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September 11, 2013

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Courier
JOHNSTON’S
HOME CENTER
1423 Military Rd • Benton, AR 72015 • 501-315-6697
www.johnstonshomecenter.com
Store Hours: Mon-Fri 9-6 • Sat 9-5 • Closed Sunday
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Volume 136
Number 253
1 Section 12 Pages
50¢
Home of Bryan Smart
and E.H. Harrison
The Saline
www. bent oncouri er. com
Wednesday, September 11, 2013
Join us on Facebook and Twitter
Recipes for Life
G
r
i
t
s
&
G
r
a
c
e
Saline County’S newS SourCe SinCe 1876
Kali comes home today
Special parade set for 10:35 a.m. Thursday
Kali Hardig has
defied medical odds
and is being dis-
charged today from
Arkansas Children’s
Hospital in Little Rock.
The 12-year-old
Benton girl is reported
to be the third person in the world
to survive the brain-eating amoeba
that caused her to become ill July
19 following an outing at a Little
Rock water park.
The condition she suffered is
known as primary amoebic memin-
goencephalitis. A then-experimen-
tal drug is credited with killing the
amoeba.
Kali’s miraculous recovery is
being celebrated locally with a
parade involving two schools in the
Benton district.
The procession is sched-
uled to begin at 10:35 a.m. on
Smithers Drive at Howard Perrin
Elementary School, where Kali pre-
viously was a student. The parade
then will proceed to Benton Middle
School, where Kali was scheduled
to begin the fall term in August.
“We’re so excited,” said Sue
Shults, principal of Benton Middle
School.
“The kids have been making
signs and will be bringing bou-
quets for her. They’re going to line
up all the way around the back side
of the school.
“Everyone is so thrilled to have
this kind of resolution to this expe-
rience,” Shults said.
Kali was admitted to the hospital
on July 19 after her mother, Traci
Hardig, took her to the emergency
room for a severe headache, a
temperature of 103 degrees and
vomiting.
Meningitis was suspected from
the start, but physicians did not
know initially that she had con-
tracted the rare form that normally
is fatal.
Dr. Dirk Haselow, Arkansas
state epidemiologist at the
Arkansas Department of Health,
reported that only one person is 33
By Lynda Hollenbeck
lyndahol@yahoo.com
MATCH POINT
BRENT DAVIS/The Saline Courier
Benton tennis player Anna Harcourt returns a shot as she competes in the heat against Pine Bluff on Tuesday at
Tyndall Park.
No vote this week
for $22M veterans
home location
Members of the state legislative task force
designated to choose the location to build a
$22 million veterans home recently predicted
a decision would be made by the end of this
month.
However, no vote is on the agenda for its
meeting scheduled for Thursday, said Sen.
Jane English, chair of the task force.
Although four frontrunners for the site
choice — including a site near the Arkansas
Health Center in Haskell — were announced
in August, the Department of Veterans Affairs,
along with several other state agencies, is
looking at 20 or 25 sites throughout Arkansas,
said Cissy Rucker, director.
“We’re doing our homework,” Rucker said.
Rucker said she was considering the ben-
efit to the community into which the veterans
home is placed, but her “first priority is the
veterans.”
Because of this, Rucker said the commit-
tee is not limiting the choices to the four
announced locations.
Terry Callahan of Saline County, former
commander of VFW Post 2256 and a former
state commander of the organization, serves
on the task force. Callahan completed his
term at the state level on June 30 of this year.
“(Rucker) wants to leave no part of the state
unvisited,” Callahan said. “Everyone wants in
their area, but we want what’s best for veter-
ans.”
According to Rucker, regulations laid
out by the Office of Long Term Care of the
Oklahoma sheriff raises $42,000 for
slain Benton dancer’s scholarship fund
Cleveland County Sheriff Joe Lester
says his agency in Norman, Okla.,
recently helped raise more than
$42,000 for a scholarship in honor of a
University of Oklahoma ballet student
from Benton who was kidnapped and
murdered in 1996.
The funds for the Juli Busken
Memorial Scholarship were raised
at a golf tournament in May, but the
money was not presented to the OU
Foundation until Tuesday of this
week.
On hand for the presentation were
Juli’s parents, Bud and Mary Jean
Busken of Benton.
“We went over Sunday and spent
Boone Road project
issue tabled again
by Bryant Council
Bryant City Council has tabled ordinances
dealing with adding questions to an upcom-
ing special election.
The ordinances considered in a special
meeting Tuesday night referred to using
money generated by extending bond money
to improve Boone Road.
The ordinances will be tabled until
December.
During the August council meeting, the
issued was tabled after the aldermen dis-
cussed possibly using some of the money
generated from the bond to make repairs at
city parks. Aldermen also stated they needed
Juli Busken
By Lynda Hollenbeck
lyndahol@yahoo.com
BUSKEN, page 8
Kali
KALI, page 3
By Sarah Derouen
sderouen@bentoncourier.com
BOONE ROAD, page 3
MISSED PAPERS
CALL
(501) 317-6013
DURING THESE HOURS
5-7 p.m. Monday-Friday
7-9 a.m. Saturday-Sunday
CONTACT US
Phone: (501) 315-8228
Fax: (501) 315-1920
Email: news@bentoncourier.com
Write: P.O. Box 207,
Benton, AR 72018
INDEX
OBITUARIES .............................. 3
OPINIONS .................................. 4
SPORTS .................................. 5,6
CLASSIFIEDS ....................... 9,10
COMICS....................................11
Early voting
continues in
school election
Early voting began
Tuesday for the annual
school election on Sept. 17.
An election worker report-
ed that 175 people cast their
ballots on opening day. This
included 171 voters in the
Benton School District and
four in the Harmony Grove
School District.
These two districts are
the only two to include con-
tested races among Saline
County’s four school dis-
tricts.
In Benton, incumbent Jeff
Morrow is being challenged
by a former board member,
Peggy Butler, for Position
6; and Greg Gillis and
Jarrod Hambric are seeking
Position 4, currently held by
Dr. Joe Felan, who did not
seek re-election.
In Harmony Grove,
Charles “Buck” Burchfield is
seeking another term and is
being challenged by Maria
Allred.
In Bauxite, Michael
Vocque is the only candidate
for Position 4, now held by
Mike Parsons.
In Bryant, David L.
Moore, who serves in the
Zone 4 position, filed for
another term.
All early voting is being
conducted in the “vote here”
election center. Early voting
continues from 8 a.m. to 4:30
p.m. today, Thursday, Friday
and Monday.
On Tuesday, polls will
open at 7:30 a.m. and close
at 7:30 p.m.
The Benton sites include:
Herzfeld Library, Ralph
Bunche Community Center,
First Baptist Church Family
Life Center, Calvary Baptist
Church and Ten Mile Baptist
Church.
In the Harmony Grove
District, the only polling site
is Haskell Fire Station.
Since there are no con-
tested races in Bauxite and
Bryant, only early voting and
absentee voting will be con-
ducted in those districts.
By Lynda Hollenbeck
lyndahol@yahoo.com
By Jennifer Joyner
jjoyner@bentoncourier.com
VET HOME, page 8
2 The Saline Courier
Wednesday, September 11, 2013
620 W. South St. • Benton • 778-3151 or 778-1166
MON. - SAT. 8am - 9pm & SUN. 12pm - 9pm
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We offer expert alterations on all clothing.
Tues-Thurs 9-5:30 • Fri. 10-5:30
211 E. Carpenter, Benton
(behind KFC) • 778-6073
Welcomes Charlotte Murray to
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Monday–Friday
11am–4pm
99
1304 Military Rd, Benton—501-778-0934
Family Practice Associates
Monday, August 5 at 5:30pm and 6:00pm
Saturday, August 17 at 10am
Thursday, August 22 at 5:30pm and 6:00pm
Tuesday, August 27 at noon
We now offer a medically managed meal replacement
weight loss program! Designed for patients with 30 or
more pounds to lose. Current patients or new patients
are welcome. High protein, low calorie diet with proven
results! Come to one of our interest meetings held at our
office; upcoming meetings are scheduled for:
Visit www.FPABenton.com for more information!
1304 Military Rd, Benton—501-778-0934
Family Practice Associates
Monday, August 5 at 5:30pm and 6:00pm
Saturday, August 17 at 10am
Thursday, August 22 at 5:30pm and 6:00pm
Tuesday, August 27 at noon
We now offer a medically managed meal replacement
weight loss program! Designed for patients with 30 or
more pounds to lose. Current patients or new patients
are welcome. High protein, low calorie diet with proven
results! Come to one of our interest meetings held at our
office; upcoming meetings are scheduled for:
Visit www.FPABenton.com for more information!
1304 Military Rd, Benton—501-778-0934
Family Practice Associates
Monday, August 5 at 5:30pm and 6:00pm
Saturday, August 17 at 10am
Thursday, August 22 at 5:30pm and 6:00pm
Tuesday, August 27 at noon
We now offer a medically managed meal replacement
weight loss program! Designed for patients with 30 or
more pounds to lose. Current patients or new patients
are welcome. High protein, low calorie diet with proven
results! Come to one of our interest meetings held at our
office; upcoming meetings are scheduled for:
Visit www.FPABenton.com for more information!
Weight Loss Program
Thursday, September 5 at noon
Sunday, September 8 at 2pm
Tuesday, September 17 at 5:30pm and 6pm
Thursday, September 26 at noon
Layla’s
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Little Rock | Rodney Parham 227-7272 & Ranch Blvd. 868-8226
Conway | Oak Street 205-8224
Lunch Special M - F
Gyro Sandwhich, Fries & Drink $6.90
Gyro | Hummus | Tabbouleh | Baba Ghannouj
Pizza | Calzone | Mediterranean Salad
TODAY
DOWN ON THE FARM STORY
TIME AND CRAFTS: Kids ages
3-5 are invited to enjoy a
farm-themed story time at
10:30 a.m. Wednesday, Sept.
11 and Thursday, Sept. 12 at
Herzfeld Library. Make-and-
take farm crafts will be avail-
able for all ages from 3-8 p.m.
(same dates). Call 778-4766
for more information.
NATIONAL DAY OF SERVICE
and Remembrance will be
held Wednesday, Sept. 11
at 11 a.m. for AR REALTORS.
The ceremony will be at
1520 Glory Cove in Habitat
for Humanity’s Partnership
Village. Lunch will be served
by Hot Dog Mike.
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 12
SOUTHWEST WATER USERS
Board Meeting is set for
Thursday, Sept. 12 at 6
p.m. at 620 Airlane Drive in
Benton.
SALINE COUNTY RETIRED
TEACHER ASSOCIATION
(SCRTA) will meet Sept.
12 at 10 a.m. at Ed & Kay’s
Restaurant. Members are
asked to bring washing
powder and/or bar soap for
C-JOHN. Any retired teachers
interested in joining are also
welcome to come.
DOWN ON THE FARM STORY
TIME AND CRAFTS: Kids ages
3-5 are invited to enjoy a
farm-themed story time at
10:30 a.m., Thursday, Sept.
12 at Herzfeld Library. Make-
and-take farm crafts will be
available for all ages from 3-8
p.m. (same dates). Call 778-
4766 for more information.
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 14
APOSTLES BUILD: Habitat
for Humanity and local
churches across Saline
County will break ground on
the 8th Apostle Build home
September 14-20. Please join
Habitat and local churches
on the construction site. Visit
www.habitatsalinecountyar.
org for more information.
RAPER FAMILY REUNION will
be held at 10 a.m., Saturday,
September 14 at Mary
McKennley Park on Hwy. 229
in Haskell. The reunion will
begin at 10 a.m., with a pot
luck luncheon at noon. For
more information call Barbara
Hilborn at 501-778-8733 or
Betty Blair 501-778-3923.
13TH ANNUAL LAKE NORRELL
Fire Department Fish Fry is
set for Saturday, Sept. 14 at 5
p.m. at the lake’s community
center and will be catered
by Riverside Grocery. It will
be all you can eat and there
will also be a live action. For
more information call Fire
Chief Ronnie Forsyth at 860-
4456 or Barbara Howell at
681-7577.
AFFORDABLE CARE ACT
CLASSES: The Saline County
Library will host pub-
lic classes regarding the
Affordable Care Act pre-
sented by Arkansas Health
Connector and The Living
Affected Corporation at 10
a.m. Saturday, Sept. 14 at
Boswell Library in Bryant and
at 1 p.m. at Herzfeld Library
in Benton. No registration is
required. Call 778-4766 for
more information.
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16
BOOK SIGNING: Local award-
winning author Carla Killough
McClafferty will discuss and
sign copies of her latest non-
fiction work “Fourth Down
and Inches: Concussions and
Football’s Make-or-Break
Moment” at 6 p.m. Monday,
Sept. 16 at Herzfeld Library in
Benton. The program is open
to all ages on a first-come
basis. Copies of her work will
be available for purchase at
the event. Call 778-4766 for
more information.
GAME ON!:Tweens and teens
are invited to play video and/
or board games from 3:30
p.m.- 5 p.m. Monday, Sept. 16
at both Saline County Library
locations. The program is for
ages 8-18 at Boswell Library
and ages 13-18 at Herzfeld
Library. Call 778-4766 or 847-
2166 for more information.
 
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17
PUPPET SHOW: All ages are
invited to a family-friendly
puppet show at 4 p.m.
Tuesday, Sept. 17 at Herzfeld
Library. Call 778-4766 for
more information.
BRYANT HISTORICAL SOCIETY
will have its monthly meeting
on Tuesday, Sept. 17, at 6:30
p.m. in the Mabel Boswell
Memorial Library in Bryant
on Prickett Road. The society
meets the third Tuesday of
every month at the library.
We encourage those students
or other individuals that are
interested in preserving the
history and heritage of Bryant
to join us at this meeting.
 
WEDNESDAY,
SEPTEMBER 18
BLOCK PARTY LIBRARY
LEGO CLUB: Ages 4 to 14
are invited to create a Lego
masterpiece from 3:30 - 5
p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 18 at
Boswell Library during the
monthly Block Party. A new
theme will be explored each
month. Call 847-2166 for
more information.
