6758
• 778-3969
I BUY JUNK CARS
Announcements
ALL LADIES Are In-
v i t e d T o A t t e n d A
W o m e n !s U n l i m i t e d
B i b l e S t u d y o n E s -
ther/Ruth for the sum-
m e r a t P a r k p l a c e
Baptist Church in Bry-
a n t W e d . E v e n i n g s
6 : 3 0 - 7 : 3 0 b e g i n n i n g
June 12t h. Chi l dcar e
i s a v a i l a b l e P l e a s e
call 501-653-0088
Diabetic Test Strips
WANTED
We Buy
Most Brands.
Pay Up To
$20/box.
Fast and Honest.
1-800-979-8220
5 Box Minimum • Unexpired Only
www.QuickCash4TestStrips.com
DIVORCE WITH or
w i t h o u t c h i l d r e n
$ 1 2 5 . 0 0 . I n c l u d e s
n a m e c h a n g e a n d
p r o p e r t y s e t t l e m e n t
a g r e e m e n t . S A V E
h u n d r e d s . F a s t a n d
Easy. Call 1-888-733-
7165, 24/7.
Adoption
ADOPTION IS a
brave choi ce f or you;
w e o f f e r y o u r n e w -
born secure & forever
love. Exp. Pd. Jenni &
Sean-1-888-502-8316
UNPLANNED PREG-
NANCY? THI NKI NG
O F A D O P T I O N ?
Open or closed adop-
tion. YOU choose the
f a m i l y L I V I N G E X -
P E N S E S P A I D . A b -
b y !s O n e T r u e G i f t
Adopt i ons Cal l 24/ 7.
1-866-459-3371
Personal
MEET SINGLES right
now! No pai d oper a-
t or s, j ust r eal peopl e
l i k e y o u . B r o w s e
g r e e t i n g s , e x c h a n g e
me s s a g e s a n d c o n -
nect l i ve. Tr y i t f r ee.
C a l l n o w
1-877-939-9299
Looking for love in all
the wrong places????
Check out the Freebie
section in today!s
classifieds. You will
fi nd uncondi ti onal
love there FREE!
Furry & Free!!
Personal
MEET SINGLES right
now! No pai d oper a-
t or s, j ust r eal peopl e
l i k e y o u . B r o w s e
g r e e t i n g s , e x c h a n g e
me s s a g e s a n d c o n -
nect l i ve. Tr y i t f r ee.
C a l l n o w
1-800-275-7212
MEET SINGLES right
now! No pai d oper a-
t or s, j ust r eal peopl e
l i k e y o u . B r o w s e
g r e e t i n g s , e x c h a n g e
me s s a g e s a n d c o n -
nect l i ve. Try i t f ree.
C a l l n o w :
1-800-247-9958
Employment
AIRLINE CAREERS
begi n here - Become
a n A v i a t i o n M a i n t e -
nance Tech. FAA ap-
p r o v e d t r a i n i n g . F i -
nancial aid if qualified
H o u s i n g a v a i l a b l e .
Job pl acement assi s-
t a n c e . C a l l A I M
877-424-4177.
ATTN: DRIVERS!
A P P L Y N O W ! 1 3
D r i v e r s N e e d e d I m-
me d i a t e l y ! T o p 5 %
Pay & GREAT Bene-
fits! Class A CDL Re-
quired, 877-258-8782,
www.drive4melton.com
BUS DRIVER - Glen
Ro s e Sc h o o l Di s t r i c t
i s ac c ept i ng appl i c a-
t i ons f or bus dr i ver s.
P r e f e r v a l i d CDL l i -
cense with school bus
endorsement, but wi l l
train. Application can
b e p r i n t e d f r o m o u r
website,
www.grbeavers.org .
For more information,
c o n t a c t R o n L o y
5 0 1 - 3 3 2 - 6 6 4 2 o r f a x
a p p l i c a t i o n t o
501-332-3031.
COMMERCIAL/RES
EDENTIAL Over-
head Door Installer
needed. MUST have
experience and good
driving record! Call
501-315-9800
COOKS & DISH-
WASHER needed.
B r y a n t r e s t a u r a n t .
E x p . p e r s o n o n l y
n e e d a p p l y . R i c k
813-4423
DENTAL ASSI S-
TANT Needed Min. 2
y r s . e x p . E - Ma i l r e -
s u m e t o i n f o @
strongdds.com
Heartland
Rehabilitation
Dietary Aide
DayShift
No Phone Calls Please
Fax or Apply in Person
19701 I-30
Benton, AR 72015
FAX 501-778-9652
HELP WANTED!!!
Make $1000 weekly
m a i l i n g b r o c h u r e s
f r om HOME! NO ex-
p e r i e n c e r e q u i r e d -
Start Immediately!
www.TheMailingHub.com
Employment
DIRECTOR OF Nurs-
i ng Ser v i c es needed
a t G o o d S a m a r i t a n
Society in Hot Springs
Village.! Qualified ap-
p l i c a n t s m u s t h a v e
c u r r e n t R N l i c e n s e
a n d 5 y e a r s o f
l o n g - t e r m c a r e a n d
ma n a g e me n t e x p e r i -
ence in a skilled nurs-
i ng f aci l i t y. ! Thi s i s a
f ul l - t i me, sal ar i ed po-
sition with a full bene-
fits package including
child care, fitness and
corporate discounts.
