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COURIER
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Write: P.O. Box 207,
Benton, AR 72018
Volume 137
Number 75
2 Sections of 16 Pages
$1.25
Home of Robert Lamb
and William Frost
SALINE COUNTY’S NEWS SOURCE SINCE 1876
THE SALINE
INDEX
OBITUARIES ............................3A
EDITORIAL ...............................4A
SPORTS ............................. 5A,6A
BUSINESS ...............................7A
CLASSIFIEDS .................... 6B,7B
CROSSWORD .........................5B
www. bent oncouri er. com
Sunday, March 16, 2014
Join us on Facebook and Twitter
Benton School District hosted its first “Read To
Succeed” event at all four elementary campuses as part of
the recent Read Across America Week.
School district officials reported the event was highly
successful, drawing more than 100 volunteers.
The purpose of the event reportedly was to highlight the
importance of early childhood literacy by having commu-
nity partners sit with students and read to them.
According to Jeff Collum, superintendent of the Benton
School District, “This is a powerful and very meaningful
exchange that takes place when an adult takes the time
from his busy schedule to sit and read to a child.”
Experts say that research and statistics show that chil-
dren who cannot read, or who are not on the appropriate
grade level for reading, may struggle throughout their edu-
cational and workforce careers.
“A quality education begins with this simple foundation-
al building block — reading,” Collum said.
The reading volunteers reportedly included parents,
grandparents, school personnel and others in the commu-
nity.
Because of its success, Collum hopes to schedule anoth-
er “Read To Succeed” day before the end of the current
school year.
Collum noted that the experience required “only about
15-20 minutes of an individual’s time to visit a school to
read to the children, but it made a difference to the chil-
dren and they will never forget it.”
To volunteer as a participant, individuals registered on
the school district website.Individual should sign up for
only one teacher and one time slot.
Benton schools host
‘Read To Succeed’
By Lynda Hollenbeck
lyndahol@yahoo.com
Four men were arrested in conjunc-
tion with a robbery and assault
after gunshots were reported near
American Best Value Inn in Bryant.
Around 8 p.m. Thursday police
responded to reports of gunshots
and a disturbance at the hotel and
determined that the two incidents
were related, said Sgt. Todd Crowson,
Bryant Police Department spokesper-
son.
No one was injured by the gunfire,
he said.
“The victims stated that when they
opened the door to their hotel room,
the five suspects rushed in and started
attacking both victims while taking
items from the room,” Crowson said.
“As the suspects fled the scene in two
different vehicle, there were gunshots
fired from one of the cars.”
The four suspects arrested were:
Johnathon Cox, 22; Yoosuf Siddiq, 20;
Ronald Spears, 21; and Xavier Reed,
21, all of Benton. All are charged
with residential burglary, aggravated
assault, robbery, a terroristic act and
false imprisonment.
“The victims were able to give infor-
mation about the suspect, which has
led to four arrests in this case with
more arrests still to come,” Crowson
said.
Cox
Spears
Reed
Siddiq
Special to The Saline Courier
Vicki Sparks volunteers as a reader for “Read to Succeed.” Many of the books read to the children were
favorite Dr. Seuss books, such as “The Cat In the Hat.” The event was held during the birthday celebra-
tion of the famous author.
Special to The Saline Courier
Benton School Board member Jeff Morrow poses with Ringgold Elementary School students following a
reading session. Morrow was at the school to read to children as part of the “Read to Succeed” program.
Benton’s new postmaster ‘76
PAGE 2
SPORTS
Lady panthers win 1st round
match in Drew Melton Tourney
PAGE 6A
SCRAPBOOK
SALINE COUNTY
WEATHER FORECAST
SUNDAY: Windy. A chance
of showers in the morning.
Rain likely during the day.
Highs around 60.
SUNDAY NIGHT: Mostly
cloudy. Windy. Much colder.
A chance of rain. A chance
of light snow and sleet after
midnight. Lows in the 20s.
MONDAY: Sunny with highs in
the lower 60s.
MONDAY NIGHT: Lows in the
upper 30s.
TUESDAY: Sunny with highs in
the lower 60s.
TUESDAY NIGHT: Lows in the
mid 40s.
By Sarah Perry
sderouen@bentoncourier.com
Salem Art Show raises funds for supplies
Benton Public Utilities
Commission will meet Monday
night to resume a discussion about
the possibility of purchasing a
16-inch water line from Southwest
Water Users.
At the March 17 meeting, the
commissioners plan to discuss a
potential contract to present to
Southwest Water Users’ Board of
Directors.
The issue previously was
explored in a March 6 work session
involving representatives of both
groups.
At that earlier meeting, the PUC
and Southwest discussed possible
terms of the potential agreement.
These included Benton Utilities
allowing Southwest to obtain water
out of the line even after the pur-
chase and not allowing Benton
Utilities to sell water to Haskell.
Additionally, the PUC will hear
an update on the utilities reloca-
tion activities for the Alcoa Road
Improvement Project, specifically
regarding funding.
In other business, the committee
plans to discuss Flex Net Metering
and the possibility of hiring addi-
tional personnel in the water dis-
tribution department to install the
meters. They also plan to discuss
the possibility of letting the Street
Department use an old electrical
power plant for supply storage.
The committee is scheduled
to hear a presentation from Steve
DiCicco, manager of the water
department, about potentially sell-
ing scrap water meters from the
water distribution department.
Additionally, the commissioners
plan to discuss and possibly vote on
starting the engineering and design
process for the new 10 MVA substa-
tion in the Hurricane Lakes Area.
In other agenda items, the com-
mittee is scheduled to discuss
receiving power from Plum Point
Unit #1 and the new electric rates
that will go into effect April 1. The
final agenda item to be discussed
will be the possible approval of the
low bidder for reclosures for distri-
bution lines.
PUC meetings are open to the
public. The meeting is set for 6 p.m.
at the Electric Utility Office at 1827
Dale St.
PUC to discuss potential contract with Southwest
By Bobbye Pyke
bpyke@bentoncourier.com
By Bobbye Pyke
bpyke@bentoncourier.com
Salem Elementary School
recently hosted its second
annual art show to raise
money for school and art
supplies.
Students competed in an
art contest and then made
their artwork available for
their families to purchase.
Awards were presented to
the top three works of art in
each grade.
At the kindergarten level,
Sammye Simmons took third
place, Ben Watson took sec-
ond place, and Max Neufer
took first place. Additionally,
Max won best in show.
In first grade Ava
Kempson took third place,
Trysten Watson took second
place, and Jordyn Purtle took
first place.
In second grade Molly
Roach took third place, Jesus
Lopez took second place,
and Jeremiah Hale took first
place.
In third grade Savannah
took third place, Carter
Moore took second place,
and Baily C. took first place.
In fourth grade Raven
Lafferty took third place,
Madison Franks took
second place, and Ben
Wertenberger took first
place.
In fifth grade Ethan
Scarbrough took third place,
Carson Smith took second
place, and Kayde Cross took
first place.
Additionally, students held
a talent show in which they
performed in dance, song,
musical instruments, and
other events.
Representatives from
Landers Chrysler were
present and allowed people
to test-drive some of their
vehicles.
For every vehicle that was
test-driven, Landers agreed
to donate $10 to Salem
Elementary for the purchase
of school supplies for the
children. Additionally cotton
candy and other treats were
available to purchase.
Glenn Sago, art teacher
at Salem Elementary,
expressed pride in the work
the children did this year,
adding that the event drew
more entries than in previ-
ous years.
Robbery leads to
four arrests; one
suspect still at large
2A The Saline Courier
Sunday, March 16, 2014
Happy Hour 2-4pm • 1/2 price Drinks & Slushes
1703 Military Rd • Benton 778-5111
5997 Hwy 67 • Haskell 860-7111
Saturday
April 12
Benefting the
Humane Society of
Saline County &
Benton Animal Control
Sunset Lake, Benton, AR
(NOTE: This is a new location for this race)
5K Start – 8:00 a.m. 1 Mile Start – 9:00 a.m.
Entry Fee (Postmarked before March 22) – 5K – $20
1 Miler – $10 Both – $25 (After March 22) - 5K – $25
1 Miler – $15 Both – $35
Honorarium and Memorials –We are offering you a
chance to honor or memorialize a pet that you’ve had to
say good-bye to. For only $10 you can add your pet’s
name to our list, which will appear on the back of the race
shirt. All honorariums and memorials must be
received by March 24. For more information check-out
www.salinecountystriders.com/races/run-with-the-dogs
presented by
Check out our daily menu on facebook
We Cater
794-0329
Open Mon-Fri
5:30am-9:00pm
Sat & Sun
6:00am - 9:00 pm
4444 Hwy 5 So.
Benton
Homestyle Cooking like Grandma used to cook!
Breakfast and Lunch
Prepared Daily 7 days a week
Sunday Lunch Special
This week including: Chicken &
Dressing, Glazed Ham, mashed or
fried taters, pinto beans, corn, sweet
potato casserole, green beans, turnip
greens, fried okra, rolls or cornbread.
Bring your Church Bulletin for 15% off
Civil
Service
Commissioner
The City of Benton is currently accepting
resumes from citizens interested in
serving on the Civil Service Commission.
One commissioner will be appointed
to fill a vacancy with expiration of
April 2017. There is no salary with
the position but appropriate expenses
incurred could be reimbursed.
Commissioners must have been a
resident of the City of Benton for the
past three (3) years and may not hold
or be a candidate for any public office.
A completed Employment application or
resume’ and letter of interest should be
submitted to the Mayor’s Office,
P. O. Box 607, Benton, AR 72018-0607
or delivered to 114 S. East Street.
Applications are available from the
Benton Municipal Complex or City
website at HYPERLINK http://www.
benton.ar.gov www.benton.ar.gov.
Responses should be received
by March 28, 2014.
LITTLE ROCK — A feder-
al judge Friday struck down
Arkansas' attempt to ban
most abortions beginning
12 weeks into a woman's
pregnancy, saying viability,
not a heartbeat, remains the
key factor in determining
whether abortions should be
allowed.
U.S. District Judge Susan
Webber Wright last year had
stopped enforcement of the
law while she reviewed it,
and on Friday she declared
that it was unconstitutional.
She cited previous court
decisions that said abortions
shouldn't be restricted until
after a fetus reaches viabil-
ity, which is typically at 22 to
24 weeks.
"The state presents no
evidence that a fetus can live
outside the mother's womb
at twelve weeks," the judge
wrote.
By adopting a ban based
on a fetal heartbeat, and not
the ability to survive, the
Arkansas Legislature had
adopted the nation's tough-
est abortion law last March.
Two weeks later, North
Dakota lawmakers passed a
bill restricting abortions at
six weeks — or before some
women would know they're
pregnant. That law is on
hold.
In her decision Friday,
Wright said only a doctor
could determine viability.
"The Supreme Court has
... stressed that it is not the
proper function of the legis-
lature or the courts to place
viability at a specific point
in the gestation period,"
Wright wrote.
Wright left in place a por-
tion of the law that requires
doctors to check for a fetal
heartbeat and to notify the
pregnant woman if one is
present.
Gov. Mike Beebe, a
Democrat, had vetoed the
bill, citing the viability
standard. But Republicans,
controlling the Statehouse
for the first time since
Reconstruction, overrode
him with a simple majority
vote.
"The ruling is what the
governor predicted in his
veto letter last year," Beebe
spokesman Matt DeCample
said.
The state attorney gener-
al's office said it was review-
ing possible next steps.
"Today's decision was not a
surprise," spokesman Aaron
Sadler said.
Bettina Brownstein, who
represented two doctors
who perform abortions at a
Little Rock clinic, said the
12-week ban was "demean-
ing to women."
"The law never should
have been passed in the first
place, it's so unquestionably
unconstitutional," she said.
She said it was unlikely that
Drs. Louis Jerry Edwards
and Tom Tvedten would
appeal the portion of the
law requiring them to notify
patients if a heartbeat is
detected.
"Practically, in my opin-
ion, it has very little effect.
It's duplicative of what doc-
tors who perform abortions
in Arkansas already have to
do," she said.
State Sen. Jason Rapert,
R-Conway, who sponsored
the fetal heartbeat bill, said
he was encouraged that that
portion of the measure was
upheld.
"Now, anyone who pres-
ents for abortion in our state,
they're going to be given
an opportunity to know if
there's a living heartbeat in
their womb, and that is a win
for the pro-life movement,"
Rapert said. "When people
have to face the reality that
there's a living heartbeat in
their womb, that will make
them rethink about taking
the life away from their
baby."
The 12-week ban had
included exemptions for
rape, incest, the life of the
mother and highly lethal
fetal disorders. Legislators
last year also passed a sepa-
rate ban at 20 weeks, based
on the disputed claim that
fetuses can feel pain at that
point.
Divorces Granted
•Daniel S. McRaven v.
Janice M. McRaven.
•Rhonda L. Burkhalter v.
William A. Burkhalter.
•Elgin L. Bowers v.
Brandy M. Bowers.
•Jose Luis Laguna v.
Maria Dolores Laguna.
•Jack King v. Roberta
Bayless King.
•Kenneth Burns v. Jinger
Martin Burns.
•Christon Smith v. Ryan
Smith.
•Danny McCoy v.
Britteny McCoy.
•Sara Gates v.
Christopher Jarvis.
•Spencer Workman v.
Megan Workman.
•Amanda Pilkington v.
Jason Pilkington.
•Ernest Maynard v. Vida
Maynard.
•Joshua Loftin v.
Elizabeth Robinson.
•Rhonda Rene Burton v.
Leonard Houston Burton.
•Shannon K. Seibs v.
Robert D. Seibs.
Marriage
Licenses Issued
•Christopher Lee Webb
of Hensely and Rachel Fay
Dickerson of Hensley.
•Rolando Delgado III of
Little Rock and Brittany E.
Thomason of Little Rock.
Felonies Filed
•Victoria Booker was
charged with a Class D
felony for theft of property.
•Sherri Michelle Davis
was charged with a Class
C felony for commercial
burglary.
•Shawn Julian Palmer
was charged with a Class
C felony for commercial
burglary.
•Beau Scott Blanchard
was charged with four Class
C felony for possession of
material depicting child
sexual explicit conduct.
•Chistopher Brian
Vaughn was charged with
a Class D felony for pos-
session of a controlled sub-
stance with intent to deliver.
•Ronald Layne Spears
was charged with two Class
D felonies for possession
of a controlled substance
with intent to deliver and a
Class C felony for failing to
appear in court on felony
charges.
•Richard T. Seales was
charged with a Class D
felony for theft of property.
•Christopher L. Sellers
was charged with a Class D
felony for theft of property.
•Paxton Lewis Griffith
was charged with a Class
D felony for breaking or
entering.
•James Carter was
charged with a Class D felo-
ny for breaking or entering.
•Ariella Jay Wilson was
charged with a Class D felo-
ny for breaking or entering.
•Shawn Julian Palmer
was charged with a Class C
felony for failing to register
as a sex offender or report
address change.
•Alyson Samantha Terry
was charged with a Class C
felony for unlawful use of a
communication device.
•Myron Singleton was
charged with a Class C felo-
ny for theft of property.
•Ike Freeman Carter
was charged with a Class D
felony for terroristic threat-
ening.
•Bradley James Gonzales
was charged with a Class B
felony for residential bur-
glary.
COURTHOUSE REPORT
March 6-12
SALINE COURIER SCRAPBOOK 1994
Courier Photo
Elaine Black, left, Main Street Benton project director, presents a $100 check to Carolyn Counts,
president of the Saline County Association for Family and Community Education Council. The FCE
council took first-place honors in this year’s Trim-A-Tree For Charity contest.
LITTLE ROCK — A fed-
eral agent says a government
unit that compiles phone and
wiretap records obtained
by federal law enforcement,
intelligence agencies and
some foreign governments
was used in the investigation
of a Mexican drug cartel's
activities in Arkansas.
But FBI Special Agent
James Woodie testified
Friday that the involvement
of the Drug Enforcement
Administration's Special
Operations Division was
minimal in the investigation
of Nishme Martinez, a U.S.
citizen.
The Arkansas Democrat-
Gazette reports that Martinez
was arrested last year and
indicted along with 16 other
defendants on a charge of
conspiracy to possess cocaine
with intent to distribute.
Database
delved in
drug case
Associated Press
US judge strikes Arkansas’ 12-week abortion ban
Associated Press
FAYETTEVILLE — Bret
Bielema hasn't exactly
taken time off from the spot-
light following his winless
debut in the Southeastern
Conference.
The Arkansas coach,
never one to avoid a healthy
debate, has spent much of
the offseason in the news for
his comments about whether
to slow the offenses in col-
lege football. He returns to
the field Sunday when the
Razorbacks open spring
practice — a welcome
reprieve for the second-year
coach who suffered though a
3-9 season in his first season
after leaving Wisconsin.
"I can't wait," Bielema
said. "I think our kids have
been chomping at the bit."
The Razorbacks lost their
final nine games last sea-
son, including all eight SEC
games. It was their first win-
less conference season since
entering the league in 1992.
They were leading LSU
in the final game until a late
fourth-quarter touchdown
by the Tigers mercifully
brought Arkansas' season
to a close — the second
straight year the school
missed out on a bowl game
in the wake of the scandal
that led the former coach
Bobby Petrino's firing.
Bielema has had plenty of
time to think about that loss
and a season that saw the
Razorbacks finish 12th in the
SEC with an average of 20.7
points per game.
Bielema has since taken
the approach that the final
dagger in the miserable year
might have been the best
thing in the long term for
Arkansas.
"Just knowing the mental-
ity and some of the guys, I
really think they would have
thought they had arrived if
they beat LSU there at the
end," Bielema said. "I'm
almost in the belief that
maybe, although it's noth-
ing I wanted to live through,
that maybe that might have
been a blessing in disguise,
to show that we had made
progress but we're not quite
where we need to be."
Much of the attention sur-
rounding Bielema's offsea-
son has been focused on the
much-scrutinized proposal
that would have penalized
offenses for snapping the ball
before 10 seconds had run
off the play clock.
Bielema support the pro-
posal and drew attention for
calling the issue a "matter of
safety, life and death."
The proposal was tabled
by the NCAA football rules
committee, meaning the
age of the up-tempo offense
will continue this season.
Bielema still hasn't com-
mented publicly on the deci-
sion, though his primary
concern is improving the
SEC's worst passing offense.
Arkansas was last in the
league last season with an
average of 148.5 yards pass-
ing per game, leaving much
of the attention this spring
centered on the progress of
incumbent starting quarter-
back Brandon Allen and his
host of challengers — includ-
ing younger brother, Austin.
Brandon Allen battled
injuries for much of last sea-
son in his first year as the
full-time starter, completing
just 128 of 258 passes (49.6
percent) while throwing 13
touchdowns and 10 intercep-
tions.
The Razorbacks brought
in one quarterback, Missouri
prep standout Rafe Peavey,
during the offseason, and
last season's backup, AJ
Derby, is back along with
freshman Damon Mitchell.
Arkansas’ Bielema to turn focus back on the field
Associated Press
Sunday, March 16, 2014
The Saline Courier 3A




File Your
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PAWN SHOP
200 E. Sevier St.
Benton, AR 72015
501-778-4775
OBITUARIES
PAID OBITUARY
Barker
ATLANTA — The South
is where President Barack
Obama and Democrats
long have struggled, and
it's where the party's tough-
est battleground will be
this year in the fight for
control of the U.S. Senate.
Three incumbents
must face the conse-
quences of having voted
for Obama's health care
law, but Republicans first
must settle primaries in
several states, including
a challenge to Minority
Leader Mitch McConnell of
Kentucky.
All but one of the poten-
tially competitive races is in
a state Obama lost in 2012,
and the president remains
deeply unpopular among
whites in the region.
Republicans are optimistic
they can achieve the six-
seat gain needed to retake
the Senate.
Democratic Sens. Kay
Hagan of North Carolina,
Mary Landrieu of Louisiana
and Mark Pryor of
Arkansas are on the ballot
for the first time since vot-
ing for the Affordable Care
Act in 2010. The law's wob-
bly start and its image as a
power-grab have the incum-
bents on the defensive,
emphasizing local issues
and avoiding unnecessary
mention of the second-term
president who leads their
party.
Obama's Gallup job
approval lingers in the low
40s, and is even lower in
several states with pivotal
Senate races. Republicans
want to feed on that and fol-
low the same road map that
carried them to a House
majority in 2010, Obama's
first midterm election.
"Democrats hope this
doesn't become a national
election, but we don't
think that's the case,"
said Republican National
Committee spokesman
Michael Short.
Democrats want the
Republican primaries
to project divisions and
extremism, especially in
races where the GOP's
leading candidates are
now in the U.S. House.
Democrats note that
Congress is more unpopu-
lar than the president.
In 2012, Democrats
defied early predictions
and expanded their Senate
majority by winning in
GOP-leaning Missouri and
Indiana, where conserva-
tive candidates tripped over
their own pronouncements
on rape and other issues.
A look at Senate races
across the South:
—Arkansas sets up
as a proxy for the tussle
between the White House
and House Republicans.
Pryor, whose father served
as governor and U.S. sena-
tor, is the last remaining
Democrat in the state's
Capitol Hill delegation.
His Republican opponent,
U.S. Rep. Tom Cotton, is a
young conservative favor-
ite.
Cotton and Pryor
avoided primaries. Cotton
voted with GOP leaders
in October to end the par-
tial federal government
shutdown, but Democrats
say they can paint him as
extreme. They're already
pointing to his vote against
the new farm bill.
Arkansas voters, who
give Obama a 35 percent
approval rating, have seen
a barrage of ads reminding
them that Pryor was "the
last vote" on the health
care bill.
—In Georgia, where
Republican Sen. Saxby
Chambliss is retiring, a
May primary is almost cer-
tain to lead to a runoff.
Three congressmen —
Jack Kingston and doctors
Phil Gingrey and Paul
Broun — each says his
record proves his conserva-
tive bona fides.
Kingston, chairman of
a House Appropriations
subcommittee, tells voters
what he's cut in the federal
budget.
Gingrey's slogan is
"Repeal or go home," and
he's banking on his oppo-
sition to the president's
health law carrying the day.
Broun, who once
declared evolutionary
theory "lies straight from
the pit of hell," says his
colleagues are poseurs. He
tried to prove his conserva-
tive credentials by holding
a drawing for an AR-15 mili-
tary style rifle.
Karen Handel, a former
secretary of state and
commission chairman in
Georgia's most populous
county, says she's got the
right experience for the
job, and without the blem-
ish of serving in Congress.
Former Dollar General
and Reebok CEO David
Perdue, the cousin of for-
mer Gov. Sonny Perdue,
says business experience
should trump the lot of
"career politicians," and
he's said he's willing to
finance his own race.
The Democratic favor-
ite is Michelle Nunn, the
daughter for former U.S.
Sen. Sam Nunn. Democrats
are confident that she can
pull in just enough Mitt
Romney voters — rural and
small-town whites fond of
her father, and suburban
white women in metropoli-
tan Atlanta — for an upset.
—In Kentucky,
McConnell finds himself
criticized from the left and
right. Wealthy business-
man Matt Bevin may be a
long shot in the Republican
primary, but he's got
enough organization and
money to grab attention
as he brands McConnell a
capitulator to Obama.
Democrats back
Secretary of State Alison
Lundergan Grimes, a party
financier's daughter who
has gotten campaign advice
and help from former
President Bill Clinton. Like
Nunn in Georgia, Grimes
wants to win big among
women. Like Bevin, she
is going after McConnell
as part of the problem in
Washington, but she also
says McConnell cares more
about his national party
post than about Kentucky.
McConnell has plenty
of money to respond. He'd
already spent $10 million
by the end of 2013.
—In Louisiana, Landrieu
is seeking a fourth term
never having topped 52.1
percent of the vote. She
won twice in Democratic
presidential years. She
won in the 2002, a midterm
year, by running as a cen-
trist who could work with
a Republican White House.
This time, she has to run
with Obama's negatives —
a 40 percent approval rat-
ing in Louisiana, according
to Gallup — without having
him at the top of the ticket
to excite Democrats, par-
ticularly black voters.
U.S. Rep. Bill Cassidy
has the backing of national
Republican leaders and
donors. But he once con-
tributed to Landrieu and,
as a state senator, he
pushed a proposal similar
to Obama's health insur-
ance exchanges. At least
two other Republicans will
be on the all-party primary
ballot, probably ensuring
that Cassidy's best shot is a
December runoff.
Landrieu defends her
health care vote, but has
clamored for changes to
the law. Democrats cite her
influence as head of the
Senate Energy and Natural
Resources Committee,
saying her post is a boon
for Louisiana's oil-and-gas
industry and hammering
Cassidy as a rubber stamp
for House Republicans.
Both she and Cassidy
champion flood insurance
relief for coastal residents.
—Mississippi hasn't
seen Sen. Thad Cochran
truly campaign in decades.
That's changing with a
challenge from state Sen.
Chris McDaniel, who
boasts endorsements from
national conservative and
tea party groups. Cochran
backers answered with a
super political action com-
mittee organized by Henry
Barbour, the nephew of the
former RNC chairman and
Gov. Haley Barbour.
