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Courier
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Write: P.O. Box 207,
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SALINE COUNTY
WEATHER FORECAST
TODAY: Partly cloudy. Fog
early. High of 81F.
TONIGHT: Clear. Low of 59F.
MONDAY: Clear. High of 81F.
MONDAY NIGHT: Clear in the
evening, then overcast. Low of
59F.
Volume 136
Number 153
2 Sections of 14 Pages
$1.25
Home of Dewell Anderson
and Wyndelyn White
Saline County’S newS SourCe SinCe 1876
The Saline
INDEX
OBITUARIES ............................3A
EDITORIAL ...............................4A
SPORTS ............................. 6A,7A
CLASSIFIEDS .................... 8A,9A
www. bent oncouri er. com
Sunday, June 2, 2013
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BAUXITE REUNION
“The Old Men on the Porch”
The Saline Courier is spon-
soring a 2014 Pet Calendar
contest, beginning Monday, as
a fundraiser for its Newspapers
in Education program. The top-
12 vote-getters will be featured
in our 2014 Pet Calendar.
The contest entry period
runs through June 10. Entry
fee is $5 per pet. Entries will
be featured in the pages of the
Courier throughout the voting
period, with updated voting
totals.
The 2014 calendar will fea-
ture the 12 pets who gain the
most votes. Each pet will be
professionally photographed for
the calendar. The calendars will
be available by Thanksgiving
and will cost $2 each.
Saline Courier
accepting entries
for 2014 Pet
Calendar Contest
LIVING, PAGE 1B
WIL CHANDLER/Saline Courier
Rain does not deter 3-year-old Jude Turner as he pedals his trike toward the finish line at the Briley FAITH’s 3K Walk-n-Run for
a Cure. The event was held Saturday morning at Pinecrest Memorial Park to raise money and awareness about spinal muscular
atrophy, which claimed the life of Jude’s little sister, Briley FAITH.
WIL CHANDLER/Saline Courier
From left, Kaitlyn Cox, Shelby Harding and Maddy Helms celebrate crossing the finish line in the rain at the Briley FAITH’s 3K
Walk-n-Run for a Cure. More photos are found on page 5A.
bRILEy fAItH WALk CARRIES oN IN RAIN
Many times the expression “bats
in the belfry” has appeared in liter-
ary descriptions, but that literally
is what has happened at the Saline
County Courthouse.
Members of the Saline County
Quorum Court plan to address this
situation Tuesday in a meeting of
the court’s Pubic Works and Safety
Committee.
The session is scheduled for 6
p.m. at the courthouse.
The justices of the peace plan to
consider a proposal from Critter
Getters to rid the courthouse of
bats and birds, which reportedly
are inhabiting the historic struc-
ture.
Keith Counts, owner of the ani-
mal eviction business, said inspec-
tion has revealed the presence of
these two species, which he says
are entering around the soffits, attic
and entire venting system, includ-
ing the clock tower area.
His proposal notes that his com-
pany would trap the creatures and
seal all entry ways.
“Critter Getters will trap, remove
and relocate pests that are posing
a health risk to people occupying
the building,” Counts said. “Once
Andru Phillips, a 17-year old sing-
er/songwriter
from Benton,
will be a senior
in the fall, but
he doesn’t know
if he’ll be able
to attend any
classes.
His newfound
success may
make it neces-
sary for him to
receive his edu-
cation through tutors, his father said.
Phillips’ first CD titled simply
“Andru” was released last week and
soon will be available for sale on
iTunes.
According to Phillips, the first
batch is almost already sold out.
“I have great fans and the demand
for a copy of my first CD was actu-
ally surprising to me,” he said. “It’s
really just a demo CD that I’ll use to
promote my music and include in
my media kit that I give to studios. I
don’t have a record deal yet, but I’m
on my way and if all goes as planned,
I’m hopeful that I’ll have a major
Kum & Go on Reynolds Road
was robbed at gunpoint early Friday
morning, according to Bryant police.
The convenience store clerk told
police that two white men wear-
ing masks came in the store about
4:30 a.m., pointed a gun at her, and
demanded all the money from the
cash register drawer.
According to police, after the
clerk complied, the two suspects
fled the scene with an undisclosed
amount of money.
The Bryant Police Department
is encouraging anyone with infor-
mation regarding the incident to
contact the Criminal Investigation
Division at 501-943-0943.
Police search
for suspects
in Kum &
Go robbery
SALINE RIvER LEvEL StILL HIgH
WIL CHANDLER/Saline Courier
Recent precipitation has caused the Saline River to rise above average water levels.
On Saturday, it was measured at 9 feet, and forecasted storms were predicted to
bring the level higher. Strong storms on Thursday caused the level to reach more
than 16 feet on Friday. The average water level for the Saline River is about 4 feet.
Benton teen is on path for
professional singing career
Phillips
By Lynda Hollenbeck
lyndahol@yahoo.com
By Lynda Hollenbeck
lyndahol@yahoo.com
SINgER, page 5A
Birds, bats in
courthouse
an issue of
county JPs
QUoRUM CoURt, page 5A
2A The Saline Courier
Sunday, June 2, 2013
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news across
-Associated Press
Ark. asks court to uphold
‘heartbeat’ abortion law
courier ScrAPBook
Courier photo
1997 — The Benton-Bryant Realtors Association recently elected new officers, from left, Immediate
Past President Tom Baxley, President Pat Mote, Treasurer Barry Wilson, President-Elect Anne
Beyers, Secretary Keeley Landers and Executive Secretary Sandra Carlisle.
LITTLE ROCK —
Arkansas officials on Friday
asked a federal judge to
uphold the part of a new
state law banning abortions
12 weeks into a pregnancy
that requires doctors to test
for a fetal heartbeat before
performing the procedure.
The state attorney gener-
al’s office asked U.S. District
Judge Susan Webber Wright
to allow the state to enforce
that portion of the law while
the constitutionality of the
12-week ban is being chal-
lenged in her court. Wright
on May 17 blocked the
enforcement of the 12-week
ban, which had been set to
take effect in August.
The law prohibits abor-
tions starting at 12 weeks if
a fetal heartbeat is detected
using an abdominal ultra-
sound.
The AG’s office, which
is representing the state
Medical Board, also asked
Wright to uphold the part of
the law that requires doctors
to inform women seeking
an abortion if a heartbeat
is detected and the statisti-
cal likelihood of the child
surviving based on its gesta-
tional age.
The state argued that the
ultrasound provision would
not place a significant bur-
den on a woman seeking an
abortion before a fetus could
viably survive outside the
womb.
“The informed consent
provisions of Act 301 do not
have the purpose or effect of
placing a substantial obsta-
cle in the path of a woman
seeking a pre-viability
abortion, and the informed
consent provisions further
legitimate interests of the
state,” the state said in its fil-
ing. “The informed consent
provisions are constitutional
as a matter of well-settled
law.”
In issuing the injunction
blocking the law’s enforce-
ment, Wright said that the
ultrasound provision may
not pose an undue burden
on a woman’s ability to have
an abortion. A trial is set for
next year.
The American Civil
Liberties Union of Arkansas
and the Center for
Reproductive Rights sued
the state on behalf of two
Little Rock doctors who per-
form abortions. The lawsuit
names members of the State
Medical Board as defen-
dants because the board is
responsible for licensing
medical professionals.
Arkansas’ Republican-led
Legislature enacted the ban
in March when it overrode
Democratic Gov. Mike
Beebe’s veto of the measure.
Beebe and other opponents
of the ban say it violates the
U.S. Supreme Court’s 1973
Roe v. Wade decision that
legalized abortion until a
fetus could viably survive
outside the womb, which is
generally considered to be
at 22 to 24 weeks.
5 confirmed deaths in tornado in
Oklahoma City area, 50 injured
OKLAHOMA CITY —
Tornadoes rolled in from
the prairie and slammed
Oklahoma City and its sub-
urbs, trapping people in their
vehicles as a storm swept
down an interstate highway
while commuters tried to
beat it home.
Five people were killed,
including a mother and
baby killed near Union City.
Another person died at El
Reno, the first city struck
by the storm, said Amy
Elliott, a spokeswoman for
the state medical examiner.
Circumstances involving the
other two deaths weren’t
immediately known, Elliott
said.
About 50 people were
hurt, five critically, hospital
officials said.
Meteorologists had
warned about particularly
nasty weather Friday but
said the storm’s fury didn’t
match that of a deadly
twister that struck suburban
Moore last week. Violent
weather also moved through
the St. Louis area, ripping
part of the roof off a subur-
ban casino.
Friday’s broad storm in
Oklahoma hit during the
evening rush hour and stuck
around, causing havoc on
Interstate 40, a major artery
connecting suburbs east and
west of the city, and drop-
ping so much rain on the
area that streets were flood-
ed to a depth of 4 feet.
To the south, a severe
storm with winds approach-
ing 80 mph rolled into
Moore, where a top-of-the-
scale EF5 tornado killed 24
on May 20.
Rick Smith, the warning
coordination meteorologist
for the National Weather
Service at Norman, said that
while the storm packed a
powerful punch, it wasn’t
as strong as the Moore tor-
nado.
“This storm had every-
thing you could handle at
one time: tornadoes, hail,
lightning, heavy rain, people
clogging the highways,”
Smith said.
The region was fortunate
because the storm touched
down mostly in rural
areas and missed central
Oklahoma City.
“It’s not even close to
anything like what we had
last week,” Smith said. “We
were very concerned this
would move into downtown.
It would have been a major
problem. It made all the dif-
ference that it was out in the
country.”
The U.S. averages more
than 1,200 tornadoes a year
and most are relatively
small. Of the 60 EF5 tor-
nadoes to hit since 1950,
Oklahoma and Alabama
have been hit the most —
seven times each.
Heavy rain and hail
hampered rescue efforts in
Oklahoma City. Frequent
lightning roiled the skies
well after the main threat
had moved east. Highways
and streets were clogged
late into the night as motor-
ists worked their way around
flooded portions of the city.
Will Rogers World Airport
said flights wouldn’t resume
until morning, after debris
was cleared from runways.
Oklahoma Highway Patrol
Trooper Betsy Randolph said
troopers found the bodies of
a woman and an infant near
their vehicle. Randolph said
it’s not known if the woman
was driving into the storm
when it hit around 7 p.m.
Friday.
Emergency officials
reported that numerous
injuries occurred in the area
along I-40, and Randolph
said there were toppled and
wrecked cars littering the
area. Troopers requested
a number of ambulances
at I-40 near Yukon, west of
Oklahoma City.
Standing water was sev-
eral feet deep, and in some
places it looked more like
a hurricane had passed
through than a tornado.
More than 86,000 utility cus-
tomers were without power.
In Missouri, the combina-
tion of high water and fallen
power lines closed dozen
of roads, snarling traffic on
highways and side streets
in the St. Louis area. At the
Hollywood Casino in subur-
ban of Maryland Heights,
gamblers rushed from the
floor as a storm blew out
windows and tore off part of
the roof.
Rich Gordon, of Jefferson
City, said he was on the
casino floor when he heard a
loud “boom.”
“I didn’t know if it was
lightning or what, but it was
loud,” Gordon said.
In Oklahoma, storm chas-
ers with cameras in their
cars transmitted video show-
ing a number of funnels
dropping from the supercell
thunderstorm as it passed
south of El Reno and into
Oklahoma City just south
of downtown. Police urged
motorists to leave I-40 and
seek a safe place.
“I’m in a car running
from the tornado,” said Amy
Sharp, who last week pulled
her fourth-grade daughter
from the Plaza Towers
Elementary School as a
storm approached with 210
mph winds. “I’m in Norman
and it just hit Yukon where
I was staying” since last
week’s storm.
“I’m with my children who
wanted their mother out of
that town,” Sharp said, her
voice quivering with emo-
tion.
At Will Rogers, pas-
sengers were directed into
underground tunnels as the
storm passed just north of
the airfield. However, people
near the area said they
weren’t aware of any dam-
age.
Television cameras
showed debris falling from
the sky west of Oklahoma
City and power transformers
being knocked out by high
winds across a wider area.
As the storm bore down
on suburban Oklahoma City,
Adrian Lillard, 28, of The
Village, went to the base-
ment of her mother’s office
building with a friend, her
nieces, nephews and two
dogs.
“My brother’s house
was in Moore, so it makes
you take more immediate
action,” Lillard said while
her young nieces played
on a blanket on the floor
of the parking garage. “We
brought toys and snacks to
try our best to keep them
comfortable.”
Well before Oklahoma’s
first thunderstorms fired up
at late afternoon, the Storm
Prediction Center in Norman
was already forecasting a
violent evening. From the
Texas border to near Joplin,
Mo., residents were told to
keep an eye to the sky and
an ear out for sirens.
Friday evening’s weather
came after flash flooding and
tornadoes killed three people
in Arkansas late Thursday
and early Friday. Three oth-
ers were missing in floods
that followed 6 inches of
rain in the rugged Ouachita
Mountains near Y City, 125
miles west of Little Rock.
This spring’s tornado
season got a late start, with
unusually cool weather keep-
ing funnel clouds at bay until
mid-May. The season usually
starts in March and then
ramps up for the next couple
of months.
Associated Press
LITTLE ROCK —
The Federal Election
Commission has dismissed
a complaint against Arvest
Bank Chairman Jim
Walton that he violated
federal campaign finance
laws.
The complaint filed in
November by the group
Making Change at Wal-
Mart alleged Walton con-
tributed more than the
allowable amount to com-
mittees and candidates.
Walton’s attorney said
the group double-counted
a $,300 contribution that
Walton — the son of Wal-
Mart founder Sam Walton
— made to Republican
Sen. John McCain’s presi-
dential campaign.
The Arkansas Democrat-
Gazette reports that FEC
says McCain’s campaign
initially misreported the
amounts and appears to
have corrected the error
— therefore the FEC is
dismissing the case.
Walton declined com-
ment.
MOUNTAIN HOME—
Authorities say a Baxter
County Jail inmate has been
found dead in his cell.
Sheriff John Montgomery
says 36-year-old Thomas Lee
Self of Gassville was found
unresponsive and lying
on his mat about 9:15 a.m.
Friday and was later pro-
nounced dead. Montgomery
says the body has been sent
to the state medical exam-
iner’s office to determine
both the cause and manner
of death.
The sheriff says Self was
arrested about 10:30 p.m.
Thursday on misdemeanor
charges and had been seen
earlier Friday morning in
the cell.
LITTLE ROCK — The
University of Arkansas at
Little Rock says a body
was found in a creek that
runs through the campus.
The university says the
body was discovered in
Coleman Creek on Friday
morning near the Fine Arts
Building.
UALR said in a state-
ment that the body hasn’t
been identified and a
cause of death hasn’t been
released.
Coleman Creek runs
through campus and is
prone to flooding.
NEWPORT — Jackson
County Circuit Court Clerk
Lisa Turner has pleaded
guilty to a misdemeanor
theft of property charge
and resigned from office.
Turner entered the plea
Thursday and paid $15 res-
titution.
Special prosecutor Jack
McQuary told report-
ers that even though the
amount of money taken
was small — it is still
public money and must
be accounted for. Turner
acknowledged using the
money to buy a Christmas
wreath, lunches and soft
drinks.
State police investigators
say they began looking into
allegations of theft in the
clerk's office in mid-May at
the request of Prosecuting
Attorney Henry Boyce.
Boyce also asked for the
special prosecutor.
Officials say deputy
clerks will run the office
until the quorum court
names a replacement —
which is expected in June.
Donations complaint against Arvest
Chairman Jim Walton dismissed
Inmate found dead in Baxter County Jail
Jackson County clerk pleads guilty to theft
Body found in creek on LR campus
Sunday, June 2, 2013
The Saline Courier 3A
Saline County’S newS SourCe SinCe 1876
Courier
The Saline
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SALINE MEMORIAL HOSPITAL
Award Winning. Convenient. Personal.
Dr. Russell Gornichec
Medical Director SMH Bariatric Program
(501) 778-7300
Welcome Dr. Russell Gornichec
to the SMH Team of Physicians
Dr. Russell Gornichec is a board certified
surgeon specializing in weight loss surgery
who has performed over 1,500 bariatric
procedures to date. In 2003, he performed
the first laparoscopic gastric bypass in
Edmond, Oklahoma and in 2010 he performed
the first robotically assisted weight loss
surgery in Oklahoma. He is the current US
national record holder for the most robotically
performed major procedures in one day.
Dr. Gornichec is currently the medical
director of the SMH Bariatric Program.
SalineMemorial.org
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loved one. Whether their
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Place an ad conveying
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The Saline Courier
OBITUARIES
PAID OBITUARies
Rex Carles Rasberry
Rex Carles Rasberry, age 73, of Benton passed away
Friday, May 31, 2013, at home surrounded by his loved
ones.
He was born Sept. 24, 1939m in Senath, Mo., to the late
Willie T. Rasberry and Violet M. Whitlock Rasberry.
Mr. Rasberry was a U.S. Army veteran and
a member of Johnson Street Church of Christ.
He retired from Falcon Jet after 26 years, where
he started the screen printing department
and worked in the planning department. He
was a former officer with the Newport Police
Department, and was a radio announcer.
In addition to his parents, he was preceded in
death by two sisters, Nelia Muryl Chadwell and
Edna May Rasberry.
Survivors include his wife of 52 years, Betty Hines
Rasberry; a son, Timmie Allen Rasberry and fiancée Jeanna
Mohr of North Little Rock; three daughters, Karen Patrice
Hughes and husband Gary of Mabelvale, April Dionne
Watts and husband Danny of Benton, and Patty Ann Gaylor
and husband Corkey of Benton; nine grandchildren; six
great-grandchildren; two sisters, Brenda Sue Privett and
husband Bill of Kennett, Mo., and Betty Ruth Stevens and
husband Bob of Cape Girardeau, Mo.; his father-in-law,
William Clearence Hines; an aunt, Minnie Easter; other rela-
tives and friends.
Funeral services is scheduled for 2 p.m. Tuesday, June
4, 2013, at Roller-Ballard Funeral Home in Benton (501-315-
4047). Burial will follow at New Rosemont Memorial Park in
Benton.