DRIVERS-CRST of-
f e r s t h e Be s t L e a s e
P u r c h a s e P r o g r a m !
S I G N O N B O N U S .
No Down Payment or
Cr e d i t Ch e c k . Gr e a t
Pay. Class-A CDL re-
quired. Owner Opera-
t o r s We l c o me ! C a l l :
866-261-6532.
EXP. TRACTOR /
TRAILER DRIVERS -
w i / X e n d o r s e m e n t s ,
a b l e t o p a s s D O T /
p h y s i c a l / d r u g t e s t .
St abl e j ob, l ocal dri v-
i n g , g o o d p a y a n d
b e n e f i t s . A p p l y i n
person Mon.-Fri. 9 am
- 3 pm or call toll free
877-849-1982. Local
501-569-9999. Appli-
cations can be down-
loaded at www.stam-
pede-trans.com,
St a mp e d e T r a n s p o r -
t at i on, LLC 2301 W.
60th St. LR, Ar 72209
Ful l - Ti me LPN
needed at Good Sa-
m a r i t a n i n H o t
Spri ngs Vi l l age, ni ght
s h i f t ( 1 0 : 3 0 P M t o
7 : 0 0 A M) . We o f f e r
c o mp e t i t i v e p a y a n d
f ul l benef i t s i ncl udi ng
h e a l t h , d e n t a l , PT O,
f l e x i b l e s p e n d i n g ,
d a y c a r e a n d c o r p o -
r at e di scount s. Appl y
o n l i n e a t
good-sam.com EEOE
HEARTLAND
REHABILITATION
FT CNA Mon- Fri 3-11
PT CNA 11-7 & 7-3
No Phone Calls Please
Fax or Apply in Person
19701 I-30 Benton, AR
FAX 501-778-9652
MEDICARE CASE
Mg r / R N n e e d e d a t
Good Samaritan Soci-
ety in Hot Springs Vil-
l a g e , f u l l - t i m e , d a y
s hi f t . !Previous l ong -
t erm care experi ence
pr ef er r ed. ! Thi s posi -
t i o n wi l l mo n i t o r t h e
r esi dent f r om admi s-
sion to discharge. We
of f er compet i t i ve pay
a n d f u l l b e n e f i t s i n -
cluding health, dental,
P T O, f l e x s p e n d i n g ,
d a y c a r e a n d c o r p o -
rate discounts.! Apply
o n l i n e a t
good-sam.com EEOE
PART-TIME House-
keeper needed. Must
p a s s d r u g t e s t , a n d
wo r k we e k e n d s . Ap-
p l y i n p e r s o n : B e s t
Western in Benton.
Employment
NOW HIRING- Com-
p a n i e s D e s p e r a t e l y
N e e d E mp l o y e e s t o
Assemble Products at
Home. No selling, any
h o u r s . $ 5 0 0 w e e k l y
p o t e n t i a l . I n f o .
1-985-646-1700
DEPT. AR-2270.
Cleo’s Furniture
SALES ASSOCIATE
Arkansas’ fastest growing furniture
company with over 25 years in the
business is looking to fll a sales
position in our Benton location.
LIFTING AND MOVING
FURNITURE IS REQUIRED
Health and Life Insurance,
Retirement, Vacations,
No Sundays, Excellent Pay,
Advancement Available
Must apply in person Monday thru
Friday 10:00 am to 6:00pm
201 N. Main St. Benton, AR
TRUCK DRIVERS
Wanted Best Pay and
H o m e T i m e ! A p p l y
O n l i n e T o d a y o v e r
750 Compani es! One
Application, Hundreds
of Offers!
www.HammerLaneJobs.com
Employment
Wanted
SUMMER JOB f or
teenage boy. Mowi ng
only Small to medium
lawn Contact Number
1 - 5 0 1 - 4 0 8 - 9 3 5 1 o r
1-501-909-3520
Instruction
A T T E N D C O L L E G E
O n l i n e f r o m H o m e .
*Medical, *Business,
* C r i m i n a l J u s t i c e ,
* H o s p i t a l i t y J o b
placement assistance
Comput er and Fi nan-
c i a l A i d i f q u a l i f i e d .
SCHEV authorized.
Ca l l 1 - 8 0 0 - 5 0 9 - 5 0 8 5
www.CenturaOnline.com
X-RAY MEDI CAL
TECHNICIAN®
M E D I C A L A S S I S -
T A N T T r a i n i n g –
www.changelives.co
m, 1- 800- 449- 4802,
1309 Forge Rd, LR, *
www.bls.gov/ooh/heal
thcare/medical-assis-
t a n t s . h t m, F o r l o c a l -
i zed empl oyment and
wages:
www. bl s . gov / oes For
i m p o r t a n t p r o g r a m
i n f o , p l e a s e v i s i t
www.heritage-educa-
tion.com/disclosures
ABHES Ac c r e d i t e d ,
Li c . by SBPCE | Fi -
nanci al Ai d for Those
who Qualify
Child Care
IN-HOME DAYCARE
Spotless - Non-smoking
Drop-ins Welcome!
778-2920
LICENSED CHILDCARE
Infants to 5
Mon. Fri. Vouchers
562-0691 • 951-2923
LICENSED CHILDCARE
Infants to 8 B •L• S
Vouchers • Drop-Ins
562-0691 • 951-2923
Time to get your own
place? Check out the
Rental Section in to-
day!s Classifieds...