INTRODUCTION TO
COMPUTERS: Ages 18 and
older are invited to attend an
introductory computer class
at 6 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 18
at Herzfeld Library. This class
includes information such as
learning to use a mouse and
keyboard. No registration
required. Call 778-4766 for
more information.
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19
INTRODUCTION TO THE
INTERNET: Ages 18 and older
are invited to attend a basic
computer class regarding
use of the internet at 6 p.m.
Thursday, Sept. 19 at Herzfeld
Library. No registration
required. Call 778-4766 for
more information.
SHARON EXTENSION
HOMEMAKERS Club will
meet 10:00 a.m. Thursday,
September 19 at the Saline
County Fairgrounds.
PUBLIC SPEAKING
WORKSHOP: The Saline
County Library has part-
nered with a local branch of
Toastmasters International to
offer a two-part workshop on
public speaking beginning at
6 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 19 at
Boswell Library in Bryant. The
second session will meet at
6 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 26 at
the same time and location.
Attendance is first come, first
served and is open to ages 18
and older.
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 21
MOVIE IN THE PARK: “Wreck
It Ralph” will be shown at the
Tyndall Park amphitheater in
Benton on Saturday, Sept. 21
at 8 p.m. Admission is free.
Concessions will be available
for purchase.
THEOS, A SUPPORT
GROUP FOR WIDOWS AND
WIDOWERS:will meet for
lunch, 11:30 a.m. Saturday,
September 21 at Colton’s.
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 23
CIVIL WAR dances of the time
period will be held Monday,
Sept. 23. The Historic
Washington Dancers from
Old Washington, Ark. will
be at Herzfeld Library, 1800
Smithers Drive in Benton
to perform such dances as
the Virginia Reel and other
Civil War period dances.  The
program will begin at 6:30
p.m. The dancers will be
dressed in Civil War period
costume and perform these
dances.  Make plans now to
attend. 
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24
HASKELL HISTORICAL
SOCIETY will meet on
Tuesday, Sept. 24 at 2:30
p.m. at Haskell City Hall. The
public is invited to attend
and bring old items, news
articles or pictures to be cop-
ied, loaned or donated. For
more information call Darlene
Emmons at 501-315-2913 or
Emaline Stroud at 501-303-
0384.
Saline county eventS
Email calendar items to news@bentoncourier.com or call 501-315-8228 ext. 234.
Calendar items are intended for nonprofit organizations.
Saline courier ScraPBook 1987
Benton Police
Department:
Tuesday
•A man reported his
necklace had been stolen
from his boss’s truck.
•A woman reported an
individual stole $300 worth
of items from her home at
the Castle Oak Apartments
after she asked the person
to get money from the home
to bail her out of jail.
•Officers spoke with a
woman at the Saline County
Sheriff’s Office where she
reported her car was stolen.
•A man came to the
police station to report
someone stole his lawnmow-
er from his carport.
•A man was arrested
near McAlister’s Deli for
terroristic threatening after
threatening another driver
with a gun.
•A man was arrested for
third-degree domestic bat-
tery after he struck his girl-
friend during an argument
on on Troutt Street.
Saline County
Sheriff’s Office:
Tuesday
•A woman reported
someone broke into her
vehicle on North Sardis
Road in Mabelvale.
•A man reported some-
one stole his wallet with
$100 from his vehicle
on South Sardis Road in
Bauxite.
•A man reported a
lawnmower stolen from his
house on Reeves Road in
Alexander.
•A woman reported
her home was broken into
on North Sardis Road in
Mabelvale.
•A man reported his
home was broken into on
Lucinda Lane in Mabelvale.
•An employee at the
Arch Street Shell on Arch
Street Pike reported that an
individual drove off without
paying for fuel.
Daily DiSPatcH
Daily Dispatch is published daily in The Saline Courier as
reports are received from local law enforcement agencies. Daily
Dispatch articles are edited for brevity and relevancy, and con-
tain only information provided by law enforcement. Content
written by Sarah Derouen, a reporter for The Saline Courier.
Chief praises
findings in
shooting case
Blytheville Police Chief
Ross Thompson said he’s
confident in the findings of
Prosecutor Scott Ellington
in regard to the officer-
involved shooting death
that occurred in May.
Thompson said Tuesday
he was confident that the
investigation conducted by
Ellington and the Arkansas
State Police would find no
wrongdoing on the part of
Officer Stephen Sigman,
who Ellington said was jus-
tified in his use of deadly
force against Terrence
Dawson during the inci-
dent.
“I am relieved that the
investigation into this
tragic event is closed,”
Thompson said. “I had
no doubt the State Police
and Mr. Ellington would
reach the findings they did
and I am thankful for their
efforts.
Saline Courier Photo
Saline County Judge Parker Johnston pets a once-abandoned cat and urges county residents to treat
animals with compassion during Be Kind to Animals Week, which begins Sunday and continues
through the following Saturday.
Judge in Hastings case
again asked to recuse
LITTLE ROCK — A law-
yer for a former Little Rock
police officer charged with
manslaughter is again ask-
ing the trial judge to step
away from the case.
Attorney Bill James on
Tuesday asked Circuit Judge
Wendell Griffen to recuse
from presiding at Josh
Hastings’ trial, which is set
to begin Monday.
Griffen denied a previous
request by James that he
step aside, claiming there
was no evidence he’s biased.
James renewed the request
on grounds that Griffen
didn’t copy him on a note
in which the judge asked
prosecutors whether James
was on time in turning over
information about an expert
witness.
associated Press
associated Press
Wednesday, September 11, 2013
The Saline Courier 3
RobeRson & AssociAtes insuRAnce
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John Lanier in Revival/Concert
Date: Sun. Sept. 15
th
- 18
th
Pickin’ n Grinin’ - Sept 17
th
Place: Benton Foursquare Church
Military @ Tomas Roads
(Pastor Dr. David Brewer)
Time: Sun 10:45 AM & 6 PM
Mon-Wed 7PM
John Lanier is an inspiring and anointed man of God known for his dynamic preaching and
singing. As a singer, John exuberates the joy of serving Jesus and encourages believers to
worship freely, inviting the Holy Spirit to work in their lives. John has 23 recordings to his credit,
including 10 videos. He has appeared on two of the nationally televised ‘Gaither Homecoming’
series. In 1999, John hosted the ‘Millennium Tour of the Holy Land’, where his performance of
the hit song, “Jerusalem” was flmed on location and broadcast in Europe. John is also a featured
recording artist on the annualSGM FanFair and “Victory Voyage” Christian cruise.
For more information Contact Wilds and Associates
(205) 662-4826 or www.wildsandassociates.com
OBITUARIES
Old traditions relived at County Fair
Special to The Saline Courier
Phil the pig was named Grand Champion Market Hog at this year’s
Saline County Fair. Showing Phil is Will Tudor.
Special to The Saline Courier
Showing off animals at the fair is always a big hit for patrons.
Showing goats at the Market Goat show from left, are Tanner
Harper, Brayden Adams, Will Tudor and Riley Townsend.
Special to The Saline Courier
CJ Harvey and David McCullough smile for the camera before
enjoying a ride at this year’s fair.
Special to The Saline Courier
Blake Askew shows the Grand Champion Market Steer during
the fair last week. The steer was purchased by N & D Technical
Services. Pictured with Askew is Debbie Barnett, co-owner of
N & D.
Adrein Gregory ‘Greg’ Land
Adrein Gregory “Greg” Land, 49, passed away Sunday,
Sept. 8, 2013 at Springdale.
He was born Aug. 10, 1964, in Westminster, Calif., to Otto
Adrein Land and Gara King Land.
Greg was a member of the First Presbyterian
Church of Benton. He was a 1983 graduate
of Benton High School, where he lettered in
football and track. Greg was voted outstanding
athlete his senior year.
Beginning a long career with the railroad at
the age of 19 in Atlanta, Texas, he also worked
in Alabama and Arkansas for Rail Switching
Services and Arkansas Missouri Railroad. Greg
enjoyed hunting, fishing, spending time with family and
friends, and playing with his little dog, Sweet Pea.
Greg is survived by his son, Keaton Land of Little Rock;
his parents, Otto and Gara Land of Benton; his sister, Katie
Land of Carencro, La.; and a special friend, Sandra Green of
Springdale.
A graveside memorial service will be held at 10 a.m.
Saturday at Hunnicutt Cemetery, 3798 Moss Road in Benton,
with the Rev. Carlton Cross and the Rev. Jerry Whitley offi-
ciating.
Visitation will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday, Sept. 13 at
Ashby Funeral Home.
Online guest book: http://www.ashbyfuneralhome.com.
Bernice Juanita Taylor VanDusen
Bernice Juanita Taylor VanDusen, 97, of Haskell passed
away Tuesday, Sept. 10, 2013. Bernice was born Oct. 20,
1915, in Tinsman to Mae and Auburn Taylor.
Bernice was more of a tomboy than a prin-
cess and ran barefoot through the dirt roads
in Tinsman where she was raised. She helped
tend the family garden and worked in the cotton
fields when she was very young. She read her
Bible daily and loved to read home and garden
magazines. Horses were her favorite animals.
Bernice was known especially for being
meek and humble. She was known as the family
“Prayer Warrior.”
She had two children, seven grandchildren, 22 great-
grandchildren, and eight great-great-grandchildren. Every
single one of them adored her. Except for God, she loved
her family first. Bernice was the very essence and definition
of goodness, decency, compassion and humility.
Bernice was predeceased by her parents; and her hus-
band of 30 years Ralph T. VanDusen.
She is survived by a daughter, Linda L. Boyett of Haskell;
a son, Guy M. VanDusen of Haskell; two brothers, A.W.
Taylor of Van Buren and O.B. Taylor of Little Rock; a sister
Carrie B. Bost of Waxhaw, N.C.; seven grandchildren; 22
great-grandchildren; and eight great-great-grandchildren.
Funeral service will be held at 3 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 12,
at Atkinson Funeral Home with the Rev. Henry Hunt officiat-
ing. Burial will follow at Oakridge Cemetery. Arrangements
are by Atkinson Funeral Home in Malvern.
Visitation will be held from 2 to 3 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 12,
at the funeral home.
Online guestbook: www.atkinsonfuneralhome.net.
Land
VanDusen
PAID OBITUARIES
a better plan before bring-
ing the issue to the public.
During the special meet-
ing Tuesday, this same
issue came up again.
After a two-hour long
workshop in which the
aldermen heard from rep-
resentatives of the differ-
ent athletic associations
and organizations that
use Bishop and Midland
parks, Garver and Garver
Engineers and the public,
the aldermen once again
decided that they needed
a better plan with definite
numbers before bringing
the issue to voters.
Bryant Mayor Jill Dabbs
was not in attendance.
Steven Glenn, a mem-
ber of the board of direc-
tors of the Bryant Athletic
Association, spoke to the
council about the needs
of the parks, saying that
$6 million is needed for
improvements and mainte-
nance.
With this money, the
parks could be updated to
qualify for hosting a world
series at the park, he said.
Glenn said he spoke with
Dabbs several months ago
about this bond. He says the
parks were supposed to be
included in the ordinances
from the beginning.
If the council grants the
parks $6 million, about $9
million will be available to
use for Boone Road.
Todd Mueller, a repre-
sentative from Garver and
Garver, told the council
about a simpler design
for the road. This design
Mueller proposes includes
a three-lane roadway from
Reynolds Road to Mt.
Carmel Road at a cost of
$11 million. This design can
all be fit into the 60 feet of
right of way on the street,
meaning that the city would
not have to buy property
from the residents, said
Monty Ledbetter, director of
public works.
Council members were
not receptive to this pro-
posal, indicating they want
a simpler design — a two-
lane road with turning lanes
at four busy areas.
After asking Garver and
Garver to design another
plan, council members
asked about the design
costs, which Mueller said
amounts to around $12,000.
“We can’t spend $300,000
on a project that we are
going to bring to voters,”
said Ledbetter.
Ledbetter advised the
aldermen that it would be
better to spend the money
on designs after voters
approve the project.
For this issue to be on
the May ballot, the ordi-
nances must be approved by
around February, said Ryan
Bowman, who was answer-
ing legal questions for the
council during the meeting.
Even though this issue
will not be on the ballot in
November, there still will
be a special election on
one question about the use
of funds in a bond issue
already allocated to the fire
department to improve two
smaller fire stations in the
city.
Boone Road
From page 1
million contracts the deadly
amoeba, although it is pres-
ent in many bodies of water
in Arkansas.
He explained that the
organism involved in this
illness infects people by
entering the body through
the nose and travels to the
brain.
He noted that it typi-
cally occurs when people
are swimming or diving in
warm freshwater places.
Once the amoeba enters
the brain, it causes the usu-
ally fatal infection common-
ly known as PAM, Haselow
said.
“The chance of contract-
ing this is about one in 33
million,” he said.
“It’s similar to the risk of
being struck by lightning
twice in the same place.”
The water park where
Kali had been swimming
was closed voluntarily by
its owners, after it was
reported that a similar case
was traced to that location
in 2010. At that time, it
was the first known case in
“roughly 10 years to have
origin there.”
The 2010 victim did not
survive, authorities report-
ed.
“Unfortunately, this
organism is found in most
rivers and springs in
Arkansas,” Haselow said.
“It’s not that unusual for it
to be present, but what is
unusual is for it to cause ill-
ness.”
Kali’s recovery is attrib-
uted to what was then an
experimental drug imported
from Germany. The same
medication was used to
treat a Florida child who
also contracted the parasite,
but it reportedly was not
administered in time to save
him.
The drug killed the
amoeba, but the boy did not
recover. However, because
the drug is believed to
have killed the parasite
in both his and Kali’s
cases, the Food and Drug
Administration removed it
from experimental status
and it is now an approved
treatment, Traci Hardig told
the Saline Courier.
Throughout the experi-
ence, she and other mem-
bers of the family have
expressed appreciation for
the overwhelming, wide-
spread support they have
received throughout the
ordeal.
She said they appreciated
all forms of support, but
especially the prayers that
were offered for Kali from
throughout the country.
Throughout the ordeal
Traci Hardig has been con-
ducting her own personal
battle with the cancer she
was first diagnosed with in
2005.
When the malignancy
resurfaced early in the
summer, she contacted
the American Red Cross to
bring her husband, Joseph,
home from Kuwait, where
he was serving a military
deployment.