McDaniel wants to turn
Cochran's greatest asset
— his experience and
what it's meant financially
to Mississippi — into a
liability by making the
incumbent the face of the
nation's $17 trillion debt.
The Cochran team attacks
McDaniel's legislative
votes supporting bond
debt for public projects.
The comparison, McDaniel
says, is intellectually dis-
honest. Henry Barbour
counters that McDaniel
casting Cochran as a "big-
government liberal" is just
as ludicrous.
Democrats recruited
former U.S. Rep. Travis
Childers and hope that
move positions them for
a surprise November vic-
tory if McDaniel defeats
Cochran.
—North Carolina voters
give Obama a 43 percent
job approval rating, and
some surveys put Hagan's
even lower. It's tricky
enough that she decided
not to appear with Obama
in January when he spoke
at North Carolina State
University.
Republicans have a free-
for-all primary.
North Carolina's House
speaker, Thom Thillis, who
lead a conservative resur-
gence in the Statehouse,
is the national Republican
favorite, but he must con-
tend with several conserva-
tive challengers. If Thillis
emerges, Democrats plan
to use his legislative agen-
da — making it harder to
vote, cutting public educa-
tion financing and tighten-
ing abortion regulations
— against him.
—In West Virginia, U.S.
Rep. Shelley Moore Capito
avoided a bruising GOP
primary, enabling her to
build an organization and
raise money for a race in
increasingly Republican
state. Secretary of State
Natalie Tennant will try
to hold retiring Sen. Jay
Rockefeller's seat for
Democrats.
—In Virginia,
Democratic Sen. Mark
Warner is the most popu-
lar politician, and Obama
won the commonwealth
twice. But in Ed Gillespie, a
former national GOP chair-
man, Republicans found a
candidate who can raise the
money to compete.
South at heart of close fight to control US Senate
Associated Press
NEW YORK (AP) —
Emergency workers sifted
through debris Saturday
from the site of a deadly
explosion at two New York
City apartment buildings as
they worked to reach the
basement levels, clearing
the way for investigators to
search for clues that might
reveal what caused the blast.
An uplifting moment from
the painstaking recovery
effort came as crews pulled
a large water-damaged
Bible from the rubble of the
Spanish Christian Church,
which was located in one of
the two destroyed buildings.
About two dozen people,
including clergy members,
carried the Bible in a solemn
procession near the East
Harlem site.
"This was in the depths of
the rubble. Somehow God
protected it," said Rick del
Rio, a bishop at the Church
of God.
The church's pastor,
Thomas Perez, suffered
heart palpitations when he
saw the Bible, said Letitia
James, the city's public
advocate. He was taken by
ambulance to a hospital as a
precaution, supporters said.
Workers were halfway
finished with debris removal
by midday. About 1,500
cubic feet of debris had been
hauled from the East Harlem
site since the explosion, and
an equal amount remained at
the site, said Daniel Glover,
spokesman for the Fire
Department of New York.
Truckloads of scattered
material will be sifted for
any traces of human remains
that might not have been
found at the site, said city
Fire Commissioner Salvatore
Cassano. Although the
bodies of all eight people
reported missing after
Wednesday's blast have
been recovered, the rescue
operation was continuing in
case others may be buried
beneath the rubble, he said.
Arson detectives and
fire marshals were waiting
to enter the basements to
examine meters, check pipes
and inspect any possible
ignition sources, such as
light switches, that might
have caused the blast.
Cassano scheduled a news
conference for Saturday
afternoon to update the pub-
lic on the progress of recov-
ery efforts.
More than 60 people were
injured in the explosion, and
more than 100 others were
displaced.
The theory that the
explosion was due to a gas
leak gained momentum
Friday after the National
Transportation Safety Board,
which investigates pipeline
accidents, said underground
tests conducted in the hours
after the explosion regis-
tered high concentrations of
natural gas.
The NTSB will conduct its
own inquiry after police and
fire officials determine what
might have caused the blast.
Police have identified six
of those who died: Griselde
Camacho, 45, a Hunter
College security officer;
Carmen Tanco, 67, a dental
hygienist who participated
in church-sponsored medi-
cal missions to Africa and
the Caribbean; Andreas
Panagopoulos, 43, a musi-
cian; Rosaura Hernandez,
22, a restaurant cook from
Mexico; George Ameado,
44, a handyman who lived in
one of the buildings that col-
lapsed; and Alexis Salas, 22,
a restaurant worker.
Mexican officials said
another Mexican woman,
Rosaura Barrios Vazquez, 43,
was among those killed.
The name of the eighth
person recovered, a woman,
hasn't been released.
Workers sift through rubble
for clues to NYC explosion
Gladys C. Chambliss
Gladys C. Chambliss, age 90, of Benton passed away
Friday, March 14, 2014.
She was born March 3, 1924, in Casa, Ark.
Mrs. Chambliss was a homemaker and a member of Oak
Grove Baptist Church.
She was preceded in death by her parents, Wilburn F. and
Mittie Cody; her husband, Robert Chambliss; and a grand-
daughter, Allison Chambliss.
She is survived by two sons, Ken Chambliss of Rowlett,
Texas, and Michael Chambliss of Benton; two sisters, Jackie
Pruett of Pine Bluff and Eunice Guiling of Farmers Branch,
Texas; three grandchildren, Elizabeth Chambliss, Josh
Hezlep and Haylee Hezlep; and one great-grandchild, Jacob
Hezlep.
Visitation will be held from 10 to 11 a.m. Tuesday, March
18, at Ashby Funeral Home. The funeral service will begin at
11 a.m. at the funeral home and burial will follow at Forest
Hills Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Saline
Memorial Hospice House, 23157 I-30, Bryant, AR 72022.
Online guest book: www.ashbyfuneralhome.com.
Robert R. Barker Sr.
Robert R. Barker Sr., 96, of Little Rock and recently of
Hot Springs, went to be with the Lord on Friday, March 14,
2014,in Hot Springs. He was born in Durant, Okla., on Dec.
16, 1917, to the late Robert O. and Pearl Spencer Barker.
He enjoyed his large family and leaves to cherish his
memory his loving wife, Rudene; a son, Robert
R. Barker Jr. (Bonnie) of Little Rock; daughters,
Constance Manzer of Hot Springs Village and
Joan Walker (Karl) of Benton; nine grandchil-
dren; 10 great-grandchildren; and many friends
and family members.
He was preceded in death by his wife of 64
years, Christie; his parents; five sisters; a son,
Ronald Barker; and a granddaughter, Kelly.
The Rev. Dr. Karen Akin will officiate at the funeral
service to be held at 2 p.m. Monday, March 17, at Roller-
Chenal Funeral Home Chapel, 13801 Chenal Parkway, Little
Rock, AR 72211 (phone 501-224-8300). Burial will follow at
Pinecrest Memorial Park.
Prior to the service, the family will receive friends from 1
to 2 p.m. at the funeral home.
Memorials may be made to Arkansas Hospice In-Patient
Center, 300 Werner St., 5 West, Hot Springs, AR 71913
(phone 501-622-4677).
Online guestbook: www.rollerfuneralhomes.com/chenal.
Associated Press
The Saline Courier encourages readers to
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The Saline Courier prefers typewritten or
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Please provide name, daytime phone and address
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Email letters to news@bentoncourier.com or
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LETTER TO THE EDITOR POLICY
State Sen. Jeremy Hutchinson, District 33,
201 E. North St., Benton, AR 72015, (501) 773-
3760, jeremy.hutchinson@senate.ar.gov.
State Sen. David Sanders, District 27 Room
320 State Capitol, Little Rock, AR 72201, (501)
682-6107, davidjamessanders@gmail.com.
State Sen. Alan Clark, District 13 P.O. Box
211, Lonsdale, AR 72087, (501) 262-3360, alan.
clark@senate.ar.gov.
State Rep. Ann Clemmer, District 23, 7415
Camille Drive, Benton, AR 72015, (501) 316-
0364, avclemmer@sbcglobal.net.
State Rep. Andy Davis, District 31 P.O. Box
30248, Little Rock, AR 72260, (501) 837-5109,
andy.davis@arkansashouse.org.
State Rep. Andy Mayberry, District 27 3022
E. Woodson Lateral Road, Hensley, AR 72065,
(501) 888-3522, andymayberry@windstream.net.
State Rep. Kim Hammer, District 28, 1411
Edgehill Dr., Benton, AR 72015, (501) 840-3841,
kimdhammer@yahoo.com.
Circuit Judge Bobby McCallister, 22nd
Judicial District, Division 1, Saline County
Courthouse, 200 N. Main St., Benton, AR 72015,
(501) 303-5635.
Circuit Judge Gary Arnold, 22nd Judicial
District, Division 2, Saline County Courthouse,
200 N. Main St., Benton, AR 72015, (501) 303-
5664.
Circuit Judge Grisham Phillips, 22nd
Judicial District, Division 3, Saline County
Courthouse, 200 N. Main St., Benton, AR 72015,
(501) 303-5628.
Circuit Judge Robert Herzfeld, 22nd
Judicial District, Division 4, Saline County Annex,
321 N. Main St., Benton, AR 72015, (501) 303-
1584.
District Judge Michael Robinson, Benton
District, 1605 Edison Ave., Benton, AR 72019,
(501) 303-5670.
District Judge Stephanie Casady, Bryant
District (Bryant, Alexander, Bauxite, Haskell,
Shannon Hills), Boswell Municipal Complex, 210
SW Third St., Bryant, AR 72022, (501) 847-5223.
Saline County Judge Lanny Fite,
Courthouse 200 N. Main St., Benton, AR 72015,
(501) 303-5640.
Prosecuting Attorney Ken Casady, 22nd
Juicial District, 102 S. Main St., Benton, AR
72015, (501) 315-7767.
Saline County Sheriff Cleve Barfield, Saline
County Detention Center, 735 S. Neeley St.,
Benton, AR 72015; (501) 303-5609.
news@bentoncourier.com
HOW TO REACH YOUR ELECTED OFFICIALS
“Congress shall make no law ... abridging the freedom
of speech, or of the press ... .”
— From the First Amendment to Constitution
A
nyone who has seen the many movies made
about World War II knows that soldiers who
had forgotten the day’s password, or who
happened upon Allied troops who weren’t from their
own company, were always asked something like
“Who won the 1939 World Series?” It was a question
designed to prove that they were real Americans and
not enemy spies. And all real Americans would know
the answer, and they’d also probably know the names
of every player on each team, because
everybody had listened to the games
on the radio -- young and old, black and
white, Jew and Gentile.
If I had to answer a similar question
today -- “Who won the 2012 World
Series?” -- they would shoot me on the
spot because I haven’t got a clue. And
the sad thing is, I watched the entire
series. The only thing I’m sure of is
that it couldn’t have been the Cubs.
Like many people, I haven’t lost my
memory. I’ve just handed it over to
Google and Wikipedia for the duration.
Why bother to remember anything
when those two will do it for you -- and
better? I didn’t remember that the Yankees beat the
Cincinnati Reds in the 1939 World Series; I Googled
it.
Are there any questions you could ask today that
every American would know the answer to, but few
foreigners? Can you name all the Kardashians? Can
you name the winner of last season’s “Survivor”? Who
won “American Idol” two years ago? Who won the
Super Bowl two years ago? What movie won Best
Picture at last year’s Academy Awards? Who is the
host of “Jeopardy!”? What time of day is “The View”
on? What was the No. 1 country song last year? How
about the No. 1 rap song?
Few people can answer all those questions because
there are very few things all of us watch or listen to at
the same time anymore.
Even dating sites are dividing people into smaller
and smaller groups. I’ve started seeing ads for dating
websites targeted to specific groups, instead of singles
in general: FarmersOnly.com, ChristianMingle.com,
BlackPeopleMeet.com, Mate1.com for people over
30, ProfessionalSinglesOver40.com, OurTime.com for
singles over 50, and SingleParentMeet.com. Sounds
like it’s OK to be a single parent of any age. Or maybe
single parents are just not that picky about who they
date.
But even these categories are probably too vague
for a lot of people. Would a dairy farmer really want to
date someone who raises beef cattle? Would a Baptist
want to date a Catholic? Would their families approve?
How long before we see ads for MethodistMingle.com
or LutheranLove.com? More and more specific dating
services are sure to follow as time goes by with some-
thing for everyone. Can SingleUndertakersUnder35.
com or DrunkenGamblersWithoutPartners.com be
that far away?
How did people ever hook up before the Internet?
I don’t remember so many people being single
before the Internet came along -- is there a connec-
tion? Maybe the more connected we are, the less
connected we become. Or is it something even
more basic? Could money have something to do
with it? I doubt we’ll ever see a dating site called
LonelyProAthletes.com, SingleHedgeFundManagers.
com or MovieStarMatch.com because those people
don’t seem to have any trouble finding dates. Lots and
lots of dates.
You might say, “But look how many of them
break up or get divorced!” Yes, but so do regu-
lar people. When a couple two blocks away from
you splits up, you don’t read about it in the news-
paper; it’s not splashed on the magazine covers
at the grocery store. You might not even hear
about it. Until you see the two parties show up on
WontMakeTheSameMistakeAgain.com
Contact Jim Mullen at JimMullenBooks.com.
T
here’s nothing quite so help-
ful as a fatwa and threats of
a Christian boycott to create
buzz in advance of new movie.
“Noah,” scheduled for its U.S.
release on March 28, has become
such a target. The United Arab
Emirates, Qatar and Bahrain have
banned the movie because it depicts
a prophet, which, as
Danish cartoonists
will attest, isn’t the
peachiest of ideas in
certain circles.
Even here in the
land of religious
tolerance, the
National Religious
Broadcasters threat-
ened to boycott
the film unless
Paramount, the
film’s distributor
and co-financer with New Regency,
issued a disclaimer that the movie
isn’t a literal interpretation of the
Genesis story. It is good to have fun-
damentalist literalists explain exactly
what the Bible’s authors intended,
especially since a literal interpreta-
tion would keep moviegoers away or
put them to sleep.
To wit: In the literal tale, no one
speaks until after (spoiler alert) a
dove sent to find land returns with
an olive twig in its beak, indicating
the flood is over and the world is
saved. In the movie version, people
talk, which is awfully helpful in fol-
lowing the narrative.
Alas, under pressure, Paramount
altered its advertising to say the
movie was “inspired” by the Bible
story and is not The Bible story.
Note the frequent use of the
word “movie” in the preceding para-
graphs. This is because “Noah” is
... a movie. It is not a sermon or a
call to prayer. It cost $130 million to
make and is intended to entertain,
inspire and -- bear with me, I know
this is crazy -- make money. It does
not presume to encourage religious
conversion, disrespect a prophet or
evangelize a snake, though it does
glorify virtue in the highest.
I recently viewed the film and can
confidently report the following: If
you liked “Braveheart,” “Gladiator,”
“Star Wars,” “The Lord of the
Rings,” “Indiana Jones” or “Titanic,”
you will like “Noah.” If you liked two
or more of the above, you will love
“Noah.” Your enjoyment increases
exponentially with each movie
checked above, though I should
warn that “Titanic” made the cut for
only one reason, the major differ-
ence between it and “Noah” being
obvious. “Noah” also includes the
essential love story or two, without
which no story floats.
“Noah,” in other words, is a big
movie. There’s plenty of action and
enough gore and guts to leave young
children at home. It’s a morality
play/spiritual journey without being
preachy, except occasionally by the
protagonist. Noah the man can be a
tad over the top at times, but this is
an obvious plus when you’re being
instructed by the Creator to build
an ark and fill it with snakes, among
other creatures.
And, let’s face it, Noah is ...
Russell Crowe, from whom one
wouldn’t mind hearing: “Would
you like to see my ark?” We’ve
come a long way, baby, from
Charlton Heston as Moses in
Cecil B. DeMille’s “The Ten
Commandments.” Add to the
cast Anthony Hopkins playing
Methuselah, Yoda-esque in his
ancient wisdom; Jennifer Connelly,
who plays Noah’s wife; and Emma
Watson as his adopted daughter.
There are also Noah’s three heart-
stopping sons, whom we witness
evolving from innocence to self-
knowledge as they question their
father’s authority (sound familiar?)
and try to resist Oedipal urges that
surge to the surface with the terrify-
ing brutality of a serpent’s strike.
Poor Noah, alienated from a
world consumed by evil, aspires to
goodness and justice even as he
questions his qualifications to the
task. Moviegoers are treated to a
short course in original sin, magi-
cally presented with zoom lenses,
a pulsating apple and, shall we say,
reptilian dispatch. (“Anaconda” prob-
ably deserves an honorable mention
on the list.)
This is all to say, the film is art,
neither executed nor to be taken
literally. And who are these experts
who know precisely what the Bible’s
authors intended? Among other criti-
cisms are the implications that evolu-
tion and creation might be mutually
inclusive and that man and beast
are equal in the eyes of the Creator.
Noah and his family are vegetarian
and demonstrate respect for the
Earth’s fragile balance.
Pure heresy. Next thing you
know, we’ll all be driving Teslas and
eating basil burgers.
To each his own interpretation,
but at least one conclusion seems
self-evident: The Bible’s authors
were far more literary than we. They
clearly had a keen appreciation for
parable and metaphor, as well as a
profound understanding that truth is
better revealed than instructed.
If the literalists prevail, we just
might need another flood.
Kathleen Parker’s email address is
kathleenparker@washpost.com.
Noah’s arc of triumph
EDITORIAL CARTOON
T
he Arkansas Trauma System,
which the legislature authorized
through Act 393 of 2009, saves
more than 200 lives and $237 million a
year, according to the most recent Health
Department update.
The trauma system ensures that acci-
dent victims are taken as soon as possible
to a hospital that best can address their
needs. That is not always the nearest
hospital. In the past, ambulances usu-
ally took trauma victims to the closest
hospital, and if the patient
needed a higher level of
care it sometimes took
precious hours arranging
a transfer from one hospi-
tal to another.
Now, ambulances
are connected with the
statewide trauma system
through modern commu-
nications technology and
technicians know immedi-
ately whether they should
bypass the nearest hospi-
tal and transport the victim to a hospital
that may be further away but has a higher
level of care.
To date, 70 hospitals are participat-
ing. They include five Level I hospitals,
five Level II hospitals, 22 Level III and 39
Level IV facilities.
Also, 114 Emergency Medical Service
providers participate, which makes them
eligible for funding for training and equip-
ment. There are 23 training sites in the
Arkansas trauma system for new emer-
gency medical technicians and paramed-
ics.
Level IV hospitals can stabilize a
critically injured person, but transfer to
a higher level trauma center is usually
required. Level III hospitals can treat mild
and moderately severe injuries, and most
trauma victims can be adequately treated
at a Level III center.
Level II hospitals provide comprehen-
sive clinical care to the same degree as a
Level I hospital. Level I hospitals are con-
sidered community resources in that they
provide education and outreach programs
in their neighborhoods, and they conduct
research.
Victims of injury are admitted much
more quickly, in large part because of
improvements in the statewide commu-
nications network that connect trauma
centers and EMS providers.
According to the Health Department
update, hospitals in the trauma network
have changed long-standing policies so
that now their medical staff can immedi-
ately accept patients, and an admitting
specialist doesn’t have to be notified and
therefore doesn’t have to spend time in
discussions to arrive at a decision about
whether to accept or reject the patient.
New Water Plan
The state Natural Resources
Commission has scheduled five public
meetings across Arkansas to update the
public on proposed changes in the state
Water Plan, which was last revised in
1990.
They will be in Texarkana, Stuttgart,
Fayetteville, Russellville and El Dorado.
In addition, there will be a final meeting
in Little Rock on April 29.
Since the last Arkansas water plan
was adopted, there have been significant
changes in the accuracy of methods of
measuring water use, so that a more
detailed picture can be drawn that out-
lines the needs of agriculture, industry,
residences and municipalities. Also, the
plan will take into account the needs of
energy producers.
The commission will complete the
most recent version of the water plan by
November. For more details you can visit
this website: www.arwaterplan.arkansas.
gov or you can call the commission at
501-682-3979.
Sen. Alan Clark represents District 13,
which includes portions of Saline County.
State Capitol
week in review
Halt, who dates there?
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Columns and cartoons on the opinion page do not necessarily reflect
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JIM
MULLEN
THE VILLAGE
IDIOT
Page 4A – The Saline Courier
news@bentoncourier.com Sunday, March 16, 2014
OPINION
SEN. ALAN
CLARK
KATHLEEN
PARKER
Today in history
Today is the 75th day of 2014 and the
86th day of winter.
TODAY’S HISTORY: In 1945, U.S. mili-
tary forces declared the island of Iwo Jima
secure after 25 days of fighting.
In 1968, U.S. Army soldiers massacred
more than 300 civilians in the My Lai vil-
lage in South Vietnam.
In 1988, Lt. Col. Oliver North and Vice
Adm. John Poindexter were indicted on
charges of conspiracy during the Iran-
Contra affair.
In 1998, mass trials began in Rwanda for
roughly 125,000 suspected perpetrators of
the country’s 1994 genocide.
TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS: James Madison
(1751-1836), fourth U.S. president; Henny
Youngman (1906-1998), comedian; Pat
Nixon (1912-1993), former first lady;
Jerry Lewis (1926- ), comedian; Daniel
Patrick Moynihan (1927-2003), U.S. sena-
tor; Chuck Woolery (1941- ), game show
host; Erik Estrada (1949- ), actor; Nancy
Wilson (1954- ), singer-songwriter; Ozzie
Newsome (1956- ), football player/execu-
tive; Gore Verbinski (1964- ), filmmaker;
Lauren Graham (1967- ), actress; Blake
Griffin (1989- ), basketball player.
Breaking news
www.bentoncourier.com
BUSINESS
Sunday, March 16, 2014
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ARKANSAS STOCKS
Stocks listed as of close of previous business day
ACXM 36.01 -0.15
CRMT 36.19 -0.08
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OZRK 68.33 +0.82
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TSN 41.48 +1.01
USAK 14.78 -0.05
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Stock investors started the
week worrying about China.
They ended it waiting on
Russia.
Investors spent much of
Friday monitoring devel-
opments in the Ukraine's
region of Crimea, where
residents will vote Sunday on
whether to join Russia. The
U.S. and European Union
have vowed to impose sanc-
tions on Russia as early as
Monday if Moscow moves to
annex Crimea.
The uncertainty mostly
stalled major stock indexes,
which moved between small
gains and losses through
much of the day. Many
investors took a cautious
approach, turning to lower-
risk stocks like utilities.
All told, the Dow Jones
industrial average slid 43.22
points, or 0.3 percent, to end
at 16,065.67. The Standard
& Poor's 500 index fell
5.21 points, or 0.3 percent,
to close at 1,841.13. The
Nasdaq composite dropped
15.02 points, or 0.4 percent,
to finish at 4,245.40.
Even so, the S&P 500
index ended the week down
less than 2 percent from a
record high reached the pre-
vious Friday. And it remains
just slightly in the red for the
year.
"The market is still pretty
close to all-time highs. I
think that speaks volumes,"
said Karyn Cavanaugh, a
senior market strategist
with ING U.S. Investment
Management. "The market
hasn't been rattled severely
by what's been going on this
week, therefore I think next
week I'd probably expect a
similar reaction."
In government bond trad-
ing, the yield on the 10-year
Treasury note was little
changed from late Thursday
at 2.65 percent.
Despite the Dow posting
its fifth loss in five days, the
market regained some of
its footing from a day ear-
lier, when the three major
indexes lost more than 1
percent — the worst day
for the market in six weeks.
Thursday's decline was a
sharp contrast to the rela-
tively quiet trading Monday
through Wednesday.
Discussions between
U.S. Secretary of State
John Kerry and Russia
Foreign Minister Sergei
Lavrov Friday set the mood
heading into the weekend.
Despite six hours of talks,
the two sides had "no com-
mon vision," for the crisis in
Ukraine, Lavrov said.
He told reporters that
Russia has no plans to invade
southeastern Ukraine.
But if Crimea secedes, the
U.S. and European Union
plan to slap sanctions on
Russian officials and busi-
nesses accused of escalating
the crisis and undermining
Ukraine's new government.
The impact of sanctions
on Russia would likely affect
the energy sector and oil
in particular, said Jonathan
Corpina, senior managing
partner at Median Equity
Partners.
"Any sanctions, if they
get to that level, are going
to have a major effect in all
areas," he said.
Russia is the world's
eighth largest economy. Its
oil and gas exports make up
roughly a quarter of its GDP.
Escalating tension in
Ukraine is the latest develop-
ment in a volatile year for
the stock market. Severe
winter weather has hurt cor-
porate earnings and stoked
doubts about the strength of
the U.S. economy. Concerns
over emerging markets
battered stocks at the end
of January. And in recent
weeks, discouraging data on
the Chinese economy have
added to investors' concerns.
That's a stark shift from
last year, when the market
enjoyed a surge of 30 per-
cent and slightly more, if
dividends are included.
"The ride this year will
be bumpier than last year,"
said Jim Dunigan, managing
executive of investments at
The PNC Financial Services
Group. "Coming off a market
of plus 32 percent last year,
it's not surprising the dif-
ficulty to gain any traction
here."
