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Benton, AR 72018
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Li f el i ne
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health Center
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C h i r o p r a C t i C
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Volume 136
Number 258
1 Section 10 Pages
50¢
Home of Tom Younts
and Tammy Hyslop
THE SALINE
INDEX
OBITUARIES .............................. 3
EDITORIAL ................................. 4
SPORTS ..................................... 6
CLASSIFIEDS ............................ 7
COMICS ..................................... 9
www. bent oncouri er. com
Monday, September 16, 2013
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SCRAPBOOK
1987 — Longhills Junior Golf
program
Britney Sahlmann
PAGE 2
PAGE 6
SALINE COUNTY
WEATHER FORECAST
TONIGHT: Partly cloudy. Low
of 64F.
TUESDAY: Partly cloudy with a
chance of a thunderstorm and a
chance of rain. High of 95F.
TUESDAY NIGHT: Partly cloudy.
Low of 66F. Winds less than 5
mph.
WEDNESDAY: Partly cloudy.
High of 95F.
WEDNESDAY NIGHT: Partly
cloudy in the evening, then clear.
Low of 68F.
SALINE COUNTY’S NEWS SOURCE SINCE 1876
BUICK • GMC
I-30 Alcoa
Exit Next to Target
501.315.7100
2013 Terrain
proud
member of
A record turnout was reported
for the 10th annual Swing Fore
Saline charity golf tournament.
This event raised more than
$80,000 for the SMH Health
Foundation. Proceeds from the
event will be used for patient room
and lobby renovations.
“This was our best tournament
and Gathering on the Greens to
date,” said Matt Brumley, SMH
Foundation director. “We’ve grown
from a few teams to almost 90
teams and a two-day event. It’s
encouraging to see increased
participation every year. We hope
this means more and more people
understand the importance of the
Foundation and are getting behind
our mission to enhance healthcare
for our community.”
As a 501(c)(3) nonprofit orga-
nization, Saline Memorial relies
on the funds raised through the
Foundation to enhance services for
the community.
Brumley noted that no taxpayer
or county dollars are used for
hospital operations. It is sustained
through the revenue generated
through patient services, grants
and private donations made
through the Foundation.
The patient room renovation
process, which is a $1.25 million
project, will be completed in phas-
es as the funds are raised, Brumley
said.
The golf tournament is the
Foundation’s largest fundraiser
each year. Other annual fundrais-
ing events include an annual 5K
Run/Walk and Heart of Saline
Dinner held in February.
“It is a great feeling to not only
see the tremendous support from
our community, but also from our
SMH co-workers and our local
physicians,” said Brumley. “Over
the past year, we have seen our
physicians and co-workers rally
behind the Health Foundation and
our mission. The number of con-
tributors in these two groups alone
has increased over 500 percent in a
little over a year.”
SMH, like many hospitals, is
facing tough fiscal challenges,
Brumley noted. In the past four
years, SMH has provided in excess
Saline Memorial golf tournament
raises $80K for Health Foundation
Saline is
still under
burn ban
By Lynda Hollenbeck
lyndahol@yahoo.com
By Lynda Hollenbeck
lyndahol@yahoo.com
By Jennifer Joyner
jjoyner@bentoncourier.com
REBECCA JONES/Special to The Saline Courier
Participating in the Swing Fore Saline golf tournament are, from left, Brian Fowler,
Brad Dowler, Nate Sullivan and Luke Hedrick.
REBECCA JONES/Special to The Saline Courier
Karen Carter, left, and Susie Everett visit during the Gathering on the Greens. The
event takes place annually as part of the Swing Fore Saline golf tournament that
benefits the Saline Memorial Health Foundation.
LYNDA HOLLENBECK/The Saline Courier
Members of Mayor’s Youth Advisory Councils of Benton, Bryant and Haskell plus
participants gather before the start of a bike-a-thon Saturday morning at the Benton
Athletic Complex. The three youth councils jointly coordinated the project.
LYNDA HOLLENBECK/The Saline Courier
The first riders in the bike race are, from left, Kevin Kraft of Benton, Van Reid of
Sheridan, Jerry Adcock of Bryant and Cory Adcock of Benton. Jerry Adcock finished
third in the 13-mile race with a time of 41 minutes and 30 seconds.