Services
*REDUCE YOUR CA-
B L E B I L L ! G e t a
4 - R o o m A l l - D i g i t a l
S a t e l l i t e s y s t e m i n -
s t a l l e d F R E E P r o -
gr ammi ng st ar t i ng at
$ 2 4 . 9 9 / m o . F R E E
HD/ DVR Up g r a d e t o
new callers, SO CALL
NOW (800) 799-4935
WELL WATER -
Tr eat ment Sof t eni ng,
I r o n R e m o v a l , R e -
verse Osmosis, Drink-
i n g w a t e r s y s t e m s ,
O d o r r e m o v a l ,
( 5 0 1 ) - 7 5 3 - 5 2 3 6 , A r -
kansasSoftWater.com
, Since 1962.
Apartments
Unfurnished
1 BR APT. $400 mo.,
$100 Dep. Cal l ( 501)
303-8166 / 909-9240
1 BR, 1 BA apartment
$300 mo. w/deposit, 6
m o . l e a s e r e q u i r e d .
Call 778-3324.
1BR 1BA Ki t appl i -
ances W/D $425mo +
$ 2 0 0 d e p , 3 1 5 - 9 3 3 7
b e t w e e n 9 a - 8 p , N o
Pets!
2 BR Apts, kit. appl.,
W&D conn. , $500 &
up. Handicap access.
317-5190 / 317-5192
2 BR, 1 B A , k i t c h .
a p p l . , W / D c o n n . ,
$500 mo. , $250 dep.
C a l l b e t w e e n 9 a m -
8pm, (501)315-9337
HURRY
CALL NOW!
Super clean, well
maintained 1 & 2 BR
Apts Starting @ $450
Ready for move-in,
Castle Properties
Call Connie
501-626-4596
315-4900
SUMMERWOOD
APARTMENTS
COUNTRY OAKS
DUPLEXES
• Pool & Park
• All units available
with or without full
size washer & dryer
• Pets welcome with
limitations
• On-site Management
justinproperties.com
Silica Heights off Hwy 183
Edison Ave. & Cole Dr.
3200 Congo Road
Let the
Courier Classifieds
work for you.
Call Mary or Shawna
to place your
Classified Ad.
Mon.-Fri. 8am-5pm
315-8228
or come by
321 N. Market St.
Apartments
Unfurnished
CAMRY COURT
Now Open
in Bryant
New Construction
2 BR, 2 BA or 2.5 BA
off Wilkerson Rd.
on Sadie Dr.
(By Hill Farm Elem.)
Call Terri the on-site
manager for appt.
501-804-0125
Bldg. 1225 #2
or call Dale King
501-539-1935
Visit our web-site
www.arkansas
apartments.net
NOTICE: All real es-
tate advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to the Fair Housing
Act which makes it il-
legal to advertise any
preference, limitation
or di scr i mi nat i on
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or in-
tention to make any
such preference. We
will not knowingly ac-
cept any advertising
for real estate which
is in violation of the
law. All persons are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis.
Houses for Rent
2 BR 1 BA, 1 car Ga-
r a g e 4 y r s . o l d
$ 7 5 0 m o + D e p
607-3229 /414-6430
Houses for Rent
2 BR, 1 BA w/garage,
Orleans Court, Ben-
ton. 501-672-0407 or
affordablepropertiesar.com
2 BR, 1 BA, f enc ed
back yard, 2 car car -
por t . $650 mo. $500
dep. 501-317-7536
3 & 4 BEDROOM
$ 8 2 5 - $ 1 4 0 0 m o . ,
H a s k e l l , B e n t o n &
Bryant. 315-9370
3 BR, 1 ba , CH/ A,
kitchen appli.$675 mo
+ $ 5 0 0 d e p . 1 5 0 2
Sorrell. 612-8848
3 BR, 2 ba, 2 car gar.,
Bryant Schools.
$1250 mth, $1250
dep. 501-317-0422
4 BR, 2 bath, stai ned
concrete fl oors, 2 car
g a r a g e , g r e a t l o c a -
ti on, Benton School s.
F o r m o r e i n f o .
501-778-4402
519 PEARSON 2Br
1 B A $ 6 2 5 mo + 4 0 0
D e p . N o P e t s
326-3907
Eagle Properties
LLC
315–2075
Nice 2 & 3 BR Homes
from $500 to $925
Apartments
1 BR’s from $415
2 BR’s from $475
*based on availability
Deposit & References
Required
eaglepropsaline.com
FOR LEASE/SALE
New 3 & 4 BR, 2 BA,
brick, FP, ceiling fans,
car pet , 2 car gar age,
patio. Go to: www.
catalyst-residential.com
or 501-697-6342
HOUSE FOR Leas e
2Br Mid-Town Benton
C a l l 3 1 5 - 9 4 2 2 B i l l
Barlow
HOUSE FOR RENT 3
br, 2 ba, 2 car garage.
$950mo + $950 dep.
Call 317-0422
IN BRYANT 3 Br 2
Full Baths Double Car
Garage Fenced Back-
y a r d $ 9 5 0 m o + D e p .
Call 501-315-4110
Mobile Homes
For Rent
2 BR, 1 BA, Q u i e t
park, Benton Schools.