Still, Cavanaugh of
ING U.S. Investment
Management, said investors
know that fundamentals are
"solid."
She noted that corporate
earnings are good at 8.5
percent growth in the fourth
quarter versus a year earlier.
Beyond the action in
Ukraine, investors also will
have a dose of U.S. housing
data and an update from Fed
Chair Janet Yellen in the mix
next week. Fed policymak-
ers are expected to continue
scaling back the central
bank's stimulus.
On Friday several stocks
posted gains.
Keurig jumped $7.09, or
nearly 7 percent, to $113.25
after Starbucks said Friday
that it has agreed to give
up its right to be the only
provider of premium coffee
for Keurig's coffee brew-
ing machines. That opens
the door for Keurig to offer
other high-quality coffee
brands in single-serving
packages.
Ulta Salon, Cosmetics &
Fragrances vaulted $5.75,
or 6.4 percent, to $95.26.
The beauty products retailer
reported a nearly 10 percent
increase in its fourth-quarter
profit thanks to improved
sales.
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP)
— Arkansas' third-ever fis-
cal session was dominated
by debate about the future
of the state's compromise
Medicaid expansion, but that
may be nothing compared to
the fights that await lawmak-
ers when they return to the
Capitol in 2015.
From funding for pre-
kindergarten to the condition
of the state's centers for the
developmentally disabled,
the session that formally
ends this week leaves a
long list of unfinished busi-
ness for the Legislature to
address next year.
Many of those items
were overshadowed by
the fight over Arkansas'
"private option" plan to use
Medicaid funds to purchase
private insurance for the
poor. Crafted last year as
an alternative to expanding
Medicaid under the federal
health law, the program was
reauthorized for another
year after a defunding
attempt that stalled most of
the session's other business.
The private option debate
and the constraints of the
fiscal session offered little
room for other issues on the
agenda. Non-budget matters
such as a proposed delay in
the implementation of the
Common Core standards
and an effort to allow schools
to arm non-classroom
employees fell far short of
the supermajority needed to
even get considered during
this year's session.
But the negotiations in the
final days of the session on
proposals to tap the state's
projected $126 million sur-
plus offered a hint of what
needs are on the horizon in
next year's session.
With Gov. Mike Beebe
and lawmakers proposing
more than $92 million in
projects, the Legislature
faced the last-minute hag-
gling over the surplus that
has typically held up regular
sessions in past years. The
Legislature eventually whit-
tled that list down to nearly
$22 million in projects under
an agreement that received
final approval and was signed
into law by Beebe last week.
The agreement included
funds for school broadband,
short-term loans for charter
schools and reimbursements
to jails for housing state
inmates, with most of the
state's surplus left untouched
for the Legislature to look at
next year.
Left off the list was a pro-
posal to tap $2 million from
the surplus for the state's
pre-K program, which advo-
cates complain has suffered
from a flat funding level over
the past several years. The
lawmaker calling for the
additional funding has said
she hoped it would spur law-
makers to look at the issue
in next year's session, saying
it would help the state avoid
the need for additional pris-
on funding in future years.
"We're going to fund $9
million or so on the prison
pipeline," Sen. Joyce Elliott,
D-Little Rock, said. "It's
money we have to spend.
I'm not countering that.
What I'm asking of you as
a body to consider is we
are so much better off if we
are addressing that pipeline
before it's started, and it's
undisputable pre-K is the
way to do that."
Another proposal left off
the surplus agreement was
an effort to tap $10 million to
pay for improvements at the
state's Human Development
Centers. Sen. Jason Rapert,
who had called for the addi-
tional funding, said he'll
spend the interim between
the sessions building sup-
port for money for the facili-
ties' improvements.
"I am committed fully to
making sure that they quit
getting overlooked," said
Rapert, R-Conway. "We're
going to fund new programs
and expand a budget by over
$100 million and literally
not do anything for the least
among those in Arkansas. I
feel it's a dereliction of duty."
Those programs are likely
to compete with other needs,
including state prisons and
public schools. Lawmakers
are also facing warnings that
the money they set aside
for the teacher insurance
program last year won't be
enough to prevent rate hikes
next year.
Even without the limits
of a fiscal session, the unfin-
ished business from this
year's session could once
again be overshadowed by
another private option debate
next year. It's a debate that
legislative leaders say won't
get any easier.
"There's essentially no
room for error, and I think
even some of the people who
voted for it this time are very
questionable on whether
they'll continue to vote for
it," Senate President Michael
Lamoureux said.
Stocks end lower ahead of critical Ukraine vote
AP Analysis: Recent
fiscal session leaves
a long to-do list
Karissa Rushing of
Benton has been named
to the First Electric
Cooperative Board of
Directors.
She and longtime board
member Bob Maertens of
the Avilla community repre-
sent members in the Benton
district.
Rushing is succeeding a
board member who recently
retired from the board.
She currently is an
administrator at the Benton
campus of Fellowship Bible
Church, where she manages
business operations, organi-
zational planning and special
events.
Previously she owned and
operated a dance studio in
Benton for around 10 years.
A former Miss Arkansas,
Rushing has a background
in advertising and public
relations and has worked
with nonprofit organizations
in planning and develop-
ment.
She is a member of the
Fellowship Church, where
she is active in its women’s
ministries, small groups and
local missions.
A Saline County native,
she is the daughter of
Charles and Carol Rushing
of the Salem community.
First Electric Cooperative
serves more than 88,000
active accounts throughout
17 counties in central and
southeast Arkansas.
The cooperative is head-
quartered in Jacksonville
and maintains full-service
offices in Benton, Heber
Springs, Perryville and
Stuttgart.
Additional information
about the cooperative is
available at 800-489-7405
or www.firstelectric.coop
or www.facebook.com/
FirstElectric.
Rushing named to board of First Electric
By Lynda Hollenbeck
lyndahol@yahoo.com
Associated Press
Associated Press
Karissa Rushing
Page 6A – The Saline Courier
sports@bentoncourier.com Sunday, March 16, 2014
SPORTS
SALINE
SCOREBOARD
THURSDAY
Baseball
Benton def. LR Christian 12-5
Bryant def. Van Buren 3-0
(Ark. Tech Univ.)
FCA INVITATIONAL (Bauxite)
Bauxite def. Abundant Life 11-10
Softball
Vilonia def. Benton 5-1
FCA INVITATIONAL (Bauxite)
Bauxite def. CMS 13-2
FRIDAY
Baseball
Benton def. Arkadelphia 3-2 in 8
innings
FCA INVITATIONAL (Bauxite)
Bauxite def. BHG 4-1
Softball
Sheridan def. BHG 6-0
DREW MELTON FOREVER
YOUNG TOURNEY (Benton)
Benton def. Wynne (Bernard
Holland Park)
SATURDAY
Baseball
Harmony def. Glen Rose 5-0 in
Poyen Tourney Championship
Bryant at NLR, late
Soccer
BENTON PANTHER INVITE
Benton (G) vs. Sylvan Hills, late
Benton (B) vs. Sylvan Hills, late
Benton (G) vs. Malvern, late
Benton (B) vs. Malvern,late
BAUXITE -- The Harmony
Grove Cardinals have
been on a tear after drop-
ping the season opener to
Arkadelphia, 10-0. Winners
of three straight coming into
Friday’s match with Bauxite
in the FCA Invitational
Tournament, the Cardinals
fell victim once again, 4-1,
this time almost getting no-
hit in the process.
Bauxite’s Austin Sheridan
threw six and two-third
innings of two-hit, one-run
ball to down the Cardinals
while striking out four
and walking three. Ethan
Hendrix closed out the vic-
tory for Bauxite with a score-
less frame in the seventh.
“It was a good effort on
the mound,” Bauxite Coach
Michael Mattox said. “We
played a good game. We
hit the ball well and played
really good defense.”
For Harmony Grove, the
bats that had been alive and
well all week were silenced.
Brinson Cornwell notched
the Cardinals’ lone hit with
a double in the third inning.
The rest of the club com-
bined to go 0-22 with three
walks and seven strikeouts.
For Bauxite, the hitting
was plenty for the win.
Hunter Gautreaux paced
the Miners with a 3-for-3
showing with two RBI and a
run scored. Jared Martinez
followed going 3 for 3, driv-
ing in one, and junior Ben
Madison went 2 for 3 with a
run and RBI.
Harmony Grove scored
its only run in the sixth after
Tyler Hamilton got hit by the
pitch and later crossed the
dish on back-to-back tag ups.
Bauxite started the
scoring early, taking a 1-0
lead in the second inning
on Martinez’s RBI single
to score Gautreaux. The
Miners added to the lead in
the fifth, scoring their final
three runs of the contest.
Three hits coupled with
a Harmony Grove error
allowed for Bauxite’s late
advantage. Trent Rooks,
Ben Madison and Easton
Alarcon all scored a run in
the inning.
For Harmony Grove the
loss moves its record to
3-2 overall on the season.
Bauxite sits at 3-0 on the
year. The Cardinals battled
Glen Rose on Saturday in the
Poyen Tournament finals. A
full story will be in Monday’s
issue of the Saline Courier.
Bauxite played Mayflower
in the championship on
Saturday and results will be
in Monday’s edition.
Two-hitter sends Bauxite
to FCA Championship
By Josh Briggs
jbriggs@bentoncourier.com
Muilenburg’s 1-hitter more
than enough for Benton
Benton Panther
sophomore
courtesy run-
ner Sam Baker
scores the win-
ning run after
Arkadelphia
catcher Austin
White traps
the second
baseman’s
low throw to
prevent the
force out. The
Panthers beat
the 5A defend-
ing champion
Badgers 3-2 in
eight innings.
Benton plays
Bryant on
Tuesday
in the first
7A/6A South
Conference
game of the
year.
STEVEN LOVELL/Special to
The Saline Courier
Panthers win in extras
BENTON – It took extra
innings to do it, but the
Benton Panthers came away
with a 3-2 victory over the
defending 5A state cham-
pion Arkadelphia Badgers
on Friday at Panthers Field.
With the bases loaded in the
bottom of the eighth inning
in a 2-2 game, Benton junior
Cameron Spivey’s hard-hit
grounder to second base
scored courtesy runner Sam
Baker when the throw to
the catcher was low and the
umpire called a trap against
the ground for the winning
run.
“That was a hard call to
make,” Benton Coach Mark
Balisterri said of the throw-
ing error. “That was one of
the best calls made by an
umpire because he was in
perfect position. We played
a quality team and we fought
and battled.”
After sophomore Benton
lefty starter Chase Nix set
down the Badgers down
with a walk and a strikeout
in the first, his twin brother,
sophomore Colten Nix start-
ed the Panthers’ first with a
single to centerfield. Junior
shortstop Colby Johnson
JOSH BRIGGS/The Saline Courier
Leadoff hitter Herbie Herbner begins her follow through after ripping
a Wynne pitch back up the middle for a first-inning single Friday.
Herbner finished 3 for 3 with three runs, two RBI and three steals.
BENTON -- A year after
playing every game with
an extremely heavy heart,
the Benton Lady Panthers
revisited that emotion in full
with the first game of the
second annual Drew Melton:
Forever Young Tournament
on Friday.
With Wynne as the first
opponent up, Benton took
care of business, winning 6-0
after a second straight domi-
nating performance from
pitcher Stevi Muilenburg.
The senior allowed just one
hit over five innings, striking
out five and walking one.
“Throwing a one-hitter at
any time is a pretty impres-
sive showing,” Head Coach
Heidi Cox said. “We are very
proud of her. She is doing a
great job and seems relaxed.
We played good defense,
too.”
Muilenburg used eight
groundball outs in the win,
most going to the right side
with Herbie Herbner and
Rachel McCallister making
putout after putout all game
long.
“Herbie and Rachel made
Gators nip
Hogs in
SEC-opener
GAINESVILLE, Fla. – The
Arkansas Razorbacks lost
their SEC baseball opener 2-1
to the hosting Florida Gators
Friday night at McKethan
Stadium.
Arkansas, 8-6 overall and
0-1 in the SEC, and Florida,
12-6, 1-0, continue their
three-game series Saturday
and Sunday in Gainesville,
Fla.
Arkansas junior lefty
starter Jalen Beeks (3-2) was
saddled with the loss after
allowing two runs on six hits
and striking out three in 4.2
innings of work. Freshman
Zach Jackson entered the
game with two outs in the
fifth inning and stranded
runners on second and
third with a strikeout. The
Berryhill, Okla., native struck
out three over 2.1 innings of
work and has not allowed an
earned run in his first 14.2
innings as a Razorback.
Sophomore Bobby Wernes
and senior team captain
Jake Wise led Arkansas at
the plate with two hits each.
Freshman Clark Eagan regis-
tered his first collegiate RBI
By Tony Lenahan
tlenahan@bentoncourier.com
By Nate Allen
Razorback Report
By Josh Briggs
jbriggs@bentoncourier.com
HG plagued by errors again, fall 6-1
SHERIDAN -- It is no
secret that Harmony Grove
softball is one of the best
teams in all of 3A. After
winning the 3A State Title
last season, Harmony
Grove Head Coach Sammi
Massey made it clear that
this year’s schedule was
going to be possibly the
toughest in school history,
scheduling multiple high
classification schools.
On Friday, the Lady
Cardinals continued the
non-conference portion
with a trip to 7A/6A South
favorite Sheridan. Despite
outslugging the Lady’
Jackets 10-7 in hits, the
Lady Cardinals fell victim
for the third time this year,
6-1.
Three errors by the
squad allowed Sheridan
to score all but two of its
runs in the contest. Pitcher
Kristen Dempsey allowed
two runs on six hits, four
walks and a strikeout
over five innings in the
loss. Faith Otts, Holly
Drombetta and Hannah
Hill all notched two hits in
the effort.
The Lady ’Jackets
scored early and often in
the first three innings,
crossing the dish five
times in the span. With
two in the first and second,
Sheridan used two hits and
a Harmony Grove error to
jump on top early.
In the second, Sheridan
scored two more as walks
and another error plagued
the Lady Cardinals, drop-
ping Harmony Grove into
a 4-0 hole early. The Lady
Cardinals scored their
single run in the fifth after
LJ Helmich reached on an
error and later scored on
an RBI single from Otts.
Harmony Grove strand-
ed nine runners in the
defeat.
Sheridan scored its fifth
run in the third on a triple
and tag up before adding
its final nail to the coffin in
the fifth after a third Lady
Cardinal error led to the
score. Sheridan committed
three errors on the day.
The loss moves
Harmony Grove’s record
to 5-3 overall. The Lady
Cardinals will battle Poyen
on the road Monday. First
pitch is set for 4:30 p.m.
By Josh Briggs
jbriggs@bentoncourier.com
LADY PANTHERS, page 7A
HOGS, page 7A PANTHERS, page 7A
Lady
Cardinal
Faith Otts
goes
through
drills
before
a game
earlier this
season.
On Friday,
Harmony
Grove fell
6-1 to the
Sheridan
Lady
Jackets.
JOSH BRIGGS/The
Saline Courier
Sunday, March 16, 2014
The Saline Courier 7
a good team over there and
worked hard on defense for
her (Stevi),” Cox added.
Herbie hit the dirt in the
fourth inning after jamming
her ankle on the first base
bag covering on a bunt by
Wynne. Cox said that she
is fine, but did pull her for
the final inning on defense.
Herbner led Benton going
3 for 3 with three runs, two
RBI and three stolen bases
in the game.
“That is why (Herbner
is in the leadoff) spot right
now,” Cox said. “She is mak-
ing things happen. That is
what we need from her. If
she continues to keep doing
that then she will continue
to be in that spot.”
All of Herbner’s hits were
line shots up the middle,
splitting the Wynne defense.
Muilenburg ended the
first inning with back-to-
back strikeouts. Benton’s
offense, on the other hand,
started with a single and
swiped bag by Herbner,
a single and steal from
Muilenburg and a walk by
Taylor Ogelsby. Herbner
scored the game’s first run
on throw down to second to
make it 1-0 Benton.
The Lady Panthers struck
out in three straight appear-
ances to end their half of the
inning.
Muilenburg gave up her
lone hit of the day in the
second on a hard double
with two out before striking
out the next hitter to end the
frame.
Benton broke the game
open with a three-run show-
ing in the second, using
three hits, three walks and a
Muilenburg suicide squeeze
to take the 4-0 advantage.
Herbner drove in her first
run of the game scoring
McCallister on a one-out sin-
gle and later scored on the
bunt. Ashton Currey drove
in her only RBI with a single
moments later.
With Muilenburg sitting
down Wynne hitters left
and right, Benton continued
to back her up with runs,
adding two in the third.
After batting around in the
second, the Lady Panthers
tacked on two more runs
with two hits and an error.
Delaney Bono reached on
a single, stole second and
later scored on a Herbner
RBI while the speedy
Herbner swiped second and
third before scoring on an
error. The Lady Panthers
went in order for the only
time in the game in the
fourth, but damage was
already done as they rolled
to victory.
“They played very well,”
Cox said. “We got another
outstanding performance
from Stevi and the kids
went out there and hit the
ball. We played some good
defense and it is a good way
to start off the tournament.
Bono finished 1 for 1 with
two runs scored and a steal
in the win.
Benton drew Rogers in
Game 2 on Saturday. A full
recap of the tournament will
be in Monday’s issue of The
Saline Courier.
sacrifice bunted Nix to sec-
ond base and sophomore
Brinson Williams’ double to
centerfield would plate the
game’s first run.
The Badgers would
respond in the top of the
second with an unearned
run to tie it at 1-1, but
sophomore designated hit-
ter Ben Brasuell singled to
center to begin the bottom
of the inning for Benton
(5-0). Chase Nix sacrificed
Brasuell to second base and
reached on an error by the
third baseman before Spivey
popped a sacrifice bunt
attempt up for the first out
of the inning. Brasuell was
out at third on senior Bailey
Mitchell’s fielder’s choice
before courtesy runner Alex
Graves scored on Colten
Nix’ two-out RBI single to
left field for a 2-1 Panther
lead. Nix finished 2 for 3
with a run, an RBI and a sto-
len base.
“Colten is doing exactly
what we felt like he’d do,”
Balisterri said. “He’s a guy
we’d really like to have in
the three or four hole just
because I know he’d be an
RBI guy. But he’s so valu-
able to us at leadoff, we
don’t really have another
guy with that quality. He
makes things happen.”
Arkadelphia would
respond with a run in the
top of the third to tie it on
a sacrifice fly which could
have been much worse had
right fielder Brian Krikorian
not had an excellent diving
catch. With a runner at sec-
ond base, Chase Nix struck
out Jake Knight looking at a
curve ball to end the inning.
That would be all the scor-
ing until the eighth despite
the fact that Nix walked and
hit a batter to start the top of
the fifth. Badger J.F. Matros
couldn’t put down a sacri-
fice bunt and instead flew
out to right field in which
Krikorian would double
off Ty Costers at first base
when Jared Barker made a
good play on a high throw.
Nix would later load the
bases before striking out
J.B. Burnham to get out of
the inning. Nix would get
the no-decision giving up
two unearned runs on four
hits, four walks and seven
strikeouts in five innings. He
threw 89 pitches.
“Chase did a good job,”
Balisterri said. “He did bet-
ter than the time before,
but he still needs to get
command of his off-speed
pitches. When he gets com-
mand of his off-speed pitch-
es, he’s going to be hard to
hit. The other day he threw
68 [pitches] through three
innings and had eight Ks.
He got better.”
Junior lefty Ryan Rickford
earned the win after throw-
ing three scoreless innings
on two hits.
“The biggest part of the
day was Rickford coming in
and doing the job he did,”
Balisterri said. “I challenged
him. He went out there and
pitched three great innings.”
Badger Brandon Matros
got the no-decision after
giving up two runs (one
earned) on four hits, five
walks and seven strikeouts
in seven innings.
“Their pitcher will be one
of the better pitchers we’ll
see all year,” Balisterri said.
“To be able to win a game
like that and play the way
we did defensively, that will
tell you we compete. There
were a couple of innings we
got in trouble on the mound;
we competed and fought
through it.”
Williams finished 1 for
2 with an RBI and Brasuell
was 1 for 3.
Benton’s junior varsity
defeated Arkadelphia’s var-
sity team 7-0 thanks to Jake
Croushore throwing a one-
hitter threw four innings.
The Panthers will host the
Bryant Hornets on Tuesday
in the first 7A/6A South
Conference game of the
year.
with a two-out single to drive
in junior Eric Fisher from
second after Fisher reached
on a one-out walk in the top
of the second inning and
advanced into scoring posi-
tion with a stolen base.
“Beeks didn’t have his
best stuff tonight,” Arkansas
Coach Dave Van Horn said.
“He threw a lot better his
first four outings for sure.
We noticed early that he
wasn’t locating like normal,
but he battled and gave us
a chance to win the game.
He did a great job of battling
through innings without his
best stuff.
“Jackson came in and did
a tremendous job striking out
a really good hitter to get out
of a jam. He worked his way
into another jam and then
got out of it. He’s young and
has a great arm. This was a
great learning experience.
I’m proud of him. I thought
the pitching staff did a great
job. You don’t have a chance
to win the series unless you
win Saturday. We need to
go out and find a way to win
tomorrow.”
Kentucky romps past LSU 85-67 in SEC quarterfinals
ATLANTA — The
Kentucky Wildcats knocked
each other around in prac-
tice.
Then they did the same
thing to LSU.
Heeding coach John
Calipari’s plea to find their
“mojo,” the talented young
Wildcats pulled away to beat
LSU 85-67 in the quarter-
finals of the Southeastern
Conference tournament
Friday night, their most
impressive performance in
nearly two months.
James Young scored 21
points, Julius Randle had
17 points and 16 rebounds,
and Willie Cauley-Stein led
a dominating performance
in the middle with six of
Kentucky’s 11 blocks. This
looked more like the team
that started the season
ranked No. 1 and led to some
to project it might be capable
of a perfect season.
“We’ve always got a target
on our backs,” Cauley-Stein
said. “When other teams play
us, they play like it’s their
last game. That’s the way we
have to play.”
To emphasize that point,
Calipari changed up his
practice routine heading into
the tournament. He had his
team go longer and harder
that it normally does at this
time of year. In particular, he
implored his players to get
more physical, believing the
referees were not clamping
down on rough play as much
as they did earlier in the
season.
“We had three days of
football,” Calipari quipped,
“and they responded.”
The day before, while LSU
was beating Alabama in the
second round of the tourna-
ment, the Wildcats went hard
for nearly an hour at the
Atlanta Hawks’ NBA practice
facility.
“That was our game. We
got after it,” Calipari said.
“Now, what if someone had
gotten hurt? Well, I decided
to roll the dice. We weren’t
going to play the way we
needed to play unless we did
something like that.”
The Wildcats (23-9) came
into the tournament with
three losses in their last four
games, and they were facing
a team they split with during
the regular season — losing
in Baton Rouge and barely
pulling out an overtime vic-
tory at Rupp Arena.
But this time, Kentucky
took control with a 23-3 run
in the first half, withstood
a rally by the LSU (19-13),
and pulled away down the
stretch. Finally, the Wildcats
looked like a team capable of
making a lengthy run in the
NCAA tournament.
“Let’s see if we can con-
tinue on this path,” Calipari
said, knowing how much
his one-and-done recruiting
approach has irked hoops
purists, “and really make
some people mad.”
Cauley-Stein teamed
with fellow 7-footer Dakari
Johnson to give the Wildcats
a presence in the lane the
Tigers simply could not
match. Johnson had 9 points,
11 rebounds and three of
Kentucky’s 11 blocks.
Johnny O’Bryant III led
LSU with 18 points, while
Andre Stringer added 14. But
the Tigers hurt themselves
by making just 12 of 24
free throws, surely ruining
any hopes of pulling out an
NCAA bid.
“Right now, I don’t
really know,” O’Bryant said.
“Things didn’t turn out the
way we wanted to.”
For Kentucky, Aaron
Harrison had 14 points,
while twin brother Andrew
Harrison contributed 11
points and eight assists.
Off the opening tip, LSU’s
Shavon Coleman quickly
silenced the Kentucky-
dominated crowd at the
Georgia Dome by knocking
down two straight 3-point-
ers, leading Calipari to call
a timeout just 61 seconds
into the game. The Tigers
built their biggest lead when
Stringer’s layup made it 22-14
approaching the midway
point of the first half.
The enigmatic Wildcats
took control from there, run-
ning the court with abandon
and controlling with lane at
both ends. They ripped off
12 straight points to start the
run.
Cauley-Stein sparked the
outburst with three blocks,
each one drawing an even
louder reaction from the
crowd. Young scored seven
points, including a thun-
derous dunk and a long
3-pointer, grabbed a couple
of rebounds and doled out
an assist. Rotating in with
Cauley-Stein, Johnson did
his part by pulling down four
rebounds — two of them at
the offensive end.
LSU couldn’t do anything
right during these decisive
minutes, making just 1 of 11
shots and turning the ball
over five times to compound
their offensive woes.
Kentucky led 42-32 at
halftime, but the youthful
Wildcats have a way of mak-
ing any game interesting.
Down by 16 points in the
second half, LSU got back in
the game with a 14-3 run of
its own.