Serving as pallbearers are Tyler Watts, Jacob Watts,
Zachary Watts, Danny Watts, Nathanial Lytle, Dwayne Lytle,
Alex Howard and Gary Hughes.
Visitation is scheduled from 6 to 8 p.m. Monday, June 3,
at the funeral home.
Online guestbook: www.rollerfuneralhomes.com/ballard.
Paula Sue Smith
Paula Sue Smith passed away Friday, May 31, 2013, at
the age of 60.
She lived most of her life in Saline County where she
was loved by family and friends.
Paula was a member of North Bryant Baptist Church.
She was preceded in death by her beloved daughter, Erin
Leah Keim; her parents, John L. and Mary Lou Smith;
and a brother, (John) Leroy Smith Jr. All are of Saline
County.
Survivors include her loving children, John Tyler Smith
and Lou Ann Sherman; stepdaughters, Sorina Livingston
and Alaina Thurber; three grandchildren, Abby and
Mikey Baker and Taryn Keim; one great-granddaughter,
Emma Isom; and a niece and nephew, Kirklin and Katie
Smith. She spent many special times with the above and
the extended family in the home of her cousin (adopted
sister) Phyllis and husband, Howard Sawyer.
Paula’s life, like many, was one filled with loss and
tragedy from time to time, but underlying all was a faith
in the Lord whom she knew to be true to His word. She
loved the beauty of His creation and was often her hap-
piest fiddling in her flowers. Paula had a “green” thumb
that helped many along the way. Her talents as an artist
gave beauty and joy to many who knew her. She shared
a special bond with her son, John Tyler, who was a faith-
ful son through difficult times. Lou Ann, a special bless-
ing again brought near.
A memorial service for Paula will be held at North
Bryant Baptist Church, 2710 N. Prickett Road in Bryant,
(across from Larry’s Pizza on Highway 5) at 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday, June 4. Flowers may be sent to 2326 CD Lane,
Alexander, AR 72002.
Online guest book: www.ashbyfuneralhome.com.
Jenny Bridges Skorupa
Jenny Bridges Skorupa, age 53, of Bryant went to be
with her Lord on Thursday, May 30, 2013, at St. Vincent’s
Infirmary Medical Center in Little Rock.
She was born Sept. 3, 1959, at Millington Naval Air
Station in Millington, Tenn., to the late Joseph
Kindell Bridges and Franca Redini Bridges.
She was a special education teacher with the
Bryant School District for 20 years and a mem-
ber of First Southern Baptist Church in Bryant.
She loved scrapbooking and making cards.
In addition to her parents, she was preceded
in death by her spouse, Mark Skorupa.
Survivors include a daughter, Laura Jill
Hill and husband Wayne of Benton; a son, Austin Lee
Skorupa of Bryant; two grandchildren, Tyler and Kyndel
Hill; a sister, Arlene Bridges of Benton; a brother, Bruno
Bridges of North Little Rock; a sister-in-law, Charlotte
Dunlap of Louisville, Ky.; two nieces, Magen Schaub and
Kim Tanneyhill; a nephew, Cody Bridges; several aunts and
uncles; and an army of wonderful friends whom she loved
dearly.
Funeral service will be held at 10 a.m. Monday, June
3, at First Southern Baptist Church in Bryant with Dr.
Patrick Mead officiating. Burial will follow at New Rosemont
Memorial Park in Benton.
Visitation is scheduled from 2 to 4 p.m. Sunday, June 2, at
Roller-Ballard Funeral Home in Benton (501-315-4047).
Memorials may be made to St. Jude Children’s Research
Hospital, 501 St. Jude Place, Memphis, TN 38105, Source
Code: IIQ040799001.
Online guest book: www.rollerfuneralhomes.com/ballard.
Saline County Moose
Lodge 2567 will host its
annual Buddy Carter Rib
Cook-Off Saturday, June 8,
at the lodge, located just off
Interstate 30, 12 miles south-
west of Benton.
Entry for up to a five-per-
son team is $50. The contest
is open to anyone. Trophies
will be awarded to the top
three teams.
The Buddy Carter Rib
Cook-Off is a fundrais-
ing event for Lodge 2567,
with proceeds going to the
lodge’s various charitable
endeavors throughout the
year. The public is invited
to attend, with trophies
awarded at 4 p.m. and dinner
at 5 p.m.
Pit passes cost $8 and will
allow patrons to sample all
the ribs from the various
entries. A bake sale and des-
sert contest are also part of
the event. Entry fee for the
dessert contest is $15.
In addition to the rib
cook-off, a car, bike and jet
boat show will be held on
the lodge grounds. Entry fee
into the show is $10.
For more information,
phone 501-860-6740. Gates
open at 8 a.m. Saturday.
To get to the lodge, take
exit 106 off I-30 and turn
onto U.S. 67. The public is
encouraged to attend the all-
day event.
Moose Lodge to host annual
Buddy Carter Rib Cook-Off
Skorupa
Rasberry
Leadership saLine County Fashion For Funds beneFits saFe haven
special to the saline Courier
From left, Sen. Jeremy Hutchinson, Haskell Mayer Jeff Arey and wife Nancy
attend the Leadership Saline County Fashion For Funds event at Bishop Park on
Thursday. Money from the event went to benefit victims of domestic violence
through the organization Safe Haven.
special to the saline Courier
Siblings Amelia Lisowe and Braden Lislowe strut their
stuff on a runway set up at The Center at Bishop Park.
special to the saline Courier
Heather Brown from Alice 107.7 emcess the show.
special to the saline Courier
Jilian Berry shows off her outfit during the fashion show.
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LETTER TO THE EDITOR POLICY
“Congress shall make no law ... abridging the freedom
of speech, or of the press ... .”
— From the First Amendment to Constitution
W
hy do so many people think that the
arrival of summer means it’s time to pack
away all the clothes that actually fit them?
That it’s time to reveal their out-of-shape bodies by
wearing Speedos and tube tops? Noel Coward used
to ask, “Why do all the wrong people travel?” Now,
I’m pretty sure he would ask, “Why do all the wrong
people wear skimpy clothes?”
On that show “Cops,” every time they show up to
arrest some guy, he answers the door (or climbs out
the back window) shirtless. It’s as if shirts hurt crimi-
nals the way Kryptonite hurts Superman: “Don’t let it
touch my skin, it burns!” Do their shirts cause a rash,
or are they just trying to keep them
clean for their parole officers? You
don’t want to show up for an important
meeting with crack ashes all over your
only shirt, do you?
Going skimpy is one thing if you’re
the reigning Mr. or Miss America;
it’s quite another if you’re just some
ordinary working schlub waiting to
buy a soft-serve ice cream cone in the
summer heat. I don’t want to stand
behind you wondering if you comb
your back hair or if it just naturally
looks that way. And it can’t be good
for the soft-serve ice cream business if
you’re making the other customers so
sick that they get out of line.
I remember the first time I saw a sign that said,
“No shirt, no shoes, no service.” It struck me as
extremely funny that you would have to tell someone
that they’re expected to wear a shirt and shoes when
they’re not actually on the beach. Doesn’t everyone
know that? Or is there a sign on the inside of every-
one’s front door that says, “Don’t forget to wear pants
today!”
I grew up near a beach town with plenty of tour-
ists. Just because they were on vacation, they didn’t
seem to think that they had suddenly turned into
swimsuit models with buns of steel or that they
should suddenly start dressing as if they had got-
ten there by hopping a freight train. They seemed
to know that it’s not right to break fashion rules on
vacation any more than it is to break traffic laws.
If you don’t have any muscles, don’t wear a muscle-
T. You don’t look tough; you look like a suspect.
If you are not an Olympic swimmer or diver, or
European, do not wear a Speedo. I’m not nearly as
afraid of creeping European-style socialism as I am of
creepy European-style beachwear.
Don’t put that white zinc oxide on your nose if
you’re not a lifeguard. Even if you are a lifeguard, it’s
questionable. It makes you look as if you were on
your way to a war dance but it got cancelled due to
good weather. Sunscreen and a hat will work just fine
-- and I’m talking about a real hat, not one that holds
two beer cans.
Wear age-appropriate clothing. Spandex is not
supposed to have wrinkles. If you have the body of a
shuffleboarder, don’t dress like you’re a volleyballer.
You may win the volleyball match, but only by default
because everyone else has left in disgust.
Wearing black socks on the beach is even worse
than wearing a tie on the beach. Which is even worse
than wearing a thong. The worst possible beach out-
fit? Black socks with a thong.
If Jimmy Buffett won’t wear it, should you? If you
limbo under his very low fashion bar, it will be hard
to tell if you’re on vacation or just a local on a bender.
Unless your name is Elly May, leave the cut-off
short-shorts at home. “Let It All Hang Out” is a song,
not fashion advice. Save it for when you’re alone at
the cement pond.
Contact Jim Mullen at JimMullenBooks.com.
T
his is how strange contem-
porary Washington has
become: In the Senate -- the
less combative branch of congres-
sional Republicanism -- John McCain,
the self-proclaimed maverick who
once nearly was invited to join a
Democratic national ticket, and
Susan Collins, the Maine moderate
who often sides with Democrats --
are regarded, and sometimes dispar-
aged, as the Republican Old Guard.
Of course, this does not mean
that the GOP has drifted leftward.
On the contrary. It means that all
the assumptions once brought to
bear on congressio-
nal Republicans are
out of date. Dead.
Relegated to the
deep, dark past.
This spring these
two occasional ren-
egades found them-
selves in the role of
Old Guardians by
virtue of their longev-
ity (McCain has been
on Capitol Hill for 30
years, Collins nearly
as long, if her years
as a congressional
aide are counted),
and guardians of party tradition by
virtue of their temperament (which is
to say accommodating, though they
delight in being unpredictable in
whom they might accommodate).
But these days, an accommodat-
ing temperament and longevity are
passe, so these two onetime rebels
found themselves at the ramparts
over discussions about (and this is
the remarkable thing) whether dis-
cussions should even be held over
debt limit and budget issues. It is
probably not necessary to add that
yet another budget crisis looms.
For 10 weeks -- about the length
of an American general election cam-
paign -- Senate budget talks with the
House have been stalled. Actually,
they haven’t really begun, and as a
result the vital appropriations pro-
cess is in peril -- a potent symbol of
government dysfunction. At war are
two absolutes: the absolute neces-
sity to address budget questions and
the absolute refusal to engage those
questions without preconditions.
Before you leap to the conclusion
that Republicans are being intran-
sigent, remember that many of the
tea partiers are tired of being rolled
in negotiations, tired of watching
tax increases creep into law, tired of
watching ineffectually as big govern-
ment stays big or gets bigger.
So if you are sitting on the right,
intransigence seems prudent. And
congressional comity -- an SAT word
you used to hear on Capitol Hill --
could seem beside the point.
Increasingly, the nation sits help-
lessly by while two parallel range
wars are conducted on Capitol Hill.
The first is the usual one, drea-
rily familiar though it may be, that
pits Democrats (basically inter-
changeable with liberals) against
Republicans (basically interchange-
able with conservatives).
But the second is more interest-
ing, and maybe more consequential.
It pits veteran Republicans, reared
in a Senate where comity ruled and
intransigence was regarded as bad
manners, against newly minted
Republican senators, who regard the
upper house as a torture chamber
where principles go to die.
The result is a drastic change in
two of the most important institu-
tions in American civic life: The
Republican Party (which in both
houses of Congress provided a
far higher rate of support than the
Democrats for the Civil Rights Act
of 1964) and the Senate (where the
American filibuster was invented,
and then twisted to a form that would
be unrecognizable to its onetime
masters).
For many years, political scientists
and political commentators regarded
the Senate as if it were invulnerable
to outside influences, exempt from
time, existing in a world of its own
and, more to the point, of its own
making. This circumstance pre-
vailed for decades, even into recent
memory.
But that no longer is the case.
The first breezes of change came
with television, resisted by many
of the Senate’s old bulls at a time
when the phrase was redundant, but
implemented under an agreement
between Republican Sen. Robert J.
Dole of Kansas, no rebel against tra-
dition, and Democratic Sen. Robert
C. Byrd, the most stubborn defender
of Senate customs and prerogatives
ever.
That changed everything, includ-
ing the color of the Senate walls,
which soon were adjusted to look
better on television. Junior lawmak-
ers like Sen. Albert Gore Jr., a par-
ticularly deft manipulator of Senate
TV, developed visibility and power
beyond the expectation and experi-
ence of their predecessors.
The changes did not stop there.
Public affairs programming on
cable television and the faux drama
and high-fever rhetoric it rewarded
transformed all of politics, the Senate
especially. This new ethos reinforced
a broader culture of confrontation
and devalued the sense of reason
that the Senate, a product of the
18th-century Enlightenment and its
celebration of reason, once symbol-
ized.
“Now it’s all or nothing, com-
promise is a four-letter word, it’s
what plays on the cable shows each
night rather than the sweep of time
(that matters),” says Kenneth M.
Duberstein, who once worked for
one of the giants of the old Senate,
Republican Jacob K. Javits of New
York, and eventually became White
House chief of staff for Ronald
Reagan. “No wonder the party elders
are in short supply. Their wisdom
and voices of reason are easily dis-
missed by those who insist on instant
gratification, who believe that they
are right, and if you disagree you are
to be demonized and destroyed.”
But it’s not only the contempla-
tive streak of the Senate that has
been jeopardized. If there were one
characteristic beyond the rumina-
tive quality of the Senate that the
Old Guard cultivated and revered
-- reflected in its tone and tempo -- it
was this: honor.
Some lawmakers of the old tem-
perament complain that the current
Senate pressed for a budget, but now
refuses to go to conference with the
House to hammer one out -- the word
“hammer” indicative of the fact that
the contemplative Senate of the past
was nevertheless combative.
That sense of resistance -- dishon-
or, some of the Old Guard would say
-- is not the way things used to work
in the old days. But then again, in the
old days, things used to work.
David M. Shribman is executive
editor of the Post-Gazette (dshrib-
man@post-gazette.com, 412 263-
1890). Follow him on Twitter at
ShribmanPG.
Longing for Senates past
EDITORIAL CARTOON
T
he resignation of the state
Treasurer highlights a much-
needed cleanup bill approved by
the legislature earlier this year in the reg-
ular session, Act 1088 of 2013 to provide
for prudent management of state treasury
funds.
Act 1088 was prompted in part by
reports last year that the treasurer had
changed long standing procedures and
invested state funds with a select few
firms. Seven senators sponsored the bill,
which passed the Senate unanimously in
March.
The act expands the membership of the
state Board of Finance and requires that
at least one member have experience in
commercial banking, one member have
experience in the buying and selling of
securities and another member have five
years’ experience as a certified public
accountant.
Members of the Board
of Finance must abstain
from voting on issues
affecting any business or
organization with which
they are connected. The
Board shall select a chief
investment officer within
the Treasurer’s office, and
the Board may also hire
investment counselors
and money managers to
regularly examine the
investment practices of the
Treasurer’s office.
Act 1088 lists the qualifications needed
by employees who manage money and
make investments for the Treasurer’s
office and the Board of Finance. The new
law sets standards of transparency and
accountability that will prevent any repeat
of the practices that raised so many ques-
tions last year.
Lawmakers were concerned last year
about the state Treasurer’s change from
traditional investments practices, even
before she was arrested on a federal
charge alleging that she had steered
investments to a particular bond broker in
exchange for payment.
Legislators expressed doubts about
the qualifications of staff within the
Treasurer’s office who handled billions of
dollars in investments. Act 1088 address-
es the concerns that came to light during
last year’s legislative hearings.
Traditionally, the Treasurer and the
Board of Finance have rotated state invest-
ments more or less evenly among banks
and financial institutions throughout
Arkansas. It was quickly noticed in the
financial community when the Treasurer’s
office began doing much more business
than usual with a couple of firms, which
sold bonds before they had matured.
Legislative auditors questioned whether
the early bond sales generated as much in
earnings as the state would have earned
under traditional practices.
The governor appointed Charles
Robinson of North Little Rock to serve
as Treasurer until the next election.
Robinson, 66, graduated from Harrison
High School and earned a B.S. degree
in accounting at Arkansas Tech in
Russellville. He earned an MBA from the
University of Arkansas at Fayetteville and
worked for a private auditing company for
a couple of years before joining the staff of
the Legislative Joint Auditing Committee
in 1973.
Robinson worked for Legislative Audit
for 34 years, 28 of them as the head
of the bureau. He is a certified public
accountant and a certified fraud examiner.
He retired in 2007 and only a handful of
today’s senators and representatives were
in the legislature when Robinson headed
Joint Audit.
Those legislators who served with
Robinson say that he brings credibility to
an office that needs it. Changes mandated
by Act 1088 of 2013 will do much to help
restore the integrity of the Treasurer’s
office.
Sen. Alan Clark represents District 13
which includes portions of Saline County.
State Capitol
week in review
Taste never, ever
takes a vacation
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Columns and cartoons on the opinion page do not necessarily reflect
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Sen. Allen
ClArk
Jim
mullen
THE VILLAGE
IDIOT
Page 4A – The Saline Courier
news@bentoncourier.com Monday, February 4, 2013
OpiniOn
DAviD
ShribmAn
NATIONAL
PERSPECTIVE
Today in history
Today is the 153rd day of 2013 and the
75th day of spring.
TODAY’S HISTORY: In 1886, President
Grover Cleveland married Frances
Folsom, becoming the only president to
marry in a White House ceremony.
In 1924, an act of Congress granted
American Indians U.S. citizenship.
In 1997, Timothy McVeigh was convict-
ed of murder and conspiracy for his role in
the 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah
Federal Building in Oklahoma City.
In 2012, former Egyptian President
Hosni Mubarak was sentenced to life
imprisonment for his role in the deaths
of hundreds of protestors during a 2011
uprising.
TODAY’S FACT: The White House has
hosted 21 weddings, nine of which were
for children of sitting presidents.