N o P e t s ! C a l l a n y -
time. 501-315-1281
MOBILE HOME: 3br
1 3 / 4 b a . S t o r a g e .
N O P E T S . L a r g e
yard, rural area. !Glen
Ros e s c hool s . ! $390
p l u s d e p . ! 249-1084
or 776-1105
Business Property
For Rent
FOR RENT O f f i c e
S p a c e a v a i l a b l e i n
D o w n t o w n B e n t o n .
501-580-0358
Miscellaneous
For Rent
*REDUCE YOUR CA-
B L E B I L L ! G e t a
4 - R o o m A l l - D i g i t a l
S a t e l l i t e s y s t e m i n -
s t a l l e d F R E E P r o -
gr ammi ng st ar t i ng at
$ 2 4 . 9 9 / m o . F R E E
HD/ DVR Up g r a d e t o
new callers, SO CALL
NOW (800) 795-6129
Using the Courier
Classifieds is just a
smart thing to do!
Subscribe Today!!!
Miscellaneous
For Sale
DISH TV R e t a i l e r -
S t a r t i n g a t
1 9 . 9 9 / mo n t h ( f o r 1 2
mos . ) & Hi gh Speed
I n t e r n e t s t a r t i n g a t
$14. 95/ mont h ( wher e
available.) SAVE! Ask
About SAME DAY In-
stallation! CALL Now!
1-800-316-5180.
FOR SALE: Yamaha
alto saxophone.
Excellent condition.
With hard & soft car-
rying case. $395.
501-315-8228, leave
message.
NEED A Weedeat er?
Lewis Lumber &
Supply Benton,Ar
Musical
Merchandise
Cushing
Piano Service
Tune • Repair
Player Pianos & Pump Organs
778-6584
Yamaha Alto
Saxophone
Excellent condition
With hard & soft
carrying case $395
501-315-8228
leave message
Pets & Supplies
BENTON ANIMAL
Control & Adoption
501-776-5972
benton.petfinder.com
BRYANT ANIMAL
Control & Adoption
www.bryant.petfinder.com
www.1-800-save-a-pet.com
www.1888pets911.org
Heavy Equip-
SURPLUS EQUIP-
MENT. On l i n e a u c -
tions HUGE selection.
B I G s a v i n g s . N O
Buyer fees Low Seller
f e e s B A R G A I N S !
R e g i s t e r F R E E U s e
Promo Code cnhi313.
LIVE support.
www.SurplusOnThe.NET
334-215-3019
Autos Wanted
C A $ H F O R
CARS/ TRUCKS: Get
A T o p D o l l a r I N -
S T A N T O f f e r ! R u n -
n i n g o r N o t . D a m -
aged? Wrecked? OK!
W e P a y U p T o
$ 2 0 , 0 0 0 ! C a l l T o l l
Free: 1-800-871-9712
Houses For Sale
BENTON, 1926 Fal -
con Way, 1640 sf , 3
BR, 2 BA, new t hr u-
o u t w / c r o w n t i l e &
l a m i n a t e . $ 1 2 8 , 9 0 0
501-804-9125
Mobile Homes
For Sale
$$$ 0 DOWN $$$
with your Land!
Call 501-653-3201
DOUBLEWIDE ON
L A N D C A L L F O R
MORE I NFORMA-
TION 501-407-9500
Looking for a good
deal? Search the
Courier Classifieds!!
Mobile Homes
For Sale
FORECLOSED
DOUBLEWIDE on
Private Lot. Great
Schools, Great
Location, must sell!
501-653-3201
NEW 4 BR 2 BA
Home $39K includes
delivery to your prop-
erty. Call for Quick
Approval 653-3202
Lots & Acreage
10 ACRES with 1400
ft. footage on Hwy. 70
West between Benton
& Hot Spr i ngs Smal l
s p r i n g f e d s t r e a m
O w n e r w i l l f i n a n c e
G o s l e e R e a l t y C a l l
501-321-1213
20 ACRES F R E E !
Buy 40-Get 60 Acres.
$ 0 - D o w n $ 1 9 8 / m o .
Money Back Guaran-
t e e , N O C R E D I T
C H E C K S B e a u t i f u l
V i e w s . R o a d s / S u r -
veyed. Near El Paso,
Texas.
1-800-843-7537
www.sunsetranches.com
40 ACRES of Timber-
land near Crow!s Sta-
tion 580-0358
Business Property
For Sale
F O R S A L E !
B O O T / S H O E R E -
P A I R S H O P A l l
Equip. & Inventory In-
c l uded Es t . f or Ov er
3 0 y r s i n Bi g Sp r i n g ,
T X . O n l y S h o p i n
A r e a w / B o o m i n g
E c o n o m y S t a n l e y :
432-267-2963
Real Estate
CANCEL YOUR
T I M E S H A R E . N O
Ri s k Pr o g r a m STOP
Mo r t g a g e & Ma i n t e -
nance Payment s To-
d a y . 1 0 0 % M o n e y
B a c k G u a r a n t e e .
FREE Consultation.