Traci Hardig’s treatment
is being continued in Little
Rock through collabora-
tion between her doctors
and M.D. Anderson Cancer
Center in Houston.
Kali
From page 1
“Congress shall make no law ... abridging the freedom
of speech, or of the press ... .”
— From the First Amendment to Constitution
I
t’s been interesting to hear the debate over
whether to hold University of Arkansas football
games in Little Rock each year. There were
more than 9,000 unsold tickets for last Saturday’s
game at War Memorial Stadium against Samford.
The debate on sports talk radio centered on whether
Little Rock is being “punished” by hosting an out-
of-conference patsy game, rather than a marquee
match-up.
One radio host who has been around a while
explained that there “would be” 9,000 people outside
War Memorial Stadium during the game. Basically, a
tailgate party without the cost of a ticket.
When I was a season ticket holder at OU, I gen-
erally pawned off my tickets for teams like North
Texas, Cincinnati or any directional
school to someone who had never
seen the Sooners play live. There just
wasn’t enough interest in patsy games
for me to pay for parking, fight the
crowds or sit in the heat to watch a
blowout.
I’m sure this debate between
Fayetteville and Little Rock will con-
tinue. It’s an interesting situation
unique to the Razorbacks. I do know
Arkansas isn’t the only school strug-
gling to fill seats for warm-up games
– regardless of where they are played.
There’s a recession on, after all.
If the SEC game in Little Rock
doesn’t sell out, this argument will
move to a whole new level.
****
The Bryant Hornet faithful packed the visitor
stands at John McConnell Stadium in Conway last
Friday night. The Hornets dropped their season
opener, but they got great support from the fans.
They stayed until the end and made their presence
known in the fourth quarter, when the Hornets tried
to make a game of it.
Turns out, the slow start was just too much to
overcome.
Conway had plenty of parking, a luxury Hornet
fans won’t have this week at Little Rock Central. I’m
having my wife drop me off early, and pick me up
after the game. There can’t be more than 100 or so
parking spaces around the stadium there.
****
Sheriff Pennington kept everyone off balance
over the past few weeks. He resigned, delayed that
resignation, and then decided to stick out the rest of
his term before ultimately going back to his original
retirement date of Oct. 1.
Now that the position has been declared vacant,
the candidates are lining up. There’s still no word on
who the interim sheriff will be. By law that person
can’t run next year.
****
Got my first look at Hurricane Golf and Country
Club last week in the Swing Fore Saline tourna-
ment to benefit the hospital’s foundation. It’s a very
nice course, with a lot of subtle hazards. I especially
enjoyed the layout around the greens.
We didn’t play that well (66), but we had a blast.
The driving range was a first for me. I’ve never
seen a range where the target is water. The range
balls float, and move to a cove for retrieval. It’s prob-
ably a very good, efficient system. It’s just not for me.
I find enough water on the course accidentally with-
out practicing my way into it.
Steve Boggs is pubisher of The Saline Courier. He
can be reached at publisher@bentoncourier.com.
L
indsey Graham, perhaps the
Senate’s leading hawk on
military intervention in Syria,
says the most important part of U.S.
strategy there is “supporting vet-
ted opposition forces.” Bob Corker,
ranking Republican on the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee, says
he is dismayed by “the lack of sup-
port we are giving to the vetted mod-
erate opposition.”
The committee’s
amendment to the
intervention resolu-
tion, authored by
John McCain, calls
for strengthening
the “vetted elements
of Syrian opposition
forces.”
In Washington, use
of the word “vetting”
is usually confined
to unknown political
candidates and cabinet nominees. So
what is this vetting in Syria everyone
is talking about? Is the U.S. govern-
ment requiring opposition fighters to
fill out questionnaires? Show photo
ID? Hand over bank statements and
tax returns?
Whatever it is doing -- a good bit
of it is classified -- the Obama admin-
istration, along with some supporters
on Capitol Hill, claims its vetting
can distinguish the good guys from
the brutal jihadist killers among
the Syrian rebels. But some key
members of Congress remain very
concerned.
“In places like Syria, vetting can
be unreliable and inconsistent,”
Republican Rep. Michael McCaul,
chairman of the House Homeland
Security Committee, told me via
email recently. “So far, the adminis-
tration has not made a compelling
case that it can differentiate between
the factions, or that it even knows
the makeup of the factions. The con-
clusions it has drawn as a result of
its vetting are in stark contrast to the
briefings I’ve received, and I remain
concerned that a large part of these
rebels pose a great threat to our
interests.”
The true nature of the Syrian reb-
els has turned into perhaps the piv-
otal issue in the intervention debate.
Among the many question that oppo-
nents of intervention have, perhaps
the most fundamental is this: Who
are we helping?
The question came up when
Secretary of State John Kerry recent-
ly visited both House and Senate
foreign affairs committees. And it
became clear that there are stark dif-
ferences in opinion -- and “opinion”
seems the right word -- over who is
who in the Syrian opposition.
“Who are the rebel forces?”
asked McCaul, who receives clas-
sified briefings in his role with the
Homeland Security Committee.
“Every time I get briefed on this it
gets worse and worse, because the
majority now of these rebel forces
-- and I say majority now -- are radical
Islamists pouring in from all over the
world to come to Syria for the fight.”
Kerry strongly disputed McCaul’s
question. “I just don’t agree that a
majority are al-Qaida and the bad
guys,” he told McCaul. “That’s
not true. There are about 70,000
to 100,000 oppositionists, about
somewhere, maybe 15 percent to
25 percent might be in one group
or another who are what we would
deem to be bad guys.”
McCaul would not accept Kerry’s
numbers. “The briefings I’ve
received, unless I’ve gotten different
ones or inaccurate briefings, are 50
percent and rising,” he said. “These
fighters coming globally are not com-
ing in as moderates. They are com-
ing in as jihadists.”
McCaul later said he was
“stunned” by Kerry’s assertion.
When it comes to how many Syrian
rebels are good and how many are
bad, the U.S. government cannot
come to agreement with itself.
Kerry explained that he has met
several times with opposition leaders
in the last year. “They have evolved
... significantly,” he said. “Are they
where they need to be? Not com-
pletely. But they have changed mark-
edly over the course of the last few
months.”
The rebels, many of whom are
militantly Islamist, are now inclusive,
Kerry claimed. “At our insistence
... they reached out and expanded
significantly their base within Syria.
They elected new leadership. They
brought in a much broader base
of Syrian representation, includ-
ing women, including minorities,
Christians, others.”
After Kerry spoke, Deputy
National Security Adviser Tony
Blinken told Fox News the adminis-
tration is working with the “moderate
opposition” and aims to “make sure
that not only our assistance but the
assistance of other countries goes to
them and stays away from the radical
extreme opposition.”
In the next moment, Blinken con-
ceded, “It’s not a perfect science.”
No, it’s not. Are violent jihadists
one-quarter of the rebel forces, or
one-half, or something else? No one
seems to know.
The problem intensified with the
circulation of a video showing Syrian
rebels summarily executing captured
government soldiers. There are other
such videos around -- the incident
was in no way the first example of
rebel viciousness -- but the pictures
seemed to highlight the dilemma
as the intervention debate rages on
Capitol Hill. The Syrian civil war is
a very ugly thing for the U.S. to be
involved in, no matter how much vet-
ting goes on first.
Byron York is chief political cor-
respondent for The Washington
Examiner.
How do we tell good
guys from bad in
Syrian opposition?
EDITORIAL CARTOON
I
n the 1999 movie “The Wild Wild
West,” the character of President
Grant tells the fictional movie hero
Jim West:
“Mr. West, not every situation requires
your patented approach of shoot first,
shoot later, and shoot some more and then
when everybody’s dead
try to ask a question or
two.”
That’s funny in a com-
edy movie, but not in real
life.
In a recent radio
interview, the Chicago
Superintendent of Police
basically gave his police
officers an order to use
the “Jim West” approach.
The superintendent
of police is Garry F.
McCarthy, who was
appointed by Mayor
Rahm Emanuel. That’s
the same Emanuel who was the first White
House Chief of Staff for Barack Obama.
McCarthy went on a local radio sta-
tion to discuss how unhappy he is that
the Illinois Legislature had enacted a
concealed carry law. That law is one of
the weakest in the nation, but it made
McCarthy unhappy that ordinary, law-abid-
ing citizens now had the right to be armed
on his crime-ridden streets.
Chicago has the strictest gun-control
laws in the country. “Assault weapons” and
high-capacity magazines are completely
banned, and up until a 2010 U.S. Supreme
Court decision, handguns were banned.
Residents now can get a permit to own
a gun, but the process requires training,
background checks and a firearm owner’s
identification card
In his radio interview, McCarthy issued
a stern warning that he expects the new
law will create more incidents of police-on-
civilian shootings.
“You put more guns on the street,
expect more shootings. I don’t care if
they’re licensed legal firearms, people who
are not highly trained… putting guns in
their hands is a recipe for disaster. So I’ll
train our officers that there is a concealed
carry law, but when somebody turns with
a firearm in their hand, the officer does not
have an obligation to wait to get shot to
return fire and we’re going to have trage-
dies as a result of that. I’m telling you right
up front,” McCarthy said.
Let’s say you are in Chicago and you’re
legally armed and someone tries to steal
your wife’s purse or rob you. You use your
pistol to stop a crime and hold the would-
be robber for the police. The police arrive,
see you with a gun, they don’t ask ques-
tions — they just shoot you.
The superintendent said there are
already too many incidents of police shoot-
ing innocent and unarmed citizens and he
expects people with concealed carry per-
mits will make that worse.
“Police officers make mistakes all the
time. We spend six months in the police
academy, six months of field training and
ongoing training on a regular basis and the
fact is once in a while we’re going to shoot
someone with a cell phone; we’re going to
shoot somebody with a flashlight and none
of that is okay. But now you take John Q.
Civilian, you give them six weeks or 10
weeks of training and you say ‘have at it?’”
McCarthy said.
Since McCarthy works for a mayor who
once worked for the most anti-Second
Amendment President in history, it isn’t
had to guess the superintendent’s politics
on private ownership of firearms.
Here are two quotes from that radio
interview:
“You say concealed carry, I say Trayvon
Martin.”
“The fact is more guns are not the solu-
tion to the firearm gun violence problem
in this country. Less guns and reasonable
gun laws are,”
The superintendent’s last argument is
not supported by the facts. When states
pass concealed carry law, crime goes
down. When criminals know the average
man or woman on the street is unarmed,
they feel empowered. When criminals
have to look at a potential victim and won-
der is he or she armed, it creates a hostile
work environment for law breakers.
McCarthy’s city already has one of
the highest murder rates in the nation.
Chicago’s murder rate is far worse now
than it was during the days of Al Capone.
The problem isn’t citizens exercising
their Second Amendment rights. The prob-
lem here is a police superintendent who is
dead wrong in his thinking.
He admits that his police officers shoot
far too many people they shouldn’t. That
doesn’t seem to concern him very much.
He says people protecting themselves
from criminals is a danger to public safety.
There is an old saying,” When seconds
count, the police are minutes away.”
The major problem is that most gun-
related deaths in Chicago are gang and
drug related and yet the Superintendent’s
concern is people with concealed carry
permits.
McCarthy is afraid that having the aver-
age citizen armed will turn Chicago into
the Wild West. He needs to look around.
Under his administration, it already is the
wild, wild west.
Patrick Rhodes is chairman of the
Republican Party of Saline County.
Chicago is the
new wild west
Razorbacks not the
only team struggling
to fill stadium for
warm-up games
• The Saline Courier (USPS 050-660) is published daily by Horizon Publishing Co., 321
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©Copyright 2006 Horizon Publishing Co.
Columns and cartoons on the opinion page do not necessarily reflect
opinions of The Saline Courier. Weekend delivery times are no later than
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scheduled from 5 to 7 p.m. Monday-Friday and from 7 to 9 a.m. Saturday
and Sunday. Call 501-317-6013 or 501-315-8228 during business hours.
The Saline Courier
Founded in 1876
Phone: (501) 315-8228 • Fax: (501) 315-1230 • Email: news@bentoncourier.com
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Brent DaVis • editor
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Byron
york
Steve
BoggS
Page 4 – The Saline Courier
news@bentoncourier.com Wednesday, September 11, 2013
OpiniOn
Patrick
rhodeS
Conservative
Corner
Breaking
news
www.bentoncourier.com
SportS
Wednesday, September 11, 2013
news@bentoncourier.com The Saline Courier – Page 5
saline
scoreboard
TUESDAY
Volleyball
Benton def. JA Fair 3-0
Bryant def. Ark. Baptist 3-0
Golf
Benton (B) def. Maumelle/F.
Lake (Links); Girls 2nd
Tennis
Pine Bluff def. Benton
THURSDAY
Volleyball
Benton at Sheridan, 5 p.m.
Bryant vs. JA Fair, 5 p.m.
Golf
Benton at Sheridan, (North Hills)
Bryant at Sheridan, (North Hills)
Cross Country
Benton at Bryant Invitational
(At Bishop Park)
Jr. Girls 4 p.m.
Jr. Boys 4:30 p.m.
Sr. Girls 5 p.m.
Sr. Boys 5:30 p.m.
Football
Jr. Benton at Conway W, 5:30
Jr. Bryant vs. Cabot N, 7 p.m.
FRIDAY
Football
Benton at Jacksonville, 7 p.m.
Bryant at LR Central, 7 p.m.
Bauxite at Glen Rose, 7 p.m.
BHG vs. Gurdon, 7 p.m.
Sheridan vs. Arkadelphia, 7 p.m.
batting for
wishes tourney
Bryant Softball
Association is hosting its
First Annual Batting for
Wishes Tournament on
Sept. 27 and 28.
There will be a ceremony
on Saturday, Sept. 28, dur-
ing the tournament, where
the BSA will grant a wish
to a very special child at 2
p.m.
His wish is to go to
Disney and BSA is very
excited to say that Sunday
after the tournament he will
get to leave to go to Disney
World.
The first place team
in every age bracket will
receive a bat donated by
Sport Shop.