TODAY’S SPORTS: In 1935, baseball
legend Babe Ruth retired.
Breaking news
www.bentoncourier.com
Sunday, June 2, 2013
The Saline Courier 5A
New scientific evidence
suggests headache arising
as a result of mechanical
problems of the neck (cervi-
cogenic headache) is often
incorrectly diagnosed as ten-
sion or migraine headache.
It is not surprising, then,
that a major study recently
published in the respected
Journal of Manipulative and
Physiological Therapeutics
has established that for
patients diagnosed medically
as having “tension” head-
aches, chiropractic treatment
is more effective than stan-
dard medical management of
headache.
The antidepressant drug
amitryptyline is often pre-
scribed for chronic headache.
In this study, six weeks of
drug therapy was compared
to six weeks of chiropractic
adjustments. The patients
selected for this study had a
history of at least one head-
ache per week over a mini-
mum of three months.
The study found although
drug therapy and chiropractic
adjustments were virtually
equally effective at reducing
headache pain, relief with
the drug therapy was accom-
panied by side effects in 82
percent of the patients. It
was also noted that previous
studies have shown amitryp-
tyline can aggravate cardiac
problems and glaucoma. By
contrast, the patients receiv-
ing chiropractic adjustments
reported no side effects.
The real benefit of chiro-
practic care became appar-
ent during the four week
follow-up period after the
interventions were stopped.
The patients in the drug
therapy group returned to
their previous levels of head-
ache suffering, while those
who received chiropractic
treatment reported continued
headache relief. This group
also reported higher levels of
energy and vitality than the
drug therapy group.
Previous chiropractic and
biomedical researchers have
shown headache can result
from irritation of the spinal
nerves caused by subtle
joint motion and alignment
problems involving the upper
vertebrae of the neck. As the
first controlled experiment
comparing chiropractic and
medical approaches to head-
ache, this study substantiates
numerous accounts published
in the clinical journals of
relief from headache follow-
ing chiropractic care.
Got Headaches? Listen Up!
Dr. J. Terry Simmons
Do you think
Chiropractic can
help you?
Call Dr. Simmons for a free
consulation
Most Insurances Accepted
501.847.7246
BryantChiropractor.com
BOLL WEEVIL PAWN
along with
Aarons, Direct Insurance & Radio Shack
Invite You to Their
The New Generation....
SuperStore
Red Cross Blood Drive
Saturday, June 8
11 am – 3 pm
Come join us for
BIG SAVINGS
FOOD • FUN • PRIZES
501-778-7900 • 1200 Military Rd. Suite 4
Like us on bollw@ymail.com
WIL CHANDLER/Saline Courier
Ricky Cain carries his granddaughter, Cara Miller, through the
rain, toward the finish line at Briley FAITH’s 3K Walk-n-Run for a
Cure. Cain — or “Boompa,” as his grandchildren call him — also
is grandfather of Briley FAITH Turner, who died at two months old
from spinal muscular atrophy.
WIL CHANDLER/Saline Courier
Brandon and Lyndsey Kelly, with son Jackson, jog toward the finish
line.
label record deal in the near
future.”
Phillips’ musical accom-
plishments have come as a
surprise to his parents, noted
his dad, Dru Phillips.
“At the age of 16 he asked
us for guitar lessons, but I
told him he didn’t have time
for a new hobby,” he said.
Undeterred, Phillips took
his sister’s guitar and learned
to play by watching YouTube
videos. It wasn’t long before
Phillips was posting his own
videos on the web and writ-
ing his own music.
“Every song I’ve written
has been based on situations
I’ve faced in my life,” Phillips
said. “’Finally Famous,’ the
first original on the CD, is
about my desire to become
famous and a good role
model to my fans around the
world. ‘One Day At A Time,’
my second original, I wrote
to express my feelings about
making hard decisions … for
me it was choosing between
playing Panther baseball or
pursuing my dream to build a
professional music career.”
Obviously, music won out
in that debate.
He said “More Than
Friends,” his third original
song, is “about a girl, of
course.”
“I’ve found that putting my
feelings and experiences into
songs is a great release for
me,” he said.
Phillips, according to his
manager, is a crossover pop
and pop country artist.
In December 2012, Phillips
signed a music management
deal with Robert Tranchina
of Tranchina Management in
Los Angeles. Additionally,
Phillips is represented
by Tammy Felton of the
Tamdenwood Agency in
Branson, Mo., and cur-
rently records at Square
One Studio’s in Branson and
Nashville, Tenn., with pro-
ducer Rod Kittleman.
Phillips also is participat-
ing in the Rock-2-Live, No
Texting & Driving Campaign,
produced by Live Nation,
and plans to devote most of
the remainder of this year
traveling between Branson,
California and Nashville,
recording and developing his
brand.
His father said his next
CD project will include music
representing “a number of
genres.”
The older Phillips pointed
out that he is a cancer sur-
vivor and noted that his son
wrote a song for him that was
sung at the Saline County
Relay for Life.
The Phillips family, which
includes Andru’s mother,
Tina, have resided in Benton
since 2001.
Phillips can be found on
these social media outlets:
Instagram, Twitter & KIK,
type andru_phillips. KeeK &
Facebook, type andruphillips,
all one word.
One can look for Andru
Phillips on iTunes within the
next few weeks to purchase
his original music.
Singer
From page 1A
Quorum Court
From page 1A
BRILEY WALK FoR SMA
the pests are removed from
the building, we will seal
and repair entry ways.”
He noted that his compa-
ny also will remove any vis-
ible droppings and disinfect
soiled areas.
All of this is included in a
five-year warranty, he said.
“If any bird or bat should
re-enter, we will remove the
new pests and repair the
entry ways for free within
the warrant time,” he noted.
His proposal calls for an
extended one-year warranty
at the end of the five-year
warranty for one-third of the
original cost.
Critter Getters’ work
would cost the county
$3,000, according to the
proposal.
In that same session, the
JPs also plan to review an
ordinance adding sections
of three roads to the county
road system.
Those roads involved are
Ironstone Drive, Lodestone
Drive and Stonehill Drive.
The Public Works
Committee meeting will
be followed by a meeting
of the court’s Finance and
Personnel Committee.
That session will include
reports from Circuit Judge
Gary Arnold on court secu-
rity and an update on a
communication tower from
Judge Lanny Fite.
All Quorum Court meet-
ings and committee ses-
sions are open to the public.
LITTLE ROCK — U.S.
Sen. Mark Pryor defended
his vote against expanded
background checks for fire-
arms purchases on Saturday
before a town hall audience
that included the father of a
student killed in last year’s
Connecticut school shooting,
saying the measure wouldn’t
have prevented those deaths.
Speaking at a “Sportsmen
Town Hall” in downtown
Little Rock, the Arkansas
senator said he voted against
the gun measure earlier this
year because he didn’t think
the current background
check system was work-
ing as it should. Pryor, a
Democrat, is fighting a high-
dollar advertising blitz from
gun control advocates as
well as conservative groups
as he runs for re-election
next year.
“You could read Manchin-
Toomey a dozen times,”
Pryor said, referring to the
background check measure
sponsored by Democratic
Sen. Joe Manchin of West
Virginia and Republican
Sen. Patrick Toomey of
Pennsylvania. “There’s noth-
ing in that legislation that
would have prevented Sandy
Hook.”
Pryor held the event the
day after launching the first
television ad of his re-elec-
tion campaign, pushing back
against gun control advo-
cates criticizing him for the
vote. Mayors Against Illegal
Guns, a group founded by
New York Mayor Michael
Bloomberg, has aired televi-
sion ads against Pryor over
the vote.
The group on Saturday
also brought in Neil Heslin,
whose son was among the
26 killed at Sandy Hook
Elementary School in
Newtown, Conn.
During the town hall,
Heslin questioned how the
expanded background check
measure would infringe
on someone’s Second
Amendment rights. Pryor
said he was concerned that
the measure didn’t include a
cap on fees gun buyers could
be charged for a background
check.
“When you start putting a
cost on someone’s right and
say you have to pay money
to have this right, you’re in
the zone of infringement,”
Pryor said.
After the event, Heslin
said he was disappointed
with Pryor’s vote on expand-
ed background checks.
“I wish he would take
another look at it and recon-
sider it,” Heslin said. “The
Manchin-Toomey bill is not
a perfect bill, but it’s a very
good bill, it’s a very strong
bill and it definitely expands
the background checks con-
siderably.”
Pryor has said a compet-
ing measure he supported
that also failed in the Senate
would have done more to
address gun violence by
increasing penalties for
“straw purchases” in which
someone legally buys a gun
for a criminal or a person
barred from owning one
— and by requiring states,
courts and agencies to report
mental health records to the
background check system.
“We have a system on the
books,” Pryor said. “It just
isn’t working.”
Gun control advocates,
however, have argued that
the measure Pryor sup-
ported and backed by the
National Rifle Association
would weaken the current
system by lifting bans on
purchases by some mentally
ill.
Background checks,
designed to keep guns from
criminals and the seriously
mentally ill, are currently
required only for sales han-
dled by federally licensed
gun dealers. The proposal by
Manchin and Toomey called
for extending the require-
ment to other sales at gun
shows and on the Internet.
Mayors Against Illegal
Guns is also airing radio ads
criticizing Pryor over the
background check vote, and
its director last month said
it planned to send out direct
mail pieces focusing on the
senator.
Pryor said he didn’t know
if the ads were doing any
damage to his re-election
bid, but said he believed his
vote against the background
check measure represented
his constituents.
“I think people in
Arkansas are ready for me
to fight back,” he told report-
ers.
The campaign comes
as Pryor also faces a bar-
rage of campaign ads from
Republican groups who view
him as the most vulnerable
incumbent seeking re-elec-
tion next year. No candi-
dates have yet announced a
bid to challenge Pryor. Pryor
is the only Democrat in
Washington from Arkansas,
a state that has turned
increasingly Republican in
recent elections.
Pryor defends gun vote at
‘sportsmen’ town hall meet
Associated Press
WALNUT RIDGE —
Lawrence County authorities
say they’re still waiting for
an autopsy report on the
cause of death of a 14-year-
old Walnut Ridge girl.
Sheriff Jody Dotson told
The Jonesboro Sun that a
preliminary autopsy report
on the death of Sidney
Randall has not been
released and that a full
autopsy report could take
months to complete.
The teenager was found
dead in the Black River
on May 18 — eight days
after disappearing from her
home. Investigators have
said Sidney’s step-father was
the primary suspect in her
disappearance — but he was
found dead of a self-inflicted
gunshot wound the day after
the girl went missing.
Dotson said an autopsy
on the stepfather’s body also
has not been finished.
Autopsy still pending on
death of 14-year-old girl
Page 6A – The Saline Courier
sports@bentoncourier.com Sunday, June 2, 2013
SPORTS
The Lady Panther
Basketball Camp will be
on June 4-6 from 8 a.m. to
noon at Benton Arena. The
camp is for girls in kinder-
garten to ninth grade. Cost
is $50 and can be paid on
the first day of camp. Each
camper receives a T-shirt.
and certificate. Call Coach
Jerry Chumley at 317-2570
for any additional info.
LADY PANTHER
BASKETBALL CAMP
LADY HORNET
BASKETBALL CAMP
June 3rd-5th in the Bryant
High School Gym. 8:30-11:30
Graders 3rd -8th ( next
school year)
Cost is $20 per camper
and each camper will receive
a T-shirt.
June 10-13 in the High
School Gym from 9 a.m.
- noon. The camp is for
students entering grades
3-7 and the cost is $75 per
camper. All campers will
receive a T-shirt. Go to
Saline Courier site for regis-
tration form
LITTLE HORNETS
BASKETBALL CAMP
Harmony Grove athletics
will be hosting its annual
Future Cardinal Basketball
Camp Monday, June 3,
through Wednesday, June
5, for students entering the
3rd - 9th grade beginning
in the fall. Both boys and
girls camps will be from 9
a.m. to noon in the Daniel
Henley Fieldhouse each
day. Cost is $40 per student
and includes the cost for
the camp and official camp
T-shirt. An awards ceremony
will be held at 11:30 a.m.
on the final day of camp.
Parents are encouraged to
attend. Registration ends the
morning of June 3. For more
information call Coach John
White (girls) at 776-2337
or Coach Dexter Hendrix
(boys) at 860-6796. Harmony
Grove is located at 2621
Highway 229 in Haskell.
Make all checks payable to
Future Cardinal Basketball
Camp.
FUTURE CARDINAL
BASKETBALL CAMP
BENTON SOFTBALL
MONDAY
Tree Gals vs. Lady
Panthers, 6 p.m. F5
Limelight vs. Lady Bugs,
7 p.m. F5
Lady Sharks vs. Dirt
Diamonds, 6 p.m. F4
S.W.A.T. vs. Rockers, 7
p.m. F4
Misfits vs. Her-canes, 8
p.m. F4
Flames vs. Sliders, 6 p.m.
F3
Wreckerz vs. Impact, 7
p.m. F3
Crush vs, Angels, 8 p.m.
F3
Sassy Slammers vs. Pink
Panthers, 6 p.m. F2
Rockers vs. Steelers, 7
p.m. F2
MONDAY
Instructional AA
4-5s
Cubs vs. Rays, 6 p.m. F8
Indians vs. White Sox, 7 p.m. F8
Indians vs. Rays, 8 p.m. F8
Instructional AAA
5-6s
Brewers vs. Braves, 6 p.m. F1
Krush vs. Angels, 7:15 p.m. F1
Minor AA
7-8s
Phillies vs. Scrappers, 6 p.m. F7
Cardinals vs. Rockies, 6 p.m. F2
Yankees vs. Blue Jays, 7:30 F7
Gamecocks vs. Red Sox, 7:30 F2
Major AA
9-10s
White Sox vs. Rzrbcks, 6 p.m. F3
Rangers vs. Drhm Bulls, 7:45 F3
Major AAA
11-12s
Dodgers vs. Razorbacks, 6 F4
Mudcats vs. A’s, 7:45 p.m. F4
Babe Ruth
13-15s
Cardinals vs. Red Sox, 6 p.m. F5
Phillies vs. Tigers, 8 p.m. f5
BENTON BASEBALL
A
t the end of the 2012
baseball season, the
St. Louis Cardinals
and Cardinal Nation were
left with the sick feeling of
what could have been after
losing a 3-0 lead in the NLCS
against the Giants. A team
that wasn’t
supposed to
make it and
then proved
everyone
wrong, once
again, was
back in the
spotlight only
to fall before
the big dance.
Now that
the 2013 sea-
son is well
underway, the
Cardinals are turning heads
again. With the best record
in baseball at 35-18, St. Louis
has blown through oppo-
nents with ease while losing
very few games.
But with the best rotation
in the league, one of the
best offences and a savvy
defense, the Cardinals are
still lacking a key piece to a
great teama steady bullpen.
Thursday’s game was
a perfect example. Why
Mitchell Boggs is still at any
level of professional baseball
is beyond me. Leading 2-1
in the ninth inning against
he Royals after a magnifi-
cent debut by top pitching
prospect Michael Wacha,
second-year manager Mike
Matheny sent Boggs to the
hill for the save attempt.
With Edward Mujica and
Trevor Rosenthal both on
the shelf after pitching a lot
during the week, Matheny
turned to the struggling
Boggs. Bad idea would be an
understatement at any point
of any game. Especially
when your team is up by just
one and currently on a four-
game winning streak.
Boggs has been atop
my unsavory list since the
second or third week of
the season. After being one
of the best eighth-inning
guys in 2012, Boggs has
been plain horrible this
season. Sporting an 11.05
ERA with an 0-3 record and
three blown saves, Boggs is
the last person a manager
should go to in a tight game.
For goodness sakes, Boggs
has given up 18 earned runs
in just 14.2 innings this year.
Matheny cost the
Cardinals a potential win
by going with Boggs on
Thursday. Fernando Salas
has not been extremely
good, but anyone is better
than Boggs. Why not throw
Joe Kelly or Victor Marte in
his place?
Kelly has one of the
strongest hard-throwing
arms on the team, which
is what a manager wants
in late innings. Example,
Rosenthal. Marte put togeth-
er a 1-0 record with a 2.78
ERA and 10 saves at Triple-A
Memphis this season before
being called up. Why not
that guy? It took losing the
lead before Marte entered
the game.
Boggs couldn’t even get
minor leaguers out this
season when we was sent
down, tallying a 5.06 ERA on
five hits, three runs and five
walks in just 5.1 innings of
work.
Nothing justifies putting
this guy in to pitch the ninth
inning when you are lead-
ing. If he needs work throw
him in a bullpen session or a
blowout. Or, how about this
SEND HIM BACK DOWN
AND LEAVE HIM!
Boggs is a Triple-A
reliever at best. He has a
4.15 big league ERA with
a 13-15 record and just six
saves in 16 chances. Need I
say more?
I have never been a fan
nor will I ever be a fan of
Boggs. The other downside
is the trade market for him
is nothing. Releasing him
before he causes further
damage is the only way to
fix the problem. His head is
not straight. The mechan-
ics are all screwed up and
he can’t even find the strike
zone with anything that
has any movement. A mid-
90s fastball is a beach ball
in the bigs. Hints why Jeff
Francoeur took him deep
coming off the bench cold
last night with none on,
thank God, and none out to
tie the game.
Bottom line is that the
Cardinals front office needs
to realize that Boggs is not
and will never be a closer,
good reliever or anything at
the big league level again.
The 2012 Boggs is gone.
Stop ruining a good thing
with unneeded bodies. Let
the best team in baseball
be the best team in base-
ball without Boggs. Always
rememberthere’s no crying
in baseball.
Boggs is a minor-league reliever at best
JOSH BRIGGS
FOUL BALL
BENTON – The Benton
McClendon’s were up in
both games of their double-
header against the AAA
Texarkana Razorbacks in
American Legion baseball
action on Friday, but ended
up with 10-9 and 2-1 losses
to fall to 0-3 on the young
season.