C a l l U s N O W . W e
C a n H e l p
1-888-356-5248
Legal Notices
PUBLIC HEARING
NOTICE:
Sal i ne County on be-
hal f of t he East End
Communi t y i nvi t es i t s
ci t i zens and ot her i n-
terested persons to a
public meeting at the I
C A N ! A r t s a n d R e -
s o u r c e C e n t e r 1 0 4 0
A n g e l C o u r t , E a s t
End (Li t t l e Rock), Ar-
kansas, on June 18,
2 0 1 3 a t 6 : 0 0 P M .
T h e p u r p o s e o f t h e
meet i ng i s t o i dent i f y
potential outdoor park
a n d r e c r e a t i o n a l
n e e d s a n d p r i o r i t i e s
f o r 2 0 1 4 . Fo l l o wi n g
the identification proc-
e s s , c o u n t y o f f i c i a l s
will select those priori-
ties to be submitted to
t h e Ar k . De p a r t me n t
o f P a r k s & T o u r i s m
f or a mat c hi ng gr ant
application.
A l l p e r s o n s , e s p e -
c i al l y E t h n i c m i n o r i -
ties , persons with dis-
abilities, elderly, youth
and s p e c i a l i n t e r e s t
groups a r e i n v i t e d
and encouraged to at-
t end and par t i c i pat e.
F o r t h o s e u n a b l e t o
a t t e n d t h e m e e t i n g ,
you may phone (501)
3 4 0 - 3 4 3 3 . W r i t t e n
c o m m e n t s m a y b e
s u b m i t t e d t o S a l i n e
C o u n t y J u d g e !s O f -
f i ce, 200 Nor t h Mai n
Street, Rm. 117, Ben-
ton, AR 72015.
THE CITY OF BRYANT
i s a c c e p t i n g s e a l e d
bids for surplus vehi-
cles, the bids will be
ac c ept ed f r om !June
3r d 2013 unt i l June
12th 2013! at !3p.m.
T h e b i d s m a y b e
t u r n e d i n t o L t . J W
Pl ouch at 312 Roya
Lane Br yant Ar and
Bi d Openi ng wi l l be
at the Police Depart-
m e n t C o n f e r e n c e
Room on!June 12t h
2 0 1 3 a t 3 p . m. ! F o r
m o r e i n f o r m a t i o n ,
p l e a s e v i s i t
http://www.cityof-
bryant.com/bids
Check out the
Garage Sales
this week!
Page 8 – The Saline Courier
class@bentoncourier.com Monday, June 10, 2013
Moderately Confused Herman
Crossword Challenge
Kit ‘n’ Carlyle
Celebrity Cipher
Here’s How It Works:
Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken
down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the
numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and
box. Each number can appear only once in each row,
column and box. You can figure out the order in which
the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues
already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you
name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!
Astro•graph
bernice bede osol
www.bernice4u.com.
Alley Oop
Big Nate
Born Loser
Thatababy
Frank and Ernest
Grizzwells
Monty
Arlo and Janis
Soup to Nutz
MONDAY, JUNE 10, 2013
GEMINI (May 21-June
20) -- Should you agree
to participate in a friend’s
endeavor, make sure it has
strong potential for success.
Otherwise, your hard work
could be for naught.
CANCER (June 21-July
22) -- A friend’s innovative
idea might have every chance
of success. But you’ll need to
be careful not to use tactics
that could hurt your reputa-
tion.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) --
Instead of figuring out a new
method to get around some
obstacles, try the old way.
Sticking with what works
should be your strategy.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22) -- Although you believe
it to be a seller’s market, you
should still conduct your
business with care. You could
be more vulnerable than you
realize.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
-- As long as you don’t allow
your emotions to overrule
your logic, you could fare
very well. Make sure that you
view all new developments
from a realistic perspective.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) -- Be sure to keep your
mind on the task at hand in
your professional involve-
ments, especially if you have
to contend with some unusual
distractions.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
23-Dec. 21) -- There are some
people within your social
circle who could help you
achieve an important objec-
tive. For best results, play
things loose and friendly.
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19) -- Guard against
an inclination to try charting
a different course from your
usual route. There is a strong
chance that any variation will
work against you.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) -- A clever friend might
be able to help you resolve a
complicated matter. However,
be careful about blindly
accepting just any solution.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) -- It’s OK to feel you can’t
lose, as long as you study
matters and don’t carry things
to the extreme. Be positive,
but also prudent and realistic.
ARIES (March 21-April
19) -- Once you make a com-
mitment, you will be expected
to keep it. If you back out,
others will lose respect for
you.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) -- Don’t betray the trust
of someone who expects you
to abide by your word. If for
some reason you find it nec-
essary to do so, you’d better
have a darn good excuse.
Monday, June 10, 2013
news@bentoncourier.com The Saline Courier – Page 9
ComiCs
Air Conditioning
HEATING AND
AIR CONDITIONING
Installation,
Maintenance and
24 Hour Service
501-425-3796
Residential &
Commerical
Attorneys
David Heasley
attorney at law
Divorce &
Family Law
Free phone consultation
Payment Plan
681-4452
622 Alcoa Road,
in Benton
Backhoe & Dozer
315-2343
Peas
Gravel
Fill
SB-2
Topsoil
Sandy Loam
Sands
Donnafill
Pick-Up
or
Delivery
Build & Remodel
Build & Remodel
Parish 
Construction
BUILDING AND
REMODELING
*31 yrs experience
Small or Large
Jobs Done to
Your Satisfaction
tFree Estimates
tReasonable
Prices
Licensed
501-231-9230
501-316-2994
Carpentry
EXPERIENCED
CARPENTER
- Out of Work -
Home Maintenance
& Remodeling
of All Kinds
Vinyl Siding Installation
Call TIM
778-5171
OVER 30 YEARS
EXPERIENCE
- Free Estimates -
No job too LARGE
or small
Satisfaction Guaranteed!
