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Courier
Volume 136
Number 157
1 Sections 12 Pages
50¢
Home of Carolee Cox
and Ben Balisterri
The Saline
www. bent oncouri er. com
Thursday, June 6, 2013
Join us on Facebook and Twitter
Saline County’S newS SourCe SinCe 1876
MISSED PAPERS
CALL
(501) 317-6013
DURING THESE HOURS
5-7 p.m. Monday-Friday
7-9 a.m. Saturday-Sunday
CONTACT US
Phone: (501) 315-8228
Fax: (501) 315-1920
Email: news@bentoncourier.com
Write: P.O. Box 207,
Benton, AR 72018
INDEX
OBITUARIES .............................. 3
OPINIONS .................................. 4
SPORTS .................................. 6,7
CLASSIFIEDS ...........................10
COMICS....................................11
SALINE COUNTY
WEATHER FORECAST
THURSDAY NIGHT: Lows in the
lower 60s.
FRIDAY: Sunny with highs in the
lower 80s.
FRIDAY NIGHT: Lows in the
upper 50s.
SATURDAY: Sunny with highs
in the mid 80s.
The Saline Courier is spon-
soring a 2014 Pet Calendar
contest, beginning Monday, as
a fundraiser for its Newspapers
in Education program. The top-
12 vote-getters will be featured
in our 2014 Pet Calendar.
The contest entry period
runs through June 10. Entry
fee is $5 per pet. Entries will
be featured in the pages of the
Courier throughout the voting
period, with updated voting
totals.
The 2014 calendar will
feature the 12 pets who gain
the most votes. Each pet
will be professionally photo-
graphed for the calendar. The
calendars will be available by
Thanksgiving and will cost $2
each.
Saline Courier
accepting entries
for 2014 Pet
Calendar Contest
ROAD CLOSED:
A portion of Boone
Road — from Tanglewood
Street West to Woodland
Park Road — will be closed
Tuesday between the hours
of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.
The Bryant Street
Department will be replacing
culverts during this time.
Questions may be direct-
ed to the department at 501-
943-0468.
Firefghter suspect in robbery
A Bryant firefighter has been
arrested in conjunction with a Little
Rock bank robbery.
On Tuesday Pulaski County
sheriff’s deputies
arrested Jeremy
Heavner, 35, of
Hensley in connection
with a robbery that
occurred that morning
at Metropolitan Bank
on Arch Street in Little
Rock. Bryant Fire Chief J.P. Jordan
said Heavner is on administrative
leave for an indefinite amount of
time.
“We’re just going to let the legal
system run its course,” Jordan said.
“We’re just glad no one was hurt
(in the incident).”
Heavner is being charged with
robbery and theft of property.
Heavner is being held at Pulaski
County Detention Center under a
$100,000 bond.
He also faces several hot check
charges out of the Sherwood Police
Department.
By Jennifer Joyner
jjoyner@bentoncourier.com
Heavner
‘TempesT’ seT To reopen TonighT
WiL ChAnDLer/The saline Courier
Saline County Shakes cast of “The Tempest” will resume the production’s run tonight at the Juli Busken Amphitheatre
in Tyndall Park. From left, in this scene, are Caliban (Cory Cotham), who swears allegiance to drunkards Stefano (Koty
Mansfield) and Trinculo (Emily Kincaid). The performance begins at 7 p.m. Admission is free, but donations will be
accepted to offset production costs.
Little Rock man
arrested after
fleeing police
A chase by Benton police resulted in
the arrest of a Little Rock man for pos-
session of drug paraphernalia, tamper-
ing with physical evidence and fleeing
in a vehicle.
Officers responded May 24 to a
report of possible gun-
shots in Hiland Place.
They attempted to conduct
a traffic stop on what they
considered to be a suspi-
cious vehicle on the scene,
when the vehicle took off
at “a high rate of speed”
toward Interstate 30, according to a
report of the incident.
The vehicle did not stop for officers
and merged onto the interstate, travel-
ing eastbound toward Little Rock.
The driver, later identified as
30-year-old Paul Barnes of Little Rock,
eventually stopped in Bryant and was
taken into custody without further inci-
dent, according to the incident report.
Benton police said the suspect had
illegal possession of several prescrip-
tion narcotics and drug paraphernalia.
Barnes also is charged with driving
on a suspended license.
This is an ongoing investigation and
additional charges are possible, said
Lt. Kevin Russell, public information
officer for Benton police.
The department encourages anyone
with information about this crime to
contact the Benton Police Department
at 501-778-1171 or 501-315-TIPS.
Individuals also may send an anony-
mous tip to CRIMES (274637) with the
keyword BNPD in the body of the text
or go to www.crimereports.com and
submit a tip there.
By Jennifer Joyner
jjoyner@bentoncourier.com
Barnes
Bryant PD releases video footage
of Kum & Go robbery suspects
Bryant police are still searching for sus-
pects in an armed robbery that took place
early morning of May 31 at Kum & Go on
Reynolds Road.
Police received video surveillance footage
on Wednesday from the convenience store
chain’s home office.
Police Chief Mark Kizer said it has been
determined that the vehicle driven by the
suspects is a Toyota Forerunner made
between 1997 and 2001 and that one of the
suspects was wearing a Joe T. Robinson
sweatshirt.
The video shows the other suspect wear-
ing a Nike sweatshirt during the robbery.
The clerk told police the two suspects
were male and white and both were wearing
masks.
She told police the two entered the store
about 4:30 a.m. One of the suspects pointed
a gun at her, and the two demanded all the
money from the cash register drawer, she
said.
According to police, after the clerk com-
plied, the two suspects fled the scene with
an undisclosed amount of money.
The Bryant Police Department is follow-
ing current leads, but anyone with informa-
tion regarding the incident is encouraged to
contact the Criminal Investigation Division
at 501-943-0943, Sgt. Todd Crowson said.
Crowson said anyone who provides
information has the option to remain anony-
mous.
By Jennifer Joyner
jjoyner@bentoncourier.com Family Fun Night
set for Saturday
at War Memorial
The Spreading Anne’s Wings orga-
nization will be hosting “I SAW Hope”
Family Fun Night on Saturday at War
Memorial Stadium.
Katie Clifton, local altruist and
owner of East of Eden Salon in
Benton, is spearheading the event set
from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.
Activities will include face painting,
bounce houses and presentations by
Radio Disney. Tickets are $5 for chil-
dren and $7 for adults.
Following the event will be a free
showing on the jumbo-tron of a popu-
lar children’s animated feature.
The event is being held to raise
money for a swimming pool for a local
family who needs it for a child with
a rare skin condition, Clifton said.
However, the Family Fun Night is
meant to raise awareness and provide
an event for all special needs children
and their families.
The family’s daughter, 8-year-old
By Jennifer Joyner
jjoyner@bentoncourier.com
Two rob-
bery sus-
pects rob
a clerk at
gunpoint
at Kum
& Go in
Bryant.
special to
The saline Courier
Robbery
suspects
enter the
front door
of Kum
& Go on
Friday.
special to
The saline Courier
FUn nighT, page 5
2 The Saline Courier
Thursday, June 6, 2013
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news across
-Associated Press
Saline county eventS
Ex-Arkansas treasurer indicted
on extortion charges Wednesday
Email calendar items to news@bentoncourier.com or call 501-315-8228 ext. 234.
Calendar items are intended for nonprofit organizations.
Saline courier ScraPBook 1997
SATURDAY, JUNE 8
BUDDY CARTER RIB COOK
OFF SHOW AND SHINE: 8
a.m., Saturday, June 8 at the
Saline County Moose Lodge
in Benton. For Entry fees
and information Check out
on Facebook or call Carol
Hardin 501-860-4177
PARON SCHOOL ANNUAL
ALUMNI REUNION: 5 p.m.,
Saturday, June 8, Paron
School Cafetorium in Paron.
Potluck dinner begins at 5
p.m. For more information
call: Janice (Rickard) Hobbs
501-499-5003.
FATHER-SON BREAKFAST: 8
a.m., June 8 at First United
Methodist Church in Bryant.
NFL Referee Walt Coleman
will be the featured speaker
at a special Father-Son
Breakfast . The event is free
and open to the community,
but seating is limited. Visit
www.fumcbryant.org to
reserve your bench.
MONDAY, JUNE 10
LITTLE HORNETS CAMP: 9
a.m. Monday, June 10 in the
High School Gym. The three
day camp is for students
entering grades 3-7 and the
cost is $75 per camper.  All
campers will receive a
T-shirt. For information and
registration form.Contact
Mike Abrahamson mabra-
hamson@brayantschools.
org
ARGH, PIRATES! SUMMER
READING PROGRAM
KICKOFF: Monday, June
10 at both library loca-
tions. The Saline County
Library will kick off its 2013
Summer Reading program
with a pirate-themed event
geared toward all ages
and will take place from 10
a.m. to 1 p.m. at Boswell
Library and from 4-7 p.m. at
Herzfeld Library. Children,
tweens, teens and adults
are invited to attend and
sign up for their respective
programs. No registration is
required for teens. Call 778-
4766 or 847-2166 for more
information.
BENTON BOOK CLUB: 5 p.m.,
Monday, June 10 at the
Herzfeld Library. The Benton
Book Club will meet to dis-
cuss its chosen title. The
group is open to adults 18
and older. Call 778-4766 for
more information. 
SALEM FIRE DISTRICT
BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS
MEETING: 7 p.m., Monday,
June 10 at Station #1 locat-
ed at 1785 Salem Road.
TUESDAY, JUNE 11
THEOS, A SUPPORT
GROUP FOR WIDOWS AND
WIDOWERS: 5 p.m. Tuesday,
June 11 for its regular
monthly meeting, entertain-
ment will be provided by
Alan Townsend.
BENTON PARKINSON’S
SUPPORT GROUP MEETING:
Noon, Tuesday, June 11, in
the hospitality room of First
Baptist Church for a lun-
cheon. Dr. Lajara, a move-
ment disorder specialist
from Bartlesville, Okla., will
be the guest speaker. For
more information call Karen
Garner at 778-1682 or visit
www.arparkinson.org.
THURSDAY, JUNE 13
AMERICAN LEGION
POST 263, SONS OF
THE AMERICAN LEGION
AND AMERICAN LEGION
AUXILIARY: 5 p.m.,
Thursday,  June 13 at
Traskwood City Hall. The
Auxiliary will meet at 5:00
P.M. followed by the Sons
of the American Legion at
6:00 P.M. then the American
Legion meets at 7:00
P.M.   We are requesting
all members and anyone
interested in joining us to
make an effort to attend. 
For information or ques-
tions contact Linda Hankins,
939-9823, email lhankins@
ymail.com for the auxiliary
meeting or Sonny Hankins
at 501-326-2882, email
sonny_72087@yahoo.com
or David Brewer, phone 501-
860-2854, email bentonfour-
square@att.net. 
SOUTHWEST WATER USERS
BOARD MEETING: 6 p.m.
Thursday, June 13, at 620
Airlane Drive in Benton.
ARKANSAS CONFEDERATE
CURRENCY AND SCRIPT:
6:30 p.m., Thursday, June
13, Mr. Ray Phillips of
Russellville will present a
program at the Bob Herzfeld
Memorial Library in Benton
on Arkansas Confederate
Currency and Script.  Mr.
Phillips has been collecting
Arkansas bank notes and
currency since an early age. 
You may call the library at
778-4766 for more informa-
tion.
FRIDAY, JUNE 14
ART RECEPTION: 2-4 p.m.
Friday, June 14 at the
Herzfeld Library in Benton.
The reception is to honor
Tane Steed, Benton resident
and art teacher. For more
information Call 778-4766
for more information.
Notepad and Pencil Holder
Craft Class: 10 a.m. Friday,
June 14 at Herzfeld Library
Ages 18 and up are invited
to create an easy-to-make
notepad and pencil holder
that will be invaluable to
the kitchen for shopping
and to-do lists. The class
is led by members of the
Saline County Cooperative
Extension Homemakers
group, and attendance is
first come first served. Call
778-4766 for more informa-
tion.
 
SATURDAY, JUNE 15
LAKE NORRELL FIREWORKS
FUNDRAISER: 5 p.m.
Saturday, June 15 at the
Lake Norrell Community
Center. The Lake Norrell
Area Association will host
their firework fundraiser
dinner and quilt raffle.
Barbecue dinner will be $10
for adults. Hot dogs for the
kids is $5 (for ages 5-10),
kids plates for 4 and under
are free. The association
is selling raffle tickets for
a queen size quilt, tickets
are $1 each or 6 for $5. The
drawing will be held dur-
ing the event. For more
information contact Barbara
Howell 681-7577.
BOOK TO MOVIE CLUB:
noon, Saturday, June 15 at
Herzfeld Library. All ages are
invited to a movie viewing
followed by a discussion of
the book “Holes,” by Louis
Sachar. Light refreshments
will be provided. Call 778-
4766 for more information.
MONDAY, JUNE 17
HANDS OF HOPE CANCER
SUPPORT GROUP MEETING:
6:30 p.m., Monday, June 17
at Saline Memorial Hospital
Education Building, class-
room 2. This month in
honor of National Cancer
Survivor Month we are
having a birthday party...
another birthday for us. If
cancer has become part of
your life whether as patient,
survivor, caregiver or fam-
ily member we invite and
encourage you to join us, 
For information contact
Linda Hankins at 501-939-
9823, email lhankins@ymail.
com or Libby Aldridge at
501-412-5337.