In Game 2, Benton was
up 1-0 with two outs and
runners at second and
third, with an 0-2 count
when McClendon’s catcher
Shawn Beesley over-
threw his pitcher Hunter
McDade, which resulted in
the tying and winning runs
to come around the score,
when no one was backing
up. Benton Coach Brandon
Wake thought he had seen
everything in his years
coaching baseball.
“I’ve coached for a long
time,” Wake started, “seen
a lot of games, I saw that
one (Friday night) and I
could not believe it. He
just threw it over his head.
(Second baseman Hunter)
Wray picked it up in the
outfield, just past second
base. Wray picks it up and
drops it, picked it up again
and it was too late. It was
rough.”
The first game didn’t
end much better for the
McClendon’s as they took
a 9-6 lead into the top of
the seventh inning before
Trey Bishop’s leadoff walk
spelled doom. Benton
would get the next out on
a fielder’s choice, but a hit
by pitch and consecutive
singles scored two, and a
passed ball tied the game
at 9-9. Jack James came in
for relief and Texarkana
would score the eventual
game-winner.
Early in Game 1,
Texarkana would take a
1-0 lead in the top of the
first, but Benton would
get the run back in the
bottom. A leadoff infield
single from Tyler Lewis
got the McClendon’s
started before he stole
second base and scored on
Bishop’s double to right
field.
The two teams didn’t
score in the second, but
the Razorbacks would lead
2-1 before Benton respond-
ed in the bottom of the
third. Lewis walked and
James would reach on an
infield single. Clay Holicer
was hit by a pitch to load
the bases with one out,
but the McClendon’s could
muster just one run when
James scored on an error.
After the Razorbacks
took a 2-run lead in the
fourth, Benton responded
again, this time with small
ball. McDade reached on
an infield single and was
sacrifice bunted to second
by Tyler Turbyfill. A bunt
single by Wray put runners
at second and third, and
Lewis’ bunt single toward
first base scored a run for
a 5-4 Texarkana lead. Wray
McClendon’s can’t hold leads in DH
By Tony Lenahan
tlenahan@bentoncourier.com
TONY LENAHAN/The Saline Courier
Benton McClendon’s relief pitcher Trey Bishop throws a pitch in Benton’s 10-9 loss to Texarkana on
Friday at Bernard Holland Park. Benton also lost 2-1 in Game 2 of the doubleheader.
Missed chances nix Hogs
MANHATTAN,
Kan. – The 15th-ranked
Arkansas baseball team
dropped a 4-1 decision to
Bryant on Friday night
in the opening game of
the NCAA Tournament at
Tointon Family Stadium.
The Razorbacks drop to
37-21 on the season, while
Bryant improves to 45-16-1
on the year. Arkansas played
on Saturday in an elimina-
tion game against Wichita
State and results will be in
Monday’s sports.
Barrett Astin recorded
his third consecutive qual-
ity start, allowing just one
unearned run on seven hits
and striking out seven in
seven innings. Astin lowered
his season ERA to 1.79.
Bryant reliever Salvatore
Lisanti (2-2) earned the win
out of the bullpen, striking
out two over four hitless
innings.
Arkansas reliever Jalen
Beeks (6-2) took the loss,
giving up three runs on four
hits in an inning.
Special to the Courier
FAYETTEVILLE - Taylor
Reed, the former El Dorado
High School quarterback
and a 2012 redshirted
walk-on quarterback at the
University of Arkansas,
is transferring from the
Razorbacks to the University
of Central Arkansas.
Reed tweeted his intention
to transfer, and his intention
was confirmed Friday by
his father Scott Reed, the El
Dorado coach.
Taylor Reed played for
his father at El Dorado then
was the starting quarterback
as a freshman in 2011 at
the University of Memphis
before transferring in the
summer of 2012 to Arkansas.
The Southeastern
Conference will distrib-
ute approximately $289.4
million to the 14 league
institutions in the revenue
sharing plan for the 2012-
13 fiscal year, which ends
Aug. 31, 2013, according to
league commissioner Mike
Slive.
The $289.4 million is the
highest total ever distrib-
uted in SEC history.
The revenue sharing
plans include money gener-
ated by football television,
bowls, the SEC Football
Championship, basketball
television, the SEC Men’s
Basketball Tournament,
NCAA Championships and
supplemental distribution.
The average amount
to be distributed to each
school is $20.7 million.
Not included in the
$289.4 million was $14.1
million retained by the
institutions participating in
Reed transferring
By Nate Allen
Razorback Report
SEC revenue highest ever
JAY MANNING/jaysphotodesign.com
Jacob Mahan watches game action in a game earlier in the season.
The Razorbacks lost 4-1 to Bryant University on Friday night.
Special to the Courier
MCCLENDON’S, page 7A
HOGS, page 6A REVENUE, page 6A
Sunday, June 2, 2013
The Saline Courier 7A
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Rules of the Pet Contest
would score on an error by
the second baseman to tie
it at 5-apiece.
“The thing about small
ball is they have to make
the play,” Wake said of the
opposition. “You’re forcing
the defense to make the
play. When you struggle a
little bit at the plate, we’re
not pounding it right now,
we have to move the run-
ners over.
“You force teams to
make the play, and if they
don’t make the first one,
who knows what’s going to
happen.”
Texarkana took another
2-run lead in the fifth, but
the McClendon’s would
take their first lead of the
game when Bishop started
the bottom of the fifth with
a single, was sacrificed to
second by Grayson Chilton
and scored on McDade’s
single. Two batters later,
Wray would hit a 2-run
double for the the 7-6 lead.
Benton would add two in
the bottom of the sixth
before Texarkana came
back to win it.
“We’re doing a little
better,” Wake said after a
rough start of the season.
“All these kids have never
played together. I think
we’re coming along pretty
good. We made tremen-
dous, tremendous improve-
ment (from a 14-3 loss to
North Little Rock in the
first game of the season).
Our pitching is going to be
fine, we just got to get it
done.”
In Game 2, Patrick
Ramsey pitched four score-
less innings.
After a rainout Saturday
against Mountain Home,
the McClendon’s will play
against Little Rock today at
4 p.m. at Bernard Holland
Park.
Brandon Moore closed
the game with a scoreless
ninth inning, striking out
two.
Bryant starter Peter
Kelich received a no-deci-
sion after giving up a run on
two hits and striking out six
in five innings.
Dominic Ficociello, Jacob
Mahan and Tyler Spoon
each had a hit in the loss.
Jake Wise had the only
RBI of the contest for the
Razorbacks.
Kevin Brown and John
Mullen each had three hits
to lead the Bulldogs in the
win. Mullen had two RBI,
while Brown drove in a run.
Arkansas got on the
board first in the fifth inning.
Ficociello blasted a leadoff
double high off the wall in
right centerfield that nar-
rowly missed being his
fourth home run of the sea-
son. Mahan followed with a
bunt single which advanced
Ficociello to third and put
runners on the corners with
nobody out. Brett McAfee
was hit with the first pitch
he saw to load the bases,and
Wise worked a walk to drive
in Ficociello and give the
Razorbacks a 1-0 lead. The
Hogs wouldn’t score again
in the inning despite having
the bases loaded with no
out. Two consecutive strike-
outs and a ground out ended
Arkansas’ threat.
Bryant responded in the
top of the sixth, when AJ
Zarozny reached on an error
and advanced to third on a
single by Brown. Zarozny
scored on Mullen’s single to
left field but Astin was able
to hold the damage at one
run by recording an out on
a fielder’s choice and strik-
ing out Dan Muscatello to
end the Bulldogs’ half of the
sixth.
Bryant scored three runs
in the top of the eighth.
Zarozny started the offense
with a one-out single and
was driven home on a single
by Brown after stealing sec-
ond. Mullen then hit a ball
off the wall in center for an
RBI triple and then scored
on a single by Anderson for
the final 4-1 margin.
bowls and $980,000 divided
among all 14 institutions
by the NCAA for academic
enhancement.
Revenues derived by
the institutions from its
local media packages are
not included in the total
amount.
Other yearly money
distributions, since 1980,
are as follows: 1980 ($4.1
million); 1981 ($5.57 mil-
lion); 1982 ($7.24 million);
1983 ($9.53 million); 1984
($18.4 million); 1985 ($9.34
million); 1986 ($13.1 mil-
lion); 1987 ($13.56 million);
1988 ($14.34 million);
1989 ($13.85 million);
1990 ($16.3 million); 1991
($20.6 million); 1992 ($27.7
million); 1993 ($34.34 mil-
lion); 1994 ($34.36 million);
1995 ($40.3 million); 1996
($45.5 million); 1997 ($58.9
million); 1998 ($61.2 mil-
lion); 1999 ($68.5 million);
2000 ($73.2 million); 2001
($78.1 million); 2002 ($95.7
million); 2003 ($101.9 mil-
lion); 2004 ($108.8 million);
2005 ($110.7 million);
2006 ($116.1 million);
2007 ($122.0 million);
2008 ($127.6 million);
2009 ($132.5 million);
2010 ($209.0 million);
2011 ($219.9 million);
2012 ($244.0 million); 2013
($289.4 million).
Hogs
From page 6A
Revenue
From page 6A
McClendonʼs
From page 6A
Benton
McClendon’s
batter Hunter
Wray hits a 2-run
double in the
McClendon’s
10-9 loss in a
Game 1 double-
header on Friday
night at Bernard
Holland Park.
TONY LENAHAN/The Saline
Courier
Hargrove gets shot with Dallas after bounty ban
IRVING, Texas —
Anthony Hargrove trudges
through mundane con-
ditioning drills while the
Dallas Cowboys conduct
more spirited offseason
workouts on the same fields.
The nine-year veteran
defensive end is still getting
into practice shape because
he sat out the 2012 season
after he was among four
players suspended in the
New Orleans bounty scan-
dal.
Hargrove never actually
lost his right to play because
his eight-game ban was
appealed, reduced and even-
tually vacated. But he says
the phone never rang after
Green Bay released him in
training camp last year.
Maybe it was the specter
of a suspension hanging
over him. Or maybe it was
missing the entire 2008 sea-
son over a violation of the
league’s substance-abuse
policy.
“Maybe I’m an enigma
for trouble,” Hargrove said.
“I’m trying to get past this
three-year thing where I can
maybe get five years in the
league without losing a year.
Maybe that’s what teams are
thinking. I don’t know. We’re
going to try to break that.”
The 29-year-old Hargrove
first wanted to break
the football cycle when
it became clear another
opportunity wasn’t coming
quickly. He spent a couple of
months caring for mentally
challenged adults at a group
home, doing everything
from cooking and cleaning to
teaching basic life skills.
The look in his eye and
the carefully chosen words
say Hargrove certainly didn’t
think he was treated fairly by
NFL Commissioner Roger
Goodell, but his choice for
something to do away from
the game made acceptance a
little easier.
“It’s easy to feel bad for
yourself because so much
stuff happens to you,” said
Hargrove, who lost his
mother to AIDS at age 9
and never had a relationship
with his father. “But when
you’re able to sit down with
someone who’s much less
fortunate than you are, life
definitely comes in place.
You understand, ‘Hey, my
life isn’t that bad. Hey, at
least I can get up and I can
walk every day.’”
Hargrove had the second-
longest suspension among
the players punished by
Goodell for allegedly par-
ticipating in a scheme to pay
improper cash bonuses for
hits that injured opposing
players. The players denied
there was intent to hurt any-
one.
After an appeals panel
threw out Goodell’s suspen-
sions just before the 2012
season started, the commis-
sioner restored a full-season
ban for linebacker Jonathan
Vilma and a four-game sus-
pension for defensive end
Will Smith.
Goodell cut Hargrove’s
ban to seven, but it amount-
ed to just a pair of games
because he was given credit
for five games missed as a
free agent. Linebacker Scott
Fujita’s suspension was
reduced from three games
to one.
Two months later, all the
suspensions were vacated by
former Commissioner Paul
Tagliabue, who found fault
with everyone from Goodell
to the players.
“The way last year unfold-
ed, nothing was surprising
from anyone, responses from
anything,” Hargrove said.
“I’m putting it behind me.
I’m trying to move forward,
and that’s all I can do at the
end of the day.”
The Cowboys are switch-
ing to the 4-3 defense, which
means they need more line-
men. But they liked what
they already had enough to
skip the position in the draft.
The starters at pass-rushing
ends are set with DeMarcus
Ware and Anthony Spencer.
Hargrove figures to have
a good shot at a backup
role, which fits his career
profile. He has 25 starts in
102 career games with 19.5
sacks. He most recently
started six games for the
Saints in 2009 — the first
of the three alleged bounty
years.
The last season he
played in 2011, Hargrove
was among the final cuts in
Philadelphia and ended up in
Seattle, where he played 15
games.
By Schuyler Dixon
AP Writer
Page 8A – The Saline Courier Sunday, June 2, 2013
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www.rivendellofarkansas.com
We offer competitive compensation,
benefits, great working environment and
an opportunity of make a difference in
the lives of families in Arkansas.
RIVENDELL BEHAVIORAL
HEALTH SERVICES
100 RIVENDELL DRIVE,
BENTON, AR 72019
Equal Opportunity Employer
Employment
Alternative Community Services – Waiver
Direct Care Worker
job opening in the Benton area for full-time
energetic and skilled person to work with individual
with disabilities. Experience a must.
Competitive Salary and Benefits, including paid
leave, health and dental insurance, and retirement
We are an Equal Opportunity Employer
United Cerebral Palsy
9720 N. Rodney Parham • Little Rock, AR • 72227
E-mail resumes to hr@ucpcark.org,
fax to (501) 228-3849 or
submit application online at www.ucpark.org
315 N. Main, Benton, Arkansas
501-778-9162 or 1-800-364-9162
REAL ESTATE
Open House
Sunday 2-4pm, June 2
Open House
Sunday 2-4pm, June 2
LAND FOR SALE
1823 Kenmore Dr. – St. Andrews Woods
Well maintained (1866 Sq. Ft.) 3 bedroom, 2 bath home. Has
granite kitchen and bath counter-tops. Large master bedroom
and bath with jetted tub, separate shower. Split floor plan.
Enjoy the Spring/Summer under the 16 x 20 new covered patio
and new 12 x 20 Tuff Shed for storage.
$178,400
Directions: Alcoa Rd to St. Andrews Woods – Galloway St.
to Kenmore Dr., home on the left.
Call Barbara Harris 501-860-8544
2988 Wild Berry – Wildwood
Many up-grades to this 3 bedroom, 2 bath home
(1625 Sq. Ft.) makes this a great buy. New flooring,
covered back deck, large back yard with privacy fence.
Neutral colors, tasteful kitchen with new appliances.
Spacious master bedroom & bath.
$135,000
Directions: Benton Parkway to Gattin Rd. take left into
Wildwood subdivision then immediate left to Wild Berry,
home on the left.
Call Bill Tremor 501-317-5796
9702 Grapevine – Otter Creek (Little Rock)
Lovely Tudor home (2617 Sq. Ft.) 4 bedroom 2.5 baths.
Formal living and dining room. Large up-dated kitchen
with lots of cabinets, double oven, breakfast bar.
Covered patio with large side yard. $162,500
Directions: I-430 South to Stagecoach Rd. (exit 1) turn right
onto Otter Creek Parkway, then left onto Fawn Tree then right
onto Grapevine, home is on the left.
Call Jack Homan 501-317-8442
2.83 Acres on Elliott Road.
Just off Kirk Road. (HWY 298). Water and electricity
available Owner financing possible.
$18,000
1757 White Oak Lane – The Oaks
Great home! Corner lot with a side loading garage.
This home with 3BR, 2 Bath and over 1800 square ft.
Has tons of extras. Covered porch for entertainment.
Move in ready. Come check it out.
Directions: North on Congo Rd., right on Scott-Salem Rd.,
left into The Oaks
$179,900
Call Brooks Livers 501-412-5838
2516 Jasmine-Northshore Gardens
Executive style patio home with open floor plan. Very
elegant decor with 9 feet ceiling and crown moulding.
3 Bedroom, 2 Bath with master bath having a jacuzzi
and walk-in tub. Much more, come see.
Reduced to $209,900
Directions: From Military Rd. In Benton take North Shore
and turn left on Jasmine.
Call Barbara Harris 501-860-8544
411 Cole Drive
Beautiful 3 bedroom, 1.5 Bath with finished basement
that has a game room. Nearly 2300 square ft. of living
area on a large fenced lot with a 30x30 shop. Come
see this now! Reduced to $134,000.
Directions: From Benton take Edison Ave. toward Bauxite and
turn left on Cole.
Call Chris Brazil 501-326-8785
Other Listings
We are seeking dynamic, aggressive
salespeople with a stable work history,
to be part of our team in a fast-paced
work environment. B2B or media sales
experience is a plus.
If you can. . .
•achievemonthlysalesgoals
•workprofessionallywithclients
•enjoyprospectingandcoldcalling
•haveexcellentoralandwrittenskills
•canresolveproblemseffciently
You may be the one we’re looking for!
We offer base account list in central Arkansas,
base salary, plus commission, frequent bonus
plans, 401k available, health insurance, vacation
and sick leave.
Saline County’S newS SourCe SinCe 1876
Courier
The Saline
Please forward resume to: The Saline Courier
P.O. Box 207, Benton, AR 72018
fax to 501-315-1920 or email to:
dwills@bentoncourier.com
Advertising
Account
Executive
Garage Sales
ANOTHER
MAN'S TREASURE
Wed-Sat/ 10am-6pm
Sunday/ 1pm-6pm
Across from
Old Reynolds Plant
Bauxite
501-557-5565
EARLY BIRD SANITATION
Once a week pick up
+ Rolloff Dumpsters
332-7202 • 840-6758
• 778-3969
I BUY JUNK CARS
Wanted
W i l l b u y y o u r
n o n - w o r k i n g r i d i n g
l a w n m o w e r s . C a l l
326-1839
Auctions
SPRING CONSIGNMENT
AUCTION
Saline County Fairgrounds
June 8th 9a.m.
Turn that “For Sale” sign in
your yard i nt o cash! Farm,
Construction, Lawn & Garden,
Recreation equipment and ve-
hi cl es of al l types. Si gn up
early so we can advertise your
equipment.