But O’Bryant picked up
with his fourth foul with
more than 13 minutes
remaining and went to the
bench for an extended
period, making it that much
tougher for LSU to complete
the comeback. Kentucky
was soon rolling again, pull-
ing away from the Tigers
to set up a matchup against
Georgia in the semifinals
Saturday. Georgia edged
Mississippi 75-73.
By Paul Newberry
AP Writer
Lady Panthers
From page 6A
Hogs
From page 6A
STEVEN LOVELL/Special to The Saline Courier
Benton third baseman Cameron Spivey makes a play in the Panthers’ 3-2 win in extra innings over
Arkadelphia on Friday at Panthers Field.
Panthers
From page 6A
STEVEN LOVELL/Special to The Saline Courier
Benton sophomore left fielder Drew Dyer makes a diving catch in the Panthers 3-2 win over
Arkadelphia on Friday.
8A The Saline Courier
Sunday, March 16, 2014
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‘READ TO SUCCEED’
Special to The Saline Courier
Benton Superintendent Jeff Collum takes his turn in the reader’s chair to share a story about American
frontiersman Davy Crockett. The superintendent is hopeful that another “Read to Succeed” event can
be held this year.
Special to The Saline Courier
Gwen Walker, administrative assistant to the superintendent, volunteers her time to read to children as
part of the observance. She chose a Dr. Seuss book for the event.
Special to The Saline Courier
Larry Davis joins nearly 100 community residents to participate in “Read to Succeed.” Davis’ book was
the popular “Green Eggs and Harm.”
SAlEm ART ShOw
BOBBYE PYKE/The Saline Courier
Salem Elementary School students gather on stage for a talent show held in conjunction with a recent
fundraising art show and sale at the school.
BOBBYE PYKE/The Saline Courier
Concessions are sold at the event to bring in additional funds for the school’s art program. The chil-
dren competed in an art contest and then made their entries available to families to purchase.
BOBBYE PYKE/The Saline Courier
Landers Chrysler provided a vehicle for adult visitors to test-drive at the event. For every test drive, the
company donated $10 to the school for the purchase of supplies.
LIVING
LYNDA
HOLLENBECK
SENSE &
NONSENSE
Sunday, March 16, 2014
news@bentoncourier.com The Saline Courier – Page1B
The Art Association of
Central Arkansas (formerly
Art Guild of Saline County)
conducted its 32nd annual
youth art show.
The show drew a total
of 113 entries from young
Saline County artists.
Art teachers from
throughout the county were
invited to submit their stu-
dents’ entries.
The entries were dis-
played in the atrium of
Saline Memorial Hospital’s
Health Education Building
for a week following the
annual show.
A reception honoring the
artists took place March 9.
Entries were judged in
age groups ranging from
kindergarten to Grade 12.
Awards were given for
first, second and third places
and honorable mention in
the various age groups,
K-12.
Students receiving first-
third places in the designat-
ed age groups included:
Kindergarten
1. Brock Kirby
Pine Haven Elementary
2. Benjamin Watson
Salem Elementary
3. Morgan Ladd
Howard Perrin
First Grade
1. Luke Rose
Ringold Elementary
2. Brody Hutchins
Bryant Elementary
3. Jordyn Purtle
Salem Elementary
Second Grade
1. Naomi Morris
Dianne Roberts Art Studio
2. Matthew Bainter
Pine Haven Elementary
3. Sage Posadas
Bryant Elementary
Third Grade
1. Keaton Madsen
Pine Haven Elementary
2. Isaac Hutson
Caldwell Elementary
3. Cadence McDonal
Howard Perrin Elementary
Fourth Grade
1. Molly Maxwell
Howard Perrin Elementary
2. Anna Dixon
Ringgold Elementary
3. Caleb Turner
Caldwell Elementary
Fifth Grade
1. Abigail Werhe
Bryant
2. Tuesday Metlon
Bryant
3. Laci Lasen
Dianne Roberts Art Studio
Sixth Grade
1. Damian Constantino
Bryant Middle School
2. Alexis Brown
Bryant Middle School
3. Amelia Penn
Dianne Roberts Art Studio
Seventh Grade
1. Gwendolyn Fontcuberta
Bethel Middle School
2. Gabriel Saucier
Bryant Middle School
3. Lexi Helton
Bryant Middle School
Eighth Grade
1. Nicholas Herrington
Bryant Middle School
2. Savanna Lockridge
Bethel Middle School
3. Talia Ross
Bryant Middle School
Ninth Grade
1. Avery Rockwell
Dianne Roberts Art Studio
2. Sam McDougal
Bauxite Middle School
3. Nathan Cain
Bauxite Middle School
Tenth Grade
1. Baylee DuVall
Benton High School
2. Jonathan Douglas
Dianne Roberts Art Studio
3. Dalton Barnett
Bauxite High School
Eleventh Grade
1. Taylor Vittiton
Harmony Grove High
School
2. Jonathan Douglas
Dianne Roberts Art Studio
3. Dalton Barnett
Bauxite High School
Twelfth Grade
1. Clayton Reynolds
Harmony Grove High
School
2. Melody Cash
Benton High School
3. Nickole Boren
Benton High School
Remember when “doing one’s
colors” was the big thing?
Personally, I thought the concept
was ridiculous. Who in her right
mind would actu-
ally give money to
somebody to drape
a bunch of fabric
in varying shades
around her face
and say “you’re a
spring” or “you’re
a summer”?
This would be
followed by such
commentary as
“you can wear red
(or blue or yellow
or purple, etc.)
because it’s in your
palette.”
This color analysis was a huge
thing for a while. I never got into
it because I said I was capable of
doing my colors myself with just
me and my mirror.
All I had to do was position
myself for about 30 seconds in
front of the looking glass and see
that grey was ghoulish and green
was good.
I don’t make light of the fact that
certain colors look better on differ-
ent people. I just can’t imagine pay-
ing someone else to tell me that.
Personally, I think a classic,
tailored grey suit put together with
the right accessories is a look that’s
hard to beat. Movie stars have
been doing it for years. But wear-
ing grey in any style on me is akin
to immersing myself in a bath of
concrete.
My complexion is transformed
to the color of a street. If my hair
were to become that shade, too, I
would be the equivalent of a dead
woman walking. It would be a scary
sight indeed.
Spring tends to be associated
with pastel shades, but I run from
them also. I’m not a pastel person.
That’s for the “springs,” not the
“autumns,” which is where the
color analysts would put me. The
vibrant shades are for my friend.
But spring includes an event that
brings my favorite color to the fore-
front: St. Paddy’s Day. The “wearin’
o’ the green” is the day when we
redheads can shine.
I love Alma Joyce Hahn and
treasure her friendship, but I have
to take issue with a point in her
column today in which she says
“about the only important event
this month is the sale of Girl Scout
cookies.”
I’ll have to forgive her for the
transgression. I enjoy Girl Scout
cookies as much as the next per-
son, but for those of us with Irish
roots, her comment about noth-
ing important happening could be
“fightin’ words.”
St. Pat’s is one of the year’s
highlights for me and other Irish-
American folk, and on Monday I
will proudly pledge allegiance to
my heritage.
An event that’s become a tradi-
tion of several years for me has
been to join friends Freddy and
Brenda Burton in attending the
“First Ever 11th (this year) Annual
World’s Shortest St. Patrick’s Day
Parade” in Hot Springs. Once
again we plan to make our trek to
the Spa City to enjoy that delight-
ful event that features many fun
things, not the least of which is the
march of the International Order of
Elvi. (If you can read that and not
at least smile, I will pray that the
Irish fairies bless you with a sense
of humor.)
Freddy, who also has an Irish
background, says he “looked more
Irish” when he was a kid because
he had what his grandmother
described as “orange hair.” And
now when he grows a beard, it will
reflect that colorful past.
For several years, he’s managed
to sneak a spot onto a parade float
and ride a short distance, just to
show us that he could.
When my mother married my
father, she announced to everyone
that she planned to have “a red-
headed little girl.” As with most
things, Mamma got what she want-
ed — at least in the years after she
and Honey married. (“Honey” was
the term of endearment I gave my
father, which other relatives and all
my friends used, too.)
My Irish heritage comes from
my father, Paul Parnell. According
to the tiny bits of genealogy we
have, we know that the early
Parnells came to America from the
old country. A relative’s account
notes that one of our kin was serv-
ing in Irish parliament, but was
kicked out.
Further details of the incident
never have been revealed — but
perhaps ignorance is bliss.
The red hair that Mamma
decreed her child would have can
be traced back to those early Irish
folk.
I expected to pass it on to at
least one of my progeny, but it
didn’t happen. The only trace of it
that comes out occasionally is son
Allen’s beard when he occasionally
goes that route.
But all of us can be happy on St.
Paddy’s Day and wear green to our
hearts’ content without anybody
having to tell us “it’s OK because
it’s in your color palette.”
Someone once said that “every-
body is Irish on St. Patrick’s Day.”
I’ll keep that thought in mind and
issue a special invitation to Alma
Joyce to put on some green and
become one of the clan.
The blarney is great.
Lynda Hollenbeck is senior editor of
The Saline Courier.
lyndahol@yahoo.com
Put on the green and celebrate the best holiday of all
By Maribeth Bueche
news@bentoncourier.com
Works on exhibit at Saline Memorial atrium
All photos by MARIBETH BUECHE/The Saline Courier
AMELIA
PENN
SAGE
POSADAS
ABBY
FRAZIER
2B The Saline Courier
Sunday, March 16, 2014
501-315-7700
414 NORTH MAIN
smithcaldwell.com
SMITH CALDWELL
BABY REGISTRY
JANICE NORTHERN
EVAN CURTIS
MICHELLE CRANFORD
LORI & MATT
BRUMLEY
SARAH FARMER
ANNA GOBLE
& BLAKE RATLIFF
MEGAN PERRY
& ADAM EOFF
KELLY FERGUSON
& CONNOR SMITHSON
CHELSEA BRASHEARS
& KYLE HARMON
ASHLYN CARPENTER
& GRANT JORDAN
CAMILLE HARKLAU
& BRICE MCGUIRE
JESSICA TEMPLE
& MATTHEW WILLIS
STEPHANIE MCKENNA
& HUNTER STILWELL
ELIZABETH BURKS
& JOSH BROWN
CARRIE LIDZY
& RYAN KNAUER
AUTUMN MASSEY
& DANIEL PRIDE
LAUREN ELROD
& ROBERT ROUX
DANIELLE JUMPER
& TYLER HENRY
BRITTNEY REYNOLDS
& KYLE HARTMAN
BETHANY ELLIFF
& OLIVER THOMAS
501-315-7700
414 NORTH MAIN
smithcaldwell.com
SMITH CALDWELL
BRIDAL REGISTRY
620 W. South St. • Benton • 778-3151 or 778-1166
MON. - SAT. 8am - 9pm & SUN. 12pm - 9pm
Your Hometown Pharmacy Since 1953
FREE DELIVERY to ALL Saline County
Our Pharmacists Would Love to Serve You and Your Family.
Pay Phone Bills Here • Accept Insurance Plans & Part D Plans
Open 7
Days A
Week
1300 Military, Benton
776-1314
She
Said
YES!
Mandi Holtom
3-8-14
Derek Stokes
Kelly Ferguson
5-3-14
Connor Smithson
Laiken Johnson
6-14-14
Grant Garrett
Chelsea Brashears
6-14-14
Kyle Harmon
Brittney Reynolds
6-21-14
Kyle Hartman
Megan Perry
6-21-14
Adam Eoff
SALINE COUNTY EVENTS
Email calendar items to news@bentoncourier.com or call 501-315-8228 ext. 236.
Calendar items are intended for nonprofit organizations.
W
hat would life be
without the use
of garlic? Can
you imagine Italian dishes
without it?
Garlic is
an excellent
source of
manganese. It
is also a very
good source
of vitamin B6
and vitamin
C. In addition,
garlic is a
good source
of protein and
thiamin (vitamin B1) as well
as the minerals phosphorus,
selenium, calcium, potas-
sium, iron and copper.
Garlic is a member of
the Lily family, a cousin to
onions, leeks and chives,
and can transform any meal
into a bold, aromatic and
healthy culinary experience.
When a recipe calls for
a head of garlic, know that
garlic is arranged in a head,
called the “bulb,” which is
made up of separate cloves.
Both the cloves and the
entire bulb are encased in
paper-like sheaths or mem-
branes that can be white,
off-white or pinkish.
Garlic cloves are off-white
in color, and although they
have a firm texture, they can
be easily cut or crushed.
The teardrop-shaped gar-
lic bulbs range in size; how-
ever, they usually average
around two inches in height
and two inches in width at
their widest point. While
elephant garlic has larger
cloves, it is more closely
related to the leek and does
not offer the full health ben-
efits of regular garlic.
Always purchase fresh
garlic for the best flavor and
nutrition. Although other
forms may be more handy,
you will not get the same
health benefits or taste. To
purchase garlic, look for
plump bulbs that do not
have broken skin. The garlic
bulb should be firm and not
damp when gently squeezed
between your fingers.
Garlic that is soft, shriv-
eled and moldy or that has
begun to sprout should be
avoided. Size is often not
an indication of quality. If
your recipe calls for a large
amount of garlic, remember
that it is always easier to
peel and chop a few larger
cloves than many smaller
ones. Fresh garlic is avail-
able throughout the year in
most supermarkets.
Store fresh garlic in either
an uncovered or a loosely
covered container in a cool,
dark place away from expo-
sure to heat and sunlight.
This will help maintain its
maximum freshness and
help prevent sprouting,
which reduces its flavor and
causes excess waste. It is
not necessary to refrigerate
garlic.
Depending upon its age
and variety, whole garlic
bulbs will keep fresh from
two weeks to two months.
Inspect the bulb frequently
and remove any cloves that
appear to be dried out or
moldy. Keep in mind that
once you break the head of
garlic, it greatly reduces its
shelf life to just a few days.
Garlic can be used in
many items. Add it to soups,
sauces and stews; make a
healthy vegetable dish by
sautéing steamed spinach,
garlic and fresh lemon
juice; purée roasted garlic,
cook potatoes and olive oil
together to make delicious
garlic mashed potatoes, then
add other seasonings to suit
your taste; or sauté minced
garlic and add to your favor-
ite spaghetti sauce for a
homemade flavor.
More information con-
tact me at the University
of Arkansas, Division of
Agriculture, Cooperative
Extension Service, in Saline
County located at 1605
Edison Ave. in Benton. You
may also call 501-303-5672,
or e-mail kelliott@uaex.edu.
Follow on Facebook at
UAEX Saline County Family
& Consumer Sciences.
Fresh roasted garlic is
simple to make and will have
your neighbors knocking
on your door to see what is
cooking. Make some tonight
and add it to garlic bread to
round out your meal.
Roasted Garlic Bread
3 bulbs garlic
2 Tbsp. olive oil
1 loaf Italian or French
bread
1/2 cup margarine
Begin by roasting garlic.
Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
Slice tops off garlic bulbs,
the tip of each clove should
be exposed. Place the bulbs
on a baking sheet or in muf-
fin tin and drizzle with olive
oil. Bake for 30 minutes or
until garlic is soft.
While the garlic is roast-
ing, slice the loaf of bread in
half horizontally, and place
cut side up on baking sheet.
Once the garlic has been
roasted and slightly cooled,
squeeze the cloves of garlic
from their skins into a bowl.
Add the margarine and stir
well until blended. Spread
onto the cut sides of bread,
and broil for about four
minutes or until toasted.
Cool slightly and serve. For
another variation add freshly
grated parmesan and moz-
zarella cheese, and fresh
chopped parsley to the mar-
garine/garlic mixture.
Tried and true tip:
Never store garlic in oil at
room temperature. Garlic-in-
oil mixtures stored at room
temperature provide perfect
conditions for producing
botulism, a dangerous food-
borne illness, regardless of
whether the garlic is fresh
or has been roasted.
KRIS
ELLIOT
Use garlic to add flavor to dishes
MONDAY, MARCH 17
YOUNG ARKANSAS ARTISTS
EXHIBIT: A representation of
the creative efforts of Arkansas
artists in grades K-12 will be
on display March 17- April 18
at Herzfeld Library in Benton.
The works are award winners
from the 52nd annual Young
Arkansas Artists Exhibition
conducted at the Arkansas
Arts Center in Little Rock and
organized in coordination with
the Arkansas Department of
Education. The display is open
to the public during normal
library hours. Call 778-4766 for
more information.
ST. PATRICK’S DAY
CELEBRATION: Children of
all ages are invited to a St.
Patrick’s Day Celebration at
10 a.m. Monday, March 17 at
Boswell Library and at 6 p.m.
(same day) at Herzfeld Library.
Activities will include a puppet
show followed by games and
crafts. Call 778-4766 or 847-
2166 for more information.
TUESDAY, MARCH 18
SALINE CROSSING REGIONAL
PARK & RECREATION AREA,
INC will meet Tuesday, March
18 at 5:30 p.m. in the Gene
Moss building at Tyndall Park.
The public is invited and urged
to join us as we plan for the
2014 Historical Rendezvous
and the 2015 bicentennial
of Saline Crossing, the first
pioneer settlement in Saline
County.
PUPPET SHOW: All ages are
invited to a family-friendly
puppet show at 4 p.m.
Tuesday, March 18 at Herzfeld
Library. Call 778-4766 for more
information.
 
GENEALOGY/LOCAL HISTOY
HELP Steve Perdue, head of
genealogy/local history at
the Saline County Library, will
be available to answer your
genealogy and local history
questions from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Tuesday, March 18 at Boswell
Library in Bryant. Call 778-4766
to make an appointment.
HASKELL HISTORICAL SOCIETY
will meet Tuesday, March 18 at
3:30 p.m. at Haskell City Hall.
President Emaline Stroud will
talk about Bess Croxton and
how she coped with serious
medical issues. The group is
in need of items, articles,and
pictures to be loaned, copied,
or donated for display at the
museum which tell of our
community and school in the
past.  For more information,
please contact Emaline Stroud
at 1-501-303-0384 or Darlene
Emmons at 1-501-315-2913.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 19
USING iOS DEVICES: Adults 18+
are invited to learn the basics
and more about using an IOS
device, such as an iPad or
iPhone at 1 p.m. Wednesday,
March 19 at Herzfeld Library.
No registration required. Call
778-4766 for more informa-
tion.
 
BLOCK PARTY/LIBRARY LEGO
CLUB: Ages 4-14 are invited
to create a Lego masterpiece
from 3:30-5 p.m. Wednesday,
March 19 at Boswell Library
during the monthly Block
Party. A new theme is explored
each month. Call 847-2166 for
more information.
THURSDAY, MARCH 20
SHARON EXTENSION
HOMEMAKERS will meet 10
a.m. Thursday, March 20 at the
Saline County Fairgrounds.
SATURDAY, MARCH 22
THEOS, A SUPPORT
GROUP FOR WIDOWS AND
WIDOWERS:,will meet for
lunch, 11:30 a.m. Saturday,
March 22 at Western Sizzlin.
MONDAY, MARCH 24
BACKYARD POULTRY
FARMING: The Saline County
Library will host Carla Hardwick
as she explains the basics of
raising poultry in your own
back yard at 6 p.m. Monday,
March 24 at Herzfeld Library
in Benton. No registration is
required. Topics to be covered
include: purposes of raising
your own poultry, what kind of
birds are available to purchase
and from where, how to know
you are purchasing healthy
birds, associated costs and
how to care for your birds. Call
778-4766 for more informa-
tion.
MONDAY, MARCH 31
MONDAY WITH THE MASTER
GARDENERS: The Saline
County Master Gardeners and
presenter Mary Cowley will
discuss “Made for Shade” at
6:30 p.m. Monday, March 31 at
Herzfeld Library. The program
is open to all ages. Call 778-
4766 for more information.
TUESDAY, APRIL 8
THEOS, A SUPPORT
GROUP FOR WIDOWS AND
WIDOWERS: 5 p.m. Tuesday,
April 8 for its regular monthly
meeting. Entertainment by
Larry Loe and Susan Curis.
SATURDAY, APRIL 26
THEOS, A SUPPORT
GROUP FOR WIDOWS AND
WIDOWERS:, Eat at Whippet,
11:30 a.m. Meet at Whispering
Pines at 11 a.m. to car pool.
ONGOING EVENTS
HABITAT’S RUBY TUESDAY
NIGHT will be every Friday in
February, excluding Valentine’s
Day. All proceeds will go
toward the 2014 Youth United
Build. 
CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP
meets every third Thursday of
the month at Saline Memorial
Hospital in the educational
building from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Anyone who is a caregiver is
encouraged to attend. Next
meeting is set for Thursday,
Jan. 16. For more information
call Azy Crabb at 778-6260.
TAX PREPARATION SERVICES:
Central Arkansas Development
Council is seeking volunteers
for its VITA/EITC free tax
preparation services in Saline
County. The service offers free
electronic filing of federal and
state tax returns. The service
will be available at Herzfeld
Library and the Benton Senior
Wellness and Activities Center.
Volunteers must be certified.
CADC provides training. To
volunteer contact Susan Willis
at 501-778-1133.
BRYANT HISTORICAL SOCIETY:
meets 6:30 p.m. every third
Tuesday in the Heritage Room
at the Mabel Boswell Memorial
Library in Bryant on Prickett
Road. Students and others are
invited to join the group in
preserving the history and her-
itage of Bryant. Annual dues
are $25 for adults and $15 for
students.
TOPS: 5 p.m. Every Monday
at the Benton Main Fire
Department. Come join TOPS
Chapter 57. the group meets
every Monday. For more
information email tops0057@
yahoo.com
BENTON ALZHEIMER’s
CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP
MEETING: 7 p.m. every third
Tuesday of the month at First
Baptist Church, 211 South
Market in Benton. The meet-
ing is open to everyone who
has a loved one living with
Alzheimer’s or other related
dementia.  The group offers
a safe environment where
discussions are kept confi-
dential. For more information,
please contact Sam Sellers at
(501) 663-3900 or samuel.sell-
ers@sbcglobal.net. 
STARTING POINT SUPPORT
GROUP MEETING: 1 p.m. every
Sunday at Christ Is The Answer
Fellowship Church, Traskwood.
This is a Christian-based recov-
ery program. Call Vince for
details 722-3110
POOL TOURNAMENT: First and
third Fridays of every month at
7:30 p.m., Saline County Moose
Lodge, Highway. 67, Benton.
Must be 21 to enter lodge,
but membership in lodge not
required to participate.
SALINE COUNTY HISTORY AND
HERITAGE SOCIETY MEETING:
7 p.m., the third Thursday of
each month at 123 N. Market
St. in Benton.
BRYANT HISTORICAL SOCIETY
MEETING: 6:30 p.m., the third
Tuesday of each month in the
Heritage Room of the Mabel
Boswell Memorial Library on
Prickett Road in Bryant.
HOPE ADDICTIONS RECOVERY
PROGRAM: 7 p.m. every
Friday at Victory Baptist
Church, 5386 Highway 67
South, Benton.  Call 315-5005
for more information or for
transportation to the meeting.
SADDLES AND SPIRITS HORSE
CLUB MEETING: 6:30 p.m.
the second Thursday of each
month at East End Elementary
School. For more information,
contact Melinda Steele at 501-
580-8356.
SALINE COUNTY REPUBLICAN
COMMITTEE MEETING: 6:30
p.m. the first Thursday of
each month at Republican
Headquarters, 125 North
Market Street, in downtown
Benton. Visitors welcome
BINGO: 6:30 p.m. every
Thursday evening and every
Saturday at 1 p.m. at VFW Post 
2256.  5323 Sleepy Village
Road ( off Alcoa ).  Members
and guests welcome, must be
21 years of age.  No admission
charge, kitchen will be open
serving burgers, fries, taco sal-
ads and other items.
NONPARTISAN LAYMEN’S
STUDY OF THE ORIGINAL
INTENT OF THE FRAMERS OF
THE CONSTITUTION MEETING:
7 p.m. the fourth Monday of
each month at First Lutheran
Church, 18181 I-30 in Benton.
There is a $5 fee for materials.
SALINE COUNTY DEMOCRATIC
WOMEN’S MEETING: 6:30
p.m. the third Thursday
of every month, followed
by the Democratic Central
Committee meeting at 7 p.m.,
at Democratic Headquarters,
101 S. Market St. in downtown
Benton.
STARTING POINT SUPPORT
GROUP MEETING: 1 p.m. every
Sunday at Christ Is The Answer
Fellowship Church, Traskwood.
This is a Christian based recov-
ery program. Call Vince for
details 722-3110
BROKEN CHAIN MINISTRIES
12-STEP RECOVERY PROGRAM:
6 p.m. Monday and
Wednesday Community Care
Center 212 W. South St. in
Benton. For more information
call 501-672-6511.
BINGO: The VFW Post 2256 in
Benton is inviting the public
to come play bingo every
Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. and
Saturday at 1 p.m. Players must
be 21 or older. Cash prizes are
paid to the winners.
CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP
meets every third Thursday of
the month at Saline Memorial
Hospital from 2 to 3 p.m.
Anyone who is a caregiver of a
loved one or knows someone
who is is welcome to attend.
For more information, call Azy
Crabb at 778-6260.