LITTLE ROCK — A
federal grand jury indicted
a former Arkansas state
treasurer on extortion and
other charges Wednesday
after prosecutors allege she
accepted more than $36,000
cash from a bond broker
to whom she steered state
investments.
The indictment comes
less than a week after a
judge rejected Martha
Shoffner’s attempt to plead
guilty to accepting the
money. She is charged with
six extortion counts, one
attempted extortion count
and seven bribe-related
charges.
An FBI affidavit filed
last month in federal court
alleges that the broker
— unidentified in court
documents — would roll up
cash in $6,000 increments
and have it delivered to
Shoffner’s office every six
months. At least two of the
payments were delivered
in a pie box with a pie. The
broker “recognized his/
her bond business with the
state grew because of the
payments,” the affidavit
said.
“We certainly anticipate
at trial that we will be able
to prove that her actions in
steering business to (the
broker) were directly relat-
ed to her receipt of $6,000
payments,” U.S. Attorney
Chris Thyer told reporters.
Chuck Banks, Shoffner’s
attorney, did not immediate-
ly return a call Wednesday
afternoon.
Shoffner was arrested at
her Newport home May 18
after the FBI said it caught
her on tape accepting a
$6,000 payment from the
broker, who hasn’t been
identified.
Shoffner, 68, had ini-
tially been charged with
one count of attempt and
conspiracy to commit extor-
tion under color of official
right under the Hobbs Act,
a federal law often used
to prosecute public offi-
cials for accepting bribes.
Wednesday’s indictment
expands those to include
one count for each of the
payments the FBI says
Shoffner accepted. Those
charges carry maximum
penalties of 20 years in
prison and up to a $250,000
fine.
The seven bribery charg-
es cover all of the payments
Shoffner received, plus the
$6,000 payment the FBI
said she accepted in May.
The bribery charges carry
maximum penalties of 10
years in prison and up to a
$250,000 fine.
She was set to plead
guilty Friday to a similar
bribery charge until she
told U.S. District Judge
Leon Holmes the payments
didn’t affect her decisions
as treasurer and that she
didn’t intentionally steer
business to the broker.
When Holmes asked
Shoffner last week if she
accepted payments from
the broker, she responded:
“Yes, but it was offered. I
didn’t demand it.”
Holmes rejected the plea
since she wasn’t admitting
guilt to all of the elements
of the charge.
Thyer said he believed
Shoffner’s admission in
court could be used against
her in the trial. Thyer said
he expected Shoffner to
make her first court appear-
ance in the coming days.
“We do not consider
Miss Shoffner a flight risk
or a risk to the community,
so I doubt very seriously we
will seek detention for Miss
Shoffner at that hearing,”
he said.
The payments were made
after Shoffner asked the
broker for $1,000 a month
to pay her rent in Little
Rock, according to the affi-
davit. The document said
the broker was granted
immunity in exchange for
his or her cooperation.
Thyer said he expected the
broker to testify against
Shoffner at her trial.
Legislative auditors last
year questioned Shoffner’s
selling of bonds before
they matured, a practice
that they said cost the state
more than $434,000 worth
of earnings.
Shoffner was arrested at
her home in Newport after
the broker agreed to record
the meeting and bring
$6,000 in a pie box, accord-
ing to the affidavit. FBI
agents executed a search
warrant and found the cash
inside a cigarette pack-
age in Shoffner’s kitchen.
Shoffner admitted that she
accepted the payments from
the broker, the FBI said in
its affidavit.
Shoffner, a Democrat,
was first elected treasurer
in 2006 and won a second
term in 2010. Facing pres-
sure from fellow Democrats
as well as Republicans who
threatened impeachment
proceedings if she didn’t
resign, Shoffner stepped
down last month.
Gov. Mike Beebe last
week appointed former
Legislative Auditor Charles
Robinson to serve the
remainder of Shoffner’s
term, which ends in January
2015. Robinson is barred
from running for the post
next year since he was
appointed to it.
Saline Courier photo
J.J. Yants takes a swing during Bryant’s home game against Sheridan on Wednesday. Yatt led the
Hornets with a 3 for 4 day at the plate and two RBI.
More than
1,000 mourn
Ark. sheriff
killed in storm
WALDRON — More than
1,000 people turned out to
mourn an Arkansas sheriff
who died while attempting
a water rescue during flash
flooding last week.
The Arkansas Democrat-
Gazette reports that about
300 law enforcement offi-
cers attended Scott County
Sheriff Cody Carpenter’s
funeral on Wednesday.
Carpenter and Arkansas
Game and Fish Wildlife
Officer Joel Campora died
while trying to save two
women from the floodwaters
that destroyed their home in
Y City last week.
Carpenter, Campora and
the two women were swept
away when the women’s
home collapsed. All four
died.
Arkansas Sheriffs’
Association Executive
Director Ronnie Baldwin
said Carpenter died doing
what sheriffs do best: help-
ing others.
LITTLE ROCK — Gov.
Mike Beebe on Wednesday
asked to use $1.1 million
from a state reserve fund to
make up for a shortfall in a
program that helps students
pursuing medical degrees
that Arkansas schools
don’t offer pay for tuition at
schools in other states.
Beebe said he’ll seek leg-
islative approval to help the
Arkansas Health Education
Grants program using
money from the state’s Rainy
Day Fund, which will have
$34.4 million starting July 1.
Lawmakers will consider the
request next month.
The grants help students
pay out-of-state tuition
for medical programs not
offered at Arkansas schools,
including veterinary medi-
cine, dentistry and optom-
etry. Dwindling fund bal-
ances have left the state with
enough money to continue
existing aid, but the program
faces cuts in new awards for
incoming students.
The money will pay for
assistance for 47 incoming
students, interim Higher
Education Director Shane
Broadway said.
Beebe said the program
helps the state meet short-
ages in those areas, but
warned that the money is
just a one-time solution.
Beebe said the program will
need additional funding next
year, and said he’ll call on
the Legislature to increase
funding for the program.
Lawmakers convene for next
year’s session in February.
“Even though we’ve been
telling everybody for years
that the fund balances are
getting low and if they didn’t
do something we wouldn’t
be able to meet the needs,
people still didn’t listen,”
Beebe said. “So we got the
ability to let these students
that were counting on it to
enter this year to get this
assistance...We’re telling
them that this is a one year
deal and if the Legislature in
February doesn’t recognize
the need and take care of
it, then there’s not going to
be any opportunity going
forward.”
Beebe announced the
decision after meeting
with several students who
qualified for the grants on
Monday.
Thursday, June 6, 2013
The Saline Courier 3
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State Auditor Charlie Daniels is holding more than
$178 million in unclaimed property. Is any of it YOURS?
Search online NOW to e-file and
receive your money in days.
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OBITUARIES
Elizabeth Ann Chumley
Elizabeth Ann Chumley, 70, of Many, La., passed away on
Saturday, May 25, 2013, at Toledo Nursing Center in Zwolle,
La. She was born Saturday, May 30, 1942, in Garland Co.
She was preceded in death by her parents,
Bill and Alice Adams; and one sister, Linda
Huchingson.
She is survived by her husband, Charles E.
Chumley of Zwolle, La.; one son, Charles W.
Chumley and wife Monica of Many, La.; one
daughter, Pam Parsons and husband Bobby of
Benton; four stepsons, Clarence Chumley of
Sherman, Texas, Johnny Chumley of Lubbock,
Texas, Charles Wayne Chumley of Sherman, Texas, and
Gary Chumley of Whitesboro, Texas; two sisters, Nancy
Stevens of Benton and Billie Bair of Owensville; one broth-
er, Mike Adams of Benton; and many grandchildren, great-
grandchildren and friends.
Funeral service was held Wednesday, June 5, at the
Warren Meadows Funeral Home Chapel in Many, La., with
Brother David Permenter officiating. Burial followed in the
Friendship Nazarene Cemetery in Many.
Online guestbook: www.warrenmeadows.com
Chumley
PAID OBITUARIES
Search halted in Pa. building collapse; 6 dead
PHILADELPHIA — After
a slow but steady overnight
search buoyed by the dis-
covery of a woman in the
rubble, rescue workers at
the scene of a building col-
lapse that killed six people
took a temporary break
Thursday in what had been
a round-the-clock dig for
additional victims.
A building under demo-
lition collapsed onto a
neighboring thrift store
Wednesday morning, injur-
ing at least 14 people, includ-
ing a 61-year-old woman
pulled from the debris near-
ly 13 hours later and hospi-
talized in critical condition.
Authorities have not
officially ended the search,
but the sense of urgency
has subsided after workers
combed through bricks and
rubble using buckets and
their bare hands well into
the night.
“We’re going to keep
searching until we’re abso-
lutely sure no one else is
there,” battalion fire chief
Charles Lupre said shortly
before dawn. He said there
were no reports of anyone
missing, but there was
always the chance that
someone was inside who
wasn’t reported missing.
It was unclear what
role the demolition work
might have played in the
collapse, but the accident
raised questions about how
closely the highly visible
spot on Market Street, one
of Philadelphia’s signature
boulevards, was being
monitored, particularly
amid word of the demoli-
tion contractor’s many
legal and financial troubles.
Officials from the U.S.
Department of Labor and
Occupational Safety and
Health Administration were
at the scene.
For weeks, people work-
ing nearby had watched
with growing concern as a
crew took down the vacant
four-story building next to a
Salvation Army thrift store at
the edge of downtown.
A roofer atop another
building didn’t think the
operation looked safe. A
pair of window washers
across the street spotted an
unbraced, 30-foot section of
wall and predicted among
themselves the whole build-
ing would simply fall down.
On Wednesday, that’s
what happened. The unsta-
ble shell of a building col-
lapsed into a massive heap
of bricks and splintered
wood, taking part of the
thrift store with it.
“Our thoughts and our
prayers go out to those who
lost their lives, and their
families,” Mayor Michael
Nutter said at a late-night
news conference at which
he announced the death toll.
“At the same time, we pray
that those who survive will
recover not only physically,
but certainly mentally from
the trauma of being in a
building and it suddenly col-
lapses.”
Witnesses said they heard
a loud rumbling sound
immediately before the col-
lapse.
“I was standing there
looking out my window,
watching the men at work
on the building, and the
next thing I know I heard
something go kaboom,”
said Veronica Haynes, who
was on the fifth floor of an
apartment building across
the street. “Then you saw
the whole side of the wall
fall down ... onto the other
building.”
Several other witnesses
said they had questioned
how the demolition workers
were tackling the job.
Roofer Patrick Glynn said
he had been watching work-
ers take down the building
over the past few weeks, and
he said he suspected a col-
lapse was inevitable because
of the way they were going
about it.
“For weeks they’ve been
standing on the edge, knock-
ing bricks off,” he said. “You
could just see it was ready to
go at any time. I knew it was
going to happen.”
Steve Cramer, who has
been working as a window
washer across the street,
said the demolition crew left
30 feet of a dividing wall up
with no braces and it com-
promised the integrity of the
building
“We’ve been calling it for
the past week — it’s going
to fall, it’s going to fall,” his
co-worker Dan Gillis said.
Officials said the demoli-
tion contractor was Griffin
Campbell Construction in
Philadelphia. Messages
left for Campbell were not
returned.
Records show that
Campbell was charged in
2005 with dealing crack
cocaine near a playground.
The charges were dismissed
after prosecutors misplaced
evidence.
He pleaded guilty in an
insurance fraud case in
2009, and was acquitted
of aggravated assault and
related offenses in 2007.
Campbell has also filed
for bankruptcy protection
twice since 2010. The first
bankruptcy was dismissed
because he didn’t follow
through on a repayment
plan approved by the court.
A second bankruptcy peti-
tion was filed in March.
There were no existing
violations on the collapsed
building, and Campbell
had proper permits for the
work being done, accord-
ing to Carlton Williams, of
the city’s Department of
Licenses and Inspections.
The city issued a demoli-
tion permit for the four-
story structure on Feb. 1.
Records show the property
owner as STB Investments
Corp., a company linked to
prominent businessman and
developer Richard Basciano,
who has been best known
as the owner of porn the-
aters in New York City and
Philadelphia.
Messages left at the
company’s New York
offices were not immediately
returned.
The accident happened
on the western edge of
downtown, between the
city’s business district and
its main train terminal, 30th
Street Station. The block
had long been a seedy link
between gleaming sky-
scrapers and the busy area
around the station.
The collapse involved an
empty building that once
housed a first-floor sandwich
shop and apartments above.
The thrift shop was on one
side. The other side was an
adult bookstore and theater
that had been taken down
within the last few months.
A demolition expert
wondered what precau-
tions were taken to protect
the Salvation Army store,
especially since it remained
open. Stephen Estrin, a
Florida contractor who has
testified as an expert at sev-
eral trials involving building
collapses, also questioned
whether the demolition was
being done by hand or with
machinery. A piece of equip-
ment with a claw device
was seen amid the debris
Wednesday.
“This is an inner-city
demolition of a masonry
building, which would
normally be done manu-
ally because of the inherent
risk — predictable if certain
things are not done very
slowly and very carefully —
of a collapse,” Estrin said.
“One of the problems with
claw work is it sets up a
vibration in the walls.”
Records show the col-
lapsed building was sold to
STB in 1994 for $385,894.
Plans tentatively called for
the block to be redeveloped
into retail stores and apart-
ments.