Contact: Cox Auctions &
Realty, LLC John Cox
AALB#2066 501-617-1759 &
Matt Cox AALB#2067
501-609-6659
Freebies
FREE KITTENS t o
GOOD HOME
501-837-2603
Buy • Sell • Trade
in the Classifieds
Freebies
FREE Yorkies Male &
F e ma l e Mu s t g o t o -
gether Owner passed,
hous e t r ai ned, f i x ed,
Call 501-249-6453
Adoption
UNPLANNED PREG-
NANCY? THI NKI NG
O F A D O P T I O N ?
Open or closed adop-
tion. YOU choose the
f a m i l y L I V I N G E X -
P E N S E S P A I D . A b -
b y !s O n e T r u e G i f t
Adopt i ons Cal l 24/ 7.
1-866-459-3371
Personal
MEET SINGLES right
now! No pai d oper a-
t or s, j ust r eal peopl e
l i k e y o u . B r o w s e
g r e e t i n g s , e x c h a n g e
me s s a g e s a n d c o n -
nect l i ve. Try i t f ree.
C a l l n o w :
1-800-247-9958
MEET SINGLES right
now! No pai d oper a-
t or s, j ust r eal peopl e
l i k e y o u . B r o w s e
g r e e t i n g s , e x c h a n g e
me s s a g e s a n d c o n -
nect l i ve. Tr y i t f r ee.
C a l l n o w
1-800-275-7212
Employment
A KID!S Pl a c e Pr e-
s c h o o l / D a y c a r e i s
n o w h i r i n g . Ap p l y i n
p e r s o n @ 8 2 5 N .
Main St., Benton
Employment
ACCEPTING APPLI-
CATIONS for LPN!S,
M a l v e r n N u r s i n g &
R e h a b . , 8 2 9 C l o u d
Road, Mal ver n, Must
be Prof essi onal , Car-
ing, & Compassionate
t o wa r d s t h e E l d e r l y ,
Pai d Hol i days, Vaca-
t i o n , I n s u r a n c e , &
Benefit pay available,
Appl y i n per s on, No
Phone Calls, Please
CALL CENTER
CUSTOMER
SERVICE AGENT
NEEDED
Position is full time
with benefits start-
ing at $9.00/hr.
Must be flexible to
work any hours be -
tween 7:30 a.m.
and 9:00 p.m.!Ap-
plicant must be de-
pendable and pro-
fessional.! We are a
drug free and
smoke free com-
pany located in Bry-
ant, AR. EOE.
Only mail reumes
to: ACCOUNT AD-
VISOR POSITION,
PO Box 384, Bry-
ant, AR! 72089.
NOTE: Office is located
in Bryant, Arkansas
CAREGIVERS
NEEDED!
Competative wages
and benefits.
Must be 25 years
or older. Valid DL.
EOE. 501-538-5630
CDL-A TRUCK Driver
O / O s H o m e N e a r l y
Ever y Day! Excel l ent
P a y ! $ 1 . 0 7 / m i l e .
Mainstream Transpor-
t a t i o n , C a l l T o d a y !
866-441-0169
CLOTHES PRESSER
needed Exp.preferred
$8.50 hr Hrs. Mon-Fri
7a-4p Apply in person
at 5095 Hwy. 5 North
(Bryant)
COMPUTER DESKTOP
SUPPORT TECHNICIANS
needed in the central
Arkansas area.
Must be able to pass
criminal background
check and have valid
driver’s license.
Send resume to
P.O. Box 665
Benton, AR 72018
COOKS & DISH-
WASHER needed.
B r y a n t r e s t a u r a n t .
E x p . p e r s o n o n l y
n e e d a p p l y . R i c k
813-4423
DRIVERS: $1,200.00!
O r i e n t a t i o n C o mp l e -
t i o n B o n u s ! !Make
$63,000.00yr or more!
Ask about $2, 500. 00!
D r i v e r R e f e r r a l B o -
nus!!CDL-A OTR Exp.
R e q . ! C a l l N o w :
!1-888-993-0972
Classifieds Work!
Employment
HELP WANTED!!!
Make $1000 weekly
m a i l i n g b r o c h u r e s
f r om HOME! NO ex-
p e r i e n c e r e q u i r e d -
Start Immediately!
www.TheMailingHub.com
INDUSTRIAL
PAINTERS
Must have t wo year s
p r i o r e x p e r i e n c e i n
s pr ay pai nt i ng. Pr ef -
erably in an industrial
environment. DLM of-
f e r s a c o m p e t i t i v e
starti ng wage, 401-K,
health & dental insur-
a n c e , p a i d v a c a t i o n
and holidays. Apply in
p e r s o n a t D L M ,
1 0 9 1 2 Hi g h wa y 2 7 0
East, Malvern.
MIG WELDERS
Must have a minimum
2 year s MI G wel di ng
experience with refer-
ences and be abl e to
pas s a wel di ng t es t .
P a y p a c k a g e i n -
c l u d e s : c o m p e t i t i v e
starti ng wage, 401-K,
health & dental insur-
a n c e , p a i d v a c a t i o n .
A p p l y i n p e r s o n a t
DLM, 10912 Highway
2 7 0 E a s t , M a l v e r n .
Take exi t 99 of f I - 30
right to our door. DLM
is an EOE.
Cleo’s Furniture
SALES ASSOCIATE
Arkansas’ fastest growing furniture
company with over 25 years in the
business is looking to fll a sales
position in our Benton location.
LIFTING AND MOVING
FURNITURE IS REQUIRED
Health and Life Insurance,
Retirement, Vacations,
No Sundays, Excellent Pay,
Advancement Available
Must apply in person Monday thru
Friday 10:00 am to 6:00pm
201 N. Main St. Benton, AR
SURVEY CREW
p a r t y c h i e f a n d r o d -
ma n n e e d e d . Ho p e
C o n s u l t i n g , I n c . a t
5 0 1 - 3 1 5 - 2 6 2 6 o r
jonathanlhope@gmail.com
TELEMARKETING
AGENTS NEEDED
Pos i t i on i s par t - t i me.
Starting at $9.00/hour
Pl us Bonus ! Look i ng
f o r d e p e n d a b l e &
p r o f e s s i o n a l a p p l i -
cants. We are a drug
and smoke free com-
pany l oc at ed i n Br y -
a n t . H o u r s : M o n - F r i
4 : 3 0 p m t o 8 : 3 0 p m
and Sat. 9am to 6pm.
Send resumes to:
clewis@wehco.com
or P.O. Box 384
Bryant, AR 72089
TRUCK DRIVERS
Wanted Best Pay and
H o m e T i m e ! A p p l y
O n l i n e T o d a y o v e r
750 Compani es! One
Application, Hundreds
of Offers!
www.HammerLaneJobs.com
Want to Downsize
Your Gas Guzzler?
Sell it in the Courier
Classifieds. Call to
place your ad today!
315-8228
Instruction
A T T E N D C O L L E G E
O n l i n e f r o m H o m e .
*Medical, *Business,
* C r i m i n a l J u s t i c e ,
* H o s p i t a l i t y J o b
placement assistance
Comput er and Fi nan-
c i a l A i d i f q u a l i f i e d .
SCHEV authorized.
Ca l l 1 - 8 0 0 - 5 0 9 - 5 0 8 5
www.CenturaOnline.com
Child Care
IN-HOME DAYCARE
Spotless - Non-smoking
Drop-ins Welcome!
778-2920
LICENSED CHILDCARE
Infants to 5
Mon. Fri. Vouchers
562-0691 • 951-2923
Services
JIM CRITES
Carpentry-Handyman
a d d i t i o n s , S h e e t r o c k
& Painting, 34 yrs exp
501-249-6621
Apartments
Unfurnished
1 BR, 1 BA apartment
$300 mo. w/deposit, 6
m o . l e a s e r e q u i r e d .
Call 778-3324.
1BR 1BA Ki t appl i -
ances W/D $425mo +
$ 2 0 0 d e p , 3 1 5 - 9 3 3 7
b e t w e e n 9 a - 8 p , N o
Pets!
2BR 1 B A K i t c h e n
appl . & W/D connect.
$ 4 5 0 m o + $ 2 2 5 d e p
C a l l 3 1 5 - 9 3 3 7 b e -
tween 9a-8p, No Pets
2 BR Apts, kit. appl.,
W&D conn. , $500 &
up. Handicap access.
317-5190 / 317-5192
Courtyard Cottages Bry-
ant Senior Community,
55+, 1 & 2 BR Apts.
avail Now! 847-3002
HURRY
CALL NOW!
Super clean, well
maintained 1 & 2 BR
Apts Starting @ $450
Ready for move-in,
Castle Properties
Call Connie
501-626-4596
315-4900
SUMMERWOOD
APARTMENTS
COUNTRY OAKS
DUPLEXES
• Pool & Park
• All units available
with or without full
size washer & dryer
• Pets welcome with
limitations
• On-site Management
justinproperties.com
Silica Heights off Hwy 183
Edison Ave. & Cole Dr.
3200 Congo Road
Let the
Courier Classifieds
work for you.
Call Mary or Shawna
to place your
Classified Ad.
Mon.-Fri. 8am-5pm
315-8228
or come by
321 N. Market St.
Buy • Sell • Trade
in the Classifieds
Apartments
Unfurnished
CAMRY COURT
Now Open
in Bryant
New Construction
2 BR, 2 BA or 2.5 BA
off Wilkerson Rd.
on Sadie Dr.
(By Hill Farm Elem.)
Call Terri the on-site
manager for appt.
501-804-0125
Bldg. 1225 #2
or call Dale King
501-539-1935
Visit our web-site
www.arkansas
apartments.net
NOTICE: All real es-
tate advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to the Fair Housing
Act which makes it il-
legal to advertise any
preference, limitation
or di scr i mi nat i on
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or in-
tention to make any
such preference. We
will not knowingly ac-
cept any advertising
for real estate which
is in violation of the
law. All persons are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis.
Houses for Rent
2 BR 1 BA, 1 car Ga-
r a g e 4 y r s . o l d
$ 7 5 0 m o + D e p
607-3229 /414-6430
2 BR, 1 BA w/garage,
Orleans Court, Ben-
ton. 501-672-0407 or
affordablepropertiesar.com
2 BR, 305 Carter St.-
Benton. $650 mth. +
$500 dep. out bld. 12
mo. lease Prefer
non-smokers & no
pets 501-834-1274
2BR 1 Ba Kitch. appl.
W/D connec. No pets
$ 5 5 0 mo + $ 2 7 5 d e p .
C a l l 3 1 5 - 9 3 3 7 b e -
tween 9a -8p
3 & 4 BEDROOM
$ 8 2 5 - $ 1 4 0 0 m o . ,
H a s k e l l , B e n t o n &
Bryant. 315-9370
3 BR 2 BA Gar. Ben-
t o n , A s k a b o u t o u r
speci al rent di scount .
317-2092 , 249-1343
3 BR, 1 ba , CH/ A,
kitchen appli.$675 mo
+ $ 5 0 0 d e p . 1 5 0 2
Sorrell. 612-8848
3BR 2 B A B r y a n t
$ 7 5 0 m o N o P e t s
501-590-3055
4 BR, 2 bath, stai ned
concrete fl oors, 2 car
g a r a g e , g r e a t l o c a -
ti on, Benton School s.
F o r m o r e i n f o .
501-778-4402
Looking for a good
deal? Search the
Courier Classifieds!!
Classifieds
Sunday, June 2, 2013
The Saline Courier – Page 9A
Air Conditioning
HEATING AND
AIR CONDITIONING
Installation,
Maintenance and
24 Hour Service
501-425-3796
Residential &
Commerical
Attorneys
David Heasley
attorney at law
Divorce &
Family Law
Free phone consultation
Payment Plan
681-4452
622 Alcoa Road,
in Benton
Backhoe & Dozer
315-2343
Peas
Gravel
Fill
SB-2
Topsoil
Sandy Loam
Sands
Donnafill
Pick-Up
or
Delivery
Build & Remodel
Build & Remodel
Parish 
Construction
BUILDING AND
REMODELING
*31 yrs experience
Small or Large
Jobs Done to
Your Satisfaction
tFree Estimates
tReasonable
Prices
Licensed
501-231-9230
501-316-2994
Carpentry
EXPERIENCED
CARPENTER
- Out of Work -
Home Maintenance
& Remodeling
of All Kinds
Vinyl Siding Installation
Call TIM
778-5171
OVER 30 YEARS
EXPERIENCE
- Free Estimates -
No job too LARGE
or small
Satisfaction Guaranteed!
DAVID BURTON, SR.
794-2563
Cleaning Services
Double A’s
Cleaning
• Competitive &
Affordable Pricing
• Satisfaction
Guarantied
• Detail Oriented
• I Provide Supplies
Call For Free Estimate
Alexis
501-794-7236
lexi92981@hotmail.com
Residential &
Commercial Cleaning
References
Available
Call
Laurie
501-380-5748
Computer Services
A-1 COMPUTER
REPAIR
A+
Certified
Repair
Technician
•Desktop /Laptop
Repairs & Cleanup
•Virus-Spyware Removal-
Starting at $80.
1200 Ferguson Dr.
Ste. 5 • Benton
501-776-7577
Drywall Repair
DRYWALL
REPAIR
SERVICE
• Cracks & Holes
• Discolored Ceilings
• Water Stains
• Small Remodels
Valid References
40 Yrs. Experience
!!!!!!
Steve Burrow - Owner
337–4525
Handgun Classes
CONCEALED
HANDGUN
CLASSES
Course completed
in one day.
All
paperwork
provided.
Tim Bragg, Instructor
#95-055
501-776-7419
Handyman
Will be
handyman
Lawncare from
mowing to clean up
Tree trimming
Bush & garden
trim & clean up
Junk hauling
Flower Bed
clean out
Stump Grinding
Leaf Blowing
Deck Remodeling
Any Yard Work
FREE
ESTIMATES!
501-326-2839
and ask for
Mr. Massey
Home Inspections
Diamond R
Home Inspections
Russell Richmond
diamondrhomeinspections
@gmail.com
501-362-8160
mention ad for discount
Horses
Clinic’s Certified
HOLTZMAN
Riding Academy, LLC
BIRTHDAY PARTIES
10 & UNDER
SUMMER HORSE CAMP
316-1141
House Leveling
HOUSE
Leveling/Foundation
REPAIR
Concrete Foundations
or Pier & Beam
• Shaky floors
• Rotten wood
• Cracked brick
• French drains, etc.
~ Free Estimates ~
501-304-2040
Insulation
Southern Southern
INSULATION &
GUTTERS, Inc.
INSULATION &
GUTTERS, Inc.
INSULATION &
GUTTERS, Inc.
INSULATION &
GUTTERS, Inc.
Family Owned & Operated
for 33 Years
ª Residential & Commercial
ª Seamless ßutters
ª Leal Frool System
ª Fiberqlass, Batts & Blown
ª Stabili/ed Cellulose
ª ínsulation Removal
FREE ESTIMATES
Licensed - ínsured - Bonded
FINANCING AVAILABLE
315-2306
Toll Free. 888·278·7GOG
Landscaping
L.W. Lawn &
Landscaping
SERVICES, LLC
501-350-9137
870-942-9641
But my God shall supply all your needs according
to his riches in glory by Christ Jesus. Phil. 4:19
Call
Today!
Located in Bryant
Lawn Maintenance, Trimming,
Sprinkler Installation, French
Drains, Shrub & Tree Pruning,
Leaf Removal, Landscaping,
Gutter Maintenance and more
www.lwlawnandlandscaping.com
lwlawnandlandscaping@yahoo.com
VETERAN & SENIOR
DISCOUNT
Lawn Care
Richard
May’s
Lawn Care
10 years Local
Experience
Average yard:
Cut & Weed
Eat $25-$30
317-8966
316-6655
Flawless
Lawns
Flawless
Lawns
Spring Clean-Up
Leaves, Beds & Mulch
Mowing, Trimming, Edging
Odd Jobs and Light Hauling
Ryan Harmon 860-8789
Matthew 8:36
Classifieds Work!
Painting
SUPERIOR
PAINTING
• Residential & Small
Commercial
• Drywall Finish
& Repair
• Interior & Exterior
• Texture
• Pressure Washing
INSURED
Kelly Hill – Owner
501-316-3328
501-840-1470
Experienced
Painter
NEEDS WORK
Call Phil 249-1657
leave message
Interior & Exterior
30 yrs experience
All types of Home Maintenance
SCHAY PAINTING CO
Interior/Exterior
20 Years Experience
References Provided
Steve Schay
501-425-4492
Pet Care
Absolute
All breed mobile
dog grooming
501.732.6850
Kim McWhirter
kimmcwhirter
@ymail.com
SEEK AND YOU
SHALL FIND
Great deals in the
Courier Classifieds.
Yard Sales, Jobs,
Homes for Sale or
Rent. Check them out
daily. Call to sub-
scribe at 315-8228.
Classifieds Work!
Pressure Washing
Royal
Flush
Servicing
Central Arkansas
since 1988
316-1536
Pressure Wash & Seal
specializing in
!"#$%&'&()(*""+
,-#./(0(1'&&/(1-+-#2
3-/+&4(0(*5'&%(1'5-#6
JG’s
Pressure Wash & More
Deck Repair
Fences
Gutter Cleaning
Lawn Service
and More
501-249-4715
Roofng
ROOFING
Wagner
Residential
Commercial
&
VOTED
“Best of the Best”
2009
Free Estimates
847-6630
K & L
ROOFING
• Don’t Wait For
Roofing Repair
• All Insurance
Claims Welcome
• 40 years exp.
• Financing Avail.
w/approved credit
Upgrade to a metal roof with
a class 4 fire rating & you
may qualify for a discount on
your homeowners insurance
501-249-7735
501-778-7600
210 W. SEVIER
ST. • BENTON
Looking for love in all
the wrong places????
Check out the Freebie
section in today!s
classifieds. You will
fi nd uncondi ti onal
love there FREE!
Furry & Free!!