Please call Rob at 501-
317-7646 to register your
team or email bryantsoft-
ballassociation@yahoo.
com. There will be blow
up inflatables for the little
ones, great food, a silent
auction and much more. If
anyone would like to donate
funds or services to help
us with this exciting event
please contact Ashley Mills
at 501-251-5353 or you can
email at bryantsoftballasso-
ciation@yahoo.com.
BSA Softball Tourneys
Sept. 13-14 - Back to
School Tourney
BAUXITE -- Finishing
2012 as the 3A State
Runner-up, the Glen Rose
Beavers had a long offsea-
son before taking the field
against Malvern in Week
1 last week. After falling
at home to the Leopards
to begin the season a year
ago, the Beavers fell short
once more, losing 35-27
Friday.
But with Week 2 on the
horizon, the Beavers have
a rivalry game waiting as
they prepare to head back
to “The Pit,” a place where
the Bauxite Miners have
been pretty good when
it comes to playing Glen
Rose. The Miners, though
only 4-26 over the past
three full seasons, beat the
Beavers in a big 26-7 upset
to start the 2011 season.
“We are ready,” Head
Coach Mark Kehner said.
“It will be similar to last
week. You go into Malvern
and try to play and now
have to go to a tough place
for Glen Rose to go to and
win. We are looking for-
ward to it.”
The Beavers beat
Bauxite last season in
Week 2, 35-0, taking out
some revenge from 2011.
A key puzzle piece that
was missing from last
HASKELL -- Over the
past 10 years the Harmony
Grove School District has
seen some major changes.
From a new middle school,
elementary building and
other facilities, down to a
brand new sport; football
and a $600,000 football sta-
dium.
Now with a state-of-the-
art field and a pretty good
football team, Harmony
Grove is continuing to add
to the growth of its school
and especially its sports
programs. After the addition
of Sykes Stadium, Cardinal
baseball is getting a facelift
as well; a new $65,000 base-
ball field.
Thanks to a generous
donation from Landers Auto
Group, Harmony Grove will
now have lights, a wider
playing surface, modern-era
dugouts, a new infield and
new fencing.
According to Harmony
Grove School Board mem-
ber David Donham, the field
will be called “Landers.com
– Saline County’s #1 Auto
Group! Baseball Stadium.”
Harmony Grove signed
a 10-year agreement to get
the project done.
The total cost of the reno-
vation will be $65,850 with
the school paying nothing.
With a new infield being put
in, Head Coach Brandon
Mynhier, along with his
players, parents and other
volunteers tilled, disked, fer-
tilized and planted Bermuda
grass in the entire outfield.
Other additions will be
7-foot fences that encom-
pass the entire complex,
new red fence topper mate-
FAYETTEVILLE -
Running backs Alex Collins
and Jonathan Williams, con-
secutively well surpassing
100 yards rushing, unques-
tionably has been the
offensive story of Arkansas’
2-0 start, but sophomore
quarterback Brandon Allen
is doing fine, too, say those
who coach him and those
catching his passes.
“I think he has played
really solid football,”
Arkansas offensive coordi-
nator Jim Chaney said of
Allen after the Razorbacks
prepped Tuesday for
Saturday’s 11:20 a.m. game
at Reynolds Razorback
Stadium with Southern
Mississippi. “I think in the
third quarter this past game
(Arkansas trailed under-
dog Samford 21-17 in the
third quarter at Little Rock
before winning 31-21 in the
fourth quarter) everybody
on offense got a little pressy
including Brandon, but he
calmed down and finished
the game with the type of
calm we need at that posi-
tion. I think he learned a
lot on Saturday. I think it
was a big game for him.”
Allen converted two
third-down passes to receiv-
er Julian Horton and tight
end Hunter Henry on the
14-play 75-yard go-ahead
touchdown drive consum-
ing 6:31 and consummated
by Williams’ 2-yard touch-
down run at 13:38 of the
fourth quarter.
“That (the 11-yard pass
to Horton) was big and the
following one (13 yards)
right after that to Hunter,”
Chaney said. “That throw
to Hunter, he had two guys
right in his face that was a
real nice football play.”
Allen never threw a
fourth-quarter pass as
Arkansas put it away with
its ground game.
“I didn’t notice until
after,” Allen said Tuesday
of the Hogs running clock
entirely with its fourth-quar-
ter ground game. “I really
didn’t think about it at all.
We kept getting first downs
so I was happy.”
The offensive line was
happy to run the ball the
game’s final 7:31.
“It’s really fun to go out
there and say, we’ve got
to take over this game,”
Arkansas junior offensive
guard Brey Cook said. “We
have to be the ones that
really set the tone. Nobody
else is going to make the
plays. we’re going to make
the plays. line up behind us.
We’ll run the ball.”
The two third-quarter
passes to Horton and Henry
were huge but it seems
senior wideout Javontee
Herndon, 8 catches for
143 yards and three touch-
downs already, has estab-
lished himself as the go-to
receiver.
“You know we have a real
great connection and that’s
for sure,” Allen said. “He
runs great routes. He gets
open and I’m able to find
him.”
Herndon said, “Me and
Brandon have a great rela-
tionship and we worked
very hard during the off-
season and it’s showing
now.”
Chaney was asked how
well the Hogs offense prac-
ticed Tuesday in full pads.
“We put in some new
stuff today and struggled
with some of it as you
always do on Tuesdays,”
Chaney said. “ But I
thought their attitude was
good and their effort level
was fine. We got a lot of
cleaning up to do.”
Southern Miss won 12
games in 2011 but that was
two years and two coaches
ago.
The Golden Eagles went
0-12 last year under Ellis
Johnson and are 0-2 under
Todd Monken this season
losing to Texas State and
Nebraska.
Despite the record,
Chaney lauded the Golden
Eagles defense.
“I see a defense that
likes to bring a little bit of
pressure,” Chaney said.
“They have two dominant
defensive tackles that you
have to be aware of at all
times. They are playing
harder. Their improvement
from Game One to Game
Two was substantial. I look
forward to a hard-fought
contest when they walk in
on Saturday.”
Coach Bret Bielema said
Monday that senior tight
end Austin Tate of Harrison
(shoulder surgery during
the August preseason)
might be able to resume
drills this week but appar-
ently he wasn’t full tilt
Tuesday.
“All I know he is not out
there doing a lot,” Chaney
said. “He is involved a little
bit but I don’t know his sta-
tus going into the game.”
QB Allen solid amid running game
by nate allen
Razorback Report
HG adding baseball complex to recent additions
Special to The Saline Courier
This is a rendition of what the new Harmony Grove baseball complex is expected to look like following
its completion before the baseball which begins in the spring.
by Josh briggs
jbriggs@bentoncourier.com
COMPLEX, page 6
Beavers
looking for
different
result at
“The Pit”
by Josh briggs
jbriggs@bentoncourier.com
PREVIEW, page 6
Competing in the heat
BENTON – The Benton
tennis team competed
against rival Bryant Hornets
on Monday and Pine Bluff
on Tuesday at Tyndall Park
in Benton.
Against the Hornets in
boys’ singles, Bryant’s Gray
Orman defeated Jax Hopkins
8-0, Bryant’s Zach Gaines
took down Clay Johnston
6-2, and the Panthers’ Adam
Wilson eked by Evan Davis
7-6.
Benton’s Wilson and
Johnston would fall to
Bryant’s Tyler Marshall
and Hayden Brown in a tie-
breaker (11-9) in doubles’
play, and Nathan Daugherty
and Bryce Jefferson would
beat Bryant’s Tanner
Eichland and Robert Lynch
8-3.
Benton’s Abby McAtee
and Ashley Callison would
both pick up 8-1 wins over
Bryant’s Whitney Butler
and Estephania Ramirez
in girls’ singles, and the
Lady Hornets’ Jayda Allen
(6-3) and Kristen Walters
(6-0) would defeat Benton’s
Brianna Polner and Natalie
Penn.
Bryant would sweep the
Benton girls in doubles’
play. Ashlee Caton and
Tyler Bessent beat Polner/
Penn 8-0, Feniece Boone
and Stephanie Smith won
against Brianna Hampel and
Hannah Smothers 7-1, and
Hampel and Smothers also
lost to Kenley Davenport
and Alyssa Linam 6-3.
Against Pine Bluff on
Tuesday, the Benton girls
singles swept their oppo-
nents. McAtee won eight
straight sets in defeating
BRENT DAVIS/The Saline Courier
Benton tennis player Clay Johnston competes in upper 90-degree heat on Tuesday against Pine Bluff
at Tyndall Park.
by tony lenahan
tlenahan@bentoncourier.com
BENTON, page 6
6 The Saline Courier
Wednesday, September 11, 2013
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“There are so many
people to thank,” Mynhier
said. “First, Landers Auto
Group and Rodney Plack,
Superintendent Daniel
Henley, Athletic Director
Ricky Mooney, High School
Principal Tim Holicer and
the members of the school
board. Without these
people, none of this would
have been possible. When
this project is completed,
Harmony Grove will have
one of the most beautiful
and modern complex’s in
Saline County.”
Harmony Grove is set
to open the new complex
before the start of the
upcoming 2014 season.
week’s team was the pres-
ence of star running back
Carlos Burton, who was out
with a nagging hamstring
injury.
“He practiced (Tuesday)
and we will see how he
responds (Thursday,)”
Kehner said. “He looked
good. He didn’t just go
get it but he was about 85
percent. He should go a
little more tomorrow. We
are kind of banged up and
beat up so we have had to
practice a little slower this
week.”
Burton, a big reason why
the Beavers were in the
state finals, led the county
in rushing yards with 1,862
and 24 touchdowns. Now
as the starter, the speed
and skill of Burton, paired
with the blocking and size
of running back Austin
Kehner is a big piece of the
Beavers pie.
“We need Burton
because all of the parts
fit like that,” Kehner said.
“Austin is the big guard/
lineman type in front of all
of that speed and if we have
to put Austin at running
back we don’t have that
type person to put in front
of him.”
As for the Bauxite
Miners, they bring in some
new names to crucial posi-
tions. Trent Rooks takes
over snaps as the team’s
quarterback after taking
a one-year hiatus. Bauxite
also adds now tri-sport star
Ben Madison to an already
talented receiving corps.
Madison is the starting
point guard for the senior
high basketball team and
is also an infielder on the
baseball team.
The last time the
Beavers strolled into
Bauxite, the result was not
all too great, nor was it
what many people expect-
ed; a 26-7 Bauxite win in
2011. The Miners finished
the year with a 1-9 record.
“It doesn’t matter what
Bauxite’s situation is
for the rest of the year,”
Kehner said. “This is one
game where their kids are
going to get up and play
the best game all year long.
It is our kids’ responsibility
to come in and match that
intensity and get ready for
a big rivalry type of game.”
The Miners lost to
the defending 3A State
Champion Harding
Academy Wildcats for the
second straight year on
Friday, falling 43-20.
“Our kids better come
out ready to play,” Bauxite
Head Coach Shane Clancy
said. “Glen Rose is a well-
coached ball team and
we are going to have to
block and tackle well. Two
years ago has no impact on
Friday night.”
Glen Rose will kickoff at
7 p.m. at “The Pit.”
Jada Taylor, and Callison
took down Torrie Richardson
8-2. But, the Lady Panthers
were swept in doubles play.
Polner and Penn fell to Ajai
and Kye Richardson 8-1,
and Harcourt and Hampel
played a strong match even-
tually getting beat by Victoria
Grady and Brentney Sargent
8-6.
Boys doubles were also
swept, but Johnston and
Wilson fell 10-8 in a tie-
breaker to Jimarlo Johnson
and Mike Roberts, and
Daugherty and Jefferson lost
to Grady and Tre Harris 8-0.
Boys singles finished
well before rain shortened
their matches. Hopkins beat
Keenan Brown 7-2, Johnston
beat Grady 5-3, and Wilson
tied Harris 4-4.
“Extremely hot conditions
the past two days,” Benton
Coach Darci Stoll said. “The
kids have played hard. The
tiebreaker games were
hard-fought matches. Abby
McAtee has been a strong
leader on and off the court.”
Benton
From page 5
Complex
From page 5
Preview
From page 5
Cardinals get big hit, beat Brewers 4-2
ST. LOUIS — Twice,
Shelby Miller struck out
the hardest man to fan in
the major leagues. The
rest of the time, the rookie
threw more off-speed stuff
than usual, let the St. Louis
Cardinals defense do its job,
and waited for the offense
to show up.
Norichika Aoki fanned
three times for the first time
in his two major league
seasons, twice against
Miller, and Matt Holliday’s
two-run homer broke up
Wily Peralta’s no-hit bid
in the sixth inning of a 4-2
victory over the Milwaukee
Brewers on Tuesday night.
“He’s an amazing hitter
and he’s definitely a little
different, how he swings
and stuff,” Miller said.
“That’s one of the main
things I looked at it, going
in and seeing how I needed
to get him out.
“I got him with a change-
up and a backup cutter.”
Aoki struck for the third
time against another rookie,
lefty Kevin Siegrist, with a
runner on second to end
the seventh. Aoki entered
the game as the toughest
batter to fan in the majors
this year, averaging one per
17.2 at-bats.
“Against Siegrist, I think
the ball hit the mitt before
he even swung,” Miller
said. “I think he throws
97-98 mph. Not fair, not
fair.”
Matt Carpenter and Matt
Adams added RBIs in the
seventh and eighth for the
NL Central leaders, who are
4-0 to begin a nine-game
homestand. After a day
off, the Cardinals built on
momentum from a three-
game sweep of Pittsburgh.
“We know what’s at
stake,” Miller said. “We’re
watching the other teams,
we’re keeping up with it all.
I think it makes it more fun
for us.”
The 22-year-old Miller
(13-9) kept the pitch count
down and allowed five hits
with four strikeouts and two
walks in 6 2-3 innings. He’s
3-0 with a 1.08 ERA in four
starts against Milwaukee,
the other two wins coming
on the road.
“Look at his numbers;
he’s a great young pitcher,”
Brewers manager Ron
Roenicks said. “The first
time we saw him, he just
threw high fastballs and
blew us away. He’s really
pitching now.”
Peralta (9-15) was sig-
nificantly improved over his
first two starts against the
Cardinals, both in May, in
which he allowed 12 runs
and 22 hits in 9 1-3 innings.