Bryant competes
in Cyclone Inv.
Although parts of Saline County
experienced rain last week, it was not
enough for a burn ban to be lifted.
Saline is one of the 27 Arkansas
counties that remain under a ban.
Saline County Judge Lanny Fite
ordered the ban Friday, Sept. 6.
The Arkansas Forestry Commission
recommends enacting a burn ban
when the drought index reaches more
than 600.
A lack of rain and soaring tempera-
tures have brought the county’s index
above this level.
According to U.S. Geological Survey
data, the county has received 0.6 inch-
es of rain during the past 30 days.
Average rainfall for this time of
year is 3-4 inches during a 30-day
period, according to Brian Smith,
climate services program manager of
the National Weather Service in Little
Rock.
Officials of the Arkansas Forestry
Commission say the county is at mod-
erate risk for wildfire.
The ban applies to controlled or
other burning, Benton Fire Chief Bill
Ford explained.
“The ban will in effect until further
notice,” Ford said.
The current dry conditions and high
temperatures have necessitated the
ban on burning, the chief noted.
Officials throughout the state warn
that even the smallest spark can start
a fire and fires can quickly get out of
control.
To view current burn bans and wild-
fire danger ratings, visit www.arkan-
sasforestry.org.
To report a wildfire, call the
Arkansas Forestry Commission
Dispatch Center at 1-800-468-8834 or
911.
This is the second burn ban issued
in the county this year. The first was
issued July 8 and lasted until July 17.
The first bike-a-thon held as a
joint venture among mayor’s youth
advisory councils in Benton, Bryant
and Haskell was “a great success,”
according to Laura Stilwell, adult
coordinator of the Benton group.
The project was known as
“Pedals for People.”
“I think it was a great success,”
Stilwell said. “There was a little bit
of a glitch about where to turn at
Bryant, but that was it.
Seventeen riders participated in
the Saturday morning event, which
Stilwell called “a good number for
this to be our first time to do this.
Winners of the race were:
•Donnie Van Patter of Little
Rock, who finished first in 39 min-
utes and 39 seconds.
•Kris French of Little Rock, who
finished second in 39 minutes and
40 seconds.
•Jerry Adcock of Benton, who
finished third in 41 minutes and 30
seconds.
“These are professional cyclists
who do races all the time,” Stilwell
said.
The winners received trophies
and T-shirts, Stilwell said.
“All participants received a
T-shirt that lists all of the sponsors’
names,” she added.
Funds raised from the race will
benefit the Benton Care Center,
First Baptist Church’s outreach
ministry that is directed by Brenda
Burton.
“Each year we do this we’ll select
a different recipient,” Stilwell said.
She said she does not have
a total of the amount raised on
Saturday. “I’m still getting money
turned in,” she added.
Stilwell commended all of the
individuals who helped with the
project.
“Benton and Bryant police were
awesome to help us,” Stilwell said.
“They took time out on a Saturday
morning to work with a bunch of
kids, block traffic and keep us safe.”
“The police were so patient and
so helpful,” she said. “They gave
us safety device and helped us plan
our route so it would be the safest
for our cyclists on Saturday morn-
ing; and they stayed with our riders
on the rough patches where there’s
no real streets.”
She said personnel were Saline
Memorial Hospital’s ambulance
service were on site “in case we
needed them.”
“Firefighters from Benton and
Bryant were so helpful also,” she
said.
Trevor Villines of the Benton
Mayor’s Youth Council was in
charge of the project, Stilwell noted.
“We’ve been working on this since
April. And it took from April till last
Wednesday to get all the detailed
locked down. People don’t realize
3 youth councils collaborate
on fundraising bike-a-thon
SMH, page 10
COUNCILS, page 10
2 The Saline Courier
Monday, September 16, 2013
22005 I-30 South • Bryant, AR • 501-847-5566 • www.yourallergyreliefstore.com
•Air Purifers & Filters
•Dust Mite Proof Mattress
Protection
•Hepa Certifed Vacuums
•Allergen Cleaning Products
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Living with allergies
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Saline Courier photo
The Longhills Junior Golf program started another season Tuesday with the first clinic for new
members. Three clinics must be attended and they will be held each Tuesday in May. Regular play
begins June 2. Longhills head pro Jeff Ham (top) heads the program.