Buy • Sell • Trade
in the Classifieds
Tree Service
M00ߣ
ñFF0ßßñ8l£
Tߣ£ 5£ß¥l8£
501-778-8071
501-860-5911
28-Years
Experience
Insured &
Licensed
*Stump Grinding
*Take Downs
*Trimming
*Pruning
*Storm Cleanup
Parsons & Son
Tree Service LLC
“The Total Package”
Call us about
Tree Health Care
º 1rinning
º 1ake Lowns
º Pruning
º Renovals
º Stunp Renoval
º lirewood
º Oreen vaste lauling
Conplete
lnsuranoe Coverage
Owned 8 Operated
by an
lSA Lioensed Arborist
SO·L"PGA
840-1436
602-2959
CRITES
& TACKETT
TREE SERVICE
~ Free Estimates ~
Workman's Comp
& Liability Insured
•Stump Removal
501-337–1565
501-337-9094
Ready to graduate
from particle board?
1000!s of Courier
Classifieds will read
your ad daily. Call
Mary or Shawna to
place your ad today!
Tree Service
501.317.6788
ROCKIN B
TREE SERVICE
B
TRIMMING
PRUNING
STUMP GRINDING
REMOVALS
large & small
FREE ESTIMATES
Insured for
Your Protection
Excellent Clean up
Senior and
Military Discounts
available
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Service Directory
Auctions
WILSON AUCTIONEERS, INC.
Leading Real Estate Auctioneers “Since 1961”
501-624-1825 * TOLL FREE: 877-BID2BUY
E-MAIL: info@wilsonauctioneers.com - AAL #4
WEBSITE: www.wilsonauctioneers.com
Move-in Ready, 2,364+/- SF, 3BR/2BA Brick Home – Custom-built in
2000 w/ 24x24 Ft. Shop ~ Desirable Area in a Quiet, Convenient Location
near Ashley Park, Bryant Schools & I-30 ~ Plus, (2) Tractors
& Implements, Quality Furniture, Tools, Pottery, Appliances & Misc.
BRYANT HOME
&
PERSONAL PROPERTY AUCTION
TUESDAY ~ JUNE 18, 2013 ~ 10:00 A.M.
1011 SW 2ND STREET ~ BRYANT, AR
DIRECTIONS: From I-30 in Bryant, take Exit 123 & go 2 Miles South on Hwy. 183/
Reynolds Rd. & turn Right onto SW 3rd St. ~ Travel 1/2 Mile & turn Right onto Spruce
St. & Left onto SW 2nd St. ~ Watch for Property & Auction Sign on the Left.
REAL ESTATE DESCRIPTION: This Single Story, Brick & Vinyl Siding Home was
Custom-built in 2000 by the Current Owner ~ Property Consists of a 2,346+/- SF
Home w/2-Car Attached Garage, Covered Front & Side Porches & Screened-in Back
Patio ~ Detached, 24x24 Ft. Matching Brick & Vinyl Shop w/Overhead Door, Storage
Room & Additional Covered Storage ~ Home sits on a Beautifully Landscaped 1+/-
Acre Lot w/Flower Beds, Ornamental Shrubs & Fruit Trees & a Poured Concrete
Driveway & Sidewalks ~ Interior Consists of a Huge, Open Living Room/Dining Area
w/Hardwood Flooring, Vaulted Ceiling & Gas Log Fireplace ~ Large, Open Kitchen
w/Custom Cabinetry, Tile Flooring, White Whirlpool Appliances & Breakfast Bar ~
Master Suite w/Walk-in Closet, Jacuzzi Tub, Separate Shower & Dual Vanities ~
Spacious 2nd & 3rd Bedrooms ~ Guest Bathroom w/Handicap Accessible Walk-in
Shower ~ Oversized, Utility/Mud Room w/Sink, Built-in Cabinets & Pantry Closet.
PARTIAL LIST OF PERSONAL PROPERTY: Kubota L210 Tractor w/Wood Dixie
Cutter M5 Bush Hog ~ Ford 1700 Tractor ~ Several Tractor Implements ~ Cub
Cadet RT65 Tiller ~ Air Compressor ~ Power Tools ~ Yard Tools ~ Shop Tools ~
Kenmore Washer & Dryer ~ Refrigerator ~ (2) Chest Type Freezers ~ Houseful
of Quality Ethan Allen Furniture Including: Bedroom, Dining Room & Living Room
Furniture ~ Bar Stools ~ Bookshelves ~ Leather Sectional Sofa ~ Leather Recliners
~ China Cabinet ~ Buffet & Sideboard ~ Rugs ~ Lamps ~ Vanity Desk ~ Record
Player Cabinet ~ Rainbow Vacuum Cleaner ~ Roseville, Hull & McCoy Pottery &
Cookie Jars ~ Small Appliances ~ Pots, Pans & Kitchenware ~ Glassware & China ~
Assortment of Christmas Decorations & Misc. ~ All, Selling Regardless of Price on
Auction Day! ~ For Additional Information, Online Bidding Instructions on the
Real Estate & Photos, Visit www.wilsonauctioneers.com or Contact our Offce
Toll Free 877-243-2289.
AUCTIONEER’S NOTE: If you’re looking for a well built, well maintained, one
owner, move-in ready home on a beautiful, spacious lot in a quiet, desirable
area that is close and convenient to everything in Bryant, don’t miss this
opportunity. The sellers have already moved into assisted living and must
sell on auction day.
TERMS ON REAL ESTATE: $25,000.00 Cashier’s Check (NO EXCEPTIONS)
Down Day of Auction, as Earnest Money ~ Balance Due at Closing ~ Closing within
30 Days ~ Title Insurance with Warranty Deed Provided at Closing ~ Property Sold
Free & Clear of any Liens & Encumbrances ~ 10% Buyer’s Premium ~ Offers Prior
to Auction are Welcomed.
TERMS ON PERSONAL PROPERTY: Cash, Check & All Major Credit Cards Day
of Auction ~ 10% Buyer’s Premium.
SPECIAL INSPECTION: Sunday, June 9th from 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. or Home
can be Inspected Anytime by Appointment ~ Call Agent, Doug Westgate at 501-
815-4004 or e-mail doug@wilsonauctioneers.com to View this Property ~ Bidder
Registration will Begin On-site at 9:00 a.m. Day of Auction.
Announcements made day of sale take precedence over printed material.
WILSON REAL ESTATE AUCTIONEERS, INC.
Auctions
NILOAK; FURNISHINGS; ANTIQUES/COLLECTIBLES
AUCTION
ESTATE of GALENE McRAVEN
1706 VOLCANIC DR, BENTON (HIDDEN VALLEY)
WED. JUNE 5
th
10:00 A.M. (open at 9:00)
STARTING WITH NILOAK (200 + pcs) including SWIRL. (don’t be
late). CROCKERY: Eagle #15, #8, #3 crocks, #6 churn; Niloak #2
churn; chick waterer; stave mug. SWIRL: 12 1/2” & 8” vases; bud vase; candle
sticks; fower frogs; many other vases, bowls, etc; miniatures; cab & vases; shot
glasses; cigarette jars & more! CASTWARE: too numerous to list, incl.
animal planters; tank; cannon; ash trays (C. Burlingame & Pegasus); canoe; S.
Belles; blk strawberry vase; wishwell; deco pitcher; miniatures; & much more!
See website photos! ALSO: LIONEL & Marx trains. BY NOON: Household
(come early & preview during pottery sale). FURN. etc: Bow glass cabts; pie
safe; antique vanity & wash stand; QA leather chair; recliners; ext. table w/6
chairs & china cabt; siffel & other lamps; antique spinning wheel; bookcases;
qty books incl. lg. Qty. COOK BOOKS & MUCH MORE! ANTIQUE, etc:
Benton license plates (‘56, ‘57); 2 Aladdin & other old lamps; Dazey chvrn;
Firestone radio; Cemark ball jug; wash pot; & much more! GLASS, CHINA,
etc: punch set; Manhattan lot; Makassa china; tea sevices; fatware: crystal;
very lg. Lots everyday kitchenware (lot contents of cabts etc)! & much more!
APPLIANCES: Bernina server; 2 sew machines; porta aircond; refrig; W&D;
freezer; lap top; qty sm appliances (new/like new) individually & in lg lots!
“NO BUYERS PREMIUM CHARGES! You pay only what you bid!”
MUST SEE PHOTOS: WWW.ARKANSASAUCTIONEERS.ORG
NOTES! IN ORDER TO FINISH AT A REASONABLE TIME WE MUST SELL FAST &
MUCH IN LARGE LOTS! Come prepared! Bring boxes! Early checkout on pottery
& certain other sm. Items! NO CHILDREN PLEASE! DIRECTIONS I-30 exit
117 Hwy 5 South ¾ mi, left on Misty Lane (Hidden Valley), left on Volcanic.
DALTON DAILY & ASSOCIATES, INC.
“Our 67
th
Year of Statewide Estate Auctions”
Ray Hightower, Auctioneer, ArLic #41
(501) 562-6021 OR calls (501) 690-8981 OR 951-5055
Houses For Sale
New Construction, Bauxite Schools, 1 Acre + Lots, Both homes
are 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath Open Floor Plans. Solid Granite and Crown
Mouldings Throughout, Stainless Steel Appliances, Master Bath
with his & hers sinks and closets, Covered Front and Back Porches.
Directions I-30 to Bryant exit So on Hwy 183 left on West Sardis Rd on Mt
Olive left on Childress 4 mi on left - Hickory Nut Subdivision
4926 Hickory Nut Ln.-$169,900 14108 Hickory Nut Ridge Rd.-$171,000
Open Houses 1-4pm
4926 Hickory Nut Lane & 14108 Hickory Nut Ridge Rd.
CHILDRESS & SON CONSTRUCTION
Eric Childress 501-960-8388
L
L
C
Houses for Rent
4BR 2BA B e n t o n
School Di stri ct 19019
I - 3 0 $ 6 5 0 m o C a l l
870-556-4769
519 PEARSON 2Br
1 B A $ 6 2 5 mo + 4 0 0
D e p . N o P e t s
326-3907
Eagle Properties
LLC
315–2075
Nice 2 & 3 BR Homes
from $500 to $925
Apartments
1 BR’s from $415
2 BR’s from $475
*based on availability
Deposit & References
Required
eaglepropsaline.com
FOR LEASE/SALE
New 3 & 4 BR, 2 BA,
brick, FP, ceiling fans,
car pet , 2 car gar age,
patio. Go to: www.
catalyst-residential.com
or 501-697-6342
HOUSE FOR Leas e
2Br Mid-Town Benton
C a l l 3 1 5 - 9 4 2 2 B i l l
Barlow
NEW LEASE TO Pur-
chase: 3BR, 2BA, off
W. Col onel Gl en Rd,
2 4 2 0 W h i s p e r i n g
Pi ne, $850 mo + dep
Call 944-4976
Mobile Homes
For Rent
2 BR, 1 BA, Q u i e t
park, Benton Schools.
N o P e t s ! C a l l a n y -
time. 501-315-1281
Business Property
For Rent
FOR RENT O f f i c e
S p a c e a v a i l a b l e i n
D o w n t o w n B e n t o n .
501-580-0358
Miscellaneous
For Rent
*REDUCE YOUR CA-
B L E B I L L ! G e t a
4 - R o o m A l l - D i g i t a l
S a t e l l i t e s y s t e m i n -
s t a l l e d F R E E P r o -
gr ammi ng st ar t i ng at
$ 2 4 . 9 9 / m o . F R E E
HD/ DVR Up g r a d e t o
new callers, SO CALL
NOW (800) 799-4935
*REDUCE YOUR CA-
B L E B I L L ! G e t a
4 - R o o m A l l - D i g i t a l
S a t e l l i t e s y s t e m i n -
s t a l l e d F R E E P r o -
gr ammi ng st ar t i ng at
$ 2 4 . 9 9 / m o . F R E E
HD/ DVR Up g r a d e t o
new callers, SO CALL
NOW (800) 795-6129
Miscellaneous
For Sale
ELECTRIC
WHEELCHAIR
Li ght wei ght . Por t abl e
L i k e n e w. L o w $ o r
p e r h a p s F R E E t o
elderly. 888-442-3390
FOR SALE: Yamaha
alto saxophone.
Excellent condition.
With hard & soft car-
rying case. $395.
501-315-8228, leave
message.
Musical
Merchandise
Cushing
Piano Service
Tune • Repair
Player Pianos & Pump Organs
778-6584
SEEK AND YOU
SHALL FIND
Great deals in the
Courier Classifieds.
Yard Sales, Jobs,
Homes for Sale or
Rent. Check them out
daily. Call to sub-
scribe at 315-8228. Looking for a good
deal? Search the
Courier Classifieds!!
Musical
Merchandise
Yamaha Alto
Saxophone
Excellent condition
With hard & soft
carrying case $395
501-315-8228
leave message
Pets & Supplies
BENTON ANIMAL
Control & Adoption
501-776-5972
benton.petfinder.com
BRYANT ANIMAL
Control & Adoption
www.bryant.petfinder.com
www.1-800-save-a-pet.com
www.1888pets911.org
Time to get your own
place? Check out the
Rental Section in to-
day!s Classifieds...
Classifieds Work!
Produce
Produce 840-4076, Pick-
els, Squash, G. Peaches
Tomatoes, new Potatoes
Sweet corn,Cantaloupes,
1492 Salem Rd
STRAWBERRIES, 5k
Or c h a r d , Do n a l d s o n ,
AR. U pick or we pick
5 0 1 - 3 8 4 - 2 4 8 6 O p e n
Mo n . - S a t . , 8 - 5 . C a l l
for orders.
Heavy Equip-
SURPLUS EQUIP-
MENT. On l i n e a u c -
tions HUGE selection.
B I G s a v i n g s . N O
Buyer fees Low Seller
f e e s B A R G A I N S !
R e g i s t e r F R E E U s e
Promo Code cnhi313.
LIVE support.
www.SurplusOnThe.NET
334-215-3019
Boats & Marine
Equipment
94 SKEETERZX 150
B a s s B o a t 1 5 0 H P
M a r i n e r E l e c t r o n i c s
Trol l i ng motor $6,500
Call 501-915-8283
Autos For Sale
GOOD BUY 2 0 0 4
Jeep Grand Cherokee
62,000 miles 1 Owner
Call After 5 749-6078
Houses For Sale
EXCEPTIONAL
HOME newl y r emod-
el ed f or sal e i n Has-
k e l l . 2 B R 1 B A C a l l
501-249-8960
Mobile Homes
For Sale
Mobile Homes
For Sale
$$$ 0 DOWN $$$
with your Land!
Call 501-653-3201
FORECLOSED
DOUBLEWIDE on
Private Lot. Great
Schools, Great
Location, must sell!
501-653-3201
NEW 4 BR 2 BA
Home $39K includes
delivery to your prop-
erty. Call for Quick
Approval 653-3202
Lots & Acreage
3 ACR f o r s a l e
$ 2 9 , 5 0 0 6 1 2 - 9 5 9 2
On c o r n e r o f Co n g o
Ferndale & Lawson
40 ACRES of Timber-
land near Crow!s Sta-
tion 580-0358
Real Estate
CANCEL YOUR
T I M E S H A R E . N O
Ri s k Pr o g r a m STOP
Mo r t g a g e & Ma i n t e -
nance Payment s To-
d a y . 1 0 0 % M o n e y
B a c k G u a r a n t e e .
FREE Consultation.
C a l l U s N O W . W e
C a n H e l p
1-888-356-5248
Classifeds Work!
See Saline M A G A Z I N E
S P R I N G 2 0 1 2 I S S U E
MAKING
WAVES
MAKING
WAVES
THERE ARE MANY DIFFERENT SPOTS
IN SALINE COUNTY FOR ONE TO ENJOY
A NICE SWIM, A DAY OF FISHING OR
EVEN A COMPETITIVE CANOE RACE ON
THE SALINE RIVER
MORE INSIDE ON:
Where to golf in Saline
Where to vote
Local elected o cials
Museums, libraries and more
Fishing hole secrets
The Saline Courier along with the
entire media industry has experienced
numerous changes since its inception.
Over the years many predictions have
included the demise of print media. First
there was radio, then television and now
the Internet. Yet, through them all, The
Saline Courier remains an award winning
daily newspaper reporting the local news
Saline county residents seek. We are
proud to be a part of Saline County as its
oldest, continuously operated business.
321 N. Market St., Benton • 501-315-8228
Classifeds - a
shopping center
delivered to your home
Classifieds Work!
10A The Saline Courier
Sunday, June 2, 2013
www.oldsouthrealtyar.com • 203 Lillian Street • Corner of Lillian & East Sevier in Benton
Donna
Goodner
Associate Broker
317-1690
Denise
Hyde
Principal Broker
412-8065
Dottie
Royce
ABR, CRS, GRI
749-3031
Terri
Wise
749-3032
Susan
Gattin
317-5538
Brenda
Goines
CRS, GRI
681-4430
Cecilia
Thornbury
909-9408
Jackie
Flowers
317-7972
Laithe
Massey
501-206-5442
501-315-4554
“At your service from sign up to sign down!”
$
189,900
This house truly displays
downtown at it’s finest! Lots of
updates, with beautiful hardwood
floors. Great private enclosed
backyard w/ separate garage
Call Donna
317-1690
321 River St.
O
P
E
N
H
O
U
S
E
$
159,900
This 4BR2-1/2 BAhome in Spring Creek Village is
just the place for your family! Seller just put in new
laminate floors in den and newtile in bath.
Call Brenda 681-4430
$
99,900
Nice 2 story Condo has 2 Bedroomand 2 1/2 Baths.
Bedroom’s upstairs, Living areas down,
Newer carpet and tile, fireplace. Mowno more!!
Call Susan 317-5538
#
4 Dark Forest Place
$
82,500
Great location for small business or office,
across fromentrance to Longhills golf course.
Zoned Hwy commercial.
Call Susan 317-5538
406 Hwy 5 North
1134 Spring Creek
$
69,900
$
154,900
$
179,900
$
121,900
$
74,900
Great buy and lots of potential on this 3 BR1BAall
electric home! The living area and MBRhave hard-
wood floors, and the other 2BRhave newer carpet.