In 6 2-3 innings he was
charged with three runs
and three hits with seven
strikeouts.
The Brewers avoided
getting shut out for a third
time by St. Louis on pinch-
hitter Logan Schafer’s
two-run homer off Edward
Mujica in the ninth.
Peralta struck out five
of the first seven hitters
and the Cardinals had two
baserunners the first five
innings: a walk by Holliday
in the fourth and first base-
man Jonathan Lucroy’s
error on a dropped throw
in the third. Aoki kept the
no-hitter going with a slid-
ing catch down the right
field line that robbed David
Freese of a hit opening the
fifth.
Holliday fouled balls off
his left foot or ankle three
times in the first two at-
bats, near where he’s wear-
ing a guard from previous
occurrences. Carpenter
walked to open the sixth
and Holliday saw just one
pitch his third time against
Peralta, hammering a fast-
ball an estimated 424 feet
to left-center for his 19th
homer.
Holliday left during man-
ager Mike Matheny’s post-
game news conference after
speaking briefly to a few
reporters.
Catcher Martin
Maldonado said the pitch
was supposed to be inside.
“We threw like eight
sinkers and he didn’t hit
them,” Maldonado said.
“But that one didn’t break.
It wasn’t a mistake.
“If that ball sinks, he
might hit his foot again.”
Siegrist, a 41st-round
draft pick, has worked
18 consecutive scoreless
innings and has held left-
handed hitters to just four
hits in 53 at-bats.
Rookie Scooter Gennett
of Milwaukee had two hits
and is batting .394 his last
30 games.
By R.B. Fallstrom
AP Writer
AP
Cardinals’ Matt Holliday takes a cut in a game last season. Holliday
hhit a t two-run homerun to break up Wily Peralta’s No-hit bid in
the sixth inning on Tuesday.
Food
B
oyd Ford keeps his
menus and grocery
list on a wash-
able erase
board in the
kitchen.
He also
puts his gro-
cery list into
his phone so
he won’t for-
get anything
when he
goes to the
store.
Ford says
never use
a whisk to
blend Cool Whip. It will take
all the air out of the mixture
and turn it to liquid.
Please keep sending in
recipes and suggestions for
Grits & Grace cooks, espe-
cially tailgate and holiday
cooks, to Merryofthemark@
aol.com.
Tip of the
Week
Gail
NickersoN
Benton resident Boyd Ford learned
to cook when he was only 10. His
16-year-old brother, Rodney was the
chef of the family at the time.
Rodney had discovered early on
that their mother, Annette Ford,
didn’t like to cook and he had taken
over the role. Boyd noted that while
the boys were growing up, there
was “kind of a family joke when our
mom made brown-and-serve rolls. We
called them her black-and-serve rolls
because she had a tendency to burn
just about everything.”
According to Boyd, “Rodney finally
told Mom that if she’d buy the gro-
ceries, he’d do the cooking. I always
wanted to be just like Rodney, and
when he was cooking, I was there by
his side, watching what he was doing
and asking him lots of questions.
“Cooking is therapy for me be,
whether it’s a simple dinner or a
Thanksgiving feast,” he said. “I
learned how to do the Thanksgiving
meal when I was in 10th grade.
“After my parents got divorced, we
ate the Thanksgiving meals my mom
brought home, which were basically
school trays from the school she
worked for,” he said.
At that time it was “just Mom,
Mamaw (Ruth Boyd) and me,” he
said.
“By the next year, I had learned
how to make the entire Thanksgiving
meal because I didn’t think we should
miss out,” he said. “I can make cran-
berry sauce faster than opening up a
can. I use just cranberries, sugar and
water.”
Keeping it simple is important,
he says, “because you don’t want to
mask the natural flavor of the food.”
“I learned a lot from Rodney about
what not to do and what makes a
recipe perfect,” Boyd said. “He taught
me the importance of not just the
taste, but also the sight and aroma of
the food.
“Rodney is a perfectionist and if
it turns out wrong, he just throws it
away. He also taught me to be adven-
turous with my cooking and try new
things.”
He said these lessons have
stayed with him to this day, but now
he tries to make things his own. “I’ll
make three or four recipes of the
same thing and compare each one to
the other to see what ingredients I
like the best,” he said.
“My strawberry cheesecake ice
cream took three summers to get
it the way I liked, and my pie crust
took years to get not only the best
recipe but the right technique,” Boyd
said. “A lot of times it’s not just the
recipe but the ingredients and specific
brands that make a difference.”
As an example, he mentioned his
homemade stromboli. “If you don’t
use the right sausage, it isn’t going to
turn out.”
Boyd said he has “nearly every
gadget you can have for the kitchen,”
but noted that the most important one
is his German Wusthof knife.
“But my baby is my industrial-size
KitchenAid stand mixer,” he said,
adding that he “burned out three
hand mixers” before acquiring it.
“I had become Mom’s cook for reg-
ular meals and for bake sales and pot-
lucks at Mom’s church, so I demand-
ed a stand mixer from Mom,” he said.
“The next day, I got it. Rodney came
over, so I positioned the mixer under
a light so he could see it. He was so
jealous. The next Christmas, I bought
one for him.”
Boyd earned a reputation in his
college fraternity’s kitchen. “I think
I was the only person at Phi Sigma
Kappa who ever used the kitchen at
Henderson State University. I got on
the cleaning committee and cleaned
that kitchen because at the time it
was used just to hold beer. I ended
up moving into the frat house so I
could cook for everyone. They liked
anything. They had the choice of the
local fast food places, the cafeteria or
me.
“I cooked from scratch, and didn’t
use frozen or canned vegetables
unless I had canned them myself,” he
said.
“Nowadays Rodney and I are con-
stantly calling or texting to get advice
from each other about what we’re
cooking. My proudest moments are
when he calls me for advice. We have
our online cookbook.”
The variety of Boyd’s cooking goes
from one style and holiday to the
other. In the fall he offers summer
canned tomatoes for soups and stews
or homemade caramel for the apples,
or his own processed hamburger or
jerky during hunting season. Summer
showcases his own “Rotel,” jams and
jellies and all sorts of rich and flavor-
ful foods.
“When I’m in the kitchen, I’m on a
high. I’m like a whirlwind. The house
could burn down around me and I
wouldn’t know it. I almost went to
culinary school, but they didn’t have
one around here and my mamaw
was getting up in age at the time, so I
didn’t want to leave the area.
“I would love to open a restaurant
with Rodney someday because we’re
both so adamant about fresh food. I’ll
always have that on the back burner.
“I tell people this is my kitchen
— it isn’t Burger King. I don’t do it
your way; I do it my way. “Everyone
is not going to like it; I simply cook
for myself and share it with my close
friend, Mark Heitman; my mom; Dad
and his family; and Rodney when he
and his wife, Susan (who doesn’t like
cooking either), come home from
Cabot.
“If you want to make me a really
happy cook, just make me a pan of
plain Rice Krispies treats. Nothing
fancy because it’s just plain old good.
“Around the holidays we make our
own candies — chocolate and all the
sweets. Granny was the canner in our
family and after she passed away, I
missed her bread and butter pickles.
So that was something I learned by
trial and error.
“I did my research and tried. I
made mistakes but finally got it the
way I wanted it. I have learned a lot
from my mistakes ... and it adds a lot
of fun to the kitchen.
Recipes for Life
Grits
&
Grace
Their mother’s
aversion to
cooking leads
to sons as chefs
4 cups four
1 t. salt
1 1/2 cups warm water
1/4 c. oil
1 pkg. yeast
Filling:
1 (8 oz. pkg.) cheddar cheese
(shredded)
1 (8 oz. pkg.) mozzarella
cheese (shredded)
1 roll Jimmy Dean extra mild
sausage (browned)
10 or more thin slices of ham
(cheap stuff is better)
Preheat oven to 450 degrees.
Combine water, oil, salt and
yeast. Add 2 cups four and
blend. Add the other 2 cups of
four and knead. Divide dough
in half. Roll in 9-by-15-inch
rectangle baking dish. Pile on
flling — frst sausage, then
cheeses, then fnally the ham
to help seal the bread. Fold
up ends, then fold side over
top. Bake on cookie sheet for
15 to 20 minutes until golden
brown.
Note: It’s OK if some of the
flling leaks out.
4 slices of ham
16 fresh asparagus spears
4 slices of Swiss cheese
1 cup sour cream
Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
Steam the asparagus spears.
Place a slice of cheese on
top of each ham slice. Put
four asparagus spears
on each ham and cheese
slice. Roll up and secure with
a toothpick. Place in casserole
dish, seams side down, and
spoon sour cream over each
roll. Bake 15 minutes or until
lightly browned.
1 c. corn meal
1/4 c. all-purpose four
2 t. sugar
3/4 t. baking powder
1/4 t. baking soda
1/4 t. salt
1 egg (beaten)
1/2 c. buttermilk or sour milk
1/4 c. sliced green onions
(about 2 onions)
Shredded cheddar cheese (of
your choice - as desired)
Jalapeños (chopped and used
as desired)
Shortening or cooking oil for
deep-fat frying
In a medium bowl, stir
together corn meal, four,
sugar, baking powder, baking
soda, and salt. Make a well
in center of four mixture;
set aside. In another bowl
combine egg, buttermilk,
cheese, jalapeños, and green
onions. Add egg mixture all
at once to four mixture. Stir
just until moistened (batter
should be lumpy). Drop batter
by tablespoons into deep, hot
fat (375 degrees). Fry about
3 minutes or until golden,
turning once. Drain on rack
over baking sheet in warmed
oven to keep warm.
3 quarts tomatoes (chopped)
4 c. bell peppers (chopped)
5 hot peppers (chopped)
2 or 3 onions (chopped)
2 c. vinegar
3 Tbsp. salt (non-iodized or “canning”)
1/4 c. sugar
Combine all ingredients and simmer for 45
minutes. Then process in a boiling water
canner for 25 minutes.
Stromboli
Asparagus
Roll-Ups
Hushpuppies
Boyd’s Own ‘Rotel’
4 quarts cucumbers (sliced)
3 medium onions (sliced)
4 cups sugar
2 large cloves of garlic (cut into half - optional)
3 cups vinegar
2 t. celery seeds
1 t. turmeric (optional)
4 Tbsp. salt (non-iodized)
2 quarts ice cubes
Wash and slice cucumbers and onions. Cut
garlic in half. Place the cucumbers, garlic and
onions in a large pot and add ice. Sprinkle
salt over them. Cover three hours. Drain well;
remove the garlic. Combine sugar, spices,
and vinegar. Bring water just to a boil. Add
cucumbers and onions and heat fve minutes.
Use back of wooden spoon to “paddle” them
into juice. Pack loosely into hot jars. Adjust lids
and process in a boiling water bath for fve
minutes. Makes 8 pints
Granny’s Bread
and
Butter Pickles
Brotherly tutelage
transcends to
cooking success
2-3 heads fresh broccoli
(chopped)
1 bunch green onions
(chopped)
1 lb. bacon (cooked, drained
and broken into pieces)
1 (8 oz.) pkg. pecans
(chopped)
1 (8 oz.) pkg. of raisins
8 ounces Hellmann’s
mayonnaise
1/2 c. sugar
1/8 c. apple cider vinegar
Mix frst fve ingredients to
together. Then mix remaining
ingredients; it’s better if it sits
overnight. Pour over salad and
stir. It’s better the second day.
Crust:
1 c. four
1 stick butter
1/4 c. brown sugar
Filling Mix:
1 small can pink lemonade
1 can Eagle Brand milk1 large
container Cool Whip
Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
Mix crust ingredients. In an
oblong 10-by-13-inch pan,
pat out and bake 10 minutes.
Watch carefully. As soon
as you can, handle without
burning, pat crust in 10-inch
pie pan, saving some of crust
to sprinkle on top after flling
has been added. Pour in
flling. Refrigerate.
4 c. half-and-half
1 1/2 c. sugar
1 Tbsp. vanilla
2 c. whipping cream
1 pint fresh strawberries
(diced)
1 package Jell-O no-bake
cheesecake dessert
2 Tbsp. sugar
5 Tbsp. real butter
1 pkg. pie crust mix (or your
own pie crust recipe)
Dice three-fourths of the
strawberries. Cut the last
fourth into small to medium
pieces. Combine strawberries
with sugar and place into
the refrigerator for a couple
of hours to help break down
the smaller pieces. Stir crust
mixture and add sugar and
melted butter. Bake in oven
until crust is golden. Break
into medium pieces. Combine
in a large bowl the half-and-
half, sugar, and vanilla. Stir
till sugar
is dissolved. Stir in whipping
cream. Fold in strawberries
and crust pieces. Freeze
ice-cream mixture in a 4 - or
a 5-quart ice-cream freezer.
Makes 2 1/2 to 3 quarts.
Broccoli Salad
Pink Lemonade
Pie
Strawberry
Cheesecake
Ice Cream
By Gail Nickerson
Staff Writer
Gail NickersoN/special to The saline courier
Boyd Ford has his canning equipment ready to make strawberry and
blueberry jelly, orange marmalade and his version of “Rotel” tomatoes.
Also on his rolling work station are his stromboli, broccoli salad and a
pink lemonade pie.
Wednesday, September 11, 2013
news@bentoncourier.com The Saline Courier – Page 7
Special to The Saline Courier
Blake Askew shows the Grand Champion Market Steer during
the fair last week. The steer was purchased by N & D Technical
Services. Pictured with Askew is Debbie Barnett, co-owner of
N & D.
8 The Saline Courier
Wednesday, September 11, 2013
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the night with Joe Lester
and his wife, and then we
were there for the presenta-
tion and pictures,” Mary
Jean Busken said.
“We have become good
friends with Joe and his
wife,” she noted. “The golf
tournament, now in its
second year, has raised
over $80,000 in two years
— close to $90,000 — plus
what has been given at
other times,” she said.
“Another one is planned
for next May,” she said.
“It’s a great event in Moore,
Okla. It draws a great
crowd. Joe really pushes it
and we appreciate it.”
The exact amount
presented to the OU
Foundation was $42,343.
Juli Busken, a native of
Benton, was a ballerina in
the university’s School of
Dance. She was kidnapped
from the parking lot of
her Norman apartment in
December 1996 and found
shot to death hours later at
Lake Stanley Draper.