Associated Press
China frustration with NKorea offers hope for US
Beebe asks for $1.1M
for health education aid
Associated Press
Lottery projects loss of
$500K for scholarships
LITTLE ROCK — The
director of the Arkansas lot-
tery said Wednesday he’s
hoping for stronger sales
this summer but is project-
ing the state-run gambling
venture will pull in less
money for scholarships than
a year ago. Lottery Director
Bishop Woosley said at a
legislative Lottery Oversight
Committee meeting that the
lottery expects profits for
scholarships for the 2014 fis-
cal year, which begins July
1, to be $89.5 million.
That’s a drop from the
projected $90 million for
scholarships in the fiscal
year that will conclude at the
end of the month. Woosley
said strong summer sales
could mean more money will
be available for students, but
the protracted spell of heat
and drought last summer
kept many ticket buyers at
home. Another uncomfort-
able summer could have the
same effect.
“We have to wait and see,”
Woosley said, adding that
big jackpots in Powerball
and Mega Millions games
can boost revenues.
Powerball has had two
jackpots worth hundreds
of millions of dollars in the
past 12 months but Mega
Millions had had winners
pretty regularly, keeping its
jackpots too low to generate
extraordinary sales.
Interim Higher Education
Department Director Shane
Broadway told legislators
that about 12,000 scholar-
ships have been accepted by
students so far, with some
students still being noti-
fied that they’ve qualified.
About 30,000 students have
applied.
Legislators were curious
about a large number of
students who don’t follow up
after contacting the depart-
ment about applying for aid.
“Each year we’ve noticed
that about 4,500 begin cre-
ating an account but they
don’t come back (and) fill
out any other information,”
Broadway said. He said he’ll
conduct a study of the race
and gender of the people
who don’t follow up to see if
a specific group can be tar-
geted with more information
on how to apply.
WASHINGTON —
China’s growing frustration
with longtime ally North
Korea offers the United
States a glimmer of hope
about a once unthinkable
prospect: holding discus-
sions between Washington
and Beijing about what to
do if the government in
Pyongyang collapses.
There is no sign that
the North Korean regime
is in danger or that U.S.
President Barack Obama
and Chinese President Xi
Jinping will discuss that
possibility when they meet
this week in California. Any
such talk would alarm North
Korea if word got out.
But in China, talk of a
North Korean collapse is
no longer the taboo subject
it once was. Academics
are increasingly willing to
discuss it and a former top
U.S. admiral said he has
detected, during informal
meetings, a willingness of
Chinese officials to consider
such discussions.
That reflects internal
debate in China and dismay
about North Korean brink-
manship in the aftermath of
rocket and nuclear tests this
winter that defied China,
which supplies the North
with crucial food, energy
and diplomatic support.
Young North Korean
leader Kim Jong Un appears
to have consolidated control
since taking power a year-
and-a-half ago, and the spike
in tension that followed its
February nuclear test has
eased in recent weeks. But
there’s a perennial threat of
fighting with South Korea
on one of the world’s most
militarized frontiers. China
would want to avoid any
conflict that could draw in
its forces from the North,
and U.S. forces from South
Korea, as during the 1950-53
Korean War. Both powers
would be concerned about
the fate of North Korea’s
arsenal of chemical weap-
ons, missiles and nuclear
weapons and facilities.
But China also has reason
to fear a North Korean col-
lapse. That could trigger an
exodus of hungry refugees
across its border and lead to
a reunified Korea allied with
the United States, hosting
American troops on China’s
doorstep.
Analysts say that until
Chinese leaders decide
among themselves what
kind of outcome they are
prepared to accept on the
Korean Peninsula, they
won’t discuss the subject
with U.S. officials. Still, they
see some changes in China’s
attitude.
William Fallon, a for-
mer chief of U.S. Pacific
Command, said the U.S. and
China would have a shared
interest in working together
on North Korea and discuss-
ing issues such as securing
its nuclear weapons. He said
that in unofficial meetings in
China this year with former
and current Chinese govern-
ment and military officials,
he raised that possibility in
broad terms and detected a
willingness to consider it.
“I certainly suggested,
and I know others have offi-
cially and formally suggest-
ed that it’s about time we
sat down to talk because we
have common interest here,”
Fallon said. “I think that idea
is not being rejected. The
heads are nodding and they
are considering it. I would
expect that this would move
forward, carefully.”
Such cooperation
would require Beijing and
Washington overcoming
deep, mutual suspicions that
characterize their relations
as China’s economic and
military power grows and
the U.S. looks to boost its
profile and long-established
presence in Asia.
Associated Press
Associated Press
“Congress shall make no law ... abridging the freedom
of speech, or of the press ... .”
— From the First Amendment to Constitution
H
ardly anyone noticed when Gov. Lincoln
Chafee of Rhode Island, a Republican turned
independent, announced he was register-
ing as a Democrat. His conversion, however, marked
another significant step in the gradual extinction of an
ancient and honorable political species: Progressive
Northeastern Republicans or PNRs.
For many years, the center of gravity in the
Republican Party has been shifting to the south, the
west and the right. That left PNRs like Chafee out in
the cold. “The Southerners,” the governor told Chris
Matthews on MSNBC, “just had a different view of
where the Republican Party should be and as a result,
Northeasterners and some of the other moderate
Republicans slowly were taken out of the party, either
by elections or by choice.”
With the retirement last year of former Sen.
Olympia Snowe of Maine, only one true PNR remains
in the Senate: Snowe’s fellow Mainer, Susan Collins.
Snowe recently published a book, “Fighting For
Common Ground,” in which she
documented her own disillusion-
ment.
“The party’s changed,” she
said on the TV show “Chicago
Tonight.” “I haven’t. I haven’t left
the party. I think the party left me.
... Sometimes, I say I felt like a cast
member on Survivor -- presented
with a lot of obstacles and you get a
feeling you’re no longer wanted.”
That feeling of rejection extends
to Republicans far beyond the
East Coast who share the centrist politics of Snowe
and Chafee. Bob Dole of Kansas, the former Senate
leader and presidential candidate, told Fox News that
the GOP should hang out a sign saying “closed for
repairs.” Asked by host Chris Wallace whether he’d
be welcomed by today’s Republicans, Dole replied,
“I doubt it. Reagan wouldn’t have made it, certainly
Nixon wouldn’t have made it, because he had ideas.”
The decline of the PNRs makes it far harder for a
Democratic president like Barack Obama to pursue
any sort of legislative compromise because he lacks a
negotiating partner on the other side. When Speaker
John Boehner tried to forge a fiscal bargain with the
president, he was undermined by the hardliners in his
own caucus. He won’t try again.
In her book, Snowe cited this dynamic as the main
reason for her departure: “I found it exceedingly
frustrating that an atmosphere of polarization and my-
way-or-the-highway ideologies had become pervasive
in our governing institutions, compromising our ability
to solve problems at what was a time of monumental
challenge for our nation.”
This “atmosphere of polarization” is not what
Americans want from Washington. In the last election,
41 percent of voters called themselves moderates. In
a recent ABC/Washington Post poll, seven out of 10
agreed the Republicans were “out of touch” with the
concerns of ordinary Americans; two out of three said
the GOP was not doing enough to compromise with
the president. But no one seems to be listening.
Immigration stands as the sole exception. Even
some conservative Republicans favor a compromise on
that issue because it would appease two key groups:
Hispanic voters and business interests. Otherwise the
“my-way-or-the-highway” mindset dominates the capi-
tal. And it’s getting worse.
The National Journal has long studied congressio-
nal voting patterns and by their definition, the Senate
contained 58 centrists in 1982; that number dropped to
34 in 1994 and 7 in 2002. By 2010 there were none.
Democrats share the blame. Over the last genera-
tion, many conservative Southerners have defected
to the GOP, voicing sentiments almost identical to
Snowe’s: “I didn’t leave the party, the party left me.”
Centrists like Blanche Lincoln of Arkansas and Joe
Lieberman of Connecticut were challenged in prima-
ries for deviating from liberal orthodoxy; others have
been ostracized for anti-abortion or pro-gun views.
But the Republican migration to the right is far
more significant and the Chafee family reflects that
shift. Lincoln’s father John was a senator for 23 years,
a classic New England moderate who championed
environmental causes and was dumped from his lead-
ership post in 1990 by a conservative from Mississippi.
Lincoln was appointed to the Senate after his father’s
death in 1999 and won a single term on his own in
2000, but after he lost in 2006, he left the GOP and ran
for governor as an independent.
Now he’s a Democrat, and when Matthews asked if
he’d ever return to his father’s party, Chaffee said no.
“I was wondering, is the party going to come back to
my way of thinking? And I just made that decision,” he
said. “It’s not coming back.”
He’s right. The PNRs are just about gone. And
American politics is much poorer without them.
Steve and Cokie Roberts can be contacted by email at
stevecokie@gmail.com.
I
n a somersault of a speech,
President Barack Obama,
sounding like he did when he
first ran for the Oval Office, recently
declared that “a free press is also
essential for our democracy. That’s
who we are” (“Obama, in Nod to
Press, Orders Review of Inquiries,”
The New York Times, May 24).
He subsequently ordered a review
of his Justice Department’s subpoena
of the phone records of Associated
Press reporters and editors during
an investigation of national security
leaks. This, of course, affects any of
us who care about a free press.
“I am troubled by
the possibility that
leak investigations
may chill the inves-
tigative journalism
that holds govern-
ment accountable,”
the president orated.
It seems there are
at least two Obamas
-- one who is wary of
press disclosures of
any leaks from the
White House, and
another who supports freedom of the
press.
Even those Americans who still
trust the president must have been
jarred by his choice of who would
conduct this review: Attorney
General Eric Holder, who oversaw
the Justice Department’s undermin-
ing of press freedom.
The New York Post’s Michael A.
Walsh reminds us of what my First
Amendment hero, Justice Hugo
Black, once said: “Only a free and
unrestrained press can effectively
expose deception in government”
(“The ‘Criminal’ Press,” Walsh, New
York Post, May 23).
Even more jarring to continuing
admirers of Obama, as well as his
rising number of unbelievers, were
the ground rules laid out for those
representatives of major news outlets
who were invited to privately discuss
the proceedings with the attorney
general.
Dig this: The meetings, concern-
ing the administration’s government
violations of the First Amendment,
were to be “off the record.”
In other words, you citizens are
not entitled to know what was said.
How could a journalist, a member
of what constitutionalists used to
call “The Fourth Estate,” attend
such a gathering, only to be utterly
silenced?
Refusing to attend the meetings
out of self-respect were the AP (of
course), CBS News, Fox News,
CNN, The New York Times and the
New York Post.
So what are some of the news
organizations that went, thereby
agreeing to classify their reactions
in accordance with the very govern-
ment they were investigating?
The Washington Post, The Wall
Street Journal and ABC News,
which, in an ironic bow to the First
Amendment, “would press for the
meeting to be held on the record”
(“Fox News, other media outlets
refuse off-record meeting with
Holder,” foxnews.com, May 31).
But what if Attorney General
Holder threw that demand back in
ABC News’ face? Would its journal-
ists still agree to gag their First
Amendment rights at the investiga-
tion?
What all of this comes down to, as
it may affect future administrations
as well as generations of Americans,
has been precisely underlined
by Glenn Greenwald, an incisive
journalist who would have given
James Madison hope for the First
Amendment’s future.
Writing about how “media outlets
and journalists have finally awakened
to the serious threat posed by the
Obama administration to press free-
doms, whistle blowing and transpar-
ency,” the question now, Greenwald
demands, is:
“What, if anything, will they
(journalists) do to defend the press
freedoms they claim to value? ...
Thwarting government attacks like
these ... requires a real adversary
posture, renouncing their subservi-
ence to government interests and
fear of alienating official sources.
“It remains to be seen whether
any of that will happen” (“Will jour-
nalists take any steps to defend
against attacks on press freedom?”
Greenwald, guardian.co.uk, May 29).
Greenwald goes on to question the
future of a fundamentally free press:
“If journalists aren’t willing to defend
these freedoms, who do they think
will?”
He then explains how the
Founders made sure that our free-
doms of belief and action would
survive in an increasingly heteroge-
neous society:
“The design of the American
founding was that abuses of power
would be prevented only by various
factions fighting for their preroga-
tives and against encroachment by
other power factions.
“When it comes to attacks on
press freedoms, it’s the responsibility
of journalists, first and foremost, to
fight against those attacks.”
According to The Huffington
Post’s media reporter Michael
Calderone, whom Greenwald cites
in his commentary, some journalists
don’t appear to be putting up much
of a fight: “Several veteran reporters
told The Huffington Post that it’s
unlikely the press corps would band
together in any collective action,
such as walking out of the briefing
room, to protest the administration’s
treatment of the press” (“White
House Reporters Unlikely to Stage
Press Freedom Protest,” Calderone,
huffingtonpost.com, May 22).
“It would be unprofessional,” CBS
News radio correspondent Mark
Knoller told Calderone.
As Ann Compton, the ABC
News White House correspondent,
explained: “White House briefings
are not advocacy sessions,” later add-
ing that the “strongest voices in jour-
nalism for protecting press freedoms
remain the collective Washington
bureau chiefs” and “independent
reporters’ organizations, which do
lobby for such issues as shield laws
(protections for journalists who
refuse to identify confidential sources
without firm due process before a
court of law).”
The Reporters Committee for
Freedom of the Press, whose
Steering Committee I belong to,
works to do just that, representing
51 media organizations in this crisis.
But the federal shield law compro-
mise it supports still provides open-
ings for any administration to do
what Obama and Holder have trium-
phantly done in controlling the press.
We need a shield law with teeth!
Reporters and editors also must
organize to use the First Amendment
for what the Framers intended: to
prevent the government from pro-
tecting itself at the expense of keep-
ing We The People ignorant and
powerless. The United States is sup-
posed to act in our name.