Great location, walk to Howard Perrin school.
Near business and interstate. Cute 3 bedroom1 bath
home. Fenced back yard, single garage.
Call Brenda 681-4430
Call Dottie 749-3031
212 Crouch St.
1914 Penland Dr.
$
119,900
1719 Deerfield
1470 sf duplex with 2 BR, 1 Bin each unit and .62
acres behind property. Newdecks on front and
unit on right has been remodeled.
Call Laithe 206-5442
Great location near school and business,
3 Large bedrooms plus large den,
Lots of updating. Nice large level yard.
This “Rustic” style home has hada makeover! New
paint &fixtures inthe kitchenandlaundryanda Brand
newlook! 4BR/2BA2188SqFt. Wonderful Rock
3 BR2 Bhome located in Howard Perrin Schools!
1668 sf Great kitchen with lots of cabinets, pantry,
bar and open to the dining room, pergo wood floors
Call Dottie 749-3031
Call Denise 315-HYDE Call Denise 315-HYDE
1223 Jameson
983 Hawknest 1300 Doyle Drive
Traditional 3/2 with split BRplan. Open concept kitchen,
dining, den. FP and tray ceiling in Den. Lg master suite.
Loads of closet space. Covered back porch.
Call Jackie 317-7972
2225 Redwood Dr.
$
135,000
N
E
W
L
IS
T
IN
G
R
E
D
U
C
E
D
!
R
E
D
U
C
E
D
!
Please join us for a FREE Educational Workshop for those caring for a loved one with
Alzheimer’s disease of other dementias.
The Workshop will cover how to: • Manage Behaviors
Encourage Engagement • Care for yourself while caring for a loved one
Date: Tuesday, June 4, 2013 Time: 1:00-4:00 p.m.
RSVP: 501-778-3093
Location: Benton First United Methodist Church
200 Market Street, Benton, AR
HomeInstead.com
Each Home Instead Senior Care franchise® ofce is independently owned and operated. © 2013 Home Instead, Inc.
Bryant High School Class of 2013 commencement
WIL CHANDLER/Saline Courier
A Bryant graduate smiles as she receives the signal to walk into Verizon Arena for her commencement
ceremony. The seniors were lined up in pairs to maintain alphabetical order across an aisle.
WIL CHANDLER/Saline Courier
Bryant graduate Suzanne Atwell applauds a speaker at the commencement ceremony.
WIL CHANDLER/Saline Courier
Bryant graduate Kristen Scarlett beams as she walks across the stage of Verizon Arena, diploma in
hand.
WIL CHANDLER/Saline Courier
From left, Bryant graduates Josh Lowery, Britten Lovelace and Hollie Locke sway and sing their Alma Mater song together at the conclusion
of commencement.
WIL CHANDLER/Saline Courier
Bryant graduate Levi Brady embraces a friend after their
commencement. Brady was elected the president of the senior
class and delivered the concluding speech of the ceremony.
Sunday, June 2, 2013
news@bentoncourier.com The Saline Courier – Page1B
Living
Renewing the
ties that bind
one more time
W
hile folks with ties to Bauxite were
renewing old friendships last week-
end at the Bauxite Reunion, I was
over in Eastern Arkansas picking up pieces
of the past at the biannual Cotton Plant Get-
together.
As far as I can tell, both events appear to be
going strong.
The half-century event in my old stomping
grounds hasn’t died out in spite of the passing
of many who once were a vital part of the experi-
ence. When I looked at the two pages of names
on the memorial list of the program, it was even
more surprising to see the number of those still
carrying it forward. And toward the end of the
2013 event, it was announced that plans already
are under way for the 2015 gathering.
That was good news for those of us who
return every time to nurture
the friendships that are still
strong in spite of the time and
distance that have separated
us.
One of the neat events of
the reunion is an old-fashioned
assembly like the ones we
used to have in school. This
includes the pledge of alle-
giance, announcements, a
prayer and patriotic and school
songs.
Those of us who once
cheered for the football team
led the singing of fight songs
and the alma mater, which was fun as well as
nostalgic.
Our school music teacher for years and years
— and who gave me and many others private
piano instruction — has always accompanied
our singing. Life isn’t always kind, though, and
“Miss” Mary Elizabeth wasn’t physically able to
do so this year, for the first time ever. She had
made a recording of the school songs, so we still
had her there electronically and, of course, in
spirit.
The assembly traditionally closes with the
singing of “Memories” by Jack Caperton. Like
Joe Lee Richards in Saline County, Jack — more
accurately known as “Little Jack,” a nickname
he acquired as the son of “Big Jack” and, after
all, this is the South — earned the title of “The
Singing Sheriff” after singing for hundreds of
funerals and weddings throughout the county
during his long reign as sheriff.
Since Miss Mary Elizabeth wasn’t present and
hadn’t made a recording of that one, I had to
move over onto the piano bench and take care of
the accompaniment. It was an honor to sub for
my old teacher, but I had to do so on a piano that
had a non-working pedal — not the best way to
shine when you’re replacing an icon. Eventually,
I figured out that I could use the piano’s middle
pedal — the one that sustains notes — to offset
the problem. I think you call that improvising.
A Saturday night dance, as always, featured
the music of Sonny Burgess and the Legendary
Pacers (including Cotton Plant’s own Bobby
Crafford on drums).
This is when my dancing feet get their every-
other-year revitalization as I reconnect with
my old dance buddies, particularly Freddy
Gingerich, now of Dallas. Among our shared
memories is the time we won the Coke dance on
Little Rock’s KTHV dance party, Steve’s Show.
Freddy and I dance the way we always did
— which is a rock ‘n’ roll push-style with lots of
turns enhanced with a whole lot of enthusiasm.
We do enjoy it.
Years ago my late spouse willingly withdrew
from his valiant attempts at dancing to hand me
over to Freddy and other old friends who grew
up honing their dance styles on the patio at our
homeplace in Cotton Plant.
Ed was as close to a perfect husband as any-
one could be, but he had two left feet when they
approached the dance floor and he, more than
anyone, knew it.
A twist contest was included in the band’s pro-
gram. I chose not to participate in that — though
I have been known to try the twist in previous
times. As it turned out, I wouldn’t have been
any threat to anyone because 96-year-old Jimmy
White was the runaway contestant.
This wasn’t a be-kind-to-your-elderly-friends
honor. He more than deserved it.
Toward the end of the activities, Polly Welch
Swan, who was a few years ahead of me in
school, gave this evaluation on the overall event:
“People sometimes say that there’s nothing left
to Cotton Plant anymore, that it’s nearly a ghost
town. They just don’t understand, though, that
all of us who grew up here still love this place,
and when we get back together, we sure do
know how to throw a party.”
And don’t forget our “two movie stars,” I
reminded her.
“Remember, in Cotton Plant we had Joan
Crawford and Roy Rogers.”
How many places could boast of that?
Can’t wait for 2015.
Lynda Hollenbeck is senior editor of
The Saline Courier.
lyndahol@yahoo.com
Lynda
HoLLenbeck
SenSe &
nonSenSe
Bauxite Reunion spans three-plus decades
For the past 32 years the
Saturday of Memorial Day
weekend has been set aside for
people with Bauxite connections
to head toward “home.”
On that day the Bauxite
Community Hall comes alive
once again with laughter, lots of
hugs and memorable stories of
long ago.
This year was no exception
when former Bauxite residents
from the four corners of the
United States came together
to renew friendships and
reminisce of days gone by.
A few of these attendees
included Marilyn Sutton
Applegate from Atlanta,
Ga.; Dorothy Ricketts
Chandler from South
Florida; Sammy Talkington
from Shreveport, La.; Ron
Shephard in town from
Chicago; Tom Lindsey from
Texas; and the guest speak-
er for the event, Ragon
Don Kinney and wife Gail of
Albuquerque, N.M.
That evening following the
actual reunion activities, the
Bauxite High School Class
of 1953 celebrated the 60-year
anniversary of their graduation.
Also, the Class of 1963 met for
dinner at Western Sizzlin in
Benton to reminisce after 50
years since graduating from
Bauxite. These are only a few of
the estimated 200 attendees at
the 2013 Bauxite Reunion.
On the Friday night preced-
ing the Saturday reunion, Old
Movie Night was held at the
Bauxite Community Hall.
At that event, people were
treated to the showing of
vintage films, enhanced with
cartoons, for 1940s’ admission
prices. Concessions at vintage
prices were another highlight of
the occasion.
During the business meeting
of the reunion, Arnold Wright,
Jack English and Myrlene
Tedford were recognized as
having attended every reunion
since its inception in 1981.
Preparation for next year’s
reunion — to be held on
Saturday, May 24, 2014 — will
begin immediately.
Once again, they will come
back home.
By Ginger English
Special to The Saline Courier
GINGER ENGLISH/Special to The Saline Courier
Class of 1958 members attending the reunion include, from left,
Paul Crowson, Lawrence Spence, Bill W
Ilson, Felix Childres, Anna
Claire W
illiams, Clyde Chenault, W
ilson DuVall, Phil Daugherty
and Ginger English. Class members Johnny Fletcher
and Herbert Kitchens also attended, but are not
shown here.
GINGER ENGLISH/Special to The Saline Courier
Sharing som
e laughs at the reunion are, from
left, Elbern W
illm
on,
G
eorge and Charlotte Brotherton, Shirley Burleson, Sam
m
y Talkington,
Carol Tucker and M
arilyn Sutton.
GINGER ENGLISH/Special to The Saline Courier
Three generations represented at the reunion include, from left, Bill
Sanges; his son, Bryan Sanges; and his grandson, Chris Sanges.
GINGER ENGLISH/Special to The Saline Courier
Reunion attendees gather on the front porch of the Bauxite Community Hall, the traditional meeting place for the annual Bauxite Reunion, now in its
32nd year.
GINGER ENGLISH/Special toThe Saline Courier
“The Old Men on the Porch” annual picture group includes, from left, John
Gardner, James Smith, Charles Cousin, Larry Joe Cousin and Jack English.
2B The Saline Courier
Sunday, June 2, 2013
501-315-7700
414 North MaiN
smithcaldwell.com
SMITH CALDWELL
BABY REGISTRY
aMaNda hilborN
liNdsey haire
leslie ottosoN
Katie bloodworth
Brooke Lance
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katie HoLLand
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tiffany Linz
& Brian MattingLy
HannaH Quinn
& wesLey grant
Maegan eLMore
& andrew tiLLey
tonya LasHLee
& MicHaeL Payton
Megan sancHez
& cody crist
keeLy Hairston
& andrew norMan
racHeL redding
& Brad duLL
eLizaBetH wHiPPLe
& david duke
Jessica BoLt
& andrew stovaLL
keLLsie ferguson
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kaci BLankensHiP
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Paige MiLLer
& kaLeB ProtHro
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414 nortH Main
smithcaldwell.com
SMITH CALDWELL
BRIDAL REGISTRY
1300 Military, Benton
776-1314
Mallory Cabe
.... Glenn Loyd
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Carrie Camp
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Summer Sanders
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BRIDAL REGISTRY
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Jessica Bolt
And
Andrew Stovall
M
elissa Carter
of Glenwood
announces the
engagement and forthcom-
ing marriage of her daugh-
ter, Jessica Bolt, to Andrew
Stovall.
The bride-elect is a 2005
graduate of Benton High
School and is currently
employed as a sales repre-
sentative with The Saline
Courier.
The prospective bride-
groom is the son of Becky
Roush and Chris Stovall of
California.
He is a 2009 graduate of
Poyen High School and a
2010 graduate of Ouachita
Technical College. He is
currently employed as the
circulation manager of The
Saline Courier.
The wedding is planned
for Sept. 7 in Benton.
Bolt-Stovall
SALINE ENGAGEMENT
Jessica Lynne Penn
And
Ryne Adam Besanson
J
eff and Lynne Penn
of Benton announce
the engagement
and forthcoming marriage
of their daughter, Jessica
Lynne Penn, to Ryne Adam
Besancon.
The bride-elect is a 2011
graduate of Benton High
School and is a student
at Southern Arkansas
University in Magnolia,
where she is an animal
sience-pre-vet major.
The prospective bride-
groom is the son of Brad
and Cindy Besancon of
Benton. He is a 2012 gradu-
ate of Benton High School
and is a student at Southern
Arkansas University in
Magnolia, where he is study-
ing criminal justice.
The wedding is planned
for June 22 at North Bryant
Baptist Church in Bryant. A
reception will follow at the
Bauxite Community Hall.
Penn-Besancon
Benhams celebrate 50th
wedding anniversary
W
illiam H. and
Mary Thieme
Benham of
Benton celebrated their
50th wedding anniversary
Saturday, June 1, in Bryant.
Family members hosted
the event.
The couple married June
2, 1963.
The Gentrys have two
children, Bill and Darcy
Benham of Greenbriar
and Ken and Shannon
Benham of Fayetteville; and
three grandchildren, Will
Benham of Greenbriar and
Gracie and Ava Benham of
Fayetteville.
The Gentrys are mem-
bers of Oak Grove Baptist
Church in Benton.
SALINE ANNIVERSARY
Mr. and Mrs. William H. Benham
C
arl and Martha
Hilson of Benton
will celebrate their
50th wedding anniversary
with a gathering for family
and friends.
The event will be held
from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, June
14, in the Blue Room of The
Center at Bishop Park
The couple married June
21, 1963, at Collegeville
Church of the Nazarene. The
Rev. W.L. Harwell performed
the ceremony.
He is actively employed
as a supervisor by Harco
Constructors, and the former
Martha Burks is a part-time
bookkeeper for Quality
Drywall & Acoustical.
The Hilsons have three
children: Clint Hilson and
wife Melissa, Leslie Lovell
and husband Rick, and
Ashley Stringer and husband
Dan, all of Benton. They also
have nine grandchildren:
Hunter Hilson, Hayden
Hilson, Lauren Ritchie,
Meagan Lovell, and Burke,
Tate, Jacob, Ben and Sam
Stringer, all of Benton.
All friends and family are
invited to attend in the cel-
ebration.
Mr. and Mrs. Carl Hilson
Hilsons to mark 50th
wedding anniversary
SALINE WEDDING
S
tephanie Patterson
and Zach Penn
were united in mar-
riage Saturday, May 11, at
Family Farm Christian Day
Camp in Malvern.
Allan Eakin performed
the 5 p.m. ceremony.
The bride is the daugh-
ter of Phil and Kelle
Patterson of Haskell. She
is the granddaughter of
Ed and Maxine Wine of
Bryant, and the late Leon
and Louise Patterson of the
Salem community.
The bridegroom is the
son of Mark and Sherry
Penn of Haskell and the
grandson of James and
Uvadell Penn, Margaret
Ward and Tommy Ward.
Caitlyn Carter of Benton
was maid of honor.
Bridesmaids were
Camille Harklau of Benton,
Kylie Patterson of Benton
and Michelle Eckhoff of
Haskell. Hanna Swanson
was junior bridesmaid.
Matt Penn of Haskell
served as best man.
Serving as groomsmen
were Josh Penn of Haskell,
Chase Nichols of Benton
and Nick Hudman of Little
Rock. Daniel Lane was the
junior groomsman.
Kim Harrington and
Cameron Ivie attended the
guest book.
Ushers were Nathan
Carter and Brice McGuire,
both of Benton.
Grace Mask was the
flower girl, and Patterson
Mask was the ringbearer.
Following the ceremony,
a reception was held at
Family Farm Christian Day
Camp.
The couple spent their
honeymoon in Waikiki,
Hawaii.
Patterson, Penn exchange nuptial vows
Mr. and Mrs. Zach Penn
Sunday, June 2, 2013
The Saline Courier 3B
Cel
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t
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n
g
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Church Insurance
Columnist shares
earthquake trivia
I
t has been an interest-
ing week this past
week earthquake-
wise around planet earth.
Arkansas had seven small
quakes, all centered around
the Morrilton area. And,
since September 2011, there
have been more than 500
measurable quakes in our
state.
Also this week, Russia
experienced the deepest
earthquake ever recorded.
An 8.2 quake occurred near
the Kamchatka and was
378 miles below the ocean‘s
floor, beat-
ing the old
record of
392 miles
below
ground
level set by
Bolivia in
1994.
And
Russia also
had an 8.7
earth-shaker
this week.
This big
one was
centered in
Moscow.
Surprisingly, the seven
quakes in Arkansas attract-
ed more attention than did
the unusually large one in
Russia.
“I was busy at my desk
all day, and I didn’t notice
a thing,” said a secretary in
one of Moscow’s high-rise
office buildings. Others
about the town either said
they felt nothing, or noticed
it, but weren’t disturbed by
the slight shaking.
As I write this column, it
is Friday morning, the 24th
of May, and so far today,
we have had two quakes in
the state, and it isn’t even
noon yet. The largest was
a 3.5 earlier this morning.
A number of people were
frightened by the temblor.
There have been 17 small
quakes so far this month in
our state.
People don’t like to think
they don’t have their feet
planted on solid ground,
but the truth of the mat-
ter is that the world is not
solid. Not too far below its
surface, there are cracks,
hollow places, slimy, oozing
mud, rocks, sand, tunnels
and caverns, and even large
lakes.
Nobody really knows
what causes every earth-
quake; there can be a num-
ber of reasons. Scientists
believe that the earthquakes
we are having now reflect
changes in the underground
water levels. If our sum-
mers are quite warm and
dry, the underground water
supply is low. This leaves
empty holes and spaces
deep down as the land dries
out and causes the ground
to “settle.” By the same
token, when we have a lot
of wet weather, water seeps
down, filling up the holes
and cracks, thereby pushing
the ground upward. Both of
these processes cause small
earthquakes and are natural
phenomena and, for the
most part, cause little harm.
“Fracking” is another
possible cause of Arkansas’s
earthquake activity. This is
a similar process used by
the oil and gas industries to
force natural gas out of the
ground so it can be used to
heat our homes and run our
automobiles and factories.