Saline courier ScraPBook 1987
Benton Police
Department
Friday
•A woman reported that a
central heat and air unit was
stolen from a house she is
remodeling on South Shady
Lane.
•A man reported his aunt
assaulted him on Westbrook
Street.
•A man reported about
$570 worth of items were
stolen from his center con-
sole while his vehicle was
being serviced at Firestone
Tire Center on Interstate 30.
•A woman reported an
individual stole a GPS from
her boyfriend’s vehicle on
Arkansas Drive.
Saturday
•A man reported an indi-
vidual sprayed painted “stop
the pigs” on his tree and
stop signs near Holly Road.
•A man reported another
male threatened him on
South Summit Road.
•A man reported that
while he was unloading a
lawn mower from his truck
on East Narroway Street, a
man in a truck sped past him
and almost hit him.
•An employee at Walmart
on Interstate 30 reported
that a man stole a hat.
•A woman was arrested
after she and a man got
into an argument, and she
assaulted him.
•An employee at Pilot
Travel Center on Alcoa Road
reported that they received a
counterfeit $100 bill.
•A man was arrested
after his mother reported
he assaulted her on Banner
Street.
Sunday
•A man was arrested for
driving while intoxicated
after an employee at Big
Red Valero on Highway 67
reported he was asleep in
the parking lot.
•A woman reported an
individual damaged the lock
on her apartment door in
Castle Oak Apartment com-
plex.
•The owner of Springhill
Car Wash on Village Loop
reported that someone dam-
aged the an automatic coin
machine while trying to open
it to steal the money.
Saline County
Sheriff’s Office
Friday
•A man reported a theft
of property on Centennial
Valley Drive in Benton.
Saturday
•A woman reported some-
one broke into her storage
building on Crooked Pine in
Mabelvale.
Sunday
•A man reported a bur-
glary on South Cold Springs
Road.
•A Hospice employee
reported that one of her
patients passed away on
Barnes Drive in Mabelvale.
•A woman reported a
woman hit another person’s
car on purpose on the corner
of Sardis Road and Block
Road in Hensley.
Benton Fire
Department
This weekend, Benton fire
fighters responded to 11 res-
cue calls, 12 medical calls, a
motor vehicle accident, a gas
leak, and two unauthorized
burning.
Bryant Fire
Department
This weekend, Bryant
fire fighters responded to
five medical calls, a motor
vehicle accident and an ille-
gal burn.
DailY DiSPaTcH
Daily Dispatch is published daily in The Saline Courier as
reports are received from local law enforcement agencies. Daily
Dispatch articles are edited for brevity and relevancy, and con-
tain only information provided by law enforcement. Content
written by Sarah Derouen, a reporter for The Saline Courier.
Oklahoma
museum’s
collection
heading to
Arkansas
NORTH LITTLE ROCK,
Ark. — The artifacts and doc-
uments from an Oklahoma
museum dedicated to the
history of the Arkansas River
are heading to a maritime
museum in North Little Rock,
museum officials said.
The Arkansas River
Historical Museum at the
Tulsa Port of Catoosa is clos-
ing.
The museum’s collection
— which includes journals,
photographs and American
Indian artifacts — will be
sent to the Arkansas Inland
Maritime Museum in North
Little Rock.
The North Little Rock
museum primarily focuses on
military items, with the USS
Razorback submarine as a
focal point. The museum is
located in downtown North
Little Rock.
Trailer fire in Ohio kills 6 while mom is at work
TIFFIN, Ohio — A fire
that ripped through a mobile
home killed a man and five
children ages 6 and under
just a few hours after the
children’s mother left to
work an early morning shift
at a fast-food restaurant.
Anna Angel, the chil-
dren’s mother, lived in the
home with the children and
her boyfriend, a relative and
neighbors said.
“She had a whole family
and now she has nothing,”
said Owanna Ortiz, the
woman’s cousin. “Her kids
were her life.”