DAVID BURTON, SR.
794-2563
Cleaning Services
Double A’s
Cleaning
• Competitive &
Affordable Pricing
• Satisfaction
Guarantied
• Detail Oriented
• I Provide Supplies
Call For Free Estimate
Alexis
501-794-7236
lexi92981@hotmail.com
Residential &
Commercial Cleaning
References
Available
Call
Laurie
501-380-5748
Computer Services
A-1 COMPUTER
REPAIR
A+
Certified
Repair
Technician
•Desktop /Laptop
Repairs & Cleanup
•Virus-Spyware Removal-
Starting at $80.
1200 Ferguson Dr.
Ste. 5 • Benton
501-776-7577
Drywall Repair
DRYWALL
REPAIR
SERVICE
• Cracks & Holes
• Discolored Ceilings
• Water Stains
• Small Remodels
Valid References
40 Yrs. Experience
!!!!!!
Steve Burrow - Owner
337–4525
Handgun Classes
CONCEALED
HANDGUN
CLASSES
Course completed
in one day.
All
paperwork
provided.
Tim Bragg, Instructor
#95-055
501-776-7419
Handyman
Will be
Handyman
Tree trimming
Roofng
Bush & garden
trim & clean up
Brick
Junk hauling
Decks
Flower Bed
clean out
Block
Stump Grinding
Leaf Blowing
Painting
Any Yard Work!
FREE
ESTIMATES!
Owner
Deanna Massey
One Call Does It
All Lawncare!
501-326-2839
and ask for
Damon Massey
Home Inspections
Diamond R
Home Inspections
Russell Richmond
diamondrhomeinspections
@gmail.com
501-362-8160
mention ad for discount
Horses
Clinic’s Certified
HOLTZMAN
Riding Academy, LLC
BIRTHDAY PARTIES
10 & UNDER
SUMMER HORSE CAMP
316-1141
House Leveling
HOUSE
Leveling/Foundation
REPAIR
Concrete Foundations
or Pier & Beam
• Shaky floors
• Rotten wood
• Cracked brick
• French drains, etc.
~ Free Estimates ~
501-304-2040
Insulation
Southern
Southern
INSULATION &
GUTTERS, Inc.
INSULATION &
GUTTERS, Inc.
INSULATION &
GUTTERS, Inc.
INSULATION &
GUTTERS, Inc.
Family Owned & Operated
for 33 Years
ª Residential & Commercial
ª Seamless ßutters
ª Leal Frool System
ª Fiberqlass, Batts & Blown
ª Stabili/ed Cellulose
ª ínsulation Removal
FREE ESTIMATES
Licensed - ínsured - Bonded
FINANCING AVAILABLE
315-2306
Toll Free. 888·278·7GOG
Landscaping
L.W. Lawn &
Landscaping
SERVICES, LLC
501-350-9137
870-942-9641
But my God shall supply all your needs according
to his riches in glory by Christ Jesus. Phil. 4:19
Call
Today!
Located in Bryant
Lawn Maintenance, Trimming,
Sprinkler Installation, French
Drains, Shrub & Tree Pruning,
Leaf Removal, Landscaping,
Gutter Maintenance and more
www.lwlawnandlandscaping.com
lwlawnandlandscaping@yahoo.com
VETERAN & SENIOR
DISCOUNT
Lawn Care
Richard
May’s
Lawn Care
10 years Local
Experience
Average yard:
Cut & Weed
Eat $25-$30
317-8966
316-6655
Flawless
Lawns
Flawless
Lawns
Spring Clean-Up
Leaves, Beds & Mulch
Mowing, Trimming, Edging
Odd Jobs and Light Hauling
Ryan Harmon 860-8789
Mark 8:36
Classifieds Work!
Painting
SUPERIOR
PAINTING
• Residential & Small
Commercial
• Drywall Finish
& Repair
• Interior & Exterior
• Texture
• Pressure Washing
INSURED
Kelly Hill – Owner
501-316-3328
501-840-1470
Experienced
Painter
NEEDS WORK
Call Phil 249-1657
leave message
Interior & Exterior
30 yrs experience
All types of Home Maintenance
SCHAY PAINTING CO
Interior/Exterior
20 Years Experience
References Provided
Steve Schay
501-425-4492
Pet Care
Absolute
All breed mobile
dog grooming
501.732.6850
Kim McWhirter
kimmcwhirter
@ymail.com
SEEK AND YOU
SHALL FIND
Great deals in the
Courier Classifieds.
Yard Sales, Jobs,
Homes for Sale or
Rent. Check them out
daily. Call to sub-
scribe at 315-8228.
Classifieds Work!
Pressure Washing
Royal
Flush
Servicing
Central Arkansas
since 1988
316-1536
Pressure Wash & Seal
specializing in
!"#$%&'&()(*""+
,-#./(0(1'&&/(1-+-#2
3-/+&4(0(*5'&%(1'5-#6
JG’s
Pressure Wash & More
Deck Repair
Fences
Gutter Cleaning
Lawn Service
and More
501-249-4715
Roofng
ROOFING
Wagner
Residential
Commercial
&
VOTED
“Best of the Best”
2009
Free Estimates
847-6630
K & L
ROOFING
• Don’t Wait For
Roofing Repair
• All Insurance
Claims Welcome
• 40 years exp.