We freed ourselves from King
George III, and we must insist on
a free press so that we can be free
again. And we must make sure candi-
dates for every office agree to protect
and represent the right that consti-
tutes the very essence of who we are
as Americans: freedom of speech.
Nat Hentoff is a nation-
ally renowned authority on the First
Amendment and the Bill of Rights.
He is a member of the Reporters
Committee for Freedom of the Press,
and the Cato Institute, where he is a
senior fellow.
Take Obama at his word?
Which one — and when?
EDITORIAL CARTOON
I
am much bummed this week … One
of the nation’s premiere newspapers
— the Chicago Sun-Times — fired the
publication’s ENTIRE photography staff of
29. Included in the slaughter was a Pulitzer
Prize winner.
Management – probably life-long writer or
ad types – apparently had a “Tom Terrific”
idea to just issue their reporters an Apple
iPhone and “teach them” how to take quality
news photos with them.
The event was not unexpected, but few in
my former profession would have predicted
something so guillotine-like.
The handwriting has been
on the wall for many years
on smaller newspapers
across the country because
the position of “staff photog-
rapher” has been missing
from their mastheads for
years.
Such specialized positions
just cost too much money
today in a cash-strapped
industry.
The kicker for me is that
I decided in mid-career to
step beyond being “just the
photographer,” which on
many papers of all sizes was viewed by edi-
tors as being a trained monkey. I was tired of
editors ruining my photos just to make them
“fit the news hole.” So I learned how to be a
reporter and, later, editor of daily and weekly
newspapers across four states and two Pacific
islands.
One of the things I learned as editor was
how important a budget is and when the time
came to either hire a full-time photographer
or another reporter, I fell into the mindset
that maybe the print person could get a shot
to illustrate the story.
Unfortunately, what I and other editors
gave up along the way was the ability to have
someone who could come up with one heck
of a shot that readers would remember and
talk about for a lifetime.
We ignored the number one rule in pho-
tojournalism … The CAMERA doesn’t make
a good picture, it takes someone with experi-
ence and “vision” looking in that viewfinder
and knowing when to push that button.
I have always considered myself fortunate
to have lived in Benton when I started trying
to find a way to be a newspaper photographer
because I was fortunate to see good pictures
in the paper taken by several excellent pho-
tographers. Oldtimers will remember it was
Fred Ashcraft who not only wrote hell-fire
and brimstone editorials, but also came up
with some stem-winder news shots of fires,
wrecks and one particularly memorable
photo of a community tragedy.
Others like Wade Eaves brought some
great photos to the Courier pages back in the
day, as did a young David Conrad.
Some of the fondest days of my profession
were when I was working for the old “Saline
County Pacesetter” alongside Whit Jones and
I spent a lot of my time in competition with
Ted Hood at the Courier. When Ted left the
paper, Mr. Sam and Ron Meyer decided to
give me a chance, despite my … uh … “flam-
boyant” reputation.
While at the paper there I was pleased to
help the paper win many photo awards, but I
always wanted to get one more great photo,
and I would literally work day and night
which, sadly, cost me a wife along the way.
I considered Robert Ike Thomas the
“gonzo-like” photographer for the Arkansas
Democrat as the best in the state and I actu-
ally was able to work with him.
But, it if wasn’t for Fred giving me a
chance to shoot pictures for the paper my
life as it unfolded later would never have hap-
pened.
I can still remember my first photo ever
published in a newspaper under my byline.
I won an Arkansas Democrat weekly photo
contest as a high school student with a photo
of Buddy Jondro skiing past our dock at Lake
Norrell.
My life as a photographer allowed me to
cover several presidential visits to the state
and during my tenure at the Hot Springs
newspapers in the ‘70s, I was able to get up
close and personal to a plethora of beauty
contest contestants, every governor of the
state for many years and my first experience
shooting the Arkansas Razorbacks.
I spent a year or so in San Antone at the
Express News paper and shot all kinds of
pictures from flooding to murders. I still
remember the last picture I shot there
because I consider it one of my best. It was
a bus accident downtown where a fireman’s
shadow was projected onto a building from
the sparks coming from his extrication saw.
Many editors influenced my professional
life including Fred, Bob Ferguson and others
from Benton. Harry Wood, my editor in Hot
Springs, forced me to be creative every day
because he wanted a “weather photo” every
day on Page 3.
I also know my photo skills were impor-
tant in my later life because potential employ-
ers knew they were getting a “two-fer,” some-
one who could shoot and write as well as put
a newspaper together on deadline.
Now that I am retired and I have the time
to go back out and return to what I love –
photography – nature has the last laugh by
giving me a body that betrays me (grin).
Finally, I want to thank my friends in
Benton who always say they enjoyed my pho-
tos when I was at the Courier so long ago.
Those words mean a lot to an old man – even
today.
David Hughes is a former resident of Saline
County. His column appears each Thursday in
The Saline Courier.
Photojournalism cut
by the bean counters
The politics of extinction
• The Saline Courier (USPS 050-660) is published daily by Horizon Publishing Co., 321
N. Market St., Benton, AR. Periodical mailing privileges paid in Benton, AR.
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©Copyright 2006 Horizon Publishing Co.
Columns and cartoons on the opinion page do not necessarily reflect
opinions of The Saline Courier. Weekend delivery times are no later than
7 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. The circulation department has re-delivery
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The Saline Courier
Founded in 1876
Phone: (501) 315-8228 • Fax: (501) 315-1230 • Email: news@bentoncourier.com
Vicki J. Dorsch
Business Manager
vdorsch@bentoncourier.com
DaViD Wills
advertising director
dwills@bentoncourier.com
anDreW stoVall
circulation director
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Patricia stuckey
coMposing director
composing@bentoncourier.com
ricky Walters
press ForeMan
rwalters@bentoncourier.com
steVe Boggs • Publisher
publisher@bentoncourier.com
Brent DaVis • editor
bdavis@bentoncourier.com
Nat
HeNtoff
Steve & Cokie
RobeRtS
DaviD
HugHeS
GET THE
POINT
Page 4 – The Saline Courier
news@bentoncourier.com Thursday, June 6, 2013
OpiniOn
Thursday, June 6, 2013
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June 6th, 7th & 8th
7:00 pm each evening
Evangelist: Dan Bonnette
(also possible special guest Jamie Coulter)
Everyone is invited to come enjoy
good preaching and singing
Bethel Missionary Baptist Church
501 S. Border St. • Benton • Pastor Carl Higgs
FREE Weight Loss
Surgery Seminar
Thursday, June 13
5:30 pm - Patient Testimonial
6:00 pm - Seminar
Saline Memorial Hospital
Classroom 1
SALINE MEMORIAL HOSPITAL
SalineMemorial.org | Quality Care Close to Home
Dr. Russell Gornichec will be speaking about weight loss
surgery options. Find out if you qualify and how to get started.
Space is limited. Please RSVP
in advance to 574-7171.
Anne Marie, suffers from a
skin condition known as epi-
dermolysis bullosa.
EB is a group of several
skin disorders that share a
prominent manifestation of
extremely fragile skin that
blisters and tears easily
from any friction or trauma,
Clifton said.
The children who suffer
from this are called “the
butterfly children” because
their skin is as said to be as
fragile as a butterfly’s wings,
Clifton added.
Anne Marie is covered
with blisters and scabs and
has already exceeded the life
expectancy physicians gave
to her parents.
Internal organs also are
affected by the condition, for
which there currently is no
cure nor treatment.
Life for Anne Marie is
difficult, Clifton said. Her
family must ensure that she
receives daily wound care in
order to prevent infection.
This includes daily punc-
turing of blisters, scrubbing
of her skin and then a bath
soak in bleach water, Clifton
said.
A swimming pool would
be beneficial to Anne Marie’s
treatment, she added.
Also, the family, which
has six children, is often sep-
arated because Anne Marie
cannot participate in various
activities or visit pools where
the chemicals cannot be reg-
ulated to prevent infection.
A swimming pool at the
home will keep the family
from being separated, Clifton
said.
A partnership with
Youcaring.com has been
formed for the endeavor.
So far, $958 has been raised
toward the organization’s
goal to raise $10,000.
Event bracelets and
T-shirts are available. More
information is available at
the event’s Facebook page:
www.facebook.comSpreadin-
gAnnesWingsISawHope.
Fun Night
From page 1
Anne Marie
Survey: Economists see no stock market bubble
WASHINGTON — A
debate is raging among
investors and analysts: Has
the Federal Reserve inflated
a stock market bubble by
driving interest rates to
record lows?
The answer, according to
economists surveyed by The
Associated Press: No.
Three-quarters of the
economists say stocks,
which are at their lowest
point in a month but are up
19 percent since November,
aren’t overvalued. Many
point to strong corporate
profits as justifying the
surge in stock prices, which
have more than doubled
since bottoming in 2009.
The economists expect
many consumers to respond
to their increased stock
wealth by spending more
in coming months. Higher
spending would help sus-
tain and perhaps accelerate
growth.
The economists think
growth is slowing to around
a 2 percent annual rate in
the April-June quarter from a
2.4 percent rate last quarter.
The key reasons: Federal
spending cuts, higher taxes
and economic weakness in
Europe and elsewhere.
But they say U.S. econom-
ic growth should increase
in the second half of this
year and speed up next year.
Besides the stock market
gains, steady job growth and
surging home prices will
likely fuel more spending.
They forecast that growth
will reach 2.8 percent in
2014 as hiring accelerates
and consumer confidence
— now at a five-year high —
improves further. If they’re
accurate, that would be the
fastest growth since 2005.
“A bubble is an extreme
thing, when the market
loses all contact with real-
ity,” says Bill Cheney, chief
economist at John Hancock
Financial Services. “I don’t
think we’re near anything
like that.”
Most of the nearly three
dozen economists surveyed
by the AP say the Fed’s poli-
cies have helped boost stock
prices. The Fed has been
buying $85 billion in bonds
each month to try to keep
loan costs at record lows
and encourage borrowing
and spending. The super-
low rates have led some
investors to shift money out
of low-yielding bonds and
savings accounts and into
stocks, thereby boosting
stock prices.
In recent weeks, stock
and bond investors have
been rattled by speculation
that the Fed will start to
scale back its bond pur-
chases later this year. Once
it does, interest rates would
likely creep up. Some inves-
tors could sell stocks and
buy higher-yielding bonds.
Stock prices could fall.
For now, broad measures
of stock prices remain in
line with historic norms,
given the strength of com-
pany profits, the economists
say. The Standard & Poor’s
500 stock index, relative to
expected corporate earnings,
is only about half its level
of late 1999. That was a few
months before the dot-com
frenzy fizzled and punctured
a stock-market bubble.
Jerry Webman,
chief economist at
OppenheimerFunds, notes
that in most bubbles, stocks
or other assets are signifi-
cantly overvalued. Investors
typically invent reasons to
explain that fact away.
In the late 1990s, for
example, “We were talking
about ‘the new economy,’
‘this is all different now’ and
so on.”
But “people aren’t say-
ing that about stocks now,”
Webman says.
The AP survey collected
the views of private, corpo-
rate and academic econo-
mists on a range of issues.
Among their views:
— Housing will deliver
the biggest boost to the
U.S. economy this year —
more than will higher stock
prices or the Fed’s low-rate
policies. Higher home val-
ues and sales and increased
construction have helped
restore household wealth,
generated jobs, boosted
spending on home furnish-
ings and other goods and
services and strengthened
banks as mortgage defaults
have declined. It’s also a big
reason pickup truck sales
have jumped: Busier con-
tractors and landscapers buy
more trucks.
— U.S. consumers will
step up spending once
the job market returns to
full health, though not as
much as before the Great
Recession. In the 10 years
through 2007, consumer
spending, adjusted for infla-
tion, grew at an average
annual rate of 3.6 percent.
Since the recession ended in
2009, it’s grown at an aver-
age rate of just 2 percent.
The job market would be
considered healthy when
unemployment falls between
5 percent and 6 percent.
It’s now 7.5 percent. On
Friday, the government will
issue the May jobs report.
Employers are expected to
have added 170,000 jobs. No
change is expected in the
unemployment rate.
— The world’s biggest
economic obstacle is deep
spending cuts and shrink-
ing economies among the
17 European countries that
use the euro currency.
Unemployment across the
euro alliance hit a record
12.2 percent in April. The
number of unemployed is on
track to reach 20 million by
year’s end.
— The biggest threat
to Americans retiring over
the next 25 years is too
little savings. This is a more
significant factor than the
likelihood of reduced Social
Security benefits, high out-
of-pocket costs for Medicare
recipients or nursing home
expenses.
The stock market’s gains,
along with higher home
prices, have helped create
a “wealth effect.” That’s
when people’s rising wealth
emboldens them to spend
more. Their increased
spending benefits the
economy because consum-
ers drive about 70 percent of
U.S. economic growth.
Such spending may be
helping to prevent any drag
from a Social Security tax
increase that took effect Jan.
1. The tax increase has left
someone earning $50,000 a
year with about $1,000 less
to spend this year. A house-
hold with two highly paid
workers has up to $4,500
less.
Americans as a whole
have kept spending despite
the higher Social Security
tax. Instead, they’ve saved
less. Spending grew at a 3.4
percent annual rate in the
January-March quarter, the
fastest pace in more than
two years. The national sav-
ings rate fell to 2.3 percent
from 4.1 percent last year.
Associated Press
Marshals Museum plans
2016 opening in Fort Smith
FORT SMITH — A fall
2016 opening is planned for
the $50 million U.S. Marshals
Museum on the banks of
the Arkansas River in Fort
Smith, organizers announced
Tuesday.