The fire that broke
out Sunday morning left
neighbors stunned in the
mobile home park in Tiffin,
about 50 miles southeast of
Toledo. Firefighters got all
six people out in about 12
minutes, but they were pro-
nounced dead at a hospital,
Tiffin Fire Chief William
Ennis Jr. said.
Authorities would not
confirm the identities or
relationships of those killed
or comment on a possible
cause. A state fire marshal’s
investigator said there were
no indications of anything
suspicious and it could
take up to two days before
authorities know how the
six died.
Ortiz said Angel had four
daughters of her own as well
as a son with her boyfriend.
The Blade newspaper in
Toledo reported that Angel
identified the children at the
hospital where they were
pronounced dead.
Patricia Boes, a co-worker
who accompanied Angel,
said the woman kissed each
child goodbye.
The family didn’t have a
car and had to get around
on bicycles, Oritz said. “If
she had to get somewhere,
they had two strollers they
had to take, but they made it
work,” Ortiz said.
Angel was at work when
she was told there was a fire
at home, Ortiz said. Police
and a neighbor said Angel
raced home on her bicycle.
The two oldest children
were in kindergarten and
first grade, Ortiz said.
“They were always happy
and full of sunshine,” she
said. “The older ones looked
out for the younger ones.”
Outside the charred
home, neighbors stared at
the trailer where left in the
yard were a stroller, a little
pink bicycle and an adult
bicycle with a bike trailer for
kids.
Nancy Williams, who
manages the Highland Park
Estates mobile home park
and also lives there, said she
yelled to her son to call 911
and ran to the home when a
neighbor alerted her to the
blaze.
“I knew there were babies
in there,” she said. “But
once we got there, there was
nothing we could do. It was
fully engulfed in flames and
we couldn’t get in.”
The fire chief said there
was heavy fire in the center
of the mobile home and
heavy smoke throughout it
when firefighters arrived.
Witnesses said the fire
burned quickly, breaking
out windows and peeling
some of the trailer’s alumi-
num siding.
“I watched the babies get
dragged out,” said neighbor
Rick Hummell. “It just made
me sick.”
He said he often saw the
children outside and would
give them money when
the ice cream truck came
through the trailer park.
“She was always good to
her kids,” Hummell said of
Angel.
Louis Keller lived across
the road from the home
that burned. “They would
come over and play with my
dogs,” he said, as a strong
smell of smoke blew across
his yard.
Harry Miller, chief of the
Bascom Joint Fire District
outside Tiffin, said about
30 members of his volun-
teer department assisted
Tiffin firefighters. He said
fires involving children are
among the most difficult for
firefighters to handle.
“We had some new EMTs
on the scene as well, and
it’s very tough on everyone
when it involves kids,”
Miller said. “It hits home
because we all have kids.”
associated Press
associated Press
NC officer charged with shooting unarmed man
CHARLOTTE, N.C. — A
North Carolina police officer
accused of shooting and
killing an unarmed man
who had apparently been in
an automobile wreck was
scheduled to appear in court
Monday to face a voluntary
manslaughter charge.
Jonathan A. Ferrell, 24,
a former Florida A&M
University football player,
was killed early Saturday.
He had sought help at a
nearby house, according to
a statement from Charlotte-
Mecklenburg police. A
woman answered the door
and, when she didn’t recog-
nize the man, called 911.
Officers responding to the
breaking and entering call
found Ferrell nearby. Ferrell
ran toward the officers,
who tried to stop him with
a Taser. Police said he con-
tinued to run toward them
when officer Randall Kerrick
fired his gun, hitting Ferrell
several times. Ferrell died at
the scene.
A police statement
Saturday said the investiga-
tion showed the shooting
was excessive and “Kerrick
did not have a lawful right to
discharge his weapon during
this encounter.”
Ferrell’s mother and
brother are holding a news
conference with their
attorney, Chris Chestnut,
on Monday morning in
Charlotte. Chestnut also has
represented the family of
Robert Champion, a FAMU
drum major who died during
a hazing ritual in November
2011.
FAMU Interim Athletic
Director Michael Smith said
Ferrell played the safety
position for the school’s foot-
ball team during the 2009
and 2010 seasons.