While the long-term results
of fracking are not known,
the earthquakes they cause
seem to be minor. They
are part of the price we pay
for the comfort and conve-
niences we receive for our
natural gas supply.
All that being said,
Arkansans still can’t
breathe easy. There’s our
old friend the New Madrid
fault that keeps the state’s
geologists on constant alert.
According to an article
recently, there has been
an increase in the number
of nature’s signals recently
that the New Madrid fault
zone is waking up from
its long nap. These have
included mass bird and fish
deaths the past few years
as well as the significant
increase in the number and
size of our earthquakes.
The New Madrid earth-
quake zone is roughly
nine times larger than
California’s better known
San Andreas fault zone.
When the New Madrid’s
last major quake occurred
200 years ago, it was a
disaster of epic proportions.
There are 14 states at least
90 per cent of which are
within the boundaries of
the disaster zone and seven
more that have at least 50%
of their land area within
the danger area. Back in
1811 the area was sparsely
settled and there were no
bridges and highways and
only a few railroads and no
mega-cities with their tall
buildings.
I think I will not be plan-
ning any trips to Memphis
or St. Louis for a while. My
worst nightmare is being on
one of those long bridges
over the Mississippi River
when an earthquake hits. I
can’t swim.
AlmA Joyce
HAHn
This,
ThaT &
The OTher
DISHES HAVE NO
SENSE OF TIME
So why am I being hurried
off
to the kitchen to wash ‘em?
Whole family is huddling
‘round the radio
with “Fibber McGhee and
Molly.”
Not fair. Not fair. Not fair.
Dishwater’s too cold
to cut fatback grease
even with soap.
Guess I’ll have to poke up
the fire,
heat things up some.
Maybe if I break a plate, let
‘er slip,
accidental, I won’t never
have to wash
‘nother dish. I’d prob’ly get
a lickin’.
Now the water’s scaldin’
hot.
Ice cubes’ll cool ‘er right
down.
Should be out mummbley-
peggin’
with the guys. Washin’
dishes
is girl’s work, ever’body says
so.
What’s the durn big hurry
anyhow?
Time don’t mean nothin’ to
this old skillet.
--DEwEll H. ByrD,
EugENE, Or
INFIElDEr
(ETHErEE)
Catch
The ball.
Peg to First
With a strong throw.
Get the runner out
Then throw the ball around
While the next batter comes
up
And return to your position
Waiting on and watching
the pitcher
As well-known routine crows
out nervousness.
--HOwArD NOBlES,
BENTON
CONSOlATION
Though many troubles come
my way,
And I’m not sure what I
should say,
I know how good God’s been
to me,
And blessed me with my
family.
And it always seems that I
bounce back
And He puts me back on the
right track
--MAE HAlBErT,
lITTlE rOCk
OVErwHElMED
My fingers will not write
about the spring
with glory bursting out in
everything.
They cannot write the wind,
the song of birds,
the forest creatures, babies
in the nest,
the blossoms, leaves, the
scents, I’m out of words
I toss my pen, my heart can
write the rest.
With glory bursting out in
everything,
My fingers will not write
about the spring.
--HElENE STAllCup,
CONwAy
wAITINg
I’ve waited in the doctor’s
office
more times than I can count
I’ve waited in the check-out
line
and watched as time would
mount
I’ve waited very anxiously
to go to Sunday School.
But surely time that’s most
misspent
brewing coffee is most cruel.
--rOgEr pOOlE,
BryANT
THE CurE
Waking up this morning
Feeling sown and blue
Maybe music will help me
make it through
But who I listen to?
George Strait
A better voice I’ve seldom
heard
So smooth, he sings like a
bird.
Before too many songs, the
day that started wrong
Was right
And all my blues
Are out of sight
Thanks--- George Strait.
---pHyllIS kAy STEElE,
SHErIDAN
JuST A DOT
Sometimes I wish I were a
little dot
Doing what I wanted no
matter what.
No one could see me. . .
I guess that’s true.
I could just disappear
No one would have a clue
I wonder if anyone would go
looking
For that clear little dot
Or even wonder where she
was.
Oh, I bet not.
--JANETTE
HEFFINgTON,
BENTON
HAIku SEQuENCE
Daffodils adorn
the rolling meadows atop
Moss Mountains between
the strutting roosters
in search of ticks and sun-
shine
hidden by the cold.
--HArDINg STEDlEr,
MAuMEllE
Send poems of 16 or fewer
lines to Don Crowson, 131
S. First St., Benton, AR
72015. Please enclose a
self-addressed, stamped
envelope if a clipping or
response is desired.
Save time preparing healthy meals
S
ummer activities,
ball games, church
activities, communi-
ty activities, and the list can
go on and on so. Today’s
families are busier than
ever. As the person who
prepares the meals for your
family, you
may think it
is impossible
to prepare
quick meals
that are
good for
your family.
Never fear!
Help is on
the way.
Meal
preparation
isn’t just
cooking the food. It includes
planning what to eat, buying
the food, putting the food
away, preparing the meal,
and cleaning up afterwards.
It takes a lot of time to do
all these tasks. How many
times have you given in to
ordering out or going out
to eat, especially on busy
nights, because you think
you don’t have the time.
Then you feel guilty because
you worry if your family is
eating a balanced meal that
includes plenty of fruits and
vegetables.
What would you say if
you were handed an all-
you-need-to-know guide to
low-fat, low-calorie, fabulous
family favorite meals, which
take only minutes to prepare
(including planning, prepar-
ing, and cooking). It would
be a best-seller at all the
bookstores. Is there such a
guide? Yes, there is. All you
have to do is follow these 10
timely tips:
1. Keep your pantry well-
stocked with fat-free soup
broth (chicken, beef, orien-
tal and/or vegetable), non-
fat dry milk or evaporated
skim milk, flavorful sauces
(teriyaki, barbecue, sweet
and sour) fat-free salad
dressings, a variety of dry
pastas, minute rice, apple-
sauce and canned fruits
packed in light syrup or in
it’s own juices.
2. Fill up your spice rack.
Quick meals don’t mean
bland and boring. Necessary
spices and herbs to keep on
hand include onion powder,
garlic powder, Italian sea-
soning, oregano, pepper, dry
mustard, cinnamon and chili
powder.
3. Stock your freezer with
skinless chicken breasts,
chicken tenders, ground
turkey, lean cuts of beef,
vegetable medleys for stir-
fry meals, fruit and berries.
A good time to purchase
surplus amounts of these
foods is when they go on
sale. Watch sale papers for
the best buys.
4. A must-have-on-hand
extra is plenty of cheese.
Buy several varieties
including cheddar, Swiss,
mozzarella, parmesan and
American. Most cheese will
keep for several weeks in
the fridgerator. Consider
freezing them for longer
storage.
5. Go for timesaving pack-
aged, frozen, or canned
vegetables and fruit. They
might cost a little more,
but if you can afford it, you
might enjoy the time saved.
Pick up appropriate-sized
portions at the supermar-
ket salad bar. Add them to
soups, salads, stir-fry dishes,
casseroles, and more. Many
times, manufacturers of
timesaving foods will pro-
vide cents off coupons as
a way to entice you to use
their products.
6. Follow your grocery list
and don’t get off track. Try
to shop at the same super-
market and become familiar
with the layout. It will save
you time.
7. Make out a weekly
menu. It will save you lots of
time. Read through recipes,
defrost and prepare food
ahead of time when pos-
sible. Take advantage of
your microwave if you do
not have time to defrost.
8. If you are fortunate
enough to have someone at
home such as a relative, or
even teenagers, call ahead
and have them begin to pre-
pare dinner.
9. Plan your leftovers
and use them. Last night’s
grilled chicken can easily
become a salad meal, used
in a casserole or in stir-fry.
10. Sauté vegetables and
meats in broth or water
instead of butter or mar-
garine. You’ll not only get
added flavor; you’ll get less
fat and calories, too.
With a little bit of plan-
ning and shopping savvy,
you can cook healthy meals
at home in little time. With
summer approaching, all of
us are looking for ways to
cut time in the kitchen.
For more information
on healthy meals for your
family, contact me at the
University of Arkansas
Division of Agriculture in
Saline County at 501-303-
5672, email me at kelliott@
uaex.edu or visit me at 1605
Edison Avenue, Suite 15 in
Benton. You may also follow
me on Facebook at UAEX
Saline County Family &
Consumer Sciences.
Here is a recipe that takes
only 20 minutes to prepare.
One serving has only 130
calories with 4 grams of
fat. Add a quick-to-fix pasta
salad, fresh or frozen fruit,
and garlic bread for a meal
the whole family will enjoy.
Herb-Broiled
Chicken Breasts
1 Tablespoon butter,
melted
1 Tablespoon lemon juice
One-half teaspoon Italian
seasoning
One-eighth teaspoon each
garlic powder and cayenne
pepper
4 (4 ounce) boneless skin-
less chicken breasts
In a small bowl combine
and blend all ingredients
except chicken. Spray broil-
er pan with nonstick cook-
ing spray. Place chicken on
sprayed pan; brush with half
of the herb butter mixture.
Broil 4 to 6 inches from
heat for 10 to 12 minutes or
until chicken is fork-tender
and juices run clear, turn-
ing once and brushing with
remaining herb butter.
Yield: Four servings.
Kris
elliott
SALINE EVENTS
TODAY
NATIONAL CANCER
SURVIVOR’S DAY, PRAYER
OF THANKSGIVING: 2 p.m.,
Sunday, June 2 at the Saline
County Courthouse gazebo.
Hands of Hope cancer sup-
port group is having a prayer
of thanksgiving on National
Cancer Survivor’s Day. This is
open to the public, all who
have dealt with cancer in
their lives are encouraged
to attend.  For information
contact Linda Hankins, 501-
939-9823, email lhankins@
ymail.com.
MONDAY, JUNE 3
MONDAY AFTERNOON BOOK
CLUB: 1 p.m. Monday, June
3 at Boswell Library. The
Monday Afternoon Book Club
will meet to discuss its cho-
sen title. The group is open
to adults 18 and older. Call
847-2166 for more informa-
tion.
MONDAY WITH THE
EVENTS, page 4B
4B The Saline Courier
Sunday, June 2, 2013
FREE Weight Loss
Surgery Seminar
Thursday, June 13
5:30 pm - Patient Testimonial
6:00 pm - Seminar
Saline Memorial Hospital
Classroom 1
SALINE MEMORIAL HOSPITAL
SalineMemorial.org | Quality Care Close to Home
Dr. Russell Gornichec will be speaking about weight loss
surgery options. Find out if you qualify and how to get started.
Space is limited. Please RSVP
in advance to 574-7171.
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Telling the story of Mexico Camp in Bauxite
I
n 1920 the Bauxite
News (later called
the Pick & Shovel)
revealed that more than
300 Mexicans were living
in Bauxite in an area in the
southern part of town called
Mexico Camp. The article
stated that Mexican work-
ers had been recruited by
Alcoa for
operating
the bauxite
mines after
the begin-
ning of
World War
I. Laborers
from Mexico
began arriv-
ing in box
cars July
1919. The
war had
caused a
labor short-
age, but greatly increased
production demand.
That same year, Mexican
families began moving into
the camp. They lived tem-
porarily in tent houses until
permanent four-room wood
structures were provided
by Alcoa. The tar-paper
shacks measured 22 by 24
feet, two feet smaller than
my present-day garage. The
houses were divided down
the center by a partition to
accommodate two families
in each building. The wood
frames were built on brick
pier foundations and had no
insulation. They were cov-
ered with one-ply roofing
tar paper and the floors and
interior walls were left as
rough wood.
The temporary nature
of these homes was inten-
tional to discourage the
inhabitants from developing
permanent ties in the area.
The company did noth-
ing to enhance the areas
around the houses, such as
planting shrubs or develop-
ing streets throughout the
camp.
Mexico Camp had its
own recreational facilities,
a small convenience store
and a company-operated
school. The school was for
the benefit of the Mexican
children, who came from
homes where only their
native tongue was spoken.
Everything taught had to
be carefully translated from
English to Spanish and
vice versa, until thoroughly
understood.
For a dozen years, the
colorful newcomers lived
contentedly under the sym-
pathetic, but firm manage-
ment of C. F. Perron, assist-
ed by his foreman, Jose E.
Montalvo. Perron was the
sole authority on any ques-
tions arising within Mexico
Camp, either domestic or
public. There was no steal-
ing or burglaries; however,
an occasional fight occurred
only to be settled by Perron,
who judged impartially, and
his word was accepted as
law.
The “Mexican Village”
that existed as a suburb
of Bauxite brought on the
magic of the guitar and
Spanish songs that were
enjoyed throughout the
village at twilight. At one
time the company’s newslet-
ter, Bauxite News, printed
a page in Spanish for the
families of Mexico Camp.
W. E. Morden, payroll
agent for Alcoa, delivered
wages for the Mexican min-
ing laborers to the Perron
Store on a weekly basis for
distribution.
After the war, on May 23,
1932, the sorrowful news
from Alcoa came to the
camp that the Mexicans
would have to move back
to Mexico. The mining
program had slowed almost
to a complete stop with not
even enough employment
for what was referred to as
“our native workers.” So the
Mexicans had to go.
In a great exodus, the
weeping people of the
camp, with their house-
hold possessions, livestock
and pets, were loaded into
trucks and sent away on the
long trip to Laredo, Texas,
near the border of Mexico.
An agent from Alcoa
accompanied them on their
journey and remained with
them for a while to assist
in placing the men in suit-
able employment on farms,
ranches and in industries.
The Bauxite News later
reported that over the
course of time, four of the
Mexican men managed
to make their way back to
Bauxite and resume their
employment in the mines.
Contrary to that article,
however, Montalvo family
members say that their fam-
ily never left Bauxite with
the others.
Jose Montalvo strongly
believed his family would
have better opportuni-
ties if they remained in
Bauxite. At the time of the
move, Montalvo worked for
Perron at the Perron Store
in Mexico Camp.
Over several years in the
Jose Montalvo family, there
were a total of 19 children.
The oldest seven children
were with his first wife,
Herlinda. These children
recall a sorrowful day in
their life on Feb. 16, 1937.
Angela Montalvo wrote
this account of the day: “It
was a bright, sunshiny day
in a harsh winter month in
Arkansas. I was five and a
half years old. That year
there was a flu epidemic
in the state. Mother had
nursed the entire family,
but the flu finally forced her
to bed. It was six o’clock in
the evening when Daddy
came in from work and was
checking Mother’s pulse.
There was no pulse! I did
not know what that meant
at that time. My six broth-
ers and sisters and I were
now orphans.”
After his wife’s death,
Montalvo worked long
hard hours. With no one
to assist with his young
family, the seven children
were sent to St. Joseph’s
Orphanage in North Little
Rock and attended Catholic
schools. It was at the
orphanage that they learned
to speak English.
G.E. “Lupe” Montalvo
recalls traveling with a
priest, Father McGinnis,
from the orphanage to
Benton and Bauxite to
serve as altar boy during
Catholic mass. The steps of
the courthouse in Benton
served as an altar. In
Bauxite they were allowed
to use the hallway of the
Bauxite Community House
in winter or rain, otherwise
mass was held outside on
the porch. In later years,
Jose Montalvo married his
second wife, Guadalupe.
She brought with her into
the family six children, and
four were born to her and
Montalvo. Guadalupe died
in 1963.
Four members of the
Montalvo family still reside
in Saline County. Lupe
and Olga currently live in
Haskell. Manual and Henry
are residents of Benton.
Henry is an active member
of the Bauxite Historical
Association and pres-
ently serves as chairman
of the Bauxite Cemetery
Association.
On July 16, 1954, Jose
Eufemio Montalvo became
an Alcoa 25-Year Club mem-
ber. He worked for Perron
during earlier years, and
according to Alcoa records,
had been with the company
officially since July 1929.
Montalvo died in 1964 at
age 67, one of the first
Mexican laborers to arrive
in Bauxite and last to leave.
These are Miner Memories
and some of them are not so
minor.
Mexico Camp School, Jan. 25, 1931
GinGer
enGlish
Miner
MeMories
Typical Mexico Camp house, April 24, 1931
MASTER GARDENERS: 6:30
p.m. Monday, June 3 at
Herzfeld Library The Saline
County Master Gardeners
and presenter Ruth James
will discuss “Cooking with
Vegetables” . The program
is open to all ages. Call 778-
4766 for more information.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 5
NATIONAL ACTIVE AND
RETIRED FEDERAL EMLOYEES
CHAPTER 1256 MEETING: 11
a.m., Wednesday, June 5, at
Western Sizzlin, in Benton.
Lunch at 11a.m. and pro-
gram begins at noon. No
meetings in July and August.
Will resume meetings on
September 4.
SATURDAY, JUNE 8
BUDDY CARTER RIB COOK
OFF SHOW AND SHINE: 8
a.m., Saturday, June 8 at the
Saline County Moose Lodge
in Benton. For Entry fees and
information Check out on
Facebook or call Carol Hardin
501-860-4177
MONDAY, JUNE 10
LITTLE HORNETS CAMP: 9
a.m. Monday, June 10 in the
High School Gym. The three
day camp is for students
entering grades 3-7 and the
cost is $75 per camper.  All
campers will receive a T-shirt.
For information and regis-
tration form.Contact Mike
Abrahamson mabraham-
son@brayantschools.org
ARGH, PIRATES! SUMMER
READING PROGRAM KICKOFF:
Monday, June 10 at both
library locations. The Saline
County Library will kick off its
2013 Summer Reading pro-
gram with a pirate-themed
event geared toward all
ages and will take place from
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Boswell
Library and from 4-7 p.m. at
Herzfeld Library. Children,
tweens, teens and adults are
invited to attend and sign up
for their respective programs.
No registration is required for
teens. Call 778-4766 or 847-
2166 for more information.
BENTON BOOK CLUB: 5
p.m., Monday, June 10 at
the Herzfeld Library. The
Benton Book Club will meet
to discuss its chosen title. The
group is open to adults 18
and older. Call 778-4766 for
more information. 
Events
From page 3B
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