The museum’s board of
directors said the ground-
breaking for the museum
will be held Sept. 24, 2014.
The Southwest Times Record
reported Wednesday that the
groundbreaking will coincide
with the release of a commem-
orative coin marking the 225th
anniversary of the Marshals
Service.
Officials say they’ve raised
$11.7 million so far for the
museum, and expect to
receive another $4 million to
$5 million from sales of the
commemorative coin.
The museum is to honor
the U.S. marshals who were
based in Fort Smith and
patrolled the Indian territory
that is now Oklahoma. It will
be located along the Arkansas
River with an eight-story
tall arm facing west toward
Oklahoma.
Organizers plan a year’s
worth of events in advance
of the 2014 groundbreaking.
This fall, the museum will
dedicate the cornerstone for
its Hall of Honor, which com-
memorates U.S. marshals and
deputy marshals who died in
the line of duty, officials said.
The museum also plans a
Descendant’s Day event that
includes a trip to Tahlequah,
Okla., to explore the marshals’
relationship to the Cherokee
Nation.
Also Tuesday, the board
announced members of
the museum’s National
Leadership Council. Members
include: Gov. Mike Beebe; for-
mer Gov. Mike Huckabee; Asa
Hutchinson; former Oklahoma
Gov. Frank Keating; U.S
Marshals Service Association
President Louie McKinney;
and former U.S. Attorney
General Edwin Meese.
Associated Press
Page 6 – The Saline Courier
sports@bentoncourier.com Thursday, June 6, 2013
SPORTS
SALINE
SCOREBOARD
The Lady Panther
Basketball Camp will be
on June 4-6 from 8 a.m. to
noon at Benton Arena. The
camp is for girls in kinder-
garten to ninth grade. Cost
is $50 and can be paid on
the first day of camp. Each
camper receives a T-shirt.
and certificate. Call Coach
Jerry Chumley at 317-2570
for any additional info.
LADY PANTHER
BASKETBALL CAMP
June 10-13 in the High
School Gym from 9 a.m.
- noon. The camp is for
students entering grades
3-7 and the cost is $75 per
camper. All campers will
receive a T-shirt. Go to
Saline Courier site for regis-
tration form
LITTLE HORNETS
BASKETBALL CAMP
AMERICAN LEGION
TODAY
Benton Everett at Jacksonville,
6 p.m.
Benton McClendon’s at
Jacksonville, 8 p.m.
Benton Sport Shop vs. NLR, 6
and 8 p.m.
Bryant Black Sox at Little Rock
(UALR), 6 and 8 p.m.
Bryant Sport Shop at Ashdown,
5 p.m.
Bryant Everett at Ashdown, 7
p.m.
SATURDAY
Benton Sport Shop vs. Malvern,
1 p.m.
Benton McClendon’s vs. Malvern,
3 p.m.
Bryant Black Sox at Fat City
(Jonesboro), 1 and 3 p.m.
Bryant Everett vs. Texarkana
(Texas), 2 and 4 p.m.
ATTENTION youth base-
ball and softball coaches in
Saline County. The Saline
Courier will be printing team
pictures on Sunday, June
30. If your team has not
sent pictures to The Saline
Courier, please send them
to tonylenahan@yahoo.
com by Tuesday, June 25.
You may also bring picture
to the Saline Courier to be
scanned. Please provide
players and coaches names,
team name, age group and
league.
SALINE COUNTY
YOUTH BASEBALL/
SOFTBALL TEAM
PICTURES
Camping on the gym floor
TONY LENAHAN/The Saline Courier
A camper starts the break in a scrimmage at the Lady Hornet Basketball Camp on Wednesday at the
Bryant Gym.
TONY LENAHAN/The Saline Courier
A camper at the Lady Panther Basketball Camp takes a 3-pointer in a drill at Benton Arena on
Wendesday. Continued on page 7
Miami looking for 2 straight
AP
Lebron James pulls down a rebound in last year’s NBA finals. James and the Miaimi Heat take on the
San Antonoio Spurs today in Game 1 of the 2013 NBA Finals. Game 1 starts at 8 p.m. on ABC.
MIAMI — Before reach-
ing the top of basketball,
LeBron James was run over
by the San Antonio Spurs.
The Spurs swept James’
Cleveland Cavaliers in the
2007 NBA Finals, so long
ago that the winning game
plan focused on exploiting
James’ weaknesses. Those
are nearly impossible to find
now, and James essentially
warned the Spurs that they
shouldn’t bother looking.
The Spurs already know.
“He’ll be a lot more of
a problem than he was in
‘07, that’s for sure,” Spurs
coach Gregg Popovich said
Wednesday.
Tim Duncan told the
beaten James minutes after
that series that the league
would someday belong to
him, and he was right. The
NBA’s MVP guided Miami
to last year’s championship
and the league’s best record
this season.
Now the Spurs will try to
take it back.
But James is now the best
player in the game, is sur-
rounded by more talent in
Miami than he ever had in
Cleveland, and still carries
the memory of the beating
the Spurs laid on him six
years ago.
“I have something in me
that they took in ‘07. Beat
us on our home floor, cel-
ebrated on our home floor.
I won’t forget that. You
shouldn’t as a competitor.
You should never forget
that,” James said.
He joined the Heat in
2010, experienced more
finals failure a year later,
then was finals MVP last
year when Miami beat
Oklahoma City in five
games. Another title now
would put him halfway to
the four that Duncan and
Popovich have won togeth-
er.
“That’s what I’m here
for,” James said. “I’m here
to win championships, and
you’re not always going to
be on the successful side.
I’ve seen it twice, not being
on the successful side.”
He was just 22 at the end
of his fourth year in the
league when he carried to
the Cavs to their first finals
appearance. But there were
holes in his game, from an
unreliable jump shot to an
undeveloped post game, and
the Spurs took advantage of
every one of them.
James shot 36 percent
in the series, including a
ghastly 10 for 30 in Game
4, and committed 23 turn-
overs.
“Well, LeBron is a differ-
ent player than he was in
‘07,” Popovich said. “That
was like ancient history. He
was basically a neophyte at
the time, wondering how all
this stuff worked and how
it’s put together. We were
very fortunate at that time
to get him so early. But at
this point he’s grown.”
FINALS, page 7
By Brian Mahoney
AP Writer
FAYETTEVILLE
- Though their 2013
baseball season just
ended Sunday losing
to Kansas State in the
Manhattan Regional final
in Manhattan, Kan., the
Arkansas Razorbacks’
2014 SEC baseball sched-
ule is already set and
on Tuesday officially
announced.
Alabama, South
Carolina, Vanderbilt,
Auburn and Texas A&M
will play three-game SEC
series at Baum Stadium in
2014, and Coach Dave Van
Horn’s Razorbacks will
pay SEC three-game visits
to Florida, Mississippi
State, LSU, Ole Miss and
Missouri.
Arkansas will start its
2014 SEC season March
14-16 at Florida and play
its first Baum Stadium
SEC series March 21-23 at
Baum against Alabama.
The Razorbacks
close March (28-30) at
Mississippi State and
began April (4-6) at Baum
against South Carolina.
The Razorbacks hit the
SEC road April 11-13 at
LSU then consecutively
host Vanderbilt (April
18-20) and Auburn (April
25-27).
In May (2-4) the Hogs
visit Ole Miss, host Texas
A&M May 9-11 then
close with their first-ever
Arkansas vs. Missouri
SEC series May 15-17 in
Columbia, Mo.
Arkansas’ 2014 SEC
Baseball Schedule
Week 1 (March 14-16) –
at Florida
Week 2 (March 21-23) –
vs. Alabama
Week 3 (March 28-30) –
at Mississippi State
Week 4 (April 4-6) – vs.
South Carolina
Week 5 (April 11-13) – at
LSU
Week 6 (April 18-20) –
vs. Vanderbilt
Week 7 (April 25-27) –
vs. Auburn
Week 8 (May 2-4) – at
Ole Miss
Week 9 (May 9-11) – vs.
Texas A&M
Week 10 (May 15-17) – at
Missouri
Hogs 2014 SEC schedule set
By Nate Allen
Razorback Report
FAYETTEVILLE –
A school-record five
University of Arkansas
intercollegiate athletic
programs earned public
recognition awards for
their exemplary academic
performance by the NCAA
on Wednesday. The
Razorbacks’ men’s
golf, men’s tennis and
women’s gymnastics,
swimming and diving and
volleyball teams were
honored for their standing
among the top 10 percent
of academic performing
teams in the country in
their respective sports in
the multi-year Academic
Progress Rate (APR) for
the 2011-12 academic
year. All five Razorback
programs honored earned
a perfect 1,000 multiyear
APR rate based on scores
from the 2008-09, 2009-10,
2010-11 and 2011-12 aca-
demic years.
The five teams shattered
the previous school mark
set in 2010-11 when two
Razorback programs were
recognized and nearly
matched the seven total
public award recognitions
earned previously by the
University of Arkansas.
Gymnastics earned its
third consecutive public
recognition award while
men’s tennis was honored
for the second consecutive
year. Men’s golf, swim-
ming and diving and
volleyball each earned a
public recognition award
for the first time since the
awards were implemented
eight years ago.
Record 5 Razorback programs
earn APR recognition
Special to the Courier
Thursday, June 6, 2013
The Saline Courier 7
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CLEAN-UP
June 8
8am-11am
Volunteers meet at CADC parking lot.
Bring weed eaters, rakes, shovels – other
materials such as trash bags, trash bins and
dumpsters will be provided.
For more information call 776-2533
sponsored in part by
We’re looking for volunteers who
would like to join the cleanup. Just
come to the staging area for work
assignment. Donuts and Drinks will
be provided early Saturday morning.
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IT’S COVER CHANGE TIME!
SYMBOL CORSICANA
TONY LENAHAN/The Saline Courier
Benton Lady Panther basketball Coach Jerry Chumley points the way at the Lady Panther Basketball Camp on Wednesday at Benton Arena.
James wasn’t interested
in discussing much of that
series, but he recalled the
way the Spurs’ strategy
kept him from getting into
the paint and dared him to
shoot jumpers.
There’s no blueprint now
that would encourage a
guy who made 56.5 percent
of his shots this season to
shoot the ball.
“If you go under my pick-
and-roll now, I’m going to
shoot. And I’m confident
I’m going to make every last
one of them,” James said.
“I’m just more confident in
my ability to shoot the ball.
“But at the same time, I
also have a lot more weap-
ons this time around going
against this team, where in
‘07 they loaded three guys
to me a lot on the strong
side of the floor. So like I
said, I’m a better player,
and you can’t dare me to do
anything I don’t want to do
in 2013.”
Duncan and James prob-
ably wouldn’t have thought
it would take so long to
see each other in the finals
again after their meeting in
the hallway of Cleveland’s
Quicken Loans Arena. San
Antonio had built a quiet
dynasty, winning four titles
in nine years, and the core
of Duncan, Tony Parker and
Manu Ginobili would keep
giving the Spurs chances.
But they couldn’t get out
of the West even while fin-
ishing with the best record
in the conference the last
two years, just as Cleveland
couldn’t in the East during
James’ last two seasons
there.
“I hoped to be back
here. Whether he would
he here or not, I couldn’t
predict that,” the 37-year-old
Duncan said. “Knowing the
player that he was then and
the trajectory he was on, I
had no doubt he would be
back here. I had no doubt
he would be tops in this
league at some point. And
I’m glad and honored to be
back here playing against
him.”
The Spurs have been
off since finishing a sweep
of Memphis on May 27.
The Heat were forced to
overcome a rugged Indiana
team and the struggles of
Dwyane Wade and Chris
Bosh in a seven-game series
that wrapped up Monday.
That set up a finals
between teams built in
decidedly different ways but
with mutual respect. While
others around the league
seethed, Popovich even
called Pat Riley to offer con-
gratulations after the Heat
architect signed James and
Bosh in 2010.
It gives James a chance
to pay the Spurs back for
their 2007 romp, when they
forced the Cavaliers into the
worst offensive performance
in finals history.
“I believe that after that
finals he probably always
obviously wanted to get
back again. But I think he
probably always wanted to
get back and play them,”
Wade said. “So obviously
having this opportunity
right now is probably some-
thing he always dreamed
of, of getting back to the
finals and playing the Spurs
again.”
The Spurs’ Big Three
didn’t have to endure the
same wait to win. Duncan
won a title in just his sec-
ond season, and Parker was
only 21 when he earned his
first. Yet eventually they
stalled, so they’re as eager
for this opportunity as
James.
“When I was 21 and I
won my first one, it was
kind of fast and we think it’s
going to happen every year.
We think it’s easy. But after
a lot of years in the league,
you realize it’s really hard
to go to the finals,” Parker
said. “Now we take nothing
for granted. We appreciate
every moment, and we’ll
see what happens.”
Finals
From page 6
TONY LENAHAN/The Saline Courier
A camper at the Lady Hornet Basketball Camp takes a shot at
Bryant Gym on Wednesday.
TONY LENAHAN/The Saline Courier
Bryant Hornet volleyball players take down a net after the Lady
Hornet Volleyball Camp on Wednesday at Bryant Middle School.
TONY LENAHAN/The Saline Courier
A camper at the Lady Panther Basketball Camp takes a shot at
Benton Arena on Wednesday.
8 The Saline Courier
Thursday, June 6, 2013
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.
Custom Tile Showers
.
Hardwood
.
Carpet
.
Tile
.