At that time, Lester was
serving as police chief.
Anthony Castillo Sanchez
was convicted in 2006
of rape and first-degree
murder in her death and
remains on Oklahoma’s
death row.
A DNA profile was the
key to finding Juli’s killer.
Authorities said semen
stains on her underwear
and a pink leotard yielded
a DNA profile that eventu-
ally was entered into a state
DNA database. In 2004,
state investigators found a
match between the profile
and a newer profile taken
from Sanchez when he
entered the prison system
on a burglary conviction.
An Oklahoma law
requires all violent offend-
ers and convicted burglars
to submit a blood sample in
order for their DNA profiles
to be entered into a state-
wide database. Juli
Busken, 21, was abducted
from the parking lot of her
Norman apartment complex
in the early morning hours
of Dec. 20. She was found
shot to death about 12 hours
later at Lake Stanley Draper
in far southeast Oklahoma
City.
Authorities said her
hands were tied behind her
back and that she had been
raped, sodomized and shot
in the head. She is believed
to have been abducted after
she returned from driving a
friend to Will Rogers World
Airport in Oklahoma City.
As the investigation devel-
oped, a neighbor told police
she had heard a woman
scream early that morning.
Her abandoned car was
found a short distance away
from her apartment com-
plex.
The crime went unsolved
for several years, but
Sanchez was charged with
the death in 2004 and con-
victed two years later of
first-degree murder, rape
and sodomy.
Cleveland County District
Judge William Hetherington
agreed to a jury’s recom-
mendations that Sanchez,
27 at the time of his trial,
should die by lethal injec-
tion. The judge also sen-
tenced Sanchez to 40 years
for first-degree rape and 20
years for sodomy.
The Buskens first learned
of their daughter’s disap-
pearance after they arrived
in Norman on Dec. 20, the
day they were scheduled to
help her return home since
she had completed her
course work. They were told
immediately that she had
failed to keep a luncheon
appointment with a friend
and authorities had been
notified of her disappear-
ance.
It wasn’t long afterward
that her father faced the
painful task of identifying
her body. Authorities said
her hands were tied behind
her back.
Busken
From page 1
City Council handles light agenda
The Benton City Council
required less than an hour to
conduct city business during
Monday night’s meeting. In
the process, amendments
to previous ordinances were
approved, an ordinance to
bring the city’s planning area
boundary into legal compli-
ance and budget amend-
ments for the police depart-
ment were made.
For all ordinances, the
vote was 8 to 2 in favor.
Aldermen James Herzfeld
and Steve Lee were absent.
The council approved
wording to amend ordinance
55, which the council passed
during their previous regular
meeting. The ordinance set
the city’s sales and use tax
at 1.5 percent, continuing
the current rate that was set
to expire on Dec. 31, 2016.
The amended language
designating a portion of the
tax to be dedicated to street
improvements. As a result
of approval by the council,
ordinances 56 and 57 were
amended with the same
language. Both had been
approved during the same
meeting as ordinance 55.
Ordinance 56 approved a
special election for the pas-
sage of the 1.5 percent sales
and use tax. Ordinance 57
was approved for a special
election for the passage of
bonds to finance a project
near Bernard Holland Park,
including a community
center, an aquatic center,
Boys & Girls Club, a Senior
Activity Center, soccer fields
and a five-field girls softball
complex.
The council passed
Ordinance 59, allocating
monies from the gen-
eral fund to purchase five
police cars at a price of
approximately $45,000 each.
Alderman Jerry Ponder,
chairman of the city finance
committee, told the council
that, at present, city revenue
is approximately $389,000
over expenses, therefore
the city could purchase the
vehicles without entering
into a lease agreement. The
vehicles to be replaced are
from the 2006 and 2007
model year. The new vehi-
cles will require less mainte-
nance and the gas mileage
is better, according to Chief
Kirk Lane.
An ordinance revising the
cities planning area from
five miles beyond city limits
to one mile was approved
by the council. Alderman
Charles Cunningham pre-
sented the ordinance, stating
the change was necessary
to bring the city into compli-
ance with a recently passed
law changing the planning
limit of cities.
In other business, Garret
King, president of the
Mayor’s Youth Advisory
Council, presented the
2014/2014 group from the
Benton High School. The
council includes 50 mem-
bers and will work with the
city on community service
projects.
By Brent Davis
bdavis@bentoncourier.com
Davis Elementary welcomes new principal
Michele Lewis has been
announced as the new prin-
cipal of Davis Elementary
School in Bryant.
Prior to her appointment
as principal, Lewis acted as
assistant principal of Salem
Elementary School.
The district is now looking
for her replacement at Salem,
said Devin Sherrill, commu-
nications director.
Lewis is taking the place
of Tiffany Beasley Bone,
who recently resigned after
serving as principal at Davis
Elementary for six years,
Sherrill said.
These changes were
among the personnel items
approved by the Bryant
School Board in a special
meeting Monday night.
Other faculty resignations
include Lynn Harrison, Gifted
and Talented coordinator
and Anne Taulbee, Spanish
teacher.
Staff resignations include
Viki Anderson, custodian;
Elizabeth Presley, food ser-
vice; and Rene Prewett, bus
driver.
Staff new hires include
Katie Brooks, Parent Center
coordinator; Amanda Bunton,
food service worker; Angela
Drummond, business man-
ager; Sara Fullerton, part-
time secretary at Hill Farm
Elementary School; Courtney
Kinley, part-time secre-
tary at Davis Elementary
School; Rachel Menzies,
part-time duty supervisor at
Salem Elementary School;
Kendall Ray, bus driver; Lisa
Reid, food service worker;
Rita Schmeckenbecher
Alternative Learning
Environment paraprofes-
sional at Bryant Elementary
School; Linda Smith, secre-
tary at Bryant High School;
Lori Wielbik, paraprofes-
sional at Salem Elementary
School; and Jessica Young,
paraprofessional at Springhill
Elementary School.
NOTICE OF POLLING SITES FOR ANNUAL SCHOOL
ELECTION IN SHERIDAN SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 37
OF GRANT COUNTY, ARKANSAS
In accordance with the requirements of Ark. Code Ann. § 6-14-106,
notice is hereby given that:
(1) The polling site for each ward or precinct in the school election to
be held on September 17, 2013, is as follows:
Ward or Precinct Polling Site
Calvert Calvert Fire Department.
Darysaw St. Paul AME Church
Davis Philadelphia Baptist Church Fellowship Hall
Dekalb #1 Palestine Community Bldg.
Franklin Corinth Baptist Church Bldg.
Madison Grapevine Fire Department
Merry Green #1 Sheridan Recreation Center
Merry Green #2 Sheridan Recreation Center
River Prattsville City Hall
Saline County East End Elementary School
Simpson #1 Cane Creek Fire Department
Simpson #2 Orion Baptist Church (Fellowship Hall)
Tennessee Leola City Hall
Ward #1 Lost Creek Baptist Church Fellowship Hall
Ward #2 Sheridan Assembly of God Church (Vine St.)
Ward #3 Immanuel Baptist Church Fellowship Hall
Washington Center Grove Community Bldg.
Early and Absentee Grant County Courthouse
Voting Dates:
Absentee – August 2 through September 17, 2013
(must be proceeded by an application for a ballot)
Early – September 10 - September 16, 2013, 8:00 A.M.- 4:30 P.M.,
Election Day – September 17, 2013, 7:30AM - 7:30PM
BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF SHERIDAN SCHOOL DISTRICT NO.
37 OF GRANT COUNTY, ARKANSAS • Jeff Lisenbey, Secretary
NOTICE OF ANNUAL SCHOOL ELECTION IN BENTON SCHOOL
DISTRICT NO. 8 OF SALINE COUNTY, ARKANSAS
In accordance with the requirements of Ark. Code Ann. § 6-14-109,
notice is hereby given that the annual school election in the above
named school district will be held on September 17, 2013 for the
following purposes:
To elect two member to the Board of Directors for one term of
five (5) years each;
To submit the questions of voting a total school tax rate (state
and local) of 41.9 mills. This total tax levy includes the current uni-
form rate of tax of 25.0 mills to be collected on all taxable property in
the State and remitted to the State Treasurer pursuant to Amend-
ment No. 74 to the Arkansas Constitution to be used solely for main-
tenance and operation of schools in the State. The total proposed
school tax levy of 41.9 mills includes 25.0 mills specifically voted for
general maintenance and operation and 16.9 mills for debt service.
The 16.9 debt service mills will be a continuing levy pledged for the
retirement of existing bonded indebtedness. The surplus revenues
produced each year by debt service millage may be used by the Dis-
trict for other school purposes.
The total proposed school tax of 41.9 mills represents the same rate
presently being collected.
Early and Absentee voting will be available beginning Tuesday, Sep-
tember 10, 2013 through Friday, September 16, 2013 from 8:00 a.m.
- 4:30 p.m. at the Vote Here Center, 221 North Main Street, Benton,
Arkansas 72015.
The polls will open, Tuesday, September 17, 2013 at 7:30 a.m. and
will close at 7:30 p.m.
Board of Directors of Benton School District No. 8 Saline County,
Arkansas • Brad Bohannan, Secretary
Legal Notices
NOTICE OF ANNUAL SCHOOL ELECTION IN SHERIDAN
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 37 OF GRANT COUNTY, ARKANSAS
In accordance with the requirements of AR. Code Ann. §!6-14-109.
notice is hereby given that:
The Annual School Election in the above named school district will
be held on September 17, 2013, for the following purposes:
The issues to be decided are as follows:
BOARD OF DIRECTORS POSITION #1, for a five year regular term,
Byron Hicks, unopposed.
BOARD OF DIRECTORS POSITION #7, for a five year regular term,
Charles Tadlock
Bryce Wade Lunday
32.2 MILLS SCHOOL TAX
This represents no change from the previous year. The total tax
levy proposed above includes 25.0 mills for maintenance and op-
eration of schools, 0.0 mills for dedicated maintenance and opera-
tion millage (Capital Outlay/Current Expenditures) dedicated for
specific purposes, and 7.2 mills for debt service previously voted as
a continuing debt service tax pledged for the retirement of existing
bonded indebtedness. This district may use surplus revenues pro-
duced each year by debt service millage for other purposes.
BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF SHERIDAN SCHOOL DISTRICT NO.
37 OF GRANT COUNTY, ARKANSAS • By Jeff Lisenbey, Secretary
Special to The Saline Courier
Superintendent Randy Rutherford, left, welcomes Michele Lewis,
new principal at Davis Elementary School.
Arkansas Department for
Health and Human Services
“immediately eliminate”
some of the potential loca-
tions, and the committee
also is considering guide-
lines from the Department
of Health for long-term care
facilities.
“We’re still hopeful our
location is a lead contender,”
said Mike McCune, com-
mander of VFW Post 2256.
The next task force meet-
ing will be Oct. 10. A decision
should be made at this time
in order to meet an Oct. 31
deadline required to qualify
for a grant.
Vet Home
From page 1
First A-10s
depart from
Fort Smith
FORT SMITH — The
first A-10 jets have left for
Georgia from the Arkansas
National Guard base in Fort
Smith.
Two of the jets departed
Tuesday for Moody Air
Force Base in Valdosta, Ga.
The base in Fort Smith is
losing its 20 A-10s but is get-
ting a new mission involving
drone aircraft.
The base is converting to
support of remotely piloted
aircraft and a targeting and
intelligence unit.
The Southwest Times
Record reports the base has
had manned aircraft since
1953.
Officials say that the
188th Fighter Wing’s
aircraft-related training will
cease in the near future. The
base will shift to full-time
support for conversion of its
mission.
Associated Press
Trial date set
for man in
Ark. machete
slayings
FORT SMITH — A judge
has set a trial date for a Fort
Smith man charged with
capital murder for using a
machete to kill two people.
Circuit Judge Steve Tabor
on Tuesday ordered trial to
start Feb. 6 for 20-year-old
Gregory Anthony Kinsey. A
lawyer for Kinsey says she
expects to ask that trial be
delayed due to a schedul-
ing conflict. Prosecutors are
seeking the death penalty for
Kinsey, who is charged in the
June slayings of 39-year-old
Brandon Prince and 32-year-
old Nathan Young, both of
Fort Smith.
The Southwest Times
Record reports that Kinsey
described the killings in a vid-
eotaped interview with police.
Associated Press
By Jennifer Joyner
jjoyner@bentoncourier.com
Wednesday, September 11, 2013
The Saline Courier 9
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Or 870-336-1335
Next class starts September 14, 2013
www.adaacademy.com
Licensed by Ark State Board of
Private Career Education
An independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association.
with the card that opens doors in 50 states
Online Bidding
Available at:
Bidspotter.com
Metal Breaks, Metal Shears, Iron Workers, Lathes,
Milling Machines, Welders, Forklifts, Sand Blasting Equip.,
Lots of I Beam, Sheet Metal, Pipe & Tubing
METAL FABRICATION
AUCTION
Saturday September 21, 2013 9:00 am
Smithco Metal Works
4101 Dallas Street
Texarkana, Tx 75501
Everything from Smithco Sells regardless of Price!
Terms: Cash or Check. Buyers unknown by auction company
must provide a bank letter. 5% Buyers Premium will apply.
Check our website for complete listing!
www.nuttauction.com
John Nutt
903-824-0581
TX#11712 AR #1030
R.W. “Bud” Nutt
903-748-4400
DON’T BE A VICTIM OF
MEDICARE FRAUD!
Billions of dollars are stolen from
seniors every year.
The Arkansas Senior Medicare Patrol (SMP)
wants every beneficiary in Arkansas to
understand that PREVENTION is the most
cost-effective way to stop Medicare fraud.
REPORT FRAUD!
It’s YOUR money!
Be proactive by following three simple steps:
(1) Protect your personal information
(2) Detect errors and fraud by reading your
Medicare Summary Notice (MSN)
(3) Report any suspicious billing on your MSN
to the Arkansas SMP
Paid for by a grant from the Administration on Aging, Administration for
Community Living. The Arkansas SMP grant is administered by the Arkansas
Department of Human Services Division of Aging & Adult Services
www.daas.ar.gov/asmp.html | www.facebook.com/arsmp
1-866-726-2916
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For more information & to schedule your private exam with
our doctors call (501) 229-9300 now!