SALINE COUNTY
TOASTMASTERS meets
at Mt. Carmel Methodist
Church, Arkansas 5 and Alcoa
Road, noon-1 p.m. every
Thursday. This is an interna-
tional organization to help
people with their leadership
and communication skills.
For further information or to
register, email Joyce Moore at
jmoore25@att.net.
Sunday, March 16, 2014
The Saline Courier 3B
Family
Legacy Homes
5484 Hwy. 67
Benton
501.776.1086
3 BR - 2 Bath
M.H.
The Bad News
Research has shown that people
who have experienced whip-
lash trauma are six to ten times
more likely to develop abnormal
alignment (usually a flattened or
reversed curve) of the cervical
spine than the rest of the popula-
tion. This abnormal alignment
causes spinal and muscular mal-
function, often leading to chronic
pain or other symptoms. Incorrect
alignment also produces abnormal
spinal disc compression, eventu-
ally causing early and accelerated
spinal decay, in turn leading to
even more pain and immobil-
ity. Worst of all, a flattened or
reversed cervical curve has been
shown to adversely effect the ner-
vous system, therefore resulting
in long term health consequences.
So with all this bad news, can
whiplash victims really be helped,
or is temporary symptom relief
the best they can hope for?
The Good News
Let’s consider the case of “Pam”.
Pam had tried months of various
therapies, treatments and medica-
tions following her car accident.
Although some therapies gave
her limited relief, the results were
short lived and her now chronic
headaches and neck pain were
causing her great physical, mental
and emotional hardship.
Upon her initial visit to her
chiropractor Pam was examined
and X-rayed. Her x-rays revealed
that, although her head position
appeared normal, she had a very
significant spinal problem in her
neck. Her cervical spine showed
a complete reversal of the normal
alignment. The discs between the
vertebrae in the lower portion of
her neck were compressing and
becoming thin. Her chiroprac-
tor explained that these struc-
tural changes in her spine were
directly responsible for much of
her continuing headache, neck
and back pain. The abnormal
spinal alignment meant that her
spine was unable to move and
function correctly, causing strain
and irritation to pain-sensitive tis-
sues such as muscles, ligaments,
discs and joints. The chiropractor
also explained that unless these
structural problems were helped,
her spinal condition would likely
continue to deteriorate, eventually
leading to far more serious health
problems than those she was pres-
ently experiencing.
Having previously received
“symptom-based” therapies (what
chiropractors call relief care)
with less than satisfactory results,
Pam chose to try to correct her
problem. In a chiropractic office
the alternative to relief care is
corrective care, where the goal is
not temporary relief of symptoms,
but rather structural improvement
of the spine that can be demon-
strated objectively. Structural
improvement enables effective
long-term rehabilitation to occur,
meaning less pain and disability,
less spinal decay over time and
the opportunity for greater health.
The goal of Pam’s corrective
care program, then, would be to
correct her spine to as close to
normal as possible.
When Pam was re-examined
following her corrective care
program the alignment of her
spine was near normal, with an
improved cervical curve and
greatly reduced disc compression.
These structural changes meant
that she was now virtually pain
free, and she felt like she had
been given a new lease on life.
Pam’s case clearly illustrates
that many whiplash victims may
be suffering needlessly. There is
a better way!
WHIPLASH TREATMENT:
IS THERE A BETTER WAY?
Do you think
Chiropractic can help you?
Call Dr. Simmons for a free consultation
Most Insurances Accepted
501.847.7246
BryantChiropractor.com
ST. PATRICK’S DAY
From deep blue lakes of
Killarny
To the shores of the
Emerald Isle
A man named St. Patrick
Walked with God and
taught men to smile.
Each day a “Top O’ the
Morning’”
Was a greeting to all that
he met;
A day was named in his
honor
For this man they could
not forget.
A day to remember the
Irish,
Go forth with a shamrock
and smile,
Greet all wit a “Top O’ the
Morning
Remember the beautiful
isle.
Laugh and be glad you
are Irish,
Feel sorry for those who
are not.
You’ll hear the laughter of
angels
And Leprechauns with a
gold pot.
--Almo House,
Deceased
Limmerick written for
Howard Nobles’ memory
HURRY UP SPRING
Good riddance to old man
winter
Excuse me if I sound bit-
ter
I’m just longing for spring
Though I know bees will
sting
I’ve had enough of old
MAN WINTER.
--Mike Pafundi,
Hot Springs
RAINBOW
I saw a rainbow
staring at me
with colors so bright.
As it cam closer to me,
It felt supernatural.
I saw an image
of myself
with a pleasing smile
walking through it
and looking back
at me.
I thought to myself
how great it is
To see in the spirit,
and to know
He’s always with us.
--Kathy Easter,
Traskwood
NOT LIKE IT
USED TO BE
I watched a killdeer build
her nest
Then she sat down upon
it to rest.
When she arose and
stood on her legs,
Beneath her were three
little spotted eggs.
I’ve been watching her for
a few days,
And am amazed at the
little games she plays.
If anyone gets near her
created perfection,
She leads them away in a
different direction.
Then it seems she really
panics
And starts doing some
wild crazy antics.
She pretends she is
injured. A broken wing
Or some other such silly
thing.
As soon as the danger to
her nest is past
Recovery from her injury
is remarkably fast
She then detours back to
her nest
And settles down to warm
the eggs and rest.
--Becky Townsend,
Benton
REMEMBERING
TOGETHER
Following the path
the moon drops on the
snow
we run through
drifting white curtains
on cloud-spun carpets.
We dare the frozen creek
and laugh at winter’s
jewels
sparkling our faces.
I feel your breath, your
hands,
I hear your voice,
and yet
I dare not look behind me
for fear that I shall see
no footprints,
but my own.
--Helene Stallcup,
Conway
DANGEROUS
PLAYGROUND
The big black cat played
in the street
Till that big car went
speeding by;
Then valor caused the
cat’s retreat—
His sixth life passed, he
did not die.
Till that big car went
speeding by
That big black cat played
with such grace
His sixth life passed, he
did not die
But fear spread over that
cat’s face.
That big black cat played
with such grace
One morning he had gone
to play
But fear spread over that
cat’s face
Before he ran the 0ther
way.
One morning he had gone
to play
Then valor caused the
cat’s retreat
Before he ran the other
way
The big black cat played
in the street.
--Don Crowson,
Benton
Send poems of 16 or
fewer lines to Don Crowson,
131 South First St., Benton,
AR 72015. Please enclose
a self-addressed, stamped
envelope if a clipping or
response is desired.
T
he month of March
doesn’t have a lot
going for it; it is sort
of a “breather” month.
There is, of course, St.
Patrick’s Day, but I’m not
Irish, and the income tax
deadline, which was for
many years
in March, is
now April 15.
About the
only impor-
tant event
going on this
month is the
sale of Girl
Scout cookies.
Have you
bought your
cookies yet?
They are
available
everywhere.
And while
I think mothers do more
of the selling than the
Scouts do, it is the way
most Scouting activities are
financed.
When I was young
enough for Scouting, the
war was in full progress and
we never lived in a place
long enough for me to get
involved in Girl Scouts. I
did , for a time, belong to
the Campfire Girls, a simi-
lar organization built on an
Indian theme.
I got involved for a time
in Girl Scout activities when
my girls were young, but
their interest didn’t last long.
The cookie sale campaign
nearly did me in that year.
Not realizing how much peo-
ple looked forward to that
annual event, I agreed to
accept delivery of the cook-
ies when they arrived.
The cookies arrived on a
Tuesday, if I remember cor-
rectly.
When the UPS truck
arrived, I told the man to
just put them in the living
room. I expected about four
average size boxes. (After
all, our little GS troop only
had about six members.)
When the delivery people
left, there was only a small
trail leading to the front
door and the kitchen that
was free of the boxes.
How could six little girls
have sold that many? Of
course, I had helped out
at school by hitting up the
English department in the
teachers’ lounge, Bill sold
his carpoolers some, and
of course the grandparents
helped out. In return, I had
to purchase cookies from
these people’s children.
When the cookie sale
was history, I had about a
dozen boxes sitting in my
pantry. Fortunately, the
cookies keep well, and I
found a number of ways to
use them. I still buy boxes
of them from the neighbor-
hood Scouts who knock on
my door.
Who thought of selling
cookies as a fundraising
event anyway? The idea
seems to have originated
way back in 1917, five years
after Juliette Gordon Lowe
founded the organization.
A Scout troop, who called
themselves the Mistletoe
Group in Muscogee, Okla.,
baked some cookies and
sold them in their high
school cafeteria as a money
making project.
Then in 1922 in an article
in the official Scout maga-
zine, “The American Girl,”
Florence E. Neil, a Scout
director from Chicago, sub-
mitted a recipe for baking
cookies as a method for rais-
ing money for some 2,000
members.
She estimated the cost of
her cookies to be about 26
to 36 cents a dozen then, so
she suggested that the girls
sell them door to door for a
quarter to 35 cents a dozen.
By the 1930s the idea of
selling cookies had really
caught on. The Scouts in
Philadelphia were selling a
box of 44 cookies for only 23
cents, or six boxes for $1.24.
In 1935 Scouts in New
York were no longer baking
their cookies at home, but
were having them baked
commercially. By 1937 there
were more than 125 Scout
councils selling them.
The 1940s were war
years and sugar and butter
were rationed, making it dif-
ficult to make the cookies.
The Scouts sold calendars
instead, but resumed their
cookie sales after the war
was over. They also hired
a national baking company
to supply the cookies. The
company employed 29
bakers to fill the cookie
demand.
In the 1950s the regu-
lar cookie choices had
increased to three — choco-
late mint, a vanilla-filled
cookie and a shortbread. A
few bakeries added another
flavor.
The 1960s saw a growth
spurt for the Scouts, which
was also reflected in their
cookie sales. Fourteen
bakers could now turn out
thousands of cookies, and
they now came in a printed
aluminum foil or in cello-
phane packaging to protect
the cookies and keep them
fresh. They also expanded
the choices available, adding
a peanut butter sandwich
cookie.
The cookie sales really
became a full-fledged busi-
ness. Boxes, no matter
which bakery baked them,
came in standardized variet-
ies depicting scenes of Girl
Scout activities such as hik-
ing, swimming and canoe-
ing. On the 1979 boxes a
new logo created by a man
named Sam Bass appeared
on all the cookie boxing.
These designs emphasized
the benefits of Scouting.
By the 1980s four national
bakeries had taken over the
production of the cookies
and the number of variet-
ies had increased to eight.
These included low-fat and
sugar-free selections. Some
bakers also provided cookie
“samplers” in decorative
tins.
In the 1990s Scouting
also began offering an activ-
ity pin for cookie sales to
reward individual Scouts
who had large sales. They
also discontinued the low-
fat and low-calorie varieties
because they did not sell
well.
Which brings us to the
Evolution of Girl Scout cookies: They’ve come a long way, baby
ALMA JOYCE
HAHN
THIS, THAT &
THE OTHER
News you can use
and re-use!
COURIER
321 N. Market Street
Benton, AR 72015
501.315.8228
Local News, Sports, Events - it’s all here in the Courier.
After you finish your paper, there are many uses for your
old papers - please recycle. Recycling benefits relate
to many different areas, some of which could greatly
improve the air we breathe, and the environment.
Wrap all fragile items in newspaper. If you are
packing plates or bowls, be sure to put layers of
newspaper in between. Whether shipping or just
packing up, newspapers work great!
21st Century. New box
designs are bold and bright.
Two companies produce
eight varieties, all of which
are now kosher. And now
the younger Scouts (called
Daisies) are permitted to sell
cookies.
And don’t be content to
just eat the cookies out of the
box. There are several sites
on the Internet that feature
recipes for using the cookies
in other delicious recipes.
Special to The Saline Courier
Above: A vintage box of Girl Scout cookies that displays, at left, the activities that sales support.
Below: The selection of Girl Scout cookies has greatly increased since its inception.
GIRL SCOUT COOKIES
(1920s recipe)
1 cup butter
1 cup sugar
Extra sugar for topping
2 eggs
2 tbsp. milk
1 t. vanilla
2 cups flour
1 t. salt
2 t. baking powder
Cream butter and sugar;
add well-beaten eggs, then
milk, flour, salt and baking
powder. Refrigerate for an
hour. Roll out dough, cut into
trefoil shapes, and sprinkle
sugar on top. (Trefoils are
the Scouts’ symbol.)
4B The Saline Courier
Sunday, March 16, 2014
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Call your ad representative today 315-8228
R
aymond Thomas
was among many
young men that had
returned to their hometowns
after World War II. His
generation would go down
in the history books as The
Greatest Generation.
Franklin
Delano
Roosevelt
spoke almost
prophetically
in referring
to them in
1936 when
he said, “This
generation of
Americans has
a rendezvous
with destiny.”
Many of their destinies
came to an end as they gave
their lives for their country
on foreign soil. The fortunate
ones returned home to start
a new life in a better world.
This is a brief, unusual story
of one.
When Raymond and Jo
Hall married Dec. 21, 1946,
the last thing on their minds
would be that in 18 months
they would be living in a
new house that took only 24
hours to build.
Jo Hall had moved to
Benton from Brinkley in
1945. The biggest flirt at
BHS, Jackie Homan, sat right
behind her in school and
loved to aggravate the new
girl in town. Aggravating
pretty girls is one of the old-
est flirting tools in a boy’s
box.
Being around eight boy
cousins growing up, Jo
wasn’t as fascinated with
their clever moves as were
most of the girls she ran
around with who found boys
to be cute and fantastic. So,
for a boy to get her attention
he would have to be very cre-
ative. That’s where the clever
young Raymond Thomas
came in.
Raymond had tried to get
Jo’s attention, but his normal
charm didn’t seem to work,
so he decided to be creative.
On Oct. 7, 1946, Jo and
her friends went to catch a
movie at the IMP Theatre in
Downtown Benton. They had
driven her father’s car and
left it out front. While they
were in the theater, Raymond
Thomas removed the back
seat from Jo’s father’s car.
When the movie was over
and Jo and her friends start-
ed to get into the car, they
noticed that the back seat
was missing. Laughing cock-
ily was the young Raymond.
Without a hitch he said, “Jo
Hall, now will you give me
your undivided attention? I
just want to talk to you.”
Shocked and surprised,
she gave up, gave in and the
rest is history. In less than
three months they were mar-
ried.
They were living with
Raymond’s father, Oscar.
Raymond was attending
Ouachita in Arkadelphia and,
like most newlyweds. they
couldn’t wait to get their own
place.
The following appeared in
the June 3, 1948 edition of
The Benton Courier:
“GI’s BUILD HOME FOR
RAYMOND THOMAS IN 24
HOURS”
“GI’s Build Home At
Night: Refusal to Allow
Building of Garage
Apartment on Lot Caused Ill
Feeling and Quick Action;
Case to Come Up Before
Judge Sam Garrett Next
Wednesday”
“Incensed over refusal to
allow building of a garage
apartment on lots at 623
West North Street, G I
friends of Raymond Thomas
took matters in their hands
Wednesday afternoon and
night and built a house for
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas.”
The Thomases returned
last week from attend-
ing school at Ouachita in
Arkadelphia. Previously they
had applied for a GI loan
and the slowness of action
to get a loan through caused
them to build a garage apart-
ment for temporary use. But
J.M. Evans, who sold the
lots, objected because the
addition was restricted and
secured an injunction from
Judge Cooper. The restricted
area has a provision not
allowing a building costing
less than $3,500.”
“Friends were incensed
and with little effort a large
force of workmen were
soon on the ground. Ernest
Ward, builder, took charge,
and soon a building was on
the way and by midnight
the building was practically
complete, including electric
wiring and plumbing.”
“At one time nearly 150
men were working, hammer-
ing, sawing, digging ditches
and shoveling dirt. The
house was built in less than
a day…”
“The workmen wanted to
continue on the job all night,
but Mayor Kelley ordered
work to cease at twelve on
complaint of residents of the
neighborhood.”
“The Thomases’ furniture,
in storage, was moved to
the site Thursday morning
and they moved in, less than
24 hours after work was
started.”
Era May Weeks remem-
bers quite well the night
the house was built, for her
house was next door and the
noise kept her up all night.
Her husband, Foy, was a
plumber at that time (later
Foy became a chiropractor).
Foy and Morris Rommel
plumbed the house for the
Thomases that night.)
These young veterans
were not going to stand by
and see one of their own
treated this way. They had
learned to take care of each
other on and off the battle-
field. They were a Band of
Brothers. It didn’t matter
what branch of service they
were in; each had the back of
the other in every situation.
Together they would live,
and together they would die,
for one another. The system
would not stop them from
building the first home for
their buddy and his bride.
During the construction,
at 623 W. North St., Jo was
not able to go to the site,
but all night long could see
the trucks passing by her in-
laws’ house at 228 W. North
St. She was unable to leave
the house because she was
ordered to stay close to the
phone. Bill and Bea Byrd
were expecting their first
child (Dennis) at anytime.
Bill was working at that time
for Raymond’s father, Oscar,
at Thomas Auto. When the
call came, Jo was to call the
dealership to let Bill know
the progress of Bea’s labor.
As the boys were building
away, most of the neighbors
enjoyed the excitement. They
sat in their lawn chairs to
watch the work being done
under the lights at night.
They had never seen this
much activity in their new
neighborhood, nor had they
witnessed the enthusiasm
these veterans showed for
their fellow soldier. It made
them proud of their boys
who had been in uniforms
just a short time before. It
was a real Norman Rockwell
moment!
This was a first for Benton.
Number 1: It was the first
restricted subdivision in
Benton with restrictive cov-
enants. Number 2: The addi-
tion was billed as the finest
neighborhood to live in.
The developer, J.M. Evans,
had done all of his paper-
work correctly and was legal
down to every detail, but in
the eye of the public he was
messing with the wrong folks
— our boys, the veterans of
World War II, “The Greatest
Generation” as Tom Brokaw
would later call them in his
book by that title.
The following appeared in
the June 2, 1948, edition of
The Arkansas Democrat:
HOUSE BUDDIES
“RUSHED UP”
FOR VETERAN IN
DIFFICULTIES
“Benton veterans built
home in record time yester-
day and today for 20-year-old
Raymond Thomas, World
War II veteran, in a peck
o’ trouble with his housing
problem.”
“Despite a court injunction
and other problems, and this
morning, to top it all, a cita-
tion for contempt, Thomas’
buddies put the project
through and at 11 a.m. today
the house was outwardly
complete and Thomas and
his bride were moving in
furniture.”
The charge of contempt,
filed by J.M. Evans, the
former owner of the lot on
which the house was erected,
was filed before Chancellor
Sam W. Garratt this morning
and the hearing was set for 2
p.m. next Wednesday.”
Pubic sentiment was
strong in favor of the GI and
his bride. Mr. Evans was
seen as the villain and made
an attempt to explain his situ-
ation in the Courier. Legally,
Mr. Evans had his business
done by the letter of the law,
but not in the public’s eyes.
The public saw this as a
moral issue and disregarded
the legal issue.
From the BENTON
COURIER, June 10, 1948:
“Concise Statement That
Places the Evans Side of
Edgewood Addition before
the Public: To the Property
Owners and citizens of the
City of Benton. We wish to
make the following state-
ment of facts upon which we
based our recent action in
the courts regarding certain
protective covenants which
apply to Edgewood Addition
to the city of Benton ... (The
statement goes on to explain
the details of the addition’s
covenants) ... We regret very
much that it was necessary
to take any action on this
matter, but we believed a
violation was being made and
felt that we owe to the pur-
chasers of lots in Edgewood
the protection which they
justly deserve. Mr. and Mrs.
J.M. Evans.”
From the BENTON
COURIER, June 17, 1948:
“Oscar Thomas and son
Raymond were fined $50
each for contempt of court in
chancery court this afternoon
for building a house on a
restricted lot.
“The case will come up
again July 1. Attorneys for
the Thomases and Evanses
will file briefs, at which time
the court is expected to pass
the merits of the restricted
district ...
“Chancellor Garratt
ordered that the parties were
not to have any contact and
no arguments; if so, they
both would be fined heavily.
He issued a restraining order
that goes into effect and will
cease only after the hearing
in July.”
The entire issue was
dropped and the couple
moved into their new home.
The Thomases lived in
the garage apartment from
June until December. It took
that long for Ernest Ward to
complete the house. As the
old Couriers state, they did
move some of their furniture
in after the GI’s built it and
even slept there, but they
completely moved in after
Mr. Ward finished every-
thing.
Afterward the little garage
apartment was moved to
Gaunt Street behind the old
Thomas Auto Body Shop.
Jesse Chastain resided there
as the body shop foreman.
This little garage apart-
ment can still be seen today
at this location. I went down
to Gaunt Street to see it for
myself. The man that owns
the property said he always
wondered why the little
building had a kitchen and a
shower. He was surprised to
hear the story.
Helen Keller once wrote:
“Walking with a friend in the
dark is better than walking
alone in the light.”
Some World War II vets
came together, in the dark,
for one of their own, even if it
did take all night.
FREDDY
BURTON
The Greatest Generation: One for all and all for one
Special to The Saline Courier
Benton veterans build a house for 20-year-old Raymond Thomas,
World War II veteran, who was experiencing housing difficulties.
Special to The Saline Courier
Jo and Raymond Thomas as newlyweds.
Sunday, March 9, 2014
The Saline Courier 5B
KNOW THE SCORE
Did You Know?
u 68 MILLION adult males in the U.S. watched the big game
u 68 MILLION adult males also read a print newspaper in the past week
u 48 MILLION adult women in the U.S. watched the big game.
u 52 MILLION adult women read the average Sunday paper.
116 million adults in the U.S. watched the big
game this year. But 156 million adults read a
newspaper in print or online in the past week.
You don’t have to wait for the next big game
to make a big impact.
Newspapers score all year long.