Vinyl
13 Years
in a row!
Nathan Garner
2500 Old Congo Road • Benton, AR 72019
501-315-0022
Fax 501-315-5109
AUTO • HOME • LIFE • BUSINESS
FARMERS
Ron Jones, LUTCF
Ron Jones Agency
606 W. Commerce Dr., Suite 2
Bryant, AR 72022
Bus: 501-847-8155
Fax: 501-847-8492
rjones6@farmersagent.com
Benton Ofce:
P.O. Box 625
1700 Hot Springs Hwy
Benton AR 72018
www.arf.com/saline
Tel: 501.315.0676
Fax: 501.315.3952
Bryant Ofce:
119 Broadway Ave
Bryant, AR 72022
www.arf.com/saline
Tel: 501.653.2283
Fax: 501.653.2202
Saline County
Sheriff’s
Department
Texting while driving is against the law.
Be responsible. Be safe. Don’t text and drive
501.315.7100 • www.everettbpg.com
Interstate 30 at Alcoa Exit
21099 I-30 Bryant, AR 72202
BUICK • GMC
Family Owned CUSTOMER FRIENDLY
Arrive Alive...
Don’t Text
& Drive
Sponsored by the advertisers on this page
Txtg is 2 die 4...
Don’t Text & Drive
U.S. LED – LARGEST MILITARY OPERATION
IN THE HISTORY OF THE WORLD
D-DAY
June 6, 1944
We Salute our Veterans!
Without you we would not
be the Nation we are.
Sponsored by the Republican Committee of Saline County
PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT
Patrick Rhodes (USAF), chairman
Lanny Fite (USArmy), County Judge
Bruce Pennington, County Sheriff
Dennis Milligan, Circuit Clerk
Doug Curtis, County Clerk
Joy Ballard, County Collector
Larry Davis, County Treasurer
Air Conditioning
HEATING AND
AIR CONDITIONING
Installation,
Maintenance and
24 Hour Service
501-425-3796
Residential &
Commerical
Attorneys
David Heasley
attorney at law
Divorce &
Family Law
Free phone consultation
Payment Plan
681-4452
622 Alcoa Road,
in Benton
Backhoe & Dozer
315-2343
Peas
Gravel
Fill
SB-2
Topsoil
Sandy Loam
Sands
Donnafill
Pick-Up
or
Delivery
Build & Remodel
Build & Remodel
Parish 
Construction
BUILDING AND
REMODELING
*31 yrs experience
Small or Large
Jobs Done to
Your Satisfaction
tFree Estimates
tReasonable
Prices
Licensed
501-231-9230
501-316-2994
Carpentry
EXPERIENCED
CARPENTER
- Out of Work -
Home Maintenance
& Remodeling
of All Kinds
Vinyl Siding Installation
Call TIM
778-5171
OVER 30 YEARS
EXPERIENCE
- Free Estimates -
No job too LARGE
or small
Satisfaction Guaranteed!
DAVID BURTON, SR.
794-2563
Cleaning Services
Double A’s
Cleaning
• Competitive &
Affordable Pricing
• Satisfaction
Guarantied
• Detail Oriented
• I Provide Supplies
Call For Free Estimate
Alexis
501-794-7236
lexi92981@hotmail.com
Residential &
Commercial Cleaning
References
Available
Call
Laurie
501-380-5748
Computer Services
A-1 COMPUTER
REPAIR
A+
Certified
Repair
Technician
•Desktop /Laptop
Repairs & Cleanup
•Virus-Spyware Removal-
Starting at $80.
1200 Ferguson Dr.
Ste. 5 • Benton
501-776-7577
Drywall Repair
DRYWALL
REPAIR
SERVICE
• Cracks & Holes
• Discolored Ceilings
• Water Stains
• Small Remodels
Valid References
40 Yrs. Experience
!!!!!!
Steve Burrow - Owner
337–4525
Handgun Classes
CONCEALED
HANDGUN
CLASSES
Course completed
in one day.
All
paperwork
provided.
Tim Bragg, Instructor
#95-055
501-776-7419
Handyman
Will be
handyman
Lawncare from
mowing to clean up
Tree trimming
Bush & garden
trim & clean up
Junk hauling
Flower Bed
clean out
Stump Grinding
Leaf Blowing
Deck Remodeling
Any Yard Work
FREE
ESTIMATES!
501-326-2839
and ask for
Mr. Massey
Home Inspections
Diamond R
Home Inspections
Russell Richmond
diamondrhomeinspections
@gmail.com
501-362-8160
mention ad for discount
Horses
Clinic’s Certified
HOLTZMAN
Riding Academy, LLC
BIRTHDAY PARTIES
10 & UNDER
SUMMER HORSE CAMP
316-1141
House Leveling
HOUSE
Leveling/Foundation
REPAIR
Concrete Foundations
or Pier & Beam
• Shaky floors
• Rotten wood
• Cracked brick
• French drains, etc.
~ Free Estimates ~
501-304-2040
Insulation
Southern Southern
INSULATION &
GUTTERS, Inc.
INSULATION &
GUTTERS, Inc.
INSULATION &
GUTTERS, Inc.
INSULATION &
GUTTERS, Inc.
Family Owned & Operated
for 33 Years
ª Residential & Commercial
ª Seamless ßutters
ª Leal Frool System
ª Fiberqlass, Batts & Blown
ª Stabili/ed Cellulose
ª ínsulation Removal
FREE ESTIMATES
Licensed - ínsured - Bonded
FINANCING AVAILABLE
315-2306
Toll Free. 888·278·7GOG
Landscaping
L.W. Lawn &
Landscaping
SERVICES, LLC
501-350-9137
870-942-9641
But my God shall supply all your needs according
to his riches in glory by Christ Jesus. Phil. 4:19
Call
Today!
Located in Bryant
Lawn Maintenance, Trimming,
Sprinkler Installation, French
Drains, Shrub & Tree Pruning,
Leaf Removal, Landscaping,
Gutter Maintenance and more
www.lwlawnandlandscaping.com
lwlawnandlandscaping@yahoo.com
VETERAN & SENIOR
DISCOUNT
Lawn Care
Richard
May’s
Lawn Care
10 years Local
Experience
Average yard:
Cut & Weed
Eat $25-$30
317-8966
316-6655
Flawless
Lawns
Flawless
Lawns
Spring Clean-Up
Leaves, Beds & Mulch
Mowing, Trimming, Edging
Odd Jobs and Light Hauling
Ryan Harmon 860-8789
Mark 8:36
Classifieds Work!
Painting
SUPERIOR
PAINTING
• Residential & Small
Commercial
• Drywall Finish
& Repair
• Interior & Exterior
• Texture
• Pressure Washing
INSURED
Kelly Hill – Owner
501-316-3328
501-840-1470
Experienced
Painter
NEEDS WORK
Call Phil 249-1657
leave message
Interior & Exterior
30 yrs experience
All types of Home Maintenance
SCHAY PAINTING CO
Interior/Exterior
20 Years Experience
References Provided
Steve Schay
501-425-4492
Pet Care
Absolute
All breed mobile
dog grooming
501.732.6850
Kim McWhirter
kimmcwhirter
@ymail.com
SEEK AND YOU
SHALL FIND
Great deals in the
Courier Classifieds.
Yard Sales, Jobs,
Homes for Sale or
Rent. Check them out
daily. Call to sub-
scribe at 315-8228.
Classifieds Work!
Pressure Washing
Royal
Flush
Servicing
Central Arkansas
since 1988
316-1536
Pressure Wash & Seal
specializing in
!"#$%&'&()(*""+
,-#./(0(1'&&/(1-+-#2
3-/+&4(0(*5'&%(1'5-#6
JG’s
Pressure Wash & More
Deck Repair
Fences
Gutter Cleaning
Lawn Service
and More
501-249-4715
Roofng
ROOFING
Wagner
Residential
Commercial
&
VOTED
“Best of the Best”
2009
Free Estimates
847-6630
K & L
ROOFING
• Don’t Wait For
Roofing Repair
• All Insurance
Claims Welcome
• 40 years exp.
• Financing Avail.
w/approved credit
Upgrade to a metal roof with
a class 4 fire rating & you
may qualify for a discount on
your homeowners insurance
501-249-7735
501-778-7600
210 W. SEVIER
ST. • BENTON
Looking for love in all
the wrong places????
Check out the Freebie
section in today!s
classifieds. You will
fi nd uncondi ti onal
love there FREE!
Furry & Free!!
Buy • Sell • Trade
in the Classifieds
Tree Service
M00ߣ
ñFF0ßßñ8l£
Tߣ£ 5£ß¥l8£
501-778-8071
501-860-5911
28-Years
Experience
Insured &
Licensed
*Stump Grinding
*Take Downs
*Trimming
*Pruning
*Storm Cleanup
Parsons & Son
Tree Service LLC
“The Total Package”
Call us about
Tree Health Care
º 1rinning
º 1ake Lowns
º Pruning
º Renovals
º Stunp Renoval
º lirewood
º Oreen vaste lauling
Conplete
lnsuranoe Coverage
Owned 8 Operated
by an
lSA Lioensed Arborist
SO·L"PGA
840-1436
602-2959
CRITES
& TACKETT
TREE SERVICE
~ Free Estimates ~
Workman's Comp
& Liability Insured
•Stump Removal
501-337–1565
501-337-9094
Ready to graduate
from particle board?
1000!s of Courier
Classifieds will read
your ad daily. Call
Mary or Shawna to
place your ad today!
Tree Service
501.317.6788
ROCKIN B
TREE SERVICE
B
TRIMMING
PRUNING
STUMP GRINDING
REMOVALS
large & small
FREE ESTIMATES
Insured for
Your Protection
Excellent Clean up
Senior and
Military Discounts
available
Want to Downsize
Your Gas Guzzler?
Sell it in the Courier
Classifieds. Call to
place your ad today!
315-8228
Ready to take the
Real Estate Plunge?
Check out the Homes
for Sale in the Classi-
fieds daily.
Time to get your own
place? Check out the
Rental Section in to-
day!s Classifieds...
Using the Courier
Classifieds is just a
smart thing to do!
Subscribe Today!!!
Classifieds Work!
Check out the
Garage Sales
this week!
Service Directory
Classifieds
Employment
Advertising
Account
Executive
Advertising account executive needed
at the award winning Saline Courier
in Benton, AR. We are expanding
and in need of a salesperson. B2B or
media sales experience a plus. We offer
base salary, plus commission, frequent
bonus plans, 401(k), health insurance,
vacation and sick leave. Base account
list in Central Arkansas with much
opportunity to grow new business.
Send your resume with cover letter to:
dwills@bentoncourier.com
Saline County’S newS SourCe SinCe 1876
Courier
The Saline
Employment
Alternative Community Services – Waiver
Direct Care Worker
job opening in the Benton area for full-time
energetic and skilled person to work with individual
with disabilities. Experience a must.
Competitive Salary and Benefits, including paid
leave, health and dental insurance, and retirement
We are an Equal Opportunity Employer
United Cerebral Palsy
9720 N. Rodney Parham • Little Rock, AR • 72227
E-mail resumes to hr@ucpcark.org,
fax to (501) 228-3849 or
submit application online at www.ucpark.org
Employment
Saline County’S newS SourCe SinCe 1876
C
o
u
r
ie
r
T
he S
aline
Saline County’S newS SourCe SinCe 1876
Courier
The Saline
Looking for a Job?
A Second Job?
Want to work just a
couple hours a day?
The Saline Courier is
accepting applications
for independent
contract carriers and
substitute carriers in
home delivery areas.
• Excellent part time
income
• Afternoon delivery
Mon–Fri and early
AM on weekends
• Must have a valid
Arkansas drivers
license with proof of
(at least) state min.
auto insurance
ROUTE 78 - Hwy 70
Fairplay, Cross Roads
Interested candidates
apply in person at
The Saline Courier
321 N. Market St.,
Benton or e-mail
astovall@
bentoncourier.com
Page 10 – The Saline Courier
class@bentoncourier.com Thursday, June 6, 2013
Garage Sales
1110 ALLYSON Ave.,
Bryant, Fri. 6/7 & Sat.,
6/8, 8a-2p, Name
Brand Clothing.
1408 STAMFORD
(Hartford Hills) Sat
7a-? Lots of toys,
HH, Christmas, misc.
2 FAMILY 1611 LEA-
WOOD 7a-2 Fri & Sat
Wal l Uni t, Bi kes,
Large ki d! s toys,
clothing
2 FAMILY Yard Sale
Fri. 7a-? 1324 Stam-
ford Dr. Jewelry, HH,
Clths, Knick-Knacks,
Furn, Dorm Rm. Furn.
2 FAMILY YARD
SALE 204 MIchelle
off Gattin Rd. Sat.
only 7a-? Lots of
clothes including plus
sizes & decorations
3 FAM Sale, lots of
clothes & lots of baby
clothes, HH, & much
more. 2807 Hester Rd
Thur, Fri, & Sat
BLESSINGS TO YOU
FLEA MARKET
Going out
of business!
everything 1/2 price
2617 Military, Benton
EARLY BIRD SANITATION
Once a week pick up
+ Rolloff Dumpsters
332-7202 • 840-6758
• 778-3969
I BUY JUNK CARS
FRI & Sat 8a-4p, 408
Turtle Creek Rd, Ben-
ton, Furn & misc, To
much to list!
FRI & Sat, 7a-?, 408
Sandlewood Dr, HH,
di shes, pl us si ze
clothing, furn, book
shelves , cook books
GARAGE SALE Sat
6/8 8a-3 605 Beverly
Dr. No sales before
8a linens, china, clths.