• Financing Avail.
w/approved credit
Upgrade to a metal roof with
a class 4 fire rating & you
may qualify for a discount on
your homeowners insurance
501-249-7735
501-778-7600
210 W. SEVIER
ST. • BENTON
Looking for love in all
the wrong places????
Check out the Freebie
section in today!s
classifieds. You will
fi nd uncondi ti onal
love there FREE!
Furry & Free!!
Buy • Sell • Trade
in the Classifieds
Tree Service
M00ߣ
ñFF0ßßñ8l£
Tߣ£ 5£ß¥l8£
501-778-8071
501-860-5911
28-Years
Experience
Insured &
Licensed
*Stump Grinding
*Take Downs
*Trimming
*Pruning
*Storm Cleanup
Parsons & Son
Tree Service LLC
“The Total Package”
Call us about
Tree Health Care
º 1rinning
º 1ake Lowns
º Pruning
º Renovals
º Stunp Renoval
º lirewood
º Oreen vaste lauling
Conplete
lnsuranoe Coverage
Owned 8 Operated
by an
lSA Lioensed Arborist
SO·L"PGA
840-1436
602-2959
CRITES
& TACKETT
TREE SERVICE
~ Free Estimates ~
Workman's Comp
& Liability Insured
•Stump Removal
501-337–1565
501-337-9094
Ready to graduate
from particle board?
1000!s of Courier
Classifieds will read
your ad daily. Call
Mary or Shawna to
place your ad today!
Tree Service
501.317.6788
ROCKIN B
TREE SERVICE
B
TRIMMING
PRUNING
STUMP GRINDING
REMOVALS
large & small
FREE ESTIMATES
Insured for
Your Protection
Excellent Clean up
Senior and
Military Discounts
available
Want to Downsize
Your Gas Guzzler?
Sell it in the Courier
Classifieds. Call to
place your ad today!
315-8228
Ready to take the
Real Estate Plunge?
Check out the Homes
for Sale in the Classi-
fieds daily.
Time to get your own
place? Check out the
Rental Section in to-
day!s Classifieds...
Using the Courier
Classifieds is just a
smart thing to do!
Subscribe Today!!!
Classifieds Work!
Check out the
Garage Sales
this week!
Service Directory
10 The Saline Courier
Monday, June 10, 2013
Mills Park
to host free
movie on
Mondays
The Bryant parks depart-
ment will show a free family
movie each Monday at dusk
at Mills Park throughout the
months of June, July and
August.
A concessions stand will
offer popcorn, candy and
drinks.
More information is avail-
able by calling the park’s
department at 501-943-0444
Eureka Springs
rentals under
scrutiny
EUREKA SPRINGS —
The vacation rental business
in Eureka Springs is boom-
ing — but some say that
makes it harder for locals to
find a place to live.
Alderman James DeVito
says the city risks losing its
quirky identity if residents
can’t find anywhere to live
within city limits. He tells the
Arkansas Democrat-Gazette
that some proprietors are
choosing to rent to tourists
instead of locals because
they can make more money
that way.
DeVito says such rentals
can violate a city code pro-
hibiting commercial activity
in residential areas.
Last year, the City Council
considered an ordinance that
would have limited rentals
to no fewer than 30 days in
residential areas but took no
action on the measure.
Associated Press
NSA contractor risks steep jail time for data leak
WASHINGTON — The
man who gave classified
documents to reporters,
making public two sweeping
U.S. surveillance programs
and touching off a national
debate on privacy versus
security, has revealed his
own identity. He risked
decades in jail for the dis-
closures — if the U.S. can
extradite him from Hong
Kong where he has taken
refuge.
Edward Snowden, 29, who
says he worked as a contrac-
tor at the National Security
Agency and the CIA, allowed
The Guardian and The
Washington Post newspa-
pers to reveal his identity
Sunday.
Both papers have pub-
lished a series of top-secret
documents outlining two
NSA surveillance programs.
One gathers hundreds
of millions of U.S. phone
records while searching
for possible links to known
terrorist targets abroad,
and the second allows the
government to tap into nine
U.S. Internet companies to
gather all Internet usage to
detect suspicious behavior
that begins overseas.
The revelations have
reopened the post-Sept.
11 debate about individual
privacy concerns versus
heightened measures to pro-
tect the U.S. against terrorist
attacks. The NSA has asked
the Justice Department to
conduct a criminal inves-
tigation into the leaks.
Government lawyers are
now “in the initial stages
of an investigation into the
unauthorized disclosure of
classified information by an
individual with authorized
access,” said Nanda Chitre,
Justice Department spokes-
woman.
President Barack Obama
said the programs are autho-
rized by Congress and sub-
ject to strict supervision of a
secret court, and Director of
National Intelligence James
Clapper says they do not tar-
get U.S. citizens.
But Snowden claims the
programs are open to abuse.
“Any analyst at any
time can target anyone.