In describing the accident,
Police Chief Rodney Monroe
has said Ferrell was driv-
ing a vehicle that crashed
into trees off a northeast
Charlotte road early
Saturday, and the wreck was
so severe he would have
had to climb out of the back
window to escape. Monroe
said he did not know what
caused the crash and did not
say whether Ferrell suffered
injuries.
Ferrell apparently walked
about a half-mile to the near-
est house and was “banging
on the door viciously” to
attract attention, Monroe
said. Thinking it was her
husband coming home late
from work, the woman who
lives there opened the door.
When she saw Ferrell, she
shut it and called police
about 2:30 a.m., Monroe
said.
Monroe said he didn’t
think the unarmed Ferrell
made threats or tried to rob
the woman.
associated Press
Stocks, bonds rally after Summers exites Fed race
WASHINGTON, D.C. —
Wall Street was happy to see
Larry Summers go.
Stocks rose on Monday
after Summers, who had
been the leading candidate
to replace Federal Reserve
chairman Ben Bernanke,
withdrew his name from
consideration.
Summers was viewed as
being more likely to rein
in the government’s mas-
sive stimulus program. The
stimulus has helped com-
panies by keeping interest
rates low. The president is
expected to nominate Ben
Bernanke’s successor as
early as this month. The
new front-runner is Janet
Yellen, the Fed’s vice chair.
Stocks were also helped
by news that U.S. factory
output rose 0.7 percent in
August, the most in eight
months.
The Dow Jones industrial
average was up 130 points,
or 0.8 percent, to 15,508 as
of 10:11 a.m. Eastern. The
Standard & Poor’s 500 index
rose 12 points, or 0.7 per-
cent, to 1,700. The Nasdaq
composite rose 14 points, or
0.4 percent, to 3,736.
Bond prices rose, pushing
yields lower. The yield on
the 10-year Treasury note
fell to 2.79 percent from 2.88
percent late Friday. The dol-
lar fell against the yen and
the euro.
Companies making big
moves included:
— Homebuilders rose as
investors were encouraged
by a decline in long-term
interest rates. The biggest
gainer in percentage terms
was Lennar, up $1.50, or 4.4
percent, to $35.98.
— Boise rose $2.63, or
26 percent, to $12.59 after
news that Packaging Corp.
of America is buying it for
$1.27 billion. Packaging
Corp. rose $3.06, or almost 6
percent, to $57.61.
— Apple continued to
slide after investors were
disappointed with the com-
pany’s latest iPhone models.
Apple lost $9.22, or 2 per-
cent, to $455.70.
Summers’ withdrawal
helped stocks overseas, too.
In Europe, the FTSE 100
index of leading British
shares was up 0.5 percent.
Germany’s DAX rose 1.1
percent, and the CAC-40
in France was 0.7 percent
higher.
Hong Kong’s Hang Seng
rose 1.5 percent, and South
Korea’s Kospi advanced 1
percent. Markets in Japan
were closed for a holiday.
Oil traders were monitor-
ing Syria developments.
The recent diplomatic drive,
which has seen the pros-
pect decrease of a U.S.-led
attack on Syria dissipate,
has pushed oil prices back
down. The benchmark New
York rate was down $1 at
$107.21 a barrel.
associated Press
Flight attendant honors Sara
Low, killed on 9/11
BATESVILLE, Ark. — It
isn’t flashy or drooping with
diamonds or fancy charms,
but for Shelton Baker the
red metal bracelet embossed
with Sara Low’s name is one
accessory she doesn’t take to
the sky without.
“Every time someone asks
about it I feel I can tell peo-
ple about her,” the 24-year-
old said.
Shelton was 12 years old
on Sept. 11, 2001. She never
knew Sara but the 28-year-
old Batesville native is some-
one she’ll never forget.
Sara was living out her
dream as a flight attendant
for American Airlines and
was on Flight 11, the first
plane to strike the World
Trade Center in New York
City 12 years ago today.
More than a decade
later, Shelton is carrying
on Sara’s dream and living
out her own. A “military
brat” whose dad was in the
Army, Shelton grew up used
to traveling the world, but
“Sara definitely made me
want to be a flight atten-
dant,” she said during a
35-hour layover in Augusta
Ga. to New York.