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Classifieds
Page 10 – The Saline Courier
class@bentoncourier.com Wednesday, September 11, 2013
Georgia Pacific is one of the world’s leading manufacturers of tissue,
pulp, paper, packaging, building products and related chemicals.
We provide an excellent benefits program including medical, dental,
401(k), pension benefit, etc.
MECHANICAL TECHNICIAN
GURDON, AR
Candidates must be able to work any shift, variable start times,
including overtime, weekends, and holidays (as scheduled).
Qualified candidates must meet the following
basic requirements
• At least 2 years of relevant manufacturing-related
mechanical or millwright experience
• Demonstrated knowledge & skills in: basic hydraulics,
pneumatics, cutting with a torch, welding with an arc welder
• Knowledge of bearings, chains and sprockets
• Willingness to maintain strict adherence to safety rules
& regulations
• Ability to repair & maintain industrial machinery and
mechanical equipment for improved reliability and up-time
• Demonstrated leadership skills
To learn about additional position requirements and
complete an employment application visit our website at
www.gp.com
We are an equal opportunity employer. M/F/D/VExcept where
prohibited by state law, all offers of employment are conditioned upon
successfully passing a drug test. This employer uses E-Verify. Please
visit the following website for additional information:
www.kochcareers.com/doc/Everify.pdf
“Making differences through quality care.”
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT
Friendship Community Care is seeking a highly or-
ganized and motivated candidate to work as an ad-
ministrative assistant in the Bryant FCC waiver/day
program office. Will perform various clerical duties
as assigned. Must have administrative assistant ex-
perience with exceptional communication skills,
both oral and written. Experience with individuals
who have developmental disabilities is preferred but
not required. Must be able to pass drug and back-
ground screenings. HSD/GED required.
If interested, please apply online at
www.fccare.org EOE
“Making differences through quality care.”
LPN
Friendship Community Care is seeking a caring and
dependable LPN for the Benton/Bryant area. Will
work in a community setting with consumers who
have intellectual disabilities, overseeing basic health
and safety and monitoring chronic health issues. Must
be well organized, have basic computer skills and be
able to work independently. Some travel will be
required. Must be able to pass drug and background
screenings
If interested, please apply online at
www.fccare.org EOE
Employment
The Saline Courier
is looking for qualified writers to cover
high school football games on Friday
night. Applicants will be paid as
correspondents and cover games in
Saline County, or nearby road games.
Send resume and clips to:
Tony Lenahan
(tlenahan@bentoncourier.com)
or Josh Briggs
(jbriggs@bentoncourier.com)
Legal Notices
NOTICE OF APPEAL FROM TAX
ASSESSMENT
“Notice is hereby given that John and
Marilyn Blumbeks hereby appeals to the
County Court of Saline County from assess-
ment on property described as follows:
Name of Supposed Owner: Marilyn R. and
John J. Blumbeks
Description of Property: 18-01S-17W
Amount of Assessment Complained of:
92,710.00
“Such appeal will be heard by the county
court at 10 o!clock a.m. at the courthouse at
200 N. Main, Room 117, Benton, Arkansas,
on the 24th day of September, 2013, and
any owner of property in said county may
appear at said hearing in support thereof or
in opposition thereto.”
Doug Curtis, County Clerk
By: Lydia Brown, (D.C.)
THE SALINE County Quorum Court is re-
questing resumes for those persons inter-
ested in appointment to the office of Saline
County Sheriff. Interested parties must be
a qualified elector and resident of Saline
County. This appointment will be for a term
of October 1, 2013 until January 1, 2015.
No person appointed to fulfill a vacancy shall
be eligible for election to succeed him or
herself. Resumes will be accepted in the
Personnel Office, Saline County Court-
house, Room 112, Benton AR. 72015 until
12 noon on Friday, September 13, 2013.
The appointed Sheriff will serve as the
chief enforcement officer of the courts, con-
servator of the peace in the county, and cus-
todian of the county jail. These responsibili-
ties will include the execution of civil process
and orders of the court; the preservation of
the public peace; the protection of life and
property! the prevention, detection, and in-
vestigation of criminal activity; the apprehen-
sion and confinement of criminal offenders
and the recovery of property; the control of
vehicular traffic and the investigation of traf-
fic accidents; the rendering of services and
the protection of property during civil emer-
gencies or natural disasters; custody of per-
sons committed to the county jail; and other
duties as prescribed by law.
SALINE COUNTY IS AN EQUAL
OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
Garage Sales
Bryant
806 MIlls Park Rd
Thur Fri Sat 7a-4p
Rain or Shine!
4 Families, 2 Moving
1 Downsizing Stuff
Something for Every-
one Antique Dishes &
records, Clothing all
ages kids-adult, Books
Furn & whole lot more
Lost & Found
FOUND 2 Test Drill
Bits on Congo Fern-
dale Road 425-3690
LOST LARGE Black
Calf near Salt Creek
Mulberry Road Call
317-5110
Freebies
FREE KITTENS to
good home male and
female Please call
501-326-4470
Announcements
97TH ANNUAL GUN
SHOW - September
14TH & 15TH, Little
Rock State Fai r-
grounds,, W. Roose-
velt Rd. 9-5 Sat, 9-4
Sun.Adm. $8.00 -
Adult AGCCC-Club
Show 501-833-8064
Free Parking
Collins Hunting club
has! openings for new
members.!South of
Malvern501.327.0163
or 501-358-2502
Announcements
“A YEAR with Frog
and Toad” A
Tony-nominated chil-
dren!s musical. -Book
and Lyrics by William
Reale and Music by
Robert Reale. Based
on the classic tale
written and illustrated
by Arnold Lobel. Sept.
19, 20, 21 ,23, and 24
at 7:00 pm, Verser ,
OBU campus with a
matinee at 2:30 pm
on Sunday Septem-
ber 22. Tickets are
$8. Call the box office
1pm- 5pm, 870
245-5555 or on-line
at: www.obu.edu/boxoffice
Adoption
ADOPT:!!LOVING,
SUCCESSFUL TV
producer promises
your child a future
filled with laughter,
education, lakefront
home, wonderful fam-
ily. !Will be an awe-
some mom! Ex-
penses Paid (917)
804- 0568 gr eat -
family59@gmail.com.
ADOPTION - Loving,
well educated, finan-
cially secure couple
seeks to adopt an in-
fant. Give yourself,
your baby, and us a
happier future. Ex-
penses paid. Call
1-800-517-7840.
Personal
MEET SINGLES right
now! No paid opera-
tors, just real people
l i ke you. Browse
greetings, exchange
messages and con-
nect live. Try it free.
C a l l n o w
1-877-939-9299
Health Services
CANADA DRUG
CENTER Safe and af-
fordable medications.
Save up to 75% on
your medi cat i on
n e e d s C a l l
1-800-304-6217
$10.00 off first pre-
scription and FREE
Shipping
Buy • Sell • Trade
in the Classifieds
Employment
CALL CENTER
CUSTOMER
SERVICE AGENT
NEEDED
Position is full time
with benefits start-
ing at $9.00/hr.
Must be flexible to
work any hours be-
tween 7:30 a.m.
and 9:00 p.m.!Ap-
plicant must be de-
pendable and pro-
fessional.! We are a
drug free and
smoke free com-
pany located in Bry-
ant, AR. EOE.
Only mail reumes
to: ACCOUNT AD-
VISOR POSITION,
PO Box 384, Bry-
ant, AR! 72089.
NOTE: Office is located
in Bryant, Arkansas
COMPANY DRIVERS &
Owner Operators
Wanted! No touch
freight, 90% drop &
hook, dedicated op-
portunities available.
Call 888-710-8707
Also seeking Recent
Grads. Call Lavonna
877-440-7890. Apply
online: www.drivefor-
pamtransport.com
DRIVERS EARN up
to $55,000 per year -
We Offer Regional,
Local or Dedicated
Posi t i on. Fami l y
Owned since 1983
Direct Deposit, Paid
Weekly, Safety, Lon-
gevity & Driver Refer-
ral Bonus, Medical,
Dental & Vision Avail-
able. Call Dancor
Transit 866-677-4333
www.dancortransit.com
DRIVERS- DRIVERS
& Owner Operators,
want to be part of a
team, not a number?
Good home time, pay
& excellent benefits.
Minimum of 1year
OTR fl atbed experi-
ence. Diamond State
Trucking, Inc. Call
1-800- 332-5551
DRI VERS: MAKE
$63,000.00yr or more!
$2,500.00 Driver Re-
f er r al Bonus &
$1,200.00 Orientation
Completion Bonus!
CDL-A OTR Exp.
Req. Cal l Now:
1-888-993-0972
EXPERIENCED
COOK/WAITSTAFF
CALL HOME PLATE
DINER ASK FOR
RICK 813-4423
Grams House
Now Hiring
TEACHERS
Health & Life
Insurance, Retirement
Call Melba or Jessica
501-794-4726
HELP WANTED!!!
Make $1000 weekly
mai l i ng brochures
from HOME! NO ex-
perience required-
Start Immediately!
www.TheMailingHub.com
Housekeepers for 1st,
2nd Shift, & PT. Apply at
emsarkansas.com or call
501-776-6720. Must pass
drug & bkgrnd ck
JJ! S RESTAU-
RANT& fuel desk now
hiring all positions
and all shifts, includ-
ing exp. cooks. No
phone calls. Apply in
person, I-30, Exit 106.
LEGAL ASSISTANT
Secretary needed
Good computer skillls,
familiar with social
media, good people
skills, organizational
skills. Full time.
Contact by e-mail,
prefer cover letter
and resume to
Bbutler@huffmanbutler.com
MARKETING/SALES
POSITION
for local therapy
practice. This position
will be responsible for
helping maintain
relationships with
physicians, keeping
social media current
and organizing any
advertising.
Experience /Training
required.
Please fax resumes
(501) 776-1875.
Now Hiring at Sub-
way & Mama Delu-
ca!s Pizza. Come on
in friendly applicant,
Walmart in Benton.
TOWN OF Bauxite
seeks a part - time
employee to work in
the water/sewer/street
department. Approx.
20 hours per week
Starting at $9 per
hour. Please fill out
an appl i cati on at
Bauxite City Hall be-
tween 12:30 & 4:30
Monday thru Friday.
Employment
PART-TIME Bus At-
tendant needed for
Central Arkansas De-
velopment Council!s
Benton SCAT office.
Pre-Employment
Drug Screening and
Criminal Background
Check required. To
download an Employ-
ment Application go
to www.cadc.com.
Employment Applica-
tions are retained on
file for (1) one year.
You must contact HR
if application was pre-
viously submitted and
you want to be con-
sidered for the above
position or for more
i nf or mat i on cal l
501-315-1121 Equal
Opportunity Employer
PATIENT CARE Co-
ordinator - LR Medical
Office. F/T, M-F, 8-5.
Must be friendly, per-
sonable, verify insur-
ance & answer multi-
ple phone lines. Also,
P/T Acct. Assi st.
15-20 Hrs. Fax re-
sume 501-847-0099
WANTED TO
HIRE Receptionist
DUTIES:
• Answering Telephone
• Filing Paperwork
• Serving Customers
JOB SKILLS:
• Good Personality
• People Friendly
• Good,clear voice
• Timely & Responsible
• Able to Pass
Alcohol/Drug Screen
• High School Diploma
WORK SCHEDULE
5 days per week
Apply in Person:
Lewis Lumber & Supply
718 S. East Street
Benton, AR 72015
EOE No Calls Please
SUBSTITUTE TEACHER
needed for Central
Arkansas Develop-
ment Council!s
Benton Head Start
Center. High School
Diploma or GED
required, Child Devel-
opment Associate
Credential (CDA) and
experience working
with preschool
children preferred.
Pre-Employment
Drug Screening and
Criminal Background
Check required. To
download an Employ-
ment Application go
to www.cadc.com.
Employment Applica-
tions are retained on
file for (1) one year.
You must contact HR
if application was pre-
viously submitted and
you want to be con-
sidered for the above
position or for more
information call
501-315-1121. Equal
Opportunity Employer
TAX SCHOOL
Earn extra income
after course.
Benton & Bryant call
501-847-7774
Open House Sat 1-4
TELEMARKETING
AGENTS NEEDED
Position is part-time.
Starting at $9.00/hour
Plus Bonus! Looking
for dependable &
professional appli-
cants. We are a drug
and smoke free com-
pany located in Bry-
ant. Hours: Mon-Fri
4:30pm to 8:30pm
and Sat. 9am to 6pm.
Send resumes to:
clewis@wehco.com
or P.O. Box 384
Bryant, AR 72089
TRINITY BAPTIST
Mother's Day Out is
hiring. 10 hours/week.
Call 501-249-1660
TRUCK DRIVERS
Wanted Best Pay and
Home Time! Apply
Online Today over
750 Companies! One
Application, Hundreds
of Offers!
www.HammerLaneJobs.com
Employment
Wanted
RETIRED LADY
seeking PT Clerical,
Recept, Ans phone,
excel refs 860-1258.
Let the
Courier Classifieds
work for you.
Call Cathy or Kim
to place your
Classified Ad.
Mon.-Fri. 8am-5pm
315-8228
or come by
321 N. Market St.
Time to get your own
place? Check out the
Rental Section in to-
day!s Classifieds...
Instruction
X-RAY MEDI CAL
TECHNICIAN®
MEDICAL ASSIS-
TANT Trai ni ng –
www.changelives.co
m, 1- 800-449-4802,
1309 Forge Rd, LR, *
www.bls.gov/ooh/heal
thcare/medical-assis-
tants.htm, For local-
ized employment and
wages:
www.bls.gov/oes For
important program
i nfo, pl ease vi si t
www.heritage-educa-
tion.com/disclosures
ABHES Accredited ,
Lic. by SBPCE | Fi-
nancial Aid for Those
who Qualify
Child Care
CHILDCARE
Infants to 5 B •L• S
Vouchers
562-0691 • 951-2923
6:30a -5:30p
IN-HOME DAYCARE
Spotless - Non-smoking
Drop-ins Welcome!