GARAGE SALE
Thurs.- Sat. 8a-? 519
South Market Tools,
HH, Etc
INSIDE BARN Sale Fri &
Sat 8a-? 4421 W. Jack-
man Tr. 0-12 mo Girl
clthg, adult clths, HH,
DVD, Collect. Vacuum,
Linen antique sewing ma-
chine, ATV tires men items
MOTHER & Daughter
Garage Sale Fri & Sat
7a-6p 601 Miller Cove
Adult & children!s
clthing, toys, HH, &
t reasures! Ri di ng
lawn mower & half a
palette of bricks.
OTTER CREEK 4
Brittany Lane Fri &
Sat 8a-? Lots of misc.
Garage Sales
MOVING SALE
1yr Whirlpool W/D front
end $1,000, Pillowtop
Sealey Kg bed & matt
$1,000, Frig $200
Too much to list
501-249-9537
MULTI Fam Fri & Sat,
Too many items to list
3614 Bay Meadow
Dr, Heritage Farms
MULTI-FAMILY
SALE, Fri . &
Sat.7a-12, 417 Elaine
St., Benton, Baby
items, Name Brand
Jr. Sizes & Lots More!
SAT 6/8 7a-2p 325
Pl easant El m Dr.
Multi-Family Great
Like New Items!
SAT 7a-12p, 4321 Boone
Rd. Adult clothing $1,
childs $.50 cent benefit
Saline County Foster Care
YARD SALE Fri only
8a-5 Hwy 183 next dr
to Pat!s. Lawn Mower,
& lot!s more.
Benton
FAM GARAGE Sale.
1050 Downing. Girl
Clothes 18m-2T. Boy
Clothes 2T-4T
FRI & Sat 7a-11a
2708 Garden Bend
Dr. Furn., Toys
GARAGE SALE Sat.
7a-12 1113 Pinewood
Dr. Twin beds, Dining
room set, & other
furn., clthg, hunting
items, Wii & games
GARAGE/ ESTATE
Sale June 7-9 8a-?
2808 Pamela Furn,
HH, Clths, Glassware
Everything Must Go!
Bryant
Saturday
7 a.m. - 3 p.m.
Tons Of Items, Too
Many to List!
309 Richwoods
Drive
Richardson Place
Rescheduled
Take NW 4th off
Reynolds Rd to
Richardson Place
Wanted
Wi l l buy your
non-working riding
l awnmowers. Cal l
326-1839
Auctions
SPRING CONSIGNMENT
AUCTION
Saline County Fairgrounds
June 8th 9a.m.
Turn that “For Sale” sign in
your yard i nt o cash! Farm,
Construction, Lawn & Garden,
Recreation equipment and ve-
hi cl es of al l types. Si gn up
early so we can advertise your
equipment.
Contact: Cox Auctions &
Realty, LLC John Cox
AALB#2066 501-617-1759 &
Matt Cox AALB#2067
501-609-6659
Freebies
FREE 8 week old cal-
ico kitten-female Lit-
ter-box trained Please
call 970-317-5883
Announcements
DIVORCE WITH or
wi t hout chi l dr en
$125.00. Incl udes
name change and
property settlement
agreement. SAVE
hundreds. Fast and
Easy. Call 1-888-733-
7165, 24/7.
Want to Downsize
Your Gas Guzzler?
Sell it in the Courier
Classifieds. Call to
place your ad today!
315-8228
Announcements
Thur & Fri
5489 Ridgeway
Drive, Benton
Too much stuff, more
sales to follow
Adoption
PREGNANT? CON-
SIDERING Adoption?
A childless, success-
ful, 41 yr old single
woman seeks to
adopt. Financial secu-
rity. Will be hands-on
mom. Expenses paid.
Wendy.
1-888-990-0282.
UNPLANNED PREG-
NANCY? THINKING
OF ADOPTI ON?
Open or closed adop-
tion. YOU choose the
family LIVING EX-
PENSES PAID. Ab-
by!s One True Gift
Adoptions Call 24/7.
1-866-459-3371
Personal
MEET SINGLES right
now! No paid opera-
tors, just real people
l i ke you. Browse
greetings, exchange
messages and con-
nect live. Try it free.
C a l l n o w
1-800-275-7212
MEET SINGLES right
now! No paid opera-
tors, just real people
like you. Browse
greetings, exchange
messages and con-
nect live. Try it free.
C a l l n o w :
1-800-247-9958
Employment
A KID!S Place Pre-
school /Daycare i s
now hiring. Apply in
person @ 825 N.
Main St., Benton
AIRLINE CAREERS
begin here - Become
an Aviation Mainte-
nance Tech. FAA ap-
proved training. Fi-
nancial aid if qualified
Housing available.
Job placement assis-
t ance. Cal l AI M
877-424-4177.
ASE CERTIFIED Me-
chani c Want ed
Front-End, Brake,
Alignment, & Shock
Good Benefits Lo-
cat ed i n Bent on
Please Fax resume to
501-778-5379
CAREGIVERS
NEEDED!
Competative wages
and benefits.
Must be 25 years
or older. Valid DL.
EOE. 501-538-5630
CLOTHES PRESSER
needed Exp.preferred
$8.50 hr Hrs. Mon-Fri
7a-4p Apply in person
at 5095 Hwy. 5 North
(Bryant)
COMPUTER DESKTOP
SUPPORT TECHNICIANS
needed in the central
Arkansas area.
Must be able to pass
criminal background
check and have valid
driver’s license.
Send resume to
P.O. Box 665
Benton, AR 72018
COOKS & DISH-
WASHER needed.
Bryant restaurant.
Exp. person onl y
need appl y. Ri ck
813-4423
DEPENDABLE LA-
BORER needed - 40
hour week. Must pass
drug test 840-7261
Heartland
Rehabilitation
Dietary Aide
DayShift
No Phone Calls Please
Fax or Apply in Person
19701 I-30
Benton, AR 72015
FAX 501-778-9652
Employment
DRIVERS: $1,200.00!
Orientation Comple-
t i on Bonus! ! Make
$63,000.00yr or more!
Ask about $2,500.00!
Driver Referral Bo-
nus!!CDL-A OTR Exp.
Req. ! Cal l Now:
!1-888-993-0972
EARLY CHILDHOOD
Speech-Language
Pathologist
The Dawson Educa-
tion Service Coop-
erative, Early Child-
hood, Special Educa-
tion program is ac-
cepting resumes for
t he posi t i on of
Speech-Language
Pathologist. MSE in
Early Childhood Spe-
cial Education re-
quired. The applica-
tion process is open
until filled. Interested
appl i cants shoul d
send a resume to
Sandra Francis, Early
Chi l dhood Speci al
Education Coordina-
t or, 711 Cl i nt on
Street, Arkadelphia,
AR 71923 or fax to
870-246-3130. Daw-
son Education Coop-
erative is an Equal
Opportunity Employer
EXP.
TRACTOR/TRAILER
DRIVERS - wi/X en-
dorsements, able to
pass
DOT/physical/drug
test. Stable job, local
driving, good pay and
benefits. Apply in
person Mon.-Fri. 9 am
- 3 pm or call toll free
877-849-1982. Local
501-569-9999. Appli-
cations can be down-
loaded at www.stam-
pede-trans.com,
Stampede Transpor-
tation, LLC 2301 W.
60th St. LR, Ar 72209
Ful l - Ti me LPN
needed at Good Sa-
mar i t an i n Hot
Springs Village, night
shift (10:30 PM to
7:00 AM). We offer
competitive pay and
full benefits including
health, dental, PTO,
fl exi bl e spendi ng,
daycare and corpo-
rate discounts. Apply
o n l i n e a t
good-sam.com EEOE
HEAVY EQUIPMENT
Operator Career! 3
Week Hands On
Training School. Bull-
dozers, Backhoes,
Excavators. National
Certifications. Lifetime
Job Placement Assis-
tance. VA Benefits
Eligible!
1-866-362-6497.
HELP WANTED!!!
Make $1000 weekly
mai l i ng brochures
from HOME! NO ex-
perience required-
Start Immediately!
www.TheMailingHub.com
INDUSTRIAL
PAINTERS
Must have two years
prior experience in
spray painting. Pref-
erably in an industrial
environment. DLM of-
fers a competitive
starting wage, 401-K,
health & dental insur-
ance, paid vacation
and holidays. Apply in
person at DLM,
10912 Highway 270
East, Malvern.
TRANSPORTATION
SUPPORT
needed for Central
Arkansas Develop-
ment Council!s Ben-
ton Call Center. Ex-
cellent computer, cus-
tomer service, and or-
ganizational skills re-
quired. Pre-Employ-
ment Drug Screening
and Criminal Back-
ground Check re-
quired. To download
an Employment Appli-
c at i on go t o
www.cadc.com Em-
ployment Applications
are retained on file for
(1) one year. You
must contact HR if
application was previ-
ously submitted and
you want to be con-
sidered for the above
position or for more
i nf or mat i on cal l
501-315-1121. Equal
Opportunity Employer
Employment
WANTED TO
HIRE
Person to work
outside in the
lumber/building
materials area.
DUTIES:
• loading/unloading
building materials
• operating fork lift
• greeting & serving
customers
MUST be able to:
• communicate with
customers
• read & comprehend
• lift 100 lb..
• pass drug alcohol
screen
• produce valid Ark.
drivers license
APPLY
Sonya Goforth
Lewis Lumber & Supply
718 S. East Street
Benton, AR 72015
EOE
MEDICARE CASE
Mgr/ RN needed at
Good Samaritan Soci-
ety in Hot Springs Vil-
lage, full-time, day
shift.!Previous long -
term care experience
preferred.! This posi-
tion will monitor the
resident from admis-
sion to discharge. We
offer competitive pay
and full benefits in-
cluding health, dental,
PTO, flex spending,
daycare and corpo-
rate discounts.! Apply
o n l i n e a t
good-sam.com EEOE
MIG WELDERS
Must have a minimum
2 years MIG welding
experience with refer-
ences and be able to
pass a welding test.
Pay package i n-
cludes: competitive
starting wage, 401-K,
health & dental insur-
ance, paid vacation.
Apply in person at
DLM, 10912 Highway
270 East, Malvern.
Take exit 99 off I-30
right to our door. DLM
is an EOE.
OWNER OPERA-
TORS- Little Rock
based Coach Trans-
port Trucking Com-
pany i s seeki ng
O/O!s. GREAT Pay
and EXCELLENT
HOME TIME - Call or
Email Chelsea More-
head at 501-565-4819
chelsea@coachtrans-
port.com
PART-TIME House-
keeper needed. Must
pass drug test, and
work weekends. Ap-
ply in person: Best
Western in Benton.
Cleo’s Furniture
SALES ASSOCIATE
Arkansas’ fastest growing furniture
company with over 25 years in the
business is looking to fll a sales
position in our Benton location.
LIFTING AND MOVING
FURNITURE IS REQUIRED
Health and Life Insurance,
Retirement, Vacations,
No Sundays, Excellent Pay,
Advancement Available
Must apply in person Monday thru
Friday 10:00 am to 6:00pm
201 N. Main St. Benton, AR
Salesperson
DUTIES:
•Energetic person to work
on sales floor
JOB SKILLS:
• Good Personality
• Ability to Communicate
• High School Diploma
• Pass Al cohol / Drug
Screen
• Ark. Driver’s License
• Lift 100 lbs.
APPLY:
Sonya Goforth
Lewis Lumber &
Supply
718 S. East Street
Benton, AR 72015
EOE
SALESPERSON EX-
PERIENCED, Moti-
vat ed I ndi vi dual
needed for busy RV
dealership. Highest
commission paid in
industry. Apply at RV
City-Benton 18925
I-30 Benton,AR or
send resume to fi-
nance@rvcity.biz
TRUCK DRIVERS
Wanted Best Pay and
Home Time! Apply
Online Today over
750 Companies! One
Application, Hundreds
of Offers!
www.HammerLaneJobs.com
Looking for a good
deal? Search the
Courier Classifieds!!
Employment
SHIPPING CLERK
Must be proficient at
data entry, be ex-
tremely!detail oriented
and have excellent
working!knowledge of
MS Exel. Responsi-
bilities!include: Bill of
lading preparation,
obtaining!tracking in-
formation, preparing
picking tickets!and
shipping labels for
warehouse pickers,!
verifying accuracy of
mat er i al s pul l ed
for!shipping. Prior ex-
perience in manufac-
turing!environment a
plus. Send resume
and salary!history to
mlobel@dlminc.net
Employment
Wanted
SPOILED 15-YEAR
old son needs sum-
mer work until August
5th. Request yard
mowing, hedge work,
gutter cleaning, pool
cleaning, etc Call Dad
at 501-690-2020 to
schedule.
Instruction
ATTEND COLLEGE
Online from Home.
*Medical, *Business,
*Cri mi nal Justi ce,
* Hospi t al i t y Job
placement assistance
Computer and Finan-
cial Aid if qualified.
SCHEV authorized.
Call 1-800-509-5085
www.CenturaOnline.com
Child Care
IN-HOME DAYCARE
Spotless - Non-smoking
Drop-ins Welcome!
778-2920
LICENSED CHILDCARE
Infants to 8 B •L• S
Vouchers • Drop-Ins
562-0691 • 951-2923
LICENSED CHILDCARE
Infants to 5
Mon. Fri. Vouchers
562-0691 • 951-2923
Services
JIM CRITES
Carpentry-Handyman
additions, Sheetrock
& Painting, 34 yrs exp
501-249-6621
Apartments
Unfurnished
1 BR APT. $400 mo.,
$100 Dep. Call (501)
303-8166 / 909-9240
1 BR, 1 BA apartment
$300 mo. w/deposit, 6
mo. lease required.