Through stories of her
caring personality and poise
to her vivacious smile, evi-
denced in countless photo-
graphs, Sara was someone
Shelton grew up knowing
though she never met.
Raised in Virginia, now living
in Fayetteville, Shelton spent
many a summer in Batesville
where her dad currently
lives and her grandmother,
Glendene Baker, is neighbor
to Sara’s parents, Mike and
Bobbie Low.
June 2 marked Shelton’s
first flight with Delta, fol-
lowing seven weeks of train-
ing, six days a week and 10
hours a day, but it wasn’t
easy.
“It’s very competitive. .
People with law degrees,
Ph.D.s . those are the type
of people who apply for this
job.”
Medical situations, learn-
ing how to evacuate, etc.,
are all part of it. “It’s not all
about serving peanuts,” she
said with a laugh.
Whether Times Square,
New York, San Francisco,
Dublin or Jamaica, Shelton
said she loves the new
places she gets to see and
the different people she gets
to meet and work with every
week. “It’s exciting. It’s
definitely not 9 to 5 and the
same thing every day. . and
most people, believe it or
not, are really nice.”
A graduate of the
University of Arkansas at
Fayetteville (Sara’s alma
mater), having attended
the University of Arkansas
Community College at
Batesville from 2007-09,
Shelton believes her degree
in psychology is beneficial to
a career where she gets to
share in people’s stories and
lives. “Everyone has some-
thing to say,” she told the
Batesville Daily Guard.
associated Press
Monday, September 16, 2013
The Saline Courier 3
VOTE
MARIA ALLRED
HARMONY
GROVE SCHOOL
BOARD
Fully Vested in the Success
of Our Students, Schools &
Community.
Vote Tuesday, September 17
th
/votemariaallred
H H
H H H
Paid Political Advertisement
Glen Rose Pre-School
Has openings for the 2013-2014 school
year, for children that are or will be
four years old by September 15th.
Please inquire at the
Glen Rose
Elementary Offce
or by phone at
501-332-3694 ext 3
OBITUARIES
Clovis Juanita Harrell
Clovis Juanita Harrell, 96, of Canton, Texas, formerly of
Bryant, passed away Friday, Sept. 13, 2013. She was born
Oct. 26, 1916 in Clovis, N M.. Mrs. Harrell was a homemak-
er and a member of Oak Grove Baptist Church in Canton.
She was preceded in death by her father, Andrew Duncan;
her mother and stepfather, Alma and Luther
McDaniel; her husband, W.O. Harrell; a son,
Duncan Harrell; a brother, Seymour McDaniel;
a sister, Anna Shoemaker; a grandson, Kenny
Harrell and a great-great-granddaughter,
Charlotte Faith Rodriguez.
She is survived by three sons, Dale Harrell
(Betty) of Malvern, Fred Harrell (Judy) of
Mabank, Texas, and Jerry Harrell of Canton,
Texas; a daughter, Pat Harrell of Fort Worth, Texas; a broth-
er, Darrell McDaniel (Pat) of Oxford, Miss.; three sisters,
Leonora Green of Bryant, Jo Lawrence (Turner) of Benton
and Sue Perry (Homer) of Little Rock; 11 grandchildren,
Garry Harrell, Shelly Bell, Craig Harrell (Sheri), Conniesue
Early (John), Tim Harrell (Christine), Nicole Davis (Bo),
Amy Wright (Darby), Roslind Smith, Kim Craig (Chris),
Scott Harrell (Mendy) and Todd Harrell (Christine); 27
great-grandchildren and 15 great-great-grandchildren.
Funeral service is scheduled for noon, Tuesday, Sept. 17,
at Ashby Funeral Home. Burial will be at Pinecrest Memorial
Park.
Visitation will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. today, Sept. 16, at
Ashby Funeral Home.
In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to the Susan G.
Komen Foundation or the American Cancer Society.
Online guest book: www.ashbyfuneralhome.com.
Jerrell Wayne East Sr.
Jerrell Wayne “Pops” East Sr., 75, of Alexander passed
away Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013. He was born in Rosston,
December 5, 1937.
He was a retired Teamster member, spent 4 1/2 years
in the Navy and was a member of the Adoniram No. 288
Masonic Lodge. Pops enjoyed gardening, cooking, spending
time at the ballpark, loving on his two dogs, Sandy and Lizzy,
and being surrounded by his family and friends.