Source: Scarborough Research Call Today! 315-8228
March 17 - 21
Bauxite
School District
Breakfast
Monday: Waffles, Fruit,
Toast Juice, Milk
Tuesday: Biscuit,
Sausage, Fruit, Juice, Milk
Wednesday: Breakfast
Pizza, Fruit, Juice, Milk
Thursday: Egg, Biscuit,
Gravy, Fruit, Juice, Milk
Friday: French Toast
Sticks, Fruit, Juice, Milk
Lunch
Elementary, Middle
Monday: BBQ Pork
Sandwich, California Blend
Veggs, Carrots, Celery
Sticks, Ranch Dressing,
Fruit, Milk
Tuesday: Baked Ham,
Sweet Potato Crunch,
Peas, Fresh Fruit, Roll,
Milk
Wednesday: Sloppy
Joe on Bun, Potato Puffs,
Carrots, Celery Sticks,
Ranch Dressing, Fruit
Juice, Milk
Thursday: Macaroni/
Ground Beef, Broccoli,
Fruit, Roll, Corn, Milk
Friday: Hamburger on
Bun, Potato Puffs, Lettuce,
Tomatoes, Fruit, Mustard,
Mayo, Ketchup, Milk
High School
Monday: BBQ Pork
Sandwich, California Blend
Veggs, Carrots, Celery
Sticks, Ranch Dressing,
Fruit, Milk
Tuesday: Baked Ham,
Sweet Potato Crunch,
Peas, Fresh Fruit, Roll,
Milk
Wednesday: Sloppy Joe
on Bun, Baked Beans,
Carrots, Celery Sticks,
Ranch Dressing, Fruit
Juice, Milk
Thursday: Lasagna
Ground Beef, Broccoli,
Fruit, Roll, Juice, Corn,
Milk
Friday: Hamburger on
Bun, Potato Puffs, Lettuce,
Tomatoes, Fruit, Mustard,
Mayo, Ketchup, Milk
Benton
School District
Elementary, Middle
Breakfast
Monday: Cereal with
WG toast or Cinnamon
bun, Fruit Juice, Milk
Tuesday: Cereal with
WG toast or Yogurt, gra-
ham crackers, Fruit Juice,
Milk
Wednesday: Cereal with
WG toast or WG biscuit,
gravy, Fruit Juice, Milk
Thursday: Cereal with
WG toast or Oatmeal with
WG toast, Fruit Juice, Milk
Friday: Cereal with WG
toast or Chocolate oatmeal
bar, Fruit Juice, Milk
High School
Monday: Cereal or
Chocolate chip oatmeal
bar, Fruit Juice, Milk
Tuesday: Cereal or Mini
Waffles, Fruit Juice, Milk
Wednesday: Cereal or
Biscuit and Sausage, Fruit
Juice, Milk
Thursday: Cereal or
Bagel with Jelly and Cream
Cheese
Friday: Cereal or
Sausage Roll, Fruit Juice,
Milk
Lunch
Monday: Scrambled
eggs/bacon, Tater tots,
Ketchup, Sliced tomatoes,
Toast, Jelly, Banana, Milk
Tuesday: Crunchy beef
taco, salsa, Shredded
lettuce, tomato, Refried
beans, Orange wedges,
Milk
Wednesday: Pepperoni
Pizza, Peas and carrots,
Romaine Salad, ranch
dressing, Diced Peaches,
Milk
Thursday: BBQ
Chicken, Biscuit, Seasoned
green beans, Mashed pota-
toes, Diced Pears, Milk
Friday: Chicken
Sandwich, French Fries,
Mayonnaise, Seasoned
Broccoli, Lettuce, Tomato,
Chilled Pineapple, Milk
Bryant
School District
Breakfast
Monday: Blueberry
Waffle Bites, Juice, Milk
Tuesday: Chicken
Biscuit, Juice, Milk
Wednesday: Cereal on
the go or Bowl Cereal,
Teddy Grahams, Juice,
Milk
Thursday: Mini Cini,
Raisins, Milk
Friday: Strawberry Mini
Panckes, Apple, Milk
Lunch
Monday: Turkey
Corndog, Mustard, Baked
Beans, Pickle Spears,
Apple Slices, Milk
Tuesday: Chicken
Spaghetti, Steamed
Carrots, Green Beans, Hot
Roll, Fruit Cocktail,
Milk
Wednesday: Breaded
Chicken Sandwich, Oven
Fries, Mustard, Salad
Dressing, Ketchup,
Romaine Lettuce, Pickle
Slices, Orange slices,
Orange Wedges, Milk
Thursday: Pepperoni
Pizza, Mixed Green Salad,
Ranch Dressing, Chilled
Pears, Milk
Friday: BBQ Turkey
on Bun, Cole Slaw, Pickle
Spears, Potato Wedges,
Ketchup, Tropical Fruit,
Milk
Glen Rose
School District
Breakfast
Monday: Breakfast
Pizza, or Cereal and Toast,
Fruit Juice, Milk
Tuesday: French Toast
Sticks / Syrup, or Cereal
and Toast, Fruit Juice,
Milk
Wednesday: Donut and
Toast or Cereal and Toast,
Fruit Juice, Milk
Friday: Biscuit and
Gravy, or Cereal and Toast,
Fruit Juice, Milk
Lunch
Elementary, Middle
Monday: Chicken
Sandwich, Mayo, Mustard,
Lett., Tom., Pickles, Sweet
Potato Tots, Pinto Beans,
Fruit, Milk
Tuesday: Spaghetti with
Meat Sauce, Tossed Salad/
Ranch Dressing, Green
Beans, Roll, Fruit, Milk
Wednesday: Frito Chili
Pie, Cheese, Quick Baked
Potato, Cole Slaw, Fruit,
Milk
Thursday: Chicken
Nuggets, BBQ Sauce,
Mashed Potatoes, Gravy,
Steamed Broccoli, Fruit,
Roll, Fruit, Milk
Friday: Breakfast for
Lunch, Eggs with Ham,
Hashbrowns, Biscuit and
Jelly, Fruit, Milk
High School
Monday: Chicken
Sandwich, Mayo, Mustard,
Lett., Tom., Pickles, Sweet
Potato Tots, Pinto Beans,
Fruit, Fruit Juice, Milk
Tuesday: Spaghetti with
Meat Sauce, Tossed Salad/
Ranch Dressing, Green
Beans, Roll, Fruit, Fruit
Juice, Milk
Wednesday: Frito Chili
Pie, Cheese, Quick Baked
Potato, Cole Slaw, Fruit,
Fruit Juice, Milk
Thursday: Chicken
Nuggets, BBQ Sauce,
Mashed Potatoes, Gravy,
Steamed Broccoli, Fruit,
Roll, Fruit, Fruit Juice,
Milk
Friday: Breakfast for
Lunch, Eggs with Ham,
Hashbrowns, Biscuit and
Jelly, Fruit, Fruit Juice,
Milk
Harmony Grove
School District
Breakfast
Monday: Cereal,
Graham Crackers, Juice,
Milk
Tuesday: Chicken/
Biscuit, Juice, Milk
Wednesday: Super Bun,
Juice, Milk
Thursday: Breakfast Bar,
Juice, Milk
Friday: Breakfast Pizza,
Juice, Milk
Lunch
Monday: Chicken
Nuggets, Tater Tots,
Sherbet, Fruit, Milk
Tuesday: Soft Taco,
Lettuce, Cheese, Salsa,
Mexican Black Beans,
Fruit, Milk
Wednesday: Hot Dog,
Chips, Baked Beans,
Honey Bun cake, Fruit,
Milk
Thursday: Chicken and
Noodles, Corn Bread,
Green Beans, Fruit, Milk
Friday: Beef Nachos
with Chips, COrn, Salad
with Ranch Dressing,
Fruit, Milk
CLASSIFIEDS
PLACE AN AD
FIND AN AD
Listings are divided by category.
To get your ad in the Courier,
call 501-315-8228 Monday
through Friday, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.,
online at bentoncourier.com,
come by the offce at 321 N.
Market St. in Benton or mail
to: PO Box 207, Benton,AR
72018. We accept Visa,
MasterCard, Discover, and
American Express.
WHEN TO CALL
FOR ADS APPEARING | CALL BEFORE
Tuesday –––––––––––– Mon Noon
Wednesday –––––––––– Tues. Noon
Thursday ––––––––––– Weds. Noon
Friday –––––––––––––– Thurs. Noon
Saturday –––––––––––– Thurs. Noon
Sunday ––––––––––––– Fri. Noon
Monday –––––––––––– Fri. Noon
GET ONLINE
WHAT
IT
COSTS
YARD
SALES
4 lines – 3 days – $18.68*
4 lines – 7 days – $29.28*
4 lines – 14 days – $ 45.44*
Extra lines available
4 lines – 2 days – $15.64*
4 lines – 3 days – $18.48*
Extra lines available
Cost includes ad and yard
sale packet including signs.
You can place your ad
on our website....
bentoncourier.com
Just go to website and
follow the steps.
Email us at:
class@bentoncourier.
com
}
}
}
}
}
*Price doesn’t include charge for graphic, TMC
rate, or internet. Price is subject to change.
Page 6B – The Saline Courier
class@bentoncourier.com Sunday, March 16, 2014
Auctions
WILSON AUCTIONEERS, INC.
Leading Real Estate Auctioneers “Since 1961”
501-624-1825 * TOLL FREE: 877-BID2BUY
WEBSITE: www.wilsonauctioneers.com - AAL #4
WILSON REAL ESTATE AUCTIONEERS, INC.
Custom-Built in 2004, Well Maintained, 2,464+/- SF, 3 or 4BR/ 2BA Brick Home ~ 18x36 Ft.
In-Ground Pool ~ Excellent Location in Longhills Subdivision ~ Bryant School District ~
Plus an Entire House of Furniture, Bedroom Sets & More ~ Live, Online Bidding Available
BENTON REAL ESTATE &
PERSONAL PROPERTY AUCTION
FRIDAY ~ APRIL 4, 2014 ~ 10:00 A.M.
5024 WINGED FOOT DRIVE ~ BENTON, AR
DIRECTIONS:  From I­30 take Exit 121, Travel North on Alcoa Rd. for 0.3 Mile ~ Turn Left 
onto Salem Rd. & Travel 0.4 Mile ~ Take the First Left onto Scott Salem Rd. & Travel 0.5 Mile 
~ Take the 2nd Left onto Valhalla Dr., Left onto Turnberry Dr. & then Right onto Winged Foot 
Dr. ~ Watch for Auction Signs on the Left.
REAL ESTATE DESCRIPTION:  Single Level, 2,464+/­ SF Brick Home w/3 or 4 Bedrooms/ 
2 Baths, Custom­Built in 2004 ~ 0.28+/­ Acre Lot #80, Longhills Subdivision ~ Professionally 
Landscaped Yard ~ Private, Fenced Backyard w/18x36 Ft. In­Ground Swimming Pool, Patio 
Area  &  Double  Gate  for  Storing  a  Boat  or  Camper  ~  Enclosed  2­Car  Garage  ~  Interior 
Consists of a Split Floor Plan, Containing a Large Living Room w/Fireplace & Large Windows 
Overlooking Patio/ Pool Area ~ Open Kitchen w/Large Tile Flooring, White Cabinets, Walk­
in  Pantry  &  Matching  White  Appliances  ~  Formal  Dining  Area  ~  Large  Master  Suite  w/
Jacuzzi Tub, Separate Shower, Dual Vanities & Lots of Closet Space ~ Large Offce or could
be  a  4th  Bedroom  if  needed  ~  Generous  2nd  &  3rd  Guest  Bedrooms  ~  Plenty  of  Closet 
Space Throughout  Home  ~  Oversized  Laundry  Room  ~  Bryant  School  District  ~  Excellent 
Neighborhood of Well­Maintained Homes ~ Conveniently Located only Minutes from I­30 & 
in Close Proximity to Everything in Saline County, Multiple Shopping Centers & Restaurants 
~ Sellers have already moved to Little Rock, so now is Your Opportunity to Own 
this Home!  For Additional Information, Online Bidding Instructions & Photos, Visit 
www.wilsonauctioneers.com or Contact our Ofñce ToII Free: 877-243-2289.
PARTIAL LIST OF PERSONAL PROPERTY: Several Designer Bedroom Sets, Leather Couches, 
Dining Room Set, Washer/ Dryer, Liberty Coins & More ~ All Selling Regardless of Price!
TERMS ON REAL ESTATE:  $20,000.00 Cashier’s Check (NO EXCEPTIONS) Down Day 
of  Auction,  as  Earnest  Money  ~  Balance  Due  at  Closing  ~  Title  Insurance  with  Warranty 
Deed Provided at Closing ~ Closing within 30 Days ~ 10% Buyer’s Premium ~ Offers Prior 
to Auction are Welcomed.
TERMS  ON  PERSONAL  PROPERTY:    Cash,  Check  &  Credit  Cards  Accepted  Day  of 
Auction ~ 10% Buyer’s Premium.
SPECIAL INSPECTION:  Sunday, March 30th from 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. or Home can 
be Inspected ANYTIME by Appointment ~ Contact Agent, David Brewer at 501-760-8510/
david@wilsonauctioneers.com to View this Home.
Announcements made day of sale take precedence over printed material.
Auctions
It’s time to look around and see what you need to sell.
This is the auction where you the public can come to buy
or sell. We want your equipment, tractors, backhoes, doz-
ers, trucks, cars, farm equipment of all kinds, construction
tools and equipment, RVs, camping trailers and boats. We
will have buyers looking for just about everything. No
household items. Auction company has the right to
refuse used tires.
The auction will be held inside the security fence at the
fairgrounds. Check-in time: Tuesday, February 25th
through Friday, February 28th, from 8 to 5 each day.
Loading tractor will be there for larger items.
Call us ahead of time with items you would like for use to
advertise. We will be putting info and photos of some of
the large items on our website as they come in.
Terms: See website for photos and terms and conditions.
SATURDAY, MARCH 1, 2014 @ 9:00 AM
County Fairgrounds,
1609 Martin Luther King Blvd., Malvern, AR.
SPRING
OPEN
EQUIPMENT AUCTION
AR. LIC. #372 DONALDSON, AR.
501-384-5352• www.staffordauction.com
email: staff_auctions@catc.net
DAVID STAFFORD - AUCTIONEER/BROKER
F
r
e
e
Advertis
in
g F
re
e Loadin
g
Trucks / Vans
For Sale
‘00 F150 XLT Reg Cab
174k miles, V-8, Razorback Red
501-303-8372
$
3500
Legal Notices
REQUEST FOR Qualifications–
Construction Manager as Constructor
The City of Benton, AR is soliciting responses from interested com-
panies to provide Construction Manager as Constructor services for
the new Riverside Park Development in Benton, AR.
PROJECT: The project consists of new recreation & wellness facili-
ties, 3 buildings (total 148,000 sf), softball fields, soccer fields and all
associated site work at the new Riverside Park in Benton, AR. The
construction budget is approximately $30 million.
SUBMISSION: The deadline for RFQ responses is 4:00 PM CDT on
Monday, March 24, 2014.
The RFQ Response must be sufficient for the Owner to make a final
selection. The Owner may elect to conduct interviews to make a final
decision. Provide contact information, as all respondents will be noti-
fied of the results by email.
Address four (4) copies of the response to:
Benton Parks & Recreation
913 E. Sevier Street
Benton, AR 72015
Direct all questions or requests for additional information to Les
Owens of BCOH Architects, 501-776-5118.
Written responses should include the following and be tabbed:
1. General information on company including number of employees,
owners and office locations.
2. Proposed key project team members for this project including pri-
mary contact, project manager, project estimator(s) & project super-
intendent; provide resumes.
3. Experience of key personnel with CM as Constructor/GMP/Fast-
Track Projects.
4. List specific experience for each for the following building types:
Community Recreation Centers; Boys & Girls Clubs; Senior Activity
& Wellness centers. List owner and contact information. Provide ex-
amples of 2 completed similar projects for each building type. An ad-
ditional list (3 pages max) of other similar or relevant projects may be
included.
5. Records of management teams on similar projects completed
within budget and time schedule. Show record that company per-
formed on a large multi-building project of similar size & scope.
6. Experience in the Benton/Saline County construction market and
with other Municipal clients.
7. Provide contact information for minimum of three (3) client refer-
ences.
8. Current and projected workload; Current maximum bonding ca-
pacity and rate; Proof of licensure in the State of Arkansas.
The agreement with the Owner will be AIA Document A133 Agree-
ment Between Owner and Construction Manager as Constructor.
Services will include but not necessarily limited to:
Preconstruction Services, Estimating, Guaranteed Maximum
Price/Fast Track Management, Subcontractor Qualification/Bidding/
Contracts, Project & Change Order Pricing, Schedule Control,
Value Analysis & Cost Control, Construction Coordination, Con-
struction Closeout, Record Documents & Warranties.
The City of Benton welcomes proposals from firms with a diverse
workforce, including women and minority-owned firms and joint ven-
tures including such firms.
Legal Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF SALINE COUNTY, ARKANSAS
PROBATE DIVISION
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF
FRANCIS E. McALLISTER, deceased NO.63PR-14-094-4
NOTICE
Last known address: 1005 North Shady Lane
Benton, Arkansas 72015
Date of Death: 12th day of August, 2013
The decedent, FRANCIS E. McALLISTER, died interstate and
LARRY LEWIS, 133 Couchwood, Hot Springs, Arkansas 71901 has
been appointed Administrator of the Estate by an Order of the Court.
All persons having claims against the estate must exhibit them, duly
verified, to the Administrator within six (6) months from the date of
the first publication of this notice, or they shall be forever barred and
precluded from any benefit in the estate.
This notice first published the 9th day of March, 2014
Stacy L. Farnell
Owen, Farnell & Garner
209 Hobson Avenue, Hot Springs, AR 71913
Phone: 501-624-4244
Recreational Vehicles
Garage Sales
ANOTHER
MAN'S TREASURE
Wed-Sat/ 10am-6pm
Sunday/ 1pm-6pm
Across from
Old Reynolds Plant
Bauxite
501-557-5565
ESTATE SALES
BY JAN
1103 Crystal Dr
Benton, AR.
Sat 3/15 10a-3p
Sun 3/16 12p-4p
Great Sale!
Take exit 117 off I-30 go
over overpass to Military
Rd. Take a right on
Military Rd. Stay in left
hand lane, go to
Jameson Ave & turn
left, next stop sign go
through look to the right.
501-909-1489
I BUY Junk Cars
Call Jerry Toland
332-7202 • 840-6756
Employment
A KID!S Place Pre-
school/Daycare is
now hiring. Apply at
825 N. Main, Benton
APPLICATIONS BEING
accepted for
Bauxite Fire Chief
(Volunteer Dept.) Pay
$250mo Pick up
applications at
Bauxite City Hall
CERTIFIED DIETARY
MANAGER Needed
LTC Exp. Apply online
@ http://newbeginnings.
vikus.net
CNA POSITION
open. Apply in per-
son, Arbor Oaks, 105
Russellville Rd., Mal
DIRECTOR OF NURSING
Must have LTC exp.
LPN’s Full-time 3-11 &
Weekend option for LTC
Facility in Benton apply
online http:newbegin
nings.vikus.net
Looking for a good
deal? Search the
Courier Classifieds!!
Employment
DRIVERS: PENSKE
Logistics has Immedi-
ate OTR Openings!
Excellent Pay, Bene-
fits! 2 yrs CDL-A Exp
Req.
www.gopenske.com/c
areers, Job#1401678,
Call 855-316-7178
EXPERIENCED COOK
/ WAITSTAFF
CALL HOME PLATE
DINER ASK FOR
RICK 813-4423
SEEKING AN EXPERIENCED
DIESEL TECHNICIAN
This person will be
required to diagnose
mechanical, electrical &
hydraulic issues & repair
the unit accurately. This
position will also work on
small engines as required
by business demand.
Candidate must have
strong references, a
current resume, a full set
of tools, pass a drug
screening, have a valid
driver’s license and
reliable transportation.
Apply by calling
Chad at 501-847-9043
Resumes can be sent to
Fiser Truck and Tractor
PO BOX 850
Alexander, AR. 72002
Pay dependent on
proven experience.
Equal Opportunity Employer
FRONT DESK
CLERK (PART-TIME)
Must be able to work
nights & weekends &
pass drug test. Apply
in person: Best
Western in Benton.
No Calls
FULL TIME OFFICE
POSITION in LR
printing business for
experienced only in
payroll, P/R taxes,
qrtly P/R returns,
sales tax reporting,
A/R, A/P. Also
includes HR duties.
Experience with
Peachtree/Sage
helpful. Please call
501-687-2222,
ext.102
Housekeepers & Floor
Finishers for all Shifts. Ap-
ply at emsarkansas.com or
call 501-776-6720. Must
pass drug & bkgrd chk.
Employment
GI TECH: Exp. not
req. to work in
fast-paced endoscopy
center. Wages de-
pendent upon exp.
Familiar w/Olympus
equipment a plus.
Fax resume to
501-623-5705
LPN position open,
2-10pm, apply in per-
son Arbor Oaks, 105
Russellville Rd, Mal.
Part Time
Mailroom
Workers
The Saline
Courier is accept-
ing applications for
Part Time help in
the Mail Room.
Hours vary, Fri.
& Sat. nights
required, As well
as Tues. - Fri.
daytime. EOE
Interested candi-
dates apply in
person at:
The Saline Courier
321 N. Market St.
Benton, AR.
or email
Steve Boggs at
publisher@benton
courier.com
POLICE OFFICER
The City of Benton will
test for Police Officers
on Monday, April 7th,
6:00 p.m. at Benton High
School Cafeteria, 211 N.
Border Street. A com-
pleted employment ap-
plication must be submit-
ted by 5:00 p.m. April
3rd. Applicants must be
age 20 ?. Employment
applications and a com-
plete job description are
available at the Benton
Municipal Complex at
114 S. East St. Benton,
AR or by logging on to
www.bentonar.org or
www.bentonpolice.org
Equal Opportunity Employer
FIREFIGHTER
The City of Benton will
test for Firefighter on
Monday, April 7th, 7:00
p.m. at the Gene Moss
Building at Tyndall Park,
913 E. Sevier Street. A
completed employment
application must be sub-
mitted in order to test.
Deadline is 5:00 p.m.
April 3rd. Applicants
must be age 21. Employ-
ment applications and a
complete job description
are available at the Ben-
ton Municipal Complex
at 114 S. East St. Ben-
ton, AR or by logging on
to www.bentonar.org
Equal Opportunity Employer
Seeking full-time
administrative assis-
tance at dental office
in Benton. Dental ex-
perience preferred,
not required. Forward
resume to longhills-
dentistry@yahoo.com
or fax# 501-794-2033.
Classifieds Work!
Employment
SPEECH - Language
Pathologist The Daw-
son Education Serv-
ice Cooperative, Early
Childhood, Special
Education program is
accepting resumes for
t he posi t i on of
Speech - Language
Pathologist. MSE in
Early Childhood Spe-
ci al Educati on re-
quired. The applica-
tion process is open
until filled. Interested
appl i cants shoul d
send a r esume
to Sandra Francis,
Early Childhood Spe-
cial Education Coordi-
nator, 711 Clinton
Street, Arkadelphia,
AR 71923 or fax to
870-246-3130. Daw-
son Education. Coop-
erative is an Equal
Opportunity Employer
STAGECOACH
NURSING & REHAB
Now adding to our team:
• Bus. Office Mgr- Prev.
LTC EXP REQUIRED
• Environmental
Supervisor
• Nurses- all shifts
• Weekend RN Supervisor
• Treatment Nurse
• Admissions/Marketing
Coordinator
Looking for the best
of the best!
Must Have: LTC Experi-
ence, Computer Skills,
Team Oriented, Steady
Job History, Love of the
Industry
Send resume to
stagecoach@pinnacle-
hc.com
Or apply in person
6907 Hwy 5 N.
Bryant, AR
TEACHER I - CDA
needed for Central Arkan-
sas Development Coun-
cil’s Paron Head Start
Center. Child Develop-
ment Associate Credential
(CDA) or higher education
in Early Childhood Educa-
tion with experience work-
ing with preschool chil -
dren preferred. Pre- Em-
ployment Drug Screening
& Criminal background
Check required. To down-
load an Employment
Application go to
www.cadc.com Employ-
ment Applications are re-
tained on file for (1) one
year. You must contact
HR if application was pre-
viously submitted & you
want to be considered for
the above position or for
more information call 501-
315-1121. “Equal Oppor-
tunity Employer”
Child Care
CHILDCARE
Infants to 5 B •L• S
Vouchers
562-0691 • 951-2923
6:30a -5:30p
IN-HOME DAYCARE
Spotless • Non-smoking
Drop-ins Welcome!
501-778-2920
Apartments
Unfurnished
2 BR Apts, kit. appl.,
W&D conn., $500 &
up. Handicap access.
317-5190 / 317-5192
BRYANT - Nice
Townhome. 3 BR, 2
BA, 1300 sq. ft., $750
mo., 501-847-5377
BRYANT: 200 Prick-
ett Rd., 2 BR., 1 BA
apt., Nice. $605mo.,
$200 dep., 847-5377
Buy • Sell • Trade
in the Classifieds
Classifieds Work!
Apartments
Unfurnished
CLEAN 1BR Includes
Appliances Utilities
Paid, Ref. Req. No
Pets Allowed $650
mo + Dep. 860-1896
Courtyard Cottages Bry-
ant Senior Community,
55+, 1 & 2 BR Apts.
avail Now! 847-3002
NOTICE: All real es-
tate advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to the Fair Housing
Act which makes it il-
legal to advertise any
preference, limitation
or di scr i mi nat i on
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or in-
tention to make any
such preference. We
will not knowingly ac-
cept any advertising
for real estate which
is in violation of the
law. All persons are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis.
Houses for Rent
1024 CIRCLE Drive
(Benton) 2Br 1Ba Ga-
rage/Storage Newly
Renovated $675mo
$400 dep. 315-0674
NEW 4BR 2BA
Fenced yard Vaulted
Ceilings 1800sq.ft.
$1150mo - $1250mo
Bent on School s
Please call 326-8000
Houses for Rent
2 BR, 1 BA, newly re-
modeled, Full kitchen
furnished, Lots of
storage, basement &
garage, 6 Mo Lease,
$700 mo. + dep. Call
501-778-3324
3 & 4 BEDROOM
$825 -$1400 mo.,
Haskell, Benton &
Bryant. 315-9370
315 S. Neeley St. by
Tyndall Park. All elect
w/fridge, dish washer,
stove, W&D included
4 br, 2 ba. Free Trash
pick-up on Monday.
$900mo No inside
pets. 664-0800 office.
791-5153 Cell
3BR 2BA (Bryant)
Double Car Garage
$975mo 315-4110
3BR 2BA Tri-level on
creek next to Caldwell
School. $950mo plus
deposit 501-778-2851
Eagle Properties
LLC
315–2075
Nice 2 & 3 BR Homes
from $500 to $925
Apartments
1 BR’s from $415
2 BR’s from $475
*based on availability
Deposit & References
Required
eaglepropsaline.com
FOR LEASE/SALE
New 3 & 4 BR, 2 BA,
brick, FP, ceiling fans,
carpet, 2 car garage,
patio. Go to: www.
catalyst-residential.com
or 501-697-6342
GLEN ROSE Schools
3BR 2BA, Move in
Ready, $750 mo
+dep. 501-840-3694
Mobile Homes
For Rent
BAUXITE SCHOOLS
1 acre 3Br 2Ba CH/A
$650mo $350dep
Call 602-6161
2BR 1BA STOVE
REFRIG NO PETS
317-6426 778-1993
3BR 2BA w/storage
Asphalt Dr. 1 yr. lease
No Pets Water &
Trash Paid 602-2527
Mobile Homesites
MOBILE HOME
Space for Rent Glen
Rose $150mo, Call
501-332-2092 or
501-818-3807
Business Property
For Rent
BUSINESS OFFICE
Space in Haskell on
Hwy 67, great loca-
tion for info call
501-332-2092 or
501-818-3807
Appliances
For Sale:
Whirlpool
refrigerator
Water & Ice in
door, Excellent
condition $250
Located in
Benton
580-310-2805
Ready to take the
Real Estate Plunge?
Check out the Homes
for Sale in the Classi-
fieds daily.