Call 778-3324.
1BR 1BA Kit appli-
ances W/D $425mo +
$200dep, 315-9337
between 9a-8p, No
Pets!
2 BR Apts, kit. appl.,
W&D conn., $500 &
up. Handicap access.
317-5190 / 317-5192
2 BR, 1 BA, kitch.
appl., W/D conn.,
$500 mo., $250 dep.
Call between 9am-
8pm, (501)315-9337
HURRY
CALL NOW!
Super clean, well
maintained 1 & 2 BR
Apts Starting @ $450
Ready for move-in,
Castle Properties
Call Connie
501-626-4596
315-4900
SUMMERWOOD
APARTMENTS
COUNTRY OAKS
DUPLEXES
• Pool & Park
• All units available
with or without full
size washer & dryer
• Pets welcome with
limitations
• On-site Management
justinproperties.com
Silica Heights off Hwy 183
Edison Ave. & Cole Dr.
3200 Congo Road
Ready to take the
Real Estate Plunge?
Check out the Homes
for Sale in the Classi-
fieds daily.
Apartments
Unfurnished
CAMRY COURT
Now Open
in Bryant
New Construction
2 BR, 2 BA or 2.5 BA
off Wilkerson Rd.
on Sadie Dr.
(By Hill Farm Elem.)
Call Terri the on-site
manager for appt.
501-804-0125
Bldg. 1225 #2
or call Dale King
501-539-1935
Visit our web-site
www.arkansas
apartments.net
Houses for Rent
2 BR 1 BA, 1 car Ga-
rage 4 yrs. ol d
$750mo + Dep
607-3229 /414-6430
2 BR, 1 BA w/garage,
Orleans Court, Ben-
ton. 501-672-0407 or
affordablepropertiesar.com
2 BR, 1 BA, fenced
back yard, 2 car car-
port. $650 mo. $500
dep. 501-317-7536
2BR 1 Ba Kitch. appl.
W/D connec. No pets
$550mo + $275dep.
Call 315-9337 be-
tween 9a -8p
3 & 4 BEDROOM
$825 -$1400 mo.,
Haskell, Benton &
Bryant. 315-9370
3 BR 2 BA Gar. Ben-
ton, Ask about our
special rent discount.
317-2092 , 249-1343
3 BR, 1 ba , CH/A,
kitchen appli.$675 mo
+ $500 dep. 1502
Sorrell. 612-8848
3 BR, 2 ba, CH/A,
W/D connect, carport,
dining room. $790
mo. + dep. Avail.
NOW!! 860-8208 or
414-7188
4 BR 2.5BA $400 dep
+ $650 mo. GR SD,
no i nsi de pet s,
501-844-9340
4 BR, 2 bath, stained
concrete floors, 2 car
garage, great loca-
tion, Benton Schools.
For mor e i nf o.
501-778-4402
5 ROOM House
$500mo + $250dep
Fenced Backyard,
CH/A Call 860-8395
or 778-8613
519 PEARSON 2Br
1BA $625mo + 400
Dep. No Pet s
326-3907
FOR LEASE/SALE
New 3 & 4 BR, 2 BA,
brick, FP, ceiling fans,
carpet, 2 car garage,
patio. Go to: www.
catalyst-residential.com
or 501-697-6342
HOUSE FOR Lease
2Br Mid-Town Benton
Call 315-9422 Bill
Barlow
Classifieds Work!
Houses for Rent
Eagle Properties
LLC
315–2075
Nice 2 & 3 BR Homes
from $500 to $925
Apartments
1 BR’s from $415
2 BR’s from $475
*based on availability
Deposit & References
Required
eaglepropsaline.com
Mobile Homes
For Rent
2 BR, 1 BA, Quiet
park, Benton Schools.
No Pets! Call any-
time. 501-315-1281
MOBILE HOME: 3br
1 3/4 ba. Storage.
NO PETS. Large
yard, rural area. !Glen
Rose schools. !$390
plus dep. !249-1084
or 776-1105
Business Property
For Rent
FOR RENT Office
Space available in
Downtown Benton.
501-580-0358
Miscellaneous
For Rent
*REDUCE YOUR CA-
BLE BILL! Get a
4-Room Al l -Di gi tal
Satellite system in-
stalled FREE Pro-
gramming starting at
$24.99/mo. FREE
HD/DVR Upgrade to
new callers, SO CALL
NOW (800) 795-6129
*REDUCE YOUR CA-
BLE BILL! Get a
4-Room Al l -Di gi tal
Satellite system in-
stalled FREE Pro-
gramming starting at
$24.99/mo. FREE
HD/DVR Upgrade to
new callers, SO CALL
NOW (800) 799-4935
Antiques &
Collectibles
ANTIQUE FRENCH
Dresser Ornate carv-
ing, 2 antique end ta-
bles, 501-672-9144
Miscellaneous
For Sale
DISH NETWORK.
S t a r t i n g a t
$19.99/month (for 12
mos.) & High Speed
Internet starting at
$14.95/month (where
available.) SAVE! Ask
About SAME DAY In-
stallation! CALL Now!
1-800-316-5180
ELECTRIC
WHEELCHAIR
Lightweight. Portable
Like new. Low $ or
perhaps FREE to
elderly. 888-442-3390
FOR SALE: Yamaha
alto saxophone.
Excellent condition.
With hard & soft car-
rying case. $395.
501-315-8228, leave
message.
MOBILE HOME Air
Conditioners, Skirting,
Doors, Tubs, Water
Heaters, Faucets,
Vent Hoods, Floor
Registers,Cabinet
Doors, Moul di ngs,
Laminate, Carpet.,
501-993-3144
NEED AN American
Flag? Lewis Lumber
& Supply Benton,AR
NIKKO CHRISTMAS
Time 8 cups & sau-
cers $50 Ethan Allen
maple wooden spin-
dle-back rocker $100
Call 778-6384
Musical
Merchandise
Cushing
Piano Service
Tune • Repair
Player Pianos & Pump Organs
778-6584
Yamaha Alto
Saxophone
Excellent condition
With hard & soft
carrying case $395
501-315-8228
leave message
Produce
Produce 840-4076, Pick-
els, Squash, G. Peaches
Tomatoes, new Potatoes
Sweet corn,Cantaloupes,
1492 Salem Rd
Looking for a good
deal? Search the
Courier Classifieds!!
Produce
STRAWBERRIES, 5k
Orchard, Donaldson,
AR. U pick or we pick
501-384-2486 Open
Mon.-Sat., 8-5. Call
for orders.
Heavy Equip-
SURPLUS EQUIP-
MENT. Online auc-
tions HUGE selection.
BIG savi ngs. NO
Buyer fees Low Seller
f ees BARGAI NS!
Register FREE Use
Promo Code cnhi313.
LIVE support.
www.SurplusOnThe.NET
334-215-3019
Recreational
Vehicles
RIVERSIDE BOAT
and RV storage, cov-
ered and uncovered
parking, gated 24
hour access, security
lights, 4167 Mulberry
Rd. 501-860-5737
Houses For Sale
BENTON, 1926 Fal-
con Way, 1640 sf, 3
BR, 2 BA, new thru-
out w/crown tile &
laminate. $128,900
501-804-9125
Mobile Homes
For Sale
$$$ 0 DOWN $$$
with your Land!
Call 501-653-3201
FORECLOSED
DOUBLEWIDE on
Private Lot. Great
Schools, Great
Location, must sell!
501-653-3201
NEW 4 BR 2 BA
Home $39K includes
delivery to your prop-
erty. Call for Quick
Approval 653-3202
SPECIAL FINANC-
ING FOR LAND
OWNERS $0 Down
for Your Home Avail-
able. Easy term,sap-
pl y by phone
501-407-9500
Lots & Acreage
3 ACR for sale
$29,500 612-9592
On corner of Congo
Ferndale & Lawson
40 ACRES of Timber-
land near Crow!s Sta-
tion 580-0358
Real Estate
CANCEL YOUR
TI MESHARE. NO
Risk Program STOP
Mortgage & Mainte-
nance Payments To-
day. 100% Money
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Call Us NOW. We
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Legal Notices
NOTICE OF
PUBLIC HEARING
SALINE COUNTY
QUORUM COURT
The Saline County
Quorum Court will
hold a public hearing
concerning applica-
tion by Saline County
for federal funds from
Edward Byrne Memo-
rial Justice Assistance
Grant (JAG) Formula
Program: FY 2013
Local Solicitation. The
hearing is scheduled
for June 18, 2013 at
6:30 p.m. at the I
Can! Art & Resource
Center, 1040 Angel
Court, Little Rock in
the East End commu-
nity at the regularly
scheduled monthly
meeting of the Saline
Count y Quor um
Court. The grant
funds will be used to
improve court secu-
rity. All interested
parties are encour-
aged to attend.
THE CITY OF BRYANT
is accepting sealed
bids for surplus vehi-
cles, the bids will be
accepted from!June
3rd 2013 until June
12th 2013! at !3p.m.
The bids may be
turned into Lt. JW
Plouch at 312 Roya
Lane Bryant Ar and
Bid Opening will be
at the Police Depart-
ment Conference
Room on!June 12th
2013 at 3p.m.! For
more information,
p l e a s e v i s i t
http://www.cityof-
bryant.com/bids
Moderately Confused Herman
Crossword Challenge
Kit ‘n’ Carlyle
Celebrity Cipher
Here’s How It Works:
Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken
down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the
numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and
box. Each number can appear only once in each row,
column and box. You can figure out the order in which
the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues
already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you
name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!
Astro•graph
bernice bede osol
www.bernice4u.com.
Alley Oop
Big Nate
Born Loser
Thatababy
Frank and Ernest
Grizzwells
Monty
Arlo and Janis
Soup to Nutz
THURSDAY, JUNE 6, 2013
GEMINI (May 21-June
20) -- You’re in an exception-
ally good achievement cycle,
but your victories could come
about in a surprising way. It’ll
be a last-minute change that
does the trick.
CANCER (June 21-July
22) -- A friend might lean on
you in hopes that your capabil-
ity will rub off. Do your best
to help this person -- you’ll
need similar assistance in the
near future.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) --
An opportunity to make more
money from a work-related
matter is yours for the tak-
ing. You may need to modify
it somewhat, but it should be
easy.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22) -- Profit from past experi-
ence and don’t fall into a trap
that has snared you before.
Old mistakes don’t have to be
repeated.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
-- You are likely to fare better
in a joint endeavor than a solo
effort. Pick your ally wisely
and you’ll do quite well.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) -- Because you’re as much
of a giver as you are a taker,
you’ll be in high demand.
Your good attitude will be a
boon to your team.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
23-Dec. 21) -- To feel grati-
fied, you’ll need to engage in
an activity that produces real
benefits for you and others.
Start the ball rolling quickly.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) -- You’ll instinctively
know how to arouse interest
in your wares, making you a
good salesperson. You’ll need
to be careful when it comes to
actually handling money, how-
ever.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) -- One of your greatest
assets is a desire to do things
for others that they can’t do
themselves. If you utilize this
wonderful gift, you will gener-
ate a plethora of good will.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) -- Mental tasks will be
much easier than work requir-
ing physical effort. If there is
some type of heavy lifting on
the agenda, hire helpers.
ARIES (March 21-April
19) -- You’ll have some very
good chances to add to your
material resources if you assert
yourself. Don’t be afraid to
make extra funds by doing
something new.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) -- If you’re permitted to
use your own ideas at work,
you’ll stand a much greater
chance of success. Do what
you can on your own and
don’t be thwarted by outside
forces.
Thursday, June 6, 2013
news@bentoncourier.com The Saline Courier – Page 11
ComiCs
12 The Saline Courier
Thursday, June 6, 2013
Sardis Community Garden
project of area Methodists
The Sardis Community
Garden is a project of Sardis
United Methodist Church.
According to Elizabeth
Kooiman, project coordina-
tor, this outreach project was
initially started as a service
to the community, as well
as to help provide additional
fresh food for the church’s
food pantry.
Pantry recipients also are
being encouraged to reserve
a plot in the garden for plant-
ing and growing their own
fresh vegetables. Assistance
and instructions in planting
are made available to anyone
interested. The garden plots
also will be used to encour-
age and teach good eating
habits for those recipients of
items from the church’s food
pantry shelves.
The garden also is being
used as a teaching tool for
the children enrolled in the
Sardis Child Development
Center at the church.
The children are learn-
ing the correct way to plant,
nurture and harvest from the
garden.
The youth groups from
the church have planted
flowers in the garden, which
will be harvested and shared
by the youth with the sick
and shut-ins in the Sardis
Community.
This is another way of
getting the younger people
involved in community proj-
ects and serving others.
According to Kooiman,
a very important part of
the garden project is to
encourage families to work
together.
Plots are available not
only to church members,
but to anyone in the Sardis
Community and can be
reserved, at no charge, by
calling the Sardis United
Methodist Church office at
501-602-2129.
By Ginger English
Special to The Saline Courier
GINGER ENGLISH/Special to The Saline Courier
Garden plots are available in the Sardis Community Garden. The garden is a project of Sardis United
Methodist Church, but anyone in the community may reserve a plot at no charge.
This document is © 2013 by editor - all rights reserved.
AttachmentSize
E-Edition June 6, 2013.pdf10.43 MB
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