He was preceded in death by his parents,
George and Mae Trudy Foster East; three
brothers, Lloyd, Gradon and Jim; two sisters,
Selma Cox and Carrie Byers.
Jerrell is survived by his loving wife of 48
years, Mary Ruth Bacus East; a daughter,
Sheryl East; two sons, Jerry East (Tammy)
and Jeff East (Jessica); four grandchildren,
Cortny and Josh Spurlock, Jake East and Skyler Cook; one
great-grandchild, Kinley Henderson; a brother, Arlis East
(Dorothy); and many relatives and close friends.
A celebration of his life will be held at 2 p.m. Tuesday,
Sept. 17, at Dial and Dudley Funeral Home in Bryant.
Visitation is set from 6 to 8 p.m. Monday, Sept. 16, at the
funeral home.
Online guest book: www.dialanddudleyfuneralhome.com.
Rita Webb Mathews
Rita Webb Mathews, 67, of Mabelvale, passed away
Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013. She was born Aug. 10, 1946, in
Clay, Ark.
Mrs. Mathews was a licensed practical nurse (LPN).
She was preceded in death by her parents, W.B. and Elta
Webb.
She is survived by her husband, Rodney Mathews; two
sons, William Freeman (Jennifer) and Mick Mathews; two
daughters, Tonya Malcolm and Melissa Cox; a brother,
Charles Smith; and six grandchildren.
A private memorial service will be held at a later date.
On-line guest book: www.ashbyfuneralhome.com.
Harrell
East, Sr.
PAID OBITUARIES
BENTON ANIMAL CONTROL & ADOPTION CENTER
PET OF THE WEEK
This week’s featured pet
is Koko, an adorable female
Lab mix. Koko is about 5
months old and ready for
a safe, loving home. Please
don’t delay and adopt Koko
today.
Please visit our Facebook
page and benton.petfinder.
com to view all of the great
animals currently available
for adoption and learn how
you can help homeless pets
in our area.
Come by the shelter
and meet all of the wonder-
ful pets today. The shelter
is open Monday through
Saturday, noon to 4:30pm.
The shelter is located at
the intersection of S. Market
& Willow (less than a mile
south of the Courthouse
Square and C.W. Lewis
Stadium). For more infor-
mation, please call 501-776-
5972.
SPECIAL SPAY/
NEUTER DISCOUNT
ANNOUNCEMENT
The City of Benton and
Arkansans for Animals are
teaming up to offer the
citizens of Benton a special
discount on pet steriliza-
tion and rabies vaccina-
tions! Spay/neuter surgery
AND rabies vaccination is
only $20.00 for kittens and
cats and only $35.00 for pup-
pies and dogs. Citizens must
show proof of Benton resi-
dency, such as a utility bill
along with Photo ID. Please
call Arkansans for Animals
Spay/Neuter Clinic at
501-455-5400 to schedule
your appointment today.
Arkansans for Animals is
located at 11701 Interstate
30 in Little Rock (right off
the Otter Creek exit).
Be responsible. Spay and
neuter your pet.
SALINE COUNTy EvENTS
Email calendar items to news@bentoncourier.com or call 501-315-8228 ext. 236.
Calendar items are intended for nonprofit organizations.
TODAY
BOOK SIGNING: Local award-
winning author Carla Killough
McClafferty will discuss and sign
copies of her latest nonfiction
work “Fourth Down and Inches:
Concussions and Football’s
Make-or-Break Moment” at
6 p.m. Monday, Sept. 16 at
Herzfeld Library in Benton. The
program is open to all ages on
a first-come basis. Copies of her
work will be available for pur-
chase at the event. Call 778-4766
for more information.
GAME ON!:Tweens and teens
are invited to play video and/or
board games from 3:30 p.m.- 5
p.m. Monday, Sept. 16 at both
Saline County Library locations.
The program is for ages 8-18
at Boswell Library and ages
13-18 at Herzfeld Library. Call
778-4766 or 847-2166 for more
information.