Musical
Merchandise
Cushing
Piano Service
Tune • Repair
Player Pianos & Pump Organs
778-6584
Pets & Supplies
BENTON ANIMAL
Control & Adoption
501-776-5972
benton.petfinder.com
BRYANT ANIMAL
Control & Adoption
www.bryant.petfinder.com
www.1-800-save-a-pet.com
www.1888pets911.org
Hay For Sale
HAY FOR SALE
Round Bales
Net Wrapped. Call
501-317-1365
Autos For Sale
04 LINCOLN Town-
car Signature series
loaded, Great con
85K miles $7,500
501-249-6814
Recreational
Vehicles
2014 FLAGSTAFF
176Ltd. Pop Up camper.
Queen bed, Double
bed, Heat/Air, Heated
mattress, 3 Way refer,
Awning, Cook stove and
more. Only $7,250.00!
RV City-Benton
800-578-2489
www.rvcity.biz
Open Sundays 12-5
Time to get your own
place? Check out the
Rental Section in to-
day!s Classifieds...
Recreational
Vehicles
2014 GEORGETOWN
280DS Class A motor
home. 2 slide outs, auto
leveling jacks, back up
camera with 2 side mount
cameras, power patio
awning, 2 roof A/C units,
heated tanks, hide-a-bed
sofa and more. On sale
now for only $79,658.00!
RV City-Benton
800-578-2489
www.rvcity.biz
Open Sundays 12-5
2014 Grey Wolf
28BH T.T. 1 Slide out,
Bunk beds, U Shaped
dinette, sofa, 15 A/C,
power awning, Electric
tongue jack, Fold down
cargo rack and more.
Blow out price of $17,759!
RV City Benton
800-578-2489
www.rvcity.biz
Open Sunday 12-5
Recreational
Vehicles
KEYSTONE LAREDO
250RL fifth wheel “NEW”.
3 slide outs. Rear living
room with 2 recliners,
free standing dinette with
4 chairs. Huge shower
with glass doors, 60 x 80
Queen island bed. 12
gallon water heater, 15
A/C, 50 amp service. 4
seasons unit with heated
& enclosed underbelly.
Power patio awning,
electric jacks & more. On
sale now for only $29,500
RV City-Benton
800-578-2489
www.rvcity.biz
Open Sundays 12-5
Let RVCity in Benton
be your specialist for
all of your RV needs.
We stock a full line of
parts and our service
dept. is second to none.
Our parts and sales dept.
si open on Sat. 9-5 &
Sun. 12-5 to better serve
you. We also do warranty
and service work on all
makes and models.
RV City - Benton, AR
800-578-2489
www.rvcity.biz
CLASSIFIEDS
Sunday, March 16, 2014
class@bentoncourier.com The Saline Courier – Page 7B
STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS
Call Eva or Linda at 1-800-569-8762 to place your ad here!
HELP WANTED
Can You Dig It? Bulldozers,
Backhoes, and Excavators. 3
Weeks Hands On Training Pro-
vided. Become Nationally Cer-
tified. Lifetime Job Placement
Assistance. GI Bill Eligible.
1-866-362-6497.
Coordinator P/T: Provide sup-
port and activities for high school
exchange students. Volunteer
hosts also needed. Apply online:
www.AspectFoundation.com
HELP WANTED -
TRUCK DRIVERS
DRIVERS- Train to be a PRO-
FESSIONAL TRUCK DRIVER
through Prime's Student Driver
Program. Obtain your Commer-
cial Driver's License, then get
paid while training! 1-800-277-
0212.
www.DriveForPrime.com
DRIVERS- Tango offers up to
$.42 cpm to start plus home most
weekends. Family Medical/Den-
tal, 401k, Paid Vacation. CDL-A
w/1 yr OTR req'd. 877-826-4605.
www.DriveForTango.com.
DRIVERS- CDL-A SOLO & TEAM
DRIVERS NEEDED. Top Pay for
Hazmat. OTR & Regional Runs.
CDL Grads Welcome. 700+ Trucks
& Growing! 888-928-6011.
www.Drive4Total.com
DRIVERS- DRIVER TRAINEES
NEEDED IN LITTLE ROCK! Be-
come a driver for Stevens Transport!
EARN $800 PER WEEK! NO CDL?
No problem! We can help you get
trained locally! 1-888-778-0459.
DRIVERS- REGIONAL CDL-A
DRIVERS Great Career w/weekly
hometime! 888-362-8608. For paid
training, apply online at
AverittCareers.com.
Equal Opportunity Employer - Fe-
males, minorities, protected veter-
ans, and individuals with disabilities
are encouraged to apply.
DRIVERS- DRIVE THE BEST.
DRIVE MAVERICK! NOW HIRING
IN YOUR AREA!! OTR, regional &
dedicated. Exp drivers or students
with Class A-CDL for training. New
student spots just opened. Great
pay & home time. Flatbed, glass,
and reefer. Must be 21 yrs old & hold
Class A-CDL. 1-800-289-1100.
www.DriveMaverick.com
DRIVERS- Need Contract Drivers,
CDL A or B to transfer commercial
vehicles to and from various loca-
tions throughout U.S. OTR - no
forced dispatch - drivers choice. Ap-
ply online at
www.MamoTransportation.com
under careers or call 1-800-501-
3783 to speak with a recruiter.
DRIVERS- "Partners in Ex-
cellence" - OTR Drivers APU
Equipped. Pre-Pass, EZ-pass, pas-
senger policy. 2012 & Newer equip-
ment. 100% NO touch. Butler Trans-
port 1-800-528-7825.
www.ButlerTransport.com
DRIVERS- TRUCK DRIVING OP-
PORTUNITY! Become a new driver
for USA Truck! NO EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! USA Truck can help you
get your CDL now! New drivers can
earn $750/week! Call for Pre-Hire
and details! 1-888-528-7112.
MISCELLANEOUS
LIVE LINKS- Meet singles right
now! No paid operator, just real
people like you. Browse greet-
ings, exchange message and
connect live Try it free. Call
1-877-939-9299.
FOR SALE
For Sale- 4ct. tw NovaBright Dia-
mondExcel Stud Earrings $4.95 SH
for the look of $20,000.00 Earrings.
1-800-613-7231 or ihsfreeearrings.
com Offer Code: K2075.
TRAINING/EDUCATION
MOBILE HOMES
Mobile Homes with acreage. Ready
to move in. Seller Financing (subject
to credit approval). 3Br 2Ba. No rent-
ers. 501-588-3300.
www.VMFHomes.com
COMPANY DRIVERS & OWNER
OPERATORS WANTED! No touch
freight, 90% drop & hook, dedicated op-
portunities available. Call 888-710-8707
Applyonline: www.driveforpamtransport.com
Also seeking Recent Grads
Call Lavonna 877-440-7890
REDUCE YOUR CABLE BILL!
Get a whole-home Satellite
system installed at NO COST
and programming starting
at $19.99/mo. FREE HD/DVR
Upgrade to new callers.
CALL NOW 1-800-474-0423
Attn: Drivers -
24/7 Support!
Up to 50cpm +
Quality hometime.
$1000 weekly. CDL A Req.
877-258-8782
www.Ad-Drivers.com
Dish TV Retailer - SAVE!
Starting $19.99/month (for
12 months.) FREE Premium
Movie Channels. FREE
Equipment, Installation &
Activation. CALL, COMPARE
LOCAL DEALS!
1-800-278-8081
Week of 03-17-14
Medical Billing Trainees
Needed! Become a Medical
Office Assistant now!
Online job training gets you job
ready. Job placement when
program completed. Call ACC
for details. HS Diploma/GED
needed. 1-888-734-6717.
HOLTGER BROS., INC.
UTILITY CONTRACTOR
Immediate Opportunities in
the Telephone Industry for:
• Aerial Technicians
• Cable Plow/Bore Operators
• Foremen
• CDL Laborers
Training Offered. Travel
Required for All Positions.
www.holtger.com
Call 501-410-0209 | EOE by AA
WANTED -
ONLY 5 MORE HOMES
to advertise Siding, Windows or
Roofs for upcoming brochure.
Save hundreds of dollars. No
money down EZ financing. Home
owners only. 1-866-668-8681
Become a TRUCK
DRIVER IN LESS THAN
30 DAYS!!
Tuition Reimbursement
Available if Qualified!
Classes Start
Every Monday!
• Financing Avail.
• Lodging Provided!
PINE BLUFF TRUCK DRIVING
SCHOOL, INC.
CALL TODAY!
1-800-954-4981
www.pbtds.net
The RIGHT TRAINING for today’s trucking industry
lic. by ASBPCE
25 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED
NOW! Become a driver for TMC
Transportation! Earn $700 per
week! No CDL? No Problem!
Training is available!
1-888-248-1948.
TRUCK DRIVER TRAINEES
NEEDED! Become a driver
for US XPRESS! New
Drivers can earn $800 per
week! No Experience? We
can get you trained! Call for
details & Pre-hire now!
1-888-747-3068.
$7500 GUARANTEED
TRADE-IN VALUE for your
mobile home regardless of the
condition. Call 501-407-9500 .
BANK OWNED mobile home
repos . Easy terms . Call 501-
407-9500 .
SPRING PRICING!
$1.25/sq yd*
Meyers Z-52 Zoysia
$2.50/sq yd*
Call 800-458-4756
Bermuda
*Prices are COD on full truck
loads in the LR area.
Legal Notices
COMMISSIONER'S SALE NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the authority and direc-
tions contained in the decretal order of the Circuit Court of Saline
County, Arkansas, made and entered on January 22, 2014, in a cer-
tain cause (No. 63CV-13-117-2) then pending between THE BANK
OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS
TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS
OF THE CWABS INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES
2007-SD1, Plaintiff, and Diana Bratton, et al., Defendants, the under-
signed, as Commissioner of said Court, will offer for sale at public
vendue to the highest bidder, at the Saline County Courthouse in
which said Court is held, located in Benton, Arkansas, within the
hours prescribed by law for judicial sales, on May 13, 2014 at 11:00
A.M., the following-described real estate, situated in Saline County,
Arkansas:
All that part of the South Half of the Southwest Quarter of the
Southwest Quarter, Section 13, Township 2 South, Range 14 West,
Saline County, Arkansas, more fully described as follows; Begin-
ning at the Northwest corner of said South Half of Southwest Quar-
ter of Southwest Quarter and run thence South 10 feet, more or
less,to the South line of County Road, this point being of beginning
of land herein described; run thence East, along South line of road
for 210 feet; run thence South parallel with West line thereof; for
210 feet; run thence West, parallel with Southline of road for 210
feet; run thence North, along West line South Half of Southwest
Quarter of Southwest Quarter, for 210 feet to the point of begin-
ning.
Also known as 2217 Sullivan Road, Bauxite, Arkansas 72011
TERMS OF SALE: On a credit of three months, provided the pur-
chaser shall execute a commercial corporate surety bond as re-
quired by law and the order and decree of said Court in said cause,
with approved security, bearing interest at the maximum legal rate
per annum from date of sale until paid, and a lien being retained on
the premises sold to secure the payment of the purchase money.
The property will be sold subject to any and all property taxes due
and payable.
GIVEN under my hand this 7th day of March, 2014.
Dennis Milligan, Commissioner in Circuit, By Lana Davis
Prepared by:
WILSON & ASSOCIATES, P.L.L.C.
1521 Merrill Drive, Suite D-220, Little Rock, Arkansas 72211
(501) 219-9388
By: Heather Martin-Herron (2011136) • Attorneys for Plaintiff
Air Conditioning
HEATING AND
AIR CONDITIONING
Installation,
Maintenance and
24 Hour Service
501-425-3796
Residential &
Commerical
Attorneys
David Heasley
attorney at law
Divorce &
Family Law
Free phone consultation
Payment Plan
681-4452
622 Alcoa Road,
in Benton
Beverly I. Brister
Attorney at Law
Bankruptcy
Chapter 7 & 13
501-778-2100
212 W. Sevier St.
Benton, Arkansas
Tax Attorney
IRS &
State Taxes
FREE Initial Consultation
Let the
Courier Classifieds
work for you.
Call Cathy or Kim
to place your
Classified Ad.
Mon.-Fri. 8am-5pm
315-8228
or come by
321 N. Market St.
Time to get your own
place? Check out the
Rental Section in to-
day!s Classifieds...
Backhoe & Dozer
315-2343
Peas
Gravel
Fill
SB-2
Topsoil
Sandy Loam
Sands
Donnafill
Pick-Up
or
Delivery
Build & Remodel
Parish 
Construction
BUILDING AND
REMODELING
*31 yrs experience
Small or Large
Jobs Done to
Your Satisfaction
Free Estimates
Reasonable
Prices
Licensed
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
501-231-9230
501-316-2994
Looking for love in all
the wrong places????
Check out the Freebie
section in today!s
classifieds. You will
fi nd uncondi ti onal
love there FREE!
Furry & Free!!
Carpentry
EXPERIENCED
CARPENTER
- Out of Work -
Home Maintenance
& Remodeling
of All Kinds
Vinyl Siding Installation
Call TIM
778-5171
OVER 30 YEARS
EXPERIENCE
- Free Estimates -
No job too LARGE
or small
Satisfaction Guaranteed!
DAVID BURTON, SR.
794-2563
Drywall Repair
DRYWALL
REPAIR
SERVICE
• Cracks & Holes
• Discolored Ceilings
• Water Stains
• Small Remodels
Valid References
40 Yrs. Experience
!!!!!!
Steve Burrow - Owner
337–4525
SEEK AND YOU
SHALL FIND
Great deals in the
Courier Classifieds.
Yard Sales, Jobs,
Homes for Sale or
Rent. Check them out
daily. Call to sub-
scribe at 315-8228.
Ready to take the
Real Estate Plunge?
Check out the Homes
for Sale in the Classi-
fieds daily.
Handgun Classes
CONCEALED
HANDGUN
CLASSES
Course completed
in one day.
All
paperwork
provided.
Tim Bragg, Instructor
#95-055
501-776-7419
Arkansas
Concealed
Permit Class
George Brooks, Instructor
License No. 12-763
501.413.2393
email:
georgebrookstheshooter@gmail.com
website:
www.georgebrookstheshooter.com
3470 Quapaw Rd., Benton
Advanced Shooting instruction available
Horses
Clinic’s Certified
HOLTZMAN
Riding Academy, LLC
BIRTHDAY PARTIES
10 & UNDER
FREE COLT STARTING CLINIC
316-1141
Need to publish a
Legal Notice in
Saline County? We
can help...published
7 days a week...
501-315-8228
Want to Downsize
Your Gas Guzzler?
Sell it in the Courier
Classifieds. Call to
place your ad today!
315-8228
Landscaping
L.W. Lawn &
Landscaping
SERVICES, LLC
501-350-9137
870-942-9641
Call
Today!
WE DO IT ALL!
Lawn Maintenance, Trimming,
Sprinkler Installation, French
Drains, Shrub & Tree Pruning,
Leaf Removal, Landscaping,
Pressure Washing,
Gutter Maintenance and more
lwlawnandlandscaping@yahoo.com
VETERAN & SENIOR
Discounts Offered
For FREE
Estimate
But my God shall supply all your needs according
to his riches in glory by Christ Jesus. Phil. 4:19
Lawn Care
JAMES
LAWN CARE
GARDEN TILLING
LARGE OR SMALL
• Mowing
• Leaf Removal
• Weed Eating
• Light Tree Trimming
~FREE ESTIMATES~
WE DO IT ALL!
316-1400
MAN AND
A MOWER
LAWN CARE
FREE Estimates
Small Jobs Welcomed
501.408.9449
R&J Lawn
Yard Work
Painting • Hauling
Small Repairs
326-2428 • 744-5835
Using the Courier
Classifieds is just a
smart thing to do!
Subscribe Today!!!
Classifieds Work!
Painting
SUPERIOR
PAINTING
Satisfaction Guaranteed
! #$%&'(( )*+*,-  
& Repair
! .+/0$*1$ 2 34/0$*1$
! 504/6$0
! 7$0,,6$0 8',-*+9
FREE ESTIMATES
INSURED
Kelly Hill – Owner
501.840.1470
501.316.3328
Pressure Washing
Royal
Flush
Servicing
Central Arkansas
since 1988
316-1536
Pressure Wash & Seal
specializing in
!"#$%&'& ) *""+
,-#./ 0 1'&&/ 1-+-#2
3-/+&4 0 *5'&% 1'5-#6
Roofing
ROOFING
Wagner
Residential
Commercial
&
VOTED
“Best of the Best”
2009
Free Estimates
847-6630
Looking for a good
deal? Search the
Courier Classifieds!!
Buy • Sell • Trade
in the Classifieds
Want to Downsize
Your Gas Guzzler?
Sell it in the Courier
Classifieds. Call to
place your ad today!
315-8228
Roofing
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• All Insurance
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• 40 years exp.
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501-249-7735
501-318-8731
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412-3770
lance@arkansasroofing
andrestoration.com
Seniors & Veterans Discounts
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Lic. #0234961014
ARKANSAS
Roofng and Restoration
Tree Service
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& Liability Insured
•Stump Removal
501-337–1565
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Tree Service
MOORE
AFFORDABLE
TREE SERVICE
501-778-8071
501-860-5911
28-Years
Experience
Insured &
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Tree Service LLC
“The Total Package”
Call us about
Tree Health Care
• Trimming
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• Pruning
• Removals
• Stump Removal
• Firewood
• Green Waste Hauling
Complete
Insurance Coverage
Owned & Operated
by an
ISA Licensed Arborist
SO-5126A
840-1436
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Buy • Sell • Trade
in the Classifieds
Tree Service
B
Rockin B
Horse & Mule Logging
We Harvest
Pine & Hardwood Timber
Only – No Pulpwood
Must Have At Least 1 Load
501-317-6788
Ebenezer
Tree Service
Bucket Truck
Stump Grinder
INSURED
Free Estimates
501-672-8595
501-627-6427
Vet & Sr.Citizen Discount
Classifieds Work!
BUSINESS & SERVICE DIRECTORY
Houses For Sale
3 BR House f or
Sale/Lease by Owner.
2433 Lee Circle, Ben-
ton. 501-653-7484
For Sale 2 BR, 1 BA
House, $5,000. The
house must be moved
from exsisting loca-
tion. 501-249-1425
or 501-778-3324
Mobile Homes
For Sale
WHY RENT? WHEN
YOU CAN OWN 4 LESS!
'94 16x64 2br $530
'95 16x72 2br $560
'99 16x80 3br $580
'00 16x80 4br $590
Lake • Fish • Walk Trail
Sunset Lake • 951-2842
Lots & Acreage
20 AC UP TO 700 AC
+/- PINE TIMBER &
HUNTING LAND
$1950 / AC. HARD
SURFACE ROADS
THROUGHOUT,
NICE POND ON ONE
TRACT, PERFECT
FOR CABIN, NEAR
HSV, AND OWENS-
VILLE, SALINE
COUNTY. CALL
BILL GROCE FLAKE
AND KELLEY
COMMERCIAL
REAL ESTATE
501-529-1263.
SALINE COUNTY’S NEWS SOURCE SINCE 1876
COURIER
THE SALINE
Have a legal that you need
to have published? WE CAN HELP YOU!
Fax your information to: 501.315.1920
or you can email it to:
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If you have any questions,
feel free to speak to us: 501.315.8228
321 North Market Street
Benton, AR 72015
CLASSIFIEDS
Employment THE SALINE COURIER has an immediate opening for a part-time page designer/reporter. Experience with In-Design a must. This position will assist our primary page designer on Thursday, Friday and Saturday and will also cover a limited beat. Send resume and clips to Steve Boggs, publisher, at 321 N. Market Street, Benton, AR. 72015 or email to publisher@bentoncourier.com
SALINE COUNTY’S NEWS SOURCE SINCE 1876 COURIER
THE SALINE
Legal Notices SALINE COUNTY PROPERTY OWNERS' MULTIPURPOSE
IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT NO. 72 – STONEHILL
SUBDIVISION PROJECT, PHASE 7 NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE BOARD OF COMMISSION-
ERS FOR SALINE COUNTY PROPERTY OWNERS! MULTIPUR-
POSE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT NO. 72 – STONEHILL SUBDIVI-
SION PROJECT, PHASE 7, HAS ENTERED INTO ITS RECORDS
THE FOLLOWING ORDER LEVYING UPON THE REAL PROP-
ERTY OF THE DISTRICT A SUFFICIENT TAX TO PAY THE ESTI-
MATED COST OF THE IMPROVEMENTS WITH TEN (10%) PER-
CENT ADDED FOR UNFORESEEN CONTINGENCIES. ALL PER-
SONS AFFECTED BY THE ORDER ARE HEREBY WARNED THAT
THE ORDER SHALL BECOME FINAL UNLESS SUIT IS BROUGHT
TO CONTEST THE ORDER WITHIN THIRTY (30) DAYS OF THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
AN ORDER ASSESSING THE VALUE OF BENEFITS TO BE RE-
CEIVED BY THE OWNERS OF EACH OF THE SEVERAL BLOCKS,
LOTS AND PARCELS OF LAND WITHIN SALINE COUNTY PROP-
ERTY OWNERS' MULTIPURPOSE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT NO.
72 – STONEHILL SUBDIVISION PROJECT, PHASE 7; ASSESSING
TAXES THEREON, AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES
WHEREAS, all of the property holders owning property situated in
Saline County Property Owners' Multipurpose Improvement District
No. 72 – Stonehill Subdivision Project, Phase 7 (the "District"), have
petitioned the Saline County County Court to form a property owners'
improvement district to be organized for the purpose of constructing
within the district waterworks, recreation, drainage, gas pipelines,
underground trenches and excavations necessary for the installation
of electric and telephone distribution systems, sanitary sewers,
streets including curbs and gutters and sidewalks, together with facili-
ties related to any of the foregoing within said District, to serve the
inhabitants of the District; said purposes to be accomplished in the
manner and of the materials that the Commissioners of the District
shall deem to be in the best interest of the District, and the cost
thereon to be assessed upon the real property of the District accord-
ing to the benefits received; and WHEREAS, the County Court of Saline County, Arkansas has estab-
lished the District to accomplish the above purposes by passing an
Order on October 5, 2006; and WHEREAS, the assessments have been duly made by the Assessor
of the District, who was appointed by the Board of Commissioners of
the District, and filed in the office of the County Clerk pursuant to law,
and notice of such filing was duly published in the Saline Courier, a
newspaper published in and of general circulation in Saline County,
Arkansas, on July 26, 2013 and August 2, 2013; and
WHEREAS, on August 5, 2013, the Commissioners and Assessor for
the District met at the place and at the time named in said notice as a
board of equalization and heard all complaints against the assess-
ments filed with the County Clerk, and equalized the same; and
WHEREAS, no protest of the assessments was received; and
WHEREAS, the benefit received by each and every block, lot and
parcel of real estate situated in the District equal or exceed the local
assessments thereon; and WHEREAS, the estimated cost of the improvements to Phase 7 of
the District is $275,000 exclusive of capitalized interest and costs of
financing; and WHEREAS, the assessed benefits (the "Assessed Benefits") amount
to $565,156. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDERED by the Board of Commission-
ers of Saline County Property Owners' Multipurpose Improvement
District No. 72 – Stonehill Subdivision Project, Phase 7:
Section 1. That each of the blocks, lots and parcels of real property
in the District be assessed according to the assessment list of the
District, as equalized, as the same now is of record in the office of the
County Clerk as reflected on Exhibit "A" attached hereto, and the As-
sessment of Benefits on each of the blocks, lots and parcels shall be
collected by the County Collector with general taxes becoming due in
the year 2014 and annually thereafter at the rate per annum of
5.435% until the whole of the local assessment, with interest thereon
at a rate equal to the lesser of the maximum rate permitted by law or
the rate of 10% per annum, shall be paid. Section 2. This Order shall have all the force of a judgment to be
paid by the real property in the District in proportion to the amount of
the Assessed Benefits as established herein and to be paid in annual
installments as set forth in Section 1 hereof and the taxes so levied
shall be a lien upon the real property in the District from the time of
the date of this Order and shall be entitled to preference over all de-
mands, executions, encumbrances or liens whatsoever created, and
continue until all such assessments, with any penalty or cost that may
accrue thereon, shall have been paid. Section 3. This Order shall be in full force and effect from and after
its entry.IT IS SO ORDERED this 5th day of August, 2013.
SALINE COUNTY PROPERTY OWNERS' MULTIPURPOSE
IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT NO. 72 /s/ Travis P. Bull • Commissioner /s/ Mickey D. Cunningham • Commissioner
/s/ Jerry Cunningham • Commissioner
Legal Notices IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF SALINE COUNTY, ARKANSAS
SUMMIT BANK PLAINTIFF
v. NO. 63CV-12-591
JOHN BEDWELL AND SANDRA L. BEDWELL,
THE ARKANSAS DEPT. OF FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION
AND PAULINE W. MYERS DEFENDANTS
NOTICE OF COMMISSIONER'S SALE
Notice is hereby given that the undersigned Commissioner, pursu-
ant to the Decree and Order of the Circuit Court of Saline County, Ar-
kansas, which was rendered on the 25th day of July, 2013 in a case
in which Summit Bank is Plaintiff and John Bedwell, Sandra L.