778-2920
Services
*REDUCE YOUR CA-
BLE BILL! * Get a
whole-home Satellite
system installed at
NO COST and pro-
gramming starting at
$19.99/mo. FREE
HD/DVR Upgrade.
C A L L N O W
1-800-474-0423.
DISH TV Retailer
- SAVE! St ar t i ng
$19.99/month (for 12
months.) FREE Pre-
mium Movie Chan-
nels. FREE Equip-
ment, Installation &
Act i vat i on. CALL,
COMPARE LOCAL
DEALS!
1-800-278-8081
SEE THE SATELLITE
TV Difference Pack-
ages as LOW as
$19.99/month! FREE
DVR Upgrade. FREE
HD Upgrade. FREE
Professional Installa-
tion! Call NOW and
Start SAVING!
1-866-725-5135
Apartments
Unfurnished
1 BR, 1 BA efficiency
apt., $350 mo., $200
dep. Avail Now 2Br
2Ba $475mo Avail
Oct 1st 501-860-1144
2 BR Apts, kit. appl.,
W&D conn., $500 &
up. Handicap access.
317-5190 / 317-5192
2 BR, 1 BA, $500
mo., No Pets, 6 mo.
l ease @ 204 N.
Fourth St. Benton,
Call 501-778-3324
SEEK AND YOU
SHALL FIND
Great deals in the
Courier Classifieds.
Yard Sales, Jobs,
Homes for Sale or
Rent. Check them out
daily. Call to sub-
scribe at 315-8228.
Ready to take the
Real Estate Plunge?
Check out the Homes
for Sale in the Classi-
fieds daily.
Apartments
Unfurnished
CAMRY COURT
Now Open
in Bryant
New Construction
2 BR, 2 BA or 2.5 BA
off Wilkerson Rd.
on Sadie Dr.
(By Hill Farm Elem.)
Call Terri the on-site
manager for appt.
501-804-0125
Bldg. 1225 #2
or call Dale King
501-539-1935
Visit our web-site
www.arkansas
apartments.net
NOTICE: All real es-
tate advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to the Fair Housing
Act which makes it il-
legal to advertise any
preference, limitation
or di scr i mi nat i on
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or in-
tention to make any
such preference. We
will not knowingly ac-
cept any advertising
for real estate which
is in violation of the
law. All persons are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis.
Houses for Rent
2 BR, 1 BA w/garage,
Orleans Court, Ben-
ton. 501-672-0407 or
affordablepropertiesar.com
2 BR, 1 BA, 515
Pearson, no pets.
$550. mo., $400 dep.,
Call 326-3907
2BR 1BA Benton
School s $500mo
$300dep 708 Adrian
Contact 847-7964
3 & 4 BEDROOM
$825 -$1400 mo.,
Haskell, Benton &
Bryant. 315-9370
3BR 1.5 BA Newly
Remodeled Bryant
School Di st r i ct
$900mo + $900 Dep
Call 501-317-0422
3BR 1BA 1 acre Sa-
l em Area Bryant
Schools $750 mo +
Dep. 501-326-8547
3BR 1BA Benton
Schools 807 Edgehill
$650mo. $400dep.
Contact 847-7964
3BR 1BA House,
$595 mo., 6mo. lease
No Pet s, Cal l
501-778-3324
3BR 2BA Benton
Schools $950mo No
HUD Avail. 9/3 Call
501-840-7626
BRYANT - Nice
Townhome. 3 BR, 2
BA, 1300 sq. ft., $795
mo., 501-847-5377
BRYANT 3BR 2Ba
Carport, No Pets,
$925mo + Dep 518
Valley View 840-3694
Eagle Properties
LLC
315–2075
Nice 2 & 3 BR Homes
from $500 to $925
Apartments
1 BR’s from $415
2 BR’s from $475
*based on availability
Deposit & References
Required
eaglepropsaline.com
Looking for a good
deal? Search the
Courier Classifieds!!
Houses for Rent
FOR LEASE/SALE
New 3 & 4 BR, 2 BA,
brick, FP, ceiling fans,
carpet, 2 car garage,
patio. Go to: www.
catalyst-residential.com
or 501-697-6342
HASKELL 204
GLENN OAK 3BR, 2
BA, 2 car garage.
Nice. $750 mo. $600
dep. 501-847-5377
HOUSE FOR RENT
(Bryant) 2000 Sq. Ft.
Near Interstate
860-0279
NEW 4BR 2Ba 2 Car
garage Fenced yard
1750sq.ft. $1200mo
Benton Schools Call
326-8000
NEW CONST. 3 min.
from Alcoa Shopping
Ctr, 3BR, 2BA, 2Car
Gar., All applicances,
FBYD, Pets/Condi-
tions, $1200 mo. +
dep., 501-690-6602
Mobile Homes
For Rent
RENT TO OWN
CLEAN/GOOD SHAPE
‘00 16x80 3BR $570
‘95 16x72 2BR $550
Includes lot Rent & Ins
Lake • Fish • Walk Trail
Sunset Lake • 951-2842
SMALL 2BR, 1BA
mobile home, Bryant
(Davis school) $350
mo + $300 dep, Bob
501-416-2639
Business Property
For Rent
BUSINESS PROP-
ERTY For Lease 608
S. East Street Office
with large parking
area Call 315-9337
between 9a&8p
WAREHOUSE/COOL
ER FACILTY w Office
space available I-30 &
Bryant, call 847-8637
Miscellaneous
For Rent
SEE THE SATELLITE
TV Difference Pack-
ages as LOW as
$19.99/month! FREE
DVR Upgrade. FREE
HD Upgrade. FREE
Professional Installa-
tion! Call NOW and
Start SAVING!
1-866-795-9295
Miscellaneous
For Sale
1 Package Deal, Hal-
loween Stuff, For out-
side & inside $500
501-765-3823
SEE THE SATELLITE
TV Difference! Pack-
ages as LOW as
$19.99/month! FREE
DVR Upgrade. FREE
HD Upgrade. FREE
Professional Installa-
tion! Call NOW and
Start SAVING!
1-866-725-5125
Musical
Merchandise
Cushing
Piano Service
Tune • Repair
Player Pianos & Pump Organs
778-6584
Pets & Supplies
BENTON ANIMAL
Control & Adoption
501-776-5972
benton.petfinder.com
BRYANT ANIMAL
Control & Adoption
www.bryant.petfinder.com
www.1-800-save-a-pet.com
www.1888pets911.org
Horses
AMHA REGISTERED
Mare Paint She is
very tame & halter
broke. Moving and
can!t keep her $500
OBO Call 766-4641
Hay For Sale
HAY
FOR SALE
Mixed grass clean.
Fertilized. 4X5 net
wrapped. In the field
cutting now.
$
35.00 loaded
1 to 400 bales
available
Buy as many as you
need. Great horse hay.
501-840-1529 or
501-860-8080
Produce
Produce 840-4076
Squash, Okra, Purple hull
Peas, Cucumbers, AR Wa-
termelons, Sweet Potatoes
Classifieds Work!
Heavy Equip-
SURPLUS EQUIP-
MENT. Online auc-
tions HUGE selection.
BIG savi ngs. NO
Buyer fees Low Seller
f ees BARGAI NS!
Register FREE Use
Promo Code cnhi313.
LIVE support.
www.SurplusOnThe.NET
334-215-3019
Autos Wanted
DONATE A CAR
Humane Society of
the United States
FREE Next-DAY
TOWING! Running or
Not. Tax Deductible.
Call Before Tax Year
Ends!
1-800-418-1562
Motorcycles
ELECTRIC 4 Wheel
Scooter $300 OBO
P l e a s e C a l l
501-326-7292
Recreational
Vehicles
06 FEMA Gulfstream
$3,995 8x32 set up in
Sunset Lake 951- 2842
Lake • Fish • Walk Trails
Houses For Sale
MUST SEE 1860sq.ft.
3Br 2Ba LR, Den,
Dining Room, Open
kitchen, hw, ceramic,
& deck 1 acre 4 Sale
or Lease Opt. Call
501-652-0390
Mobile Homes
For Sale
$$$ SAVE THOU-
SANDS - Foreclo-
sures Available $0
down w/ your land
Pl ease cal l now
501-407-9500
$0 DOWN with
your Land or
Family Land!!!
Call 501-653-3201
06 Clayton $27,900 3BR
16x80 with 16x30 add on
room & porches set up in
Sunset Lake MH 9512842
FORECLOSED
DOUBLEWIDE on
Private Lot. Great
Schools, Great
Location, must sell!
501-653-3201
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‘95 16x72 2BR $550
Includes lot Rent & Ins
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Call 501.653.3204
Lots & Acreage
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Lot 40 Miller Cove
Call 317-5408
Looking for a good
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Legal Notices
THE OWNERS of the
fol l owi ng vehi cl es
must bring proof of
ownership to Jones
Wrecker Servi ce,
Inc., 4315 Alcoa Rd,
Benton, AR! 72015,
(501) 778-1440, No
later than 45 days,
Oct. 24, 2013 (501)
778 -1440, or owner-
ship will be forfeited.
1975 Jeep Cherokee
Vin# J5A16MZ050322
1996 Ford Mustang Vin#
1FALP42X9TF179169
2000 Hyundai Accent
Vin#KMHCG35G8YU013
708
2004 Kia SpectraVin#
KNAFB121445314403
1988 Chev 1500 Vin#
1GCDC14K1JZ282236
1997 Ford MustangVin#
1FALP4048VF112199
PURSUANT TO act
576 of the 1987 act
of Arkansas, notice is
given of a public sale
for cash to the high-
est bidder. The con-
tents of the following
units for recovery of
del i nquent rent s.
Buyer must remove
al l contents and
sweep unit out on
day of auction. Date
of Sale: Sept. 18,
2013.
Sale Time: 1:00 pm.
UNIT NO.
306 Carter
120/121Christenberry
627 Crawford
108 Earnest
124 Pier
417 Pier
419 Fletcher
129 Freeman
525 Gilmore
611 Henry
523 Herrick
303/706 Hicks
214 Medsker
307 Wilder
416 Wyrick
Salem Storage Cen-
ter 7115 Terry Lynn
Dr. Bent on, AR
72019 501-794-9121
LEVI IS LOST
Please help us
fnd him. Young
chocolate Lab
disappeared
from home on
Zuber Road.
Please call:
860-9366,
860-5225 or
920-7045
LEVI is
LOST!
Moderately Confused Herman
Crossword Challenge
Kit ‘n’ Carlyle
Celebrity Cipher
Here’s How It Works:
Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken
down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the
numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and
box. Each number can appear only once in each row,
column and box. You can figure out the order in which
the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues
already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you
name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!
Astro•graph
bernice bede osol
www.bernice4u.com.
Alley Oop
Big Nate
Born Loser
Thatababy
Frank and Ernest
Grizzwells
Monty
Arlo and Janis
Soup to Nutz
WEDNESDAY,
SEPTEMBER 11, 2013
Communication will be the key to
meeting new acquaintances and learn-
ing new skills in the coming months.
Don’t let a personal matter stand
between you and your goals. Don’t
limit what you can do or stop short of
success.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- A
break will do you good and help you
rethink your approach to life. Altering
your living arrangements will be emo-
tional but ultimately beneficial.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Avoid
high-pressure situations today. Appeal
to the emotional side of anyone mak-
ing unreasonable demands. Review
your relationships and make adjust-
ments to the connections that are
standing in the way of your progress.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
-- Make your home more efficient
and compatible with your lifestyle. A
change of plans can be used to your
advantage, but you must be prepared
to roll with the punches.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21)
-- Use your energy wisely. Take advan-
tage of any chance you get to increase
your worth. You can cut corners at
home by setting a strict budget.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
-- Love, romance and adventure
should be included on your to-do list.
Broaden your outlook, explore new
places and indulge in events or activi-
ties that you find motivational.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
-- Let your emotions take over when it
comes to dealing with a domestic situ-
ation. Don’t be stingy with your take
on matters. A new source of income
encourage you.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Get
out and get involved today. Meeting
with people interested in unusual
activities or hobbies will enrich your
life. Romance should highlight your
day.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
-- There’s no need to act with undue
haste. You have more options than
you realize, so take a moment to
examine the pros and cons before tak-
ing action. Moderation should be a
factor in your decision.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) --
Aggressive action will get the job done
but also create opposition. It might be
a good idea to work secretively until
you have everything in place. It may
take longer, but you will avoid discord.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Call
in favors and you will get a job done
quickly, enabling you to do something
enjoyable later on. If you let those
who helped you in on the fun, you’ll
develop a powerful support network.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
-- Strive for excellence in whatever
you pursue. If you get outside your
comfort zone, you could learn some
valuable information. Question what
isn’t working in your life and prepare
to make changes.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Don’t
leave anything to chance. Make moves
that are unusual and unexpected, yet
shrewd. Using the element of surprise
in a competitive situation will give you
the advantage.
**
Wednesday, September 11, 2013
news@bentoncourier.com The Saline Courier – Page 11
ComiCs
12
The Saline Courier
Wednesday, September 11, 2013
All of us at
would like to especially
thank our local
Saline County
Police Departments,
Sheriff’s Department,
EMTs,
Firefighters, and all
emergency response
personnel for putting
their lives on the line
everyday to keep our
Community Safe.
On this day, we remember the tragedy of September 11, 2001. We remember the horror of the news, the
painful images and the aftermath, as the reality of what had occurred changed the face of our nation.
But we also remember with gratitude the heroes who gave their lives in their efforts to rescue victims
of the attacks. The courage and bravery of these men and women will never be forgotten, and their
spirits will always remain a proud part of our nation’s history. In times of tragedy, a strong community
will pull together, and that’s what we witnessed in the wake of September 11. A nation came together to
support the communities of New York City and Washington, D.C. Americans everywhere, from all walks of life,
displayed their patriotism and pride in our country. Twelve years later, we continue to honor the heroes of
September 11, and we continue to fight for the freedoms each of us hold so very dear. May we forever
remain the land of the free and the home of the brave.
Thank You!
21099 I-30, Bryant, AR 72022
Family Owned, Customer Friendly
501-315-7100 www.everettbpg.com
I-30 • Alcoa Exit • Next to Target
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