Any selector. Anywhere,”
Snowden said in a video on
the Guardian’s website. “I,
sitting at my desk, had the
authority to wiretap anyone,
from you or your accountant
to a federal judge to even
the president if I had a per-
sonal email.”
Some lawmakers have
expressed similar concerns
about the wide reach of the
surveillance.
“I expect the government
to protect my privacy. It
feels like that isn’t what’s
been happening,” said
Sen. Mark Udall, D-Colo.,
a member of the Senate
Intelligence Committee.
“Again, there’s a line, but
to me, the scale of it and
the fact the law was being
secretly interpreted has
long concerned me,” he said
Sunday on CNN, adding that
at the same time, he abhors
leaks.
Senate intelligence com-
mittee chairman, Democrat
Dianne Feinstein of
California, contends the sur-
veillance does not infringe
on U.S. citizens’ privacy,
and that it helped disrupt
a 2009 plot to bomb New
York City’s subways and
played a role in the case
against an American who
scouted targets in Mumbai,
India, before a deadly ter-
rorist attack there in 2008.
Feinstein spoke on ABC’s
“This Week.”
Clapper has decried the
revelation of the intelligence-
gathering programs as reck-
less and said it has done
“huge, grave damage.”
The spokesman for
the Director of National
Intelligence Shawn Turner
said intelligence officials
are “currently reviewing the
damage that has been done
by these recent disclosures.”
The disclosures come
as the White House deals
with managing fallout from
revelations that it secretly
seized telephone records of
journalists at The Associated
Press and Fox News.
Snowden says he was a
former technical assistant
for the CIA and a current
employee of defense con-
tractor Booz Allen Hamilton,
which released a statement
Sunday confirming he had
been a contractor with them
in Hawaii for less than three
months, and promising to
work with investigators.
Snowden could face many
years in prison for releasing
classified information if he is
successfully extradited from
Hong Kong, according to
Mark Zaid, a national secu-
rity lawyer who represents
whistleblowers.
Hong Kong, though part
of China, is partly autono-
mous and has a Western-
style legal system that is a
legacy from the territory’s
past as a British colony. A
U.S.-Hong Kong extradition
treaty has worked smoothly
in the past. Hong Kong
extradited three al-Qaeda
suspects to the U.S. in 2003,
for example.
But the treaty comes with
important exceptions. Key
provisions allow a request
to be rejected if it is deemed
to be politically motivated or
that the suspect would not
receive a fair trial. Beijing
may also block an extradi-
tion of Chinese nationals
from Hong Kong for national
security reasons.
“The government could
subject him to a 10 or 20
year penalty for each count,”
with each document leaked
considered a separate
charge, Zaid said.
Snowden told the
Guardian newspaper he
believes the government
could try to charge him with
treason under the Espionage
Act, but Zaid said that would
require the government to
prove he had intent to betray
the United States, whereas
he publicly made it clear he
did this to spur debate.
“My sole motive is to
inform the public as to that
which is done in their name
and that which is done
against them,” Snowden told
the Guardian.
The government could
also make an argument that
the NSA leaks have aided
the enemy — as military
prosecutors have claimed
against Army Pvt. Bradley
Manning, who faces life
in prison under military
law if convicted for releas-
ing a trove of classified
documents through the
Wikileaks website.
“They could say the
revelation of the (NSA) pro-
grams could instruct people
to change tactics,” Zaid said.
That could add more poten-
tial jail time to the punish-
ment.
Snowden told the Post he
was not going to hide.
“Allowing the U.S. govern-
ment to intimidate its people
with threats of retaliation
for revealing wrongdoing is
contrary to the public inter-
est,” he said in the interview
published Sunday. Snowden
said he would “ask for asy-
lum from any countries that
believe in free speech and
oppose the victimization of
global privacy.”
Snowden told The
Guardian he lacked a high
school diploma and served
in the U.S. Army until he
was discharged because of
an injury, and later worked
as a security guard with the
NSA at a covert facility at
the University of Maryland.
He later went to work for
the CIA as an information
technology employee and
by 2007 was stationed in
Geneva, Switzerland, where
he had access to classified
documents.
During that time, he
considered going public
about the nation’s secretive
programs but told the news-
paper he decided against it,
because he did not want to
put anyone in danger and
he hoped Obama’s election
would curtail some of the
clandestine programs.
He said he was disap-
pointed that Obama did not
rein in the surveillance pro-
grams.
“Much of what I saw in
Geneva really disillusioned
me about how my govern-
ment functions and what its
impact is in the world,” he
told The Guardian. “I real-
ized that I was part of some-
thing that was doing far
more harm than good.”
Snowden left the CIA in
2009. He said he spent the
last four years at the NSA,
briefly as a contractor with
consulting giant Booz Allen
Hamilton and, before that,
Dell.
The Guardian reported
that Snowden was working
in an NSA office in Hawaii
when he copied the last of
the documents he planned
to disclose and told supervi-
sors that he needed to be
away for a few weeks to
receive treatment for epi-
lepsy.
He left for Hong Kong on
May 20 and has remained
there since, according to the
newspaper. Snowden is quot-
ed as saying he chose that
city because “they have a
spirited commitment to free
speech and the right of polit-
ical dissent”, and because he
believed it was among the
spots on the globe that could
and would resist the dictates
of the U.S. government.
“I feel satisfied that this
was all worth it. I have no
regrets,” Snowden told The
Guardian.
Associated Press
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