Bedwell. The Arkansas Dept. of Finance & Administration and
Pauline W. Myers are the Defendant will on the 20th day of August,
2013 offer for sale on a credit of three (3) months at public auction at
the front door of the County Courthouse in Benton, Saline County,
Arkansas to the highest and best bidder the following land situated
in the County of Saline, State of Arkansas, to wit:
ALL THAT PART OF THE NW 1/4 OF THE NW 1/4 OF SECTION
19, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 13 WEST; THAT PART OF
THE NE1/4 OF THE NE1/4 OF SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 1
SOUTH, RANGE 14 WEST; ALSO PART OF THE SE 1/4 OF THE
SE 1/4 OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 14
WEST, MORE FULLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: Commenc-
ing at the Northeast corner of said Section 24 and run thence
S45˚37!15”W for 466.34 feet to the point of beginning of land
herein described; run thence N45˚37!15”E for 205.14 feet;
thence S44˚54!E for 559.87 feet to the Northwest right of way
line of Arkansas State Highway No. 111; thence S40˚44!W
along Highway Line for 313.31 feet; thence S24˚48!W along
highway line for 111.12 feet; thence N69˚37!W for 10.55 feet to
the intersection with the East line of Section 24 at a point that
is 405.65 feet North of the Southeast corner of the NE1/4 of NE
1/4 of said Section; thence N69˚37!W for 687.8 feet; thence
N22˚43!E for 132 feet; thence N45˚08!W for 602.2 feet to the
Southeast line of the Union Pacific Railroad; run thence
N45˚34!E along railroad right of way for 239 feet to a point that
is N54˚17!24”W of the point of beginning; run thence
S54˚17!24”E for 671.04 feet to the point of beginning
Said sale will be held at 11:00 A.M. on the date stated. The
purchaser at said sale will be required to give bond with approved
security to secure the payment of the purchase price together with
interest from the date of sale at the highest rate allowable by law,
and a lien will be retained on said land to secure further said
purchase price. WITNESS my hand this 17th day of June, 2013. Dennis Milligan, Commissioner, by Lana Davis, D.C.
Prepared by:Donald M. Spears, Attorney at Law
113 So. Market Street, Benton, Arkansas 72015
501-315-0092 fax 888-748-5786
Legal Notices NOTICE OF SALE Of an amount not to exceed $2,840,000 BAUXITE SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 14 SALINE COUNTY, ARKANSAS CONSTRUCTION BONDS DATED SEPTEMBER 1, 2013 Sealed bids will be received until 10:00 a.m. local time on August 20, 2013
For the above bonds, which mature serially
on February 1 of each of the years 2014
through 2040 inclusive. All bids must be on
the Official Bid Form or through PARITY. Copies of the Preliminary Official Statement,
Official Notice of Sale and Official Bid Form
may be obtained from Stephens Inc., 111
Center Street, Suite 2300, Little Rock, Ar-
kansas 72201, Telephone No. (501)
377-6315, the District!s fiscal agent. Mr. Jerrod Williams, Superintendent
Garage Sales EARLY BIRD SANITATION Once a week pick up + Rolloff Dumpsters 332-7202 • 840-6758 • 778-3969 I BUY JUNK CARS
Announcements 28TH BOOK & PA- PER SHOW – Aug. 10th & 11th, Sat 9 to 5 & Sun 10 to 4, Col- lectible Books - Books of Interest and.or Value/ Rare, Collecti- ble Ephemera, Jack- sonville Community Center, 5 Municipal DrJacksonville, AR Free Parking, Car- peted & Air Condi- tioned $5 Admission Adoption ADOPT HOPING to share our hearts and home with a newborn baby. Loving, nurtur- ing home for your baby. Expenses paid. Mar r i ed coupl e, Walt/Gina 1-800-315-6957. Happily Married Couple yearning to love a child in a secure home. Expenses paid-private Legal. Kim & Werner 1-888-416-5056 Classifieds Work!
Adoption UNPLANNED PREG- NANCY? THINKING OF ADOPTI ON? Open or closed adop- tion. YOU choose the family LIVING EX- PENSES PAID. Ab- by!s One True Gift Adoptions Call 24/7. 1-866-459-3371
Personal MEET SINGLES right now! No paid opera- tors, just real people l i ke you. Browse greetings, exchange messages and con- nect live. Try it free. C a l l n o w 1-877-939-9299
Health Services CANADA DRUG CENTER Safe and af- fordable medications. Save up to 75% on your medi cat i on n e e d s C a l l 1-800-304-6217 $10.00 off first pre- scription and FREE Shipping
Employment A KID!S Place Pre- school /Daycare i s now hiring. Apply at 825 N. Main, Benton. Classifieds Work!
Employment CLASS A CDL Driv- ers Great Home Ti me! Benefi ts & Safety Bonus Avail- able. Must have 1 year OTR in the last 3 years. Call Dancor T r a n s i t I n c . @866-677-4333 www.dancortransit.com DIETARY COOK with experience needed at Mt. Carmel Commu- ni ty Center. Cal l 501-315-1555 DRI VERS New Trucks Arriving Exp Pays up to 50 cpm, Full Benefits + Quality Homet i me CDL-A Req 877-258-8782 www.ad-drivers.com ENTERPRISE LANES Hiring Part-Time weekend help, me- chanical ability a plus. Starts at $8/hr. Apply at 1515 Military Rd. EXPERIENCED COOK/WAITSTAFF CALL HOME PLATE DINER ASK FOR RICK 813-4423 THE BAUXITE Police Department in cooperation with the Bauxite School Sys- tem is accepting applications for a full time School Re- source Officer for the 2013-2014 school year. Applications will be accepted until Thursday, August 8, 2013. Download an application at: www.bauxiteminers.org click on: District, Human Resources, Employment Opportunities or bit.ly/applybauxite TRUCK DRIVERS Wanted Best Pay and Home Time! Apply Online Today over 750 Companies! One Application, Hundreds of Offers! www.HammerLaneJobs.com
Employment
Grams House Now Hiring TEACHERS Health & Life Insurance, Retirement Call Melba 501-794-4726 HELP WANTED! Make up to $1000 a week mailing brochures from home! Genuine Opportunity! NO experience Required. Start Immediately! www.BrochureWorkers.com HELP WANTED!!! Make $1000 weekly mai l i ng brochures from HOME! NO ex- perience required- Start Immediately! www.TheMailingHub.com PART TIME Ground- skeeper/Handyman for 30 acre property $10 per hour Call 501-607-0179 EARLY CHILDHOOD Education Parapro- fessional The Dawson Education Coopera- tive Early Childhood Speci al Educati on Paraprofessional. The application process is open until the position is filled. Interested ap- plicants should send a resume to Sandra Francis, Early Child- hood Speical Educa- tion Coordinator, 711 Clinton Street, Ar- kadelphia, AR. 71923, An Equal Opportunity Employer. R.N. – Direct patient care w/sleep clinic. NO LPN!s, APN!s, MA! s. 7:15am to 5-6pm generally, 9am to 1pm sometimes. Ov er t i me av ai l In-state travel 2 - 3 times per mo. requ.. Full benefits. Hrly rate DOE. NO weekends, holidays, or on-call. Fax resumes t o 501-661-1991
Cleo’s Furniture SALES ASSOCIATE Arkansas’ fastest growing furniture company with over 25 years in the business is looking to fi ll a sales position in our Benton location. LIFTING AND MOVING FURNITURE IS REQUIRED Health and Life Insurance, Retirement, Vacations, No Sundays, Excellent Pay, Advancement Available Must apply in person Monday thru Friday 10:00 am to 6:00pm 201 N. Main St. Benton, AR SUBSTITUTE BUS DRIVERS The Bauxite Public School District is seeking qualified applicants for substi- tute bus driving positions for the 2013 - 2014 school year. Applicants must have a CDL and experi- ence as a school bus driver. If interested, please apply for future bus driver positions at: bit.ly/applybauxite WANTED FULLTIME Dental Asst. for practice in Benton, Exp. required. Send Resume to Blind Box 600, Saline Courier P.O. Box 207, Benton, AR. 72018
Instruction AIRLINE CAREERS begin here - Become an Aviation Mainte- nance Tech. FAA ap- proved training. Fi- nancial aid if qualified Housing available. Job placement assis- t ance. Cal l AI M 877-424-4177. CAN YOU DIG IT? – Heavy Equipment Op- erator Career! 3wk Hands On Training School. Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excava- tors. National Certifi- cations. Lifetime Job Pl acement Assi s- tance. VA Benefits Eligible 866-362-6497 Child Care IN-HOME DAYCARE Spotless - Non-smoking Drop-ins Welcome! 778-2920
LICENSED CHILDCARE Infants to 8 B •L• S Vouchers • Drop-Ins 562-0691 • 951-2923
Services *REDUCE YOUR CA- BLE BILL! Get a 4-Room Al l -Di gi tal Satellite system in- stalled FREE Pro- gramming starting at $24.99/mo. FREE HD/DVR Upgrade to new callers, SO CALL NOW (800) 799-4935 *REDUCE YOUR CA- BLE BILL! * Get a whole-home Satellite system installed at NO COST and pro- gramming starting at $19.99/mo. FREE HD/DVR Upgrade. C A L L N O W 1-800-474-0423. DISH TV Retailer - SAVE! St ar t i ng $19.99/month (for 12 months.) FREE Pre- mium Movie Chan- nels. FREE Equip- ment, Installation & Act i vat i on. CALL, COMPARE LOCAL DEALS! 1-800-278-8081 Apartments Unfurnished 2 BR Apts, kit. appl., W&D conn., $500 & up. Handicap access. 317-5190 / 317-5192 2 BR, 1 BA, $500 mo., No Pets, 6 mo. l ease @ 204 N. Fourth St. Benton, Call 501-778-3324 2 BR, 1 BA, kitch. appl., W/D conn., $500 mo., $250 dep. Call between 9am- 8pm, (501)315-9337
Need to publish a Legal Notice in Saline County? We can help...accurate and published 7 days a week... 501-315-8228
Apartments Unfurnished
CAMRY COURT
Now Open in Bryant New Construction 2 BR, 2 BA or 2.5 BA off Wilkerson Rd. on Sadie Dr. (By Hill Farm Elem.) Call Terri the on-site manager for appt. 501-804-0125 Bldg. 1225 #2 or call Dale King 501-539-1935 Visit our web-site www.arkansas apartments.net Want to Downsize Your Gas Guzzler? Sell it in the Courier Classifieds. Call to place your ad today! 315-8228
Apartments Unfurnished NOTICE: All real es- tate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it il- legal to advertise any preference, limitation or di scr i mi nat i on based on race, color, religion, sex, handi- cap, familial status or national origin, or in- tention to make any such preference. We will not knowingly ac- cept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings adver- tised in this newspa- per are available on an equal opportunity basis.
Houses for Rent 3 & 4 BEDROOM $825 -$1400 mo., Haskell, Benton & Bryant. 315-9370 3 BR, 2 BA, Bryant Schools, $1250 mo., $1,000 dep.. Avail August 1st Please Call 501-840-7626 3BR 1.5 BA Newly Remodeled Bryant School Di st r i ct $900mo + $900 Dep Call 501-317-0422 3BR 1BA House, $595 mo., 6mo. lease No Pet s, Cal l 501-778-3324
Eagle Properties LLC 315–2075 Nice 2 & 3 BR Homes from $500 to $925 Apartments 1 BR’s from $415 2 BR’s from $475 *based on availability Deposit & References Required eaglepropsaline.com
FOR LEASE/SALE New 3 & 4 BR, 2 BA, brick, FP, ceiling fans, carpet, 2 car garage, patio. Go to: www. catalyst-residential.com or 501-697-6342
Low Rents GINGLES RENTALS 501-778-2516 unfurnished 2 BR Duplex Apts $280 per mth. 2 BR Homes from $400 per mth for qualified renters References & Deposit Required HASKELL 204 GLENN OAK 3BR, 2 BA, 2 car garage. Nice. $790 mo. $600 dep. 501-847-5377 LRG. 3 BR, 1 BA in Bauxite, on 1 acre, absolutely no pets, $800 mo., $600 dep., (501)332-4073 NEW 4BR 2Ba 2 Car garage Fenced yard 1750sq.ft. $1200mo Benton Schools Call 326-8000 Business Property For Rent BUSINESS PROP- ERTY For Lease 608 S. East Street Office with large parking area Call 315-9337 between 9a&8p Musical Merchandise Cushing Piano Service Tune • Repair Player Pianos & Pump Organs 778-6584 Pets & Supplies BENTON ANIMAL Control & Adoption 501-776-5972 benton.petfinder.com Looking for a good deal? Search the Courier Classifieds!!
Pets & Supplies BRYANT ANIMAL Control & Adoption www.bryant.petfinder.com www.1-800-save-a-pet.com www.1888pets911.org
Produce Produce 840-4076 Home Grown Tomatoes, Purple hull Peas shelled & unshelled, AR Peaches, Squash, & Okra TOMATOES Peaches,Watermelons, Cantaloupes 501-672-2248 Heavy Equip- SURPLUS EQUIP- MENT. Online auc- tions HUGE selection. BIG savi ngs. NO Buyer fees Low Seller f ees BARGAI NS! Register FREE Use Promo Code cnhi313. LIVE support. www.SurplusOnThe.NET 334-215-3019
Autos For Sale 80 CJ7 Jeep Hard Top Doors & Bikini Top $3500 OBO Call 501-454-0551
Autos Wanted DONATE A CAR Humane Society of the United States FREE Next-DAY TOWING! Running or Not. Tax Deductible. Call Before Tax Year Ends! 1-800-418-1562
I Buy Junk Cars free pick-up & Haul all types of scrap metal Call Jerry Toland 332-7202 • 840-6756
Motorcycles
2007 HONDA VTX 1300C Cruiser Like new! Only 10K miles, Removable Windshield, Sissy Bar w/rack $4,600 Pics Available Call 501-993-6284 Houses For Sale NEWER home for lease or lease option. 4 BR, 2 BA, open floor plan. $1,200 mo. Cal l t o s ee. 501-804-4400 Mobile Homes For Sale $$$ 0 DOWN $$$ with your Land! Call 501-653-3201 14X50 3BR 2BA $3500 Down Owner Financed No Credit Needed $600mo Lot Rent Included Newly Remodeled Must Stay in Sherwood Park Call 501-541-6855 FORECLOSED DOUBLEWIDE on Private Lot. Great Schools, Great Location, must sell! 501-653-3201 NEW 4 BR 2 BA Home $39K includes delivery to your prop- erty. Call for Quick Approval 653-3202 Ready to take the Real Estate Plunge? Check out the Homes for Sale in the Classi- fieds daily. Classifieds Work!
Mobile Homes For Sale RENT TO OWN REMODEL/RECONDTION CLEAN/GOOD SHAPE ‘00 16x80 3BR $570-6yrs ‘97 16x80 3BR $570-6yrs ‘95 16x72 2BR $550-6yrs ‘99 16x80 3BR $550-6yrs Includes lot Rent & Ins Lake • Fish • Walk Trail Sunset Lake • 951-2842 Lots & Acreage 20 ACRES FREE! Buy 40 – Get 60 Acr es. $0- Down $198/ mo. Money Back Guarantee, NO CREDIT CHECKS. Beaut i f ul Vi ews. Roads/Surveyed. Near El Paso, Texas. 1-800-843-7537 www.Texaslandbuys. com
33.5 WOODED Acres 5 minutes North of Lake Degray on Hwy 347 Pl ease cal l 501-580-0358 for de- tails Priced for Quick Sale
Business Property For Sale
Turn Key ready restaurant business in Downtown Benton includes like new equipment motivated seller leaveittoliz@aol.com, Real Estate CANCEL YOUR TI MESHARE. NO Risk Program STOP Mortgage & Mainte- nance Payments To- day. 100% Money Back Guarant ee. FREE Consultation. Call Us NOW. We C a n H e l p 1-888-356-5248 Professional Services STOP MORTGAGE & Mai ntenance Pay- ments TODAY! CAN- CEL YOUR TIME- SHARE. NO Risk Pr ogr am 100% Money Back Guaran- tee. FREE Consulta- tion. Call Us NOW. We Can Hel p! 1-800-282-3206 Legal Notices THE OWNERS of the following vehicles must bring proof of ownership to Jones Wrecker Service, Inc., 4315 Alcoa Rd, Benton, AR 72015, (501) 778-1440, No later than 45 days, Sept. 20, 2013, or ownership will be forfeited. 1994 Ford Probe VIN# 1ZVLT22B6R5122101 NOTICE OF SALE On August 15, 2013 at Jones Wrecker Service, Inc., 4315 Alcoa Road, Benton, A R 7 2 0 1 5 , 501-778-1440 at 9 AM, the following vehicle(s): 1995 Dodge 1500 VIN# 1B7HF16Y5SS195525 1999 Chev Cavalier VIN# 1G1JC5247X7142316 2000 Chev Cavalier VIN# 1G1JC1246Y7383391
Give them a little bit of home... Have your hometown newspaper mailed to your favorite student.
Call Today to fnd out how, 315-8228
Page 8 – The Saline Courier
class@bentoncourier.com
Tuesday, August 6, 2013
8B The Saline Courier
Sunday, March 16, 2014
Can you find the hidden words?
Search carefully because some
words are backward or diagonal.
PECTORAL
MONSTER
DORSAL
SHRIMP
CORAL
PLATES
SCALES
HORSE
GRASP
BELLY
PREY
EGGS
BOB
EYES
TAIL
FISH
SEA
FIN
he scientific name for seahorses, “hippocampus,”
comes from the Greek words for “horse” and “sea
monster.” While seahorses may not be horses or
sea monsters, they are one of the more
unusual fishes that are found in
the oceans of our planet.
This edition of Shortcuts is
sponsored by Sea Low Green.
Seahorses do not have stomachs. Because of this,
they must continuously capture and eat prey because
food passes quickly through their digestive systems.
Seahorses feed mainly on brine shrimp and other
small crustaceans. A seahorse may eat as
many as 3,500 brine shrimp in a single day.
Most species of
seahorse are less than
15 cm (6 in.) in length.
The pygmy seahorse is the
smallest species of seahorse.
An adult male is about 1.5 cm
(.6 in.) in length.
The largest species of seahorses
can grow to be more than
30 cm (12 in.) in length.
For more information on seahorses, check out these books: “Seahorses” by Frank Indiviglio (Barron’s) or “Seahorses and Sea Dragons” by Mary Jo Rhodes (Children’s Press). www.shortcutscomic.com Distributed by Universal Uclick for UFS, Inc. © Jeff Harris 2013 5/13
A seahorse’s
pectoral fins are
located on its
head.
Seahorses
do not have
scales. Their bodies
are covered with
hard, bony plates.
How much
does it cost to fall
off a seahorse?
A buck.
Why did the
seahorse cross the road?
To get to the other
tide.
What type
of conversations do
seahorses have?
Deep.
Where
does a seahorse sleep?
In a barn-acle.
This
cartoon has
sunk to new
depths.
All my songs
come straight from the
horse’s mouth.
Can you spot all six differences between these two scenes?
A seahorse
propels itself through
the water by using a small
dorsal fin that is located
on its back.
Seahorses are
able to use their long,
flexible tails to anchor them-
selves in place by grasping
objects like sea grasses
or coral.
Like a
chameleon, a
seahorse can move
each of its eyes
in a different
direction.
For reproduction,
a female seahorse transfers
unfertilized eggs into a special pouch
located on the belly of a male seahorse.
The male carries the eggs until
they hatch.
Seahorses
are one of
the few species
of fish that swim
in an upright
position.
M O O N S O F S A T U R N
C H I P E E R I P P E R S
Y F L Y A L T A S T S A W
Y E A A A C R A S H R T O
O U R R S O O N L P O A T
G O O P C R O P M P H I Y
R C T R A M O I S O I L E
A B C A L L R D B O L Y G
S E E M E H A T O E E G G
P O P O S T R I B S A T S
G
A
M
E
A
N
S
W
E
R
S
:
1
.
E
y
e
s
a
r
e
d
if
f
e
r
e
n
t
.
2
.
H
e
a
r
t
is
m
o
v
e
d
.
3
.
H
e
a
r
t
is
m
is
s
in
g
.
4
.
H
a
ir
is
m
is
s
in
g
.
5
.
M
o
u
t
h
is
d
if
f
e
r
e
n
t
.
6
.
T
a
il
is
d
if
f
e
r
e
n
t
.
S
aline County is
blessed with a cadre
of individuals who
love the area’s past and heri-
tage and they pretty much
gather in one spot 24 hours
a day to not
only discuss
the his-
tory: “Saline
County
Happenings
and
Memories”
on Facebook.
Last count,
more than
1,400 folks
have signed
onto the page
and the num-
ber grows
daily.
Many of these members
go well beyond the talking
and reminiscing stages –
they spend hours and hours
not only mining their caches
of old photos and memora-
bilia, but also take the time
to raid relatives’ pictures
and stuff. A few of the page’s
denizens pride themselves in
that they never leave home
without a scanner when goin’
to see kinfolk. That way,
they can make copies and
leave the originals with the
owners.
Lou Jane Adams Wills (a
former bandmate of mine
back in the day) made quite
a haul when she found a
trove of early photos com-
piled by Uncle Lee Joe Alley
and used with permission of
Ella Ruth Alley.
They then come home
and, in some cases, do a little
digital magic to make old
and blemished photos look
almost new. Some members
– like Glenda Henry Jenkins
– will use their professional
skills at no charge to bring
some photos back from the
dead and sometimes even
give them a color job.
Sources say on the page
there are in excess of 800
photos, drawings, postcards,
etc., related to Benton’s
“old days” and that of other
areas of Saline County. And
while that may seem like
a bonanza unto itself, what
makes these pictures so
wonderful are the thousands
of comments from residents
and former residents whose
memories are sparked by
the images. For a few brief
moments, the fog of time is
rolled away and folks can
recall with clarity an exact
point in time that meant
something to them.
A recent example was a
photograph of the long-gone
Abercrombie Motor Co. on
Military filed by Dean Haley.
There was no date on it, but
big as life were the signs
“Desoto Hotel” and “Desoto
Café” which I am sure
brought many a smile to the
geezer set such as myself.
June Baker Walkord said
in her comment about the
photo, “When I hear Patsy
Cline music, I recall hearing
her songs on the juke box at
the Desoto Café. That really
‘takes me back.’”
Phi Lincoln posted a photo
that suddenly filled in a lot
of memories and questions I
had about my old neighbor-
hood from the time I was
a child. A comment by Tip
Hockersmith, followed up by
a response from Philm filled
in a question I had about an
old steam engine marooned
in a gravel pit near where
Hester Street is now.
The photo elsewhere in
this issue shows a HUGE
pile of gravel with two
“steam shovels” dumping
gravel into a line of small
dump trucks. Phil’s caption
said, “This is gravel mining
in the Tyndall Park-high
school area from the early
1940s. The gentleman stand-
ing on the hill near the
‘dozer is my grandpa, Alf
White; dump truck in center
with man standing out door
is my dad, Philip Lincoln;
truck in front of him is my
Uncle Ralph Steele. Truck
being loaded is also Dad. I
think they were working for
Pine Bluff Sand & Gravel.”
Tip’s comment was: “I
remember railroad tracks
about a mile northeast of the
park. Was that where they
loaded cars? At one time
there was an old engine out
there in the woods; looks
like the one they had at the
park at one time.”
Phil then replied: “Tip,
yes, I remember the engine,
too. I think they worked
the area from Siddell Road
(Benton Parkway now) to
Fourth Street.”
Former football Panther
Jerry Adcock quipped he
now knew “who to cuss” ...
“Awesome pictures! Love
seeing the trucks and other
equipment. It explains a lot.
Now I know who to blame
for the tough running up and
down that hill during football
off-seasons. Thanks for shar-
ing.”
As long as I lived in
Benton I never realized
the park and the high
school area – and I guess
the area around Eastside
Elementary (now Angie
Grant Elementary) – was a
borrow pit at one time. That
old engine was the only clue.
Instead of droning on with
my comments, I’m going
to devote as much space as
I can to photos this week.
But if you have access to
the Internet and Facebook,
I urge you find the Saline
County Happenings and
Memories page and “like” it
to enter this wonderful world
of our past.
While you are at it, apply
to join the “Pick and Shovel”
page. It’s a fantastic store-
house of Bauxite memories.
Saline County blessed with many who revere heritage
DAVID
HUGHES
GET THE
POINT
Photo couertesy of Hazel Smith
An 1896 view of South Street includes, on left, Gingles Department
Store and Bush Drug Store. Acroos the street are a barber shop, City
Bakery owned by Robbert Caldwell, Walter Caldwell’s drygoods store,
and the Bell Building.
Photo courtesy of Martha Ragan
Henry Gingles, standing against pole, is shown at Kelley’s with Mr.
Denton, arms folded.
Photo courtesy of Warren Lee cauffman
Wallace Kauffman and his wife Lena are pictured in front of the Imp
Theatre, the predecessor of the Royal Theatre.
Special to the Saline Courier
De Soto Cafe 1943, showing Mrs. Anna Hemker and daughter, Bobbie Burns Scott.
Special to the Saline Courier
Benton Courier’s publication site under L.B. White.
Special to the Saline Courier
Downtown Benton, Circa 1930.
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