 
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17
PUPPET SHOW: All ages are
invited to a family-friendly pup-
pet show at 4 p.m. Tuesday,
Sept. 17 at Herzfeld Library. Call
778-4766 for more information.
BRYANT HISTORICAL SOCIETY
will have its monthly meet-
ing on Tuesday, Sept. 17, at
6:30 p.m. in the Mabel Boswell
Memorial Library in Bryant
on Prickett Road. The society
meets the third Tuesday of
every month at the library. We
encourage those students or
other individuals that are inter-
ested in preserving the history
and heritage of Bryant to join us
at this meeting.
SALINE CROSSING REGIONAL
PARK & RECREATION AREA,
INC will meet Tuesday, Sept.
17 in the Gene Moss building
at Tyndall Park. The public is
invited to join as we plan for the
200th anniversary of the first
settlement in Saline County.
 
WEDNESDAY,
SEPTEMBER 18
BLOCK PARTY LIBRARY LEGO
CLUB: Ages 4 to 14 are invited
to create a Lego masterpiece
from 3:30 - 5 p.m. Wednesday,
Sept. 18 at Boswell Library dur-
ing the monthly Block Party.
A new theme will be explored
each month. Call 847-2166 for
more information.
INTRODUCTION TO
COMPUTERS: Ages 18 and
older are invited to attend an
introductory computer class
at 6 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 18
at Herzfeld Library. This class
includes information such as
learning to use a mouse and
keyboard. No registration
required. Call 778-4766 for
more information.
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19
INTRODUCTION TO THE
INTERNET: Ages 18 and older
are invited to attend a basic
computer class regarding use of
the internet at 6 p.m. Thursday,
Sept. 19 at Herzfeld Library. No
registration required. Call 778-
4766 for more information.
SHARON EXTENSION
HOMEMAKERS Club will meet
10:00 a.m. Thursday, September
19 at the Saline County
Fairgrounds.
PUBLIC SPEAKING WORKSHOP:
The Saline County Library has
partnered with a local branch
of Toastmasters International
to offer a two-part workshop
on public speaking beginning
at 6 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 19
at Boswell Library in Bryant.
The second session will meet
at 6 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 26 at
the same time and location.
Attendance is first come, first
served and is open to ages 18
and older.
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 21
MOVIE IN THE PARK: “Wreck
It Ralph” will be shown at the
Tyndall Park amphitheater in
Benton on Saturday, Sept. 21
at 8 p.m. Admission is free.
Concessions will be available
for purchase.
THEOS, A SUPPORT GROUP FOR
WIDOWS AND WIDOWERS:will
meet for lunch, 11:30 a.m.
Saturday, September 21 at
Colton’s.
BRAZIL FAMILY REUNION will
be held Saturday, Sept. 21 at
Sardis Ball Park at noon. Bring
enough food and drinks for
your family and more. Please
bring ice also.
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 23
CIVIL WAR dances of the
time period will be held
Monday, Sept. 23. The Historic
Washington Dancers from Old
Washington, Ark. will be at
Herzfeld Library, 1800 Smithers
Drive in Benton to perform
such dances as the Virginia
Reel and other Civil War period
dances.  The program will begin
at 6:30 p.m. The dancers will
be dressed in Civil War period
costume and perform these
dances.  Make plans now to
attend. 
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24
HASKELL HISTORICAL SOCIETY
will meet on Tuesday, Sept.
24 at 2:30 p.m. at Haskell City
Hall. The public is invited to
attend and bring old items,
news articles or pictures to be
copied, loaned or donated. For
more information call Darlene
Emmons at 501-315-2913 or
Emaline Stroud at 501-303-
0384.
CREATIVE OUTLET: Teens are
invited to participate in a book
club and make-and-take craft
from 4-5:15 p.m. Tuesday, Sept.
24 at Boswell Library in Bryant.
Call 847-2166 for more informa-
tion.
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 26
HABITAT HOMEOWNERSHIP
MEETING will be held Thursday,
Sept. 26 for anyone interested
in owning a home. The meeting
will begin at 6 p.m. at Herzfeld
Library in Benton.
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28
ALL YOU CAN EAT FISH FRY: 3 to
7 p.m., Saturday, September 28
at Congo Masonic Lodge. Corner
of Steel Bridge and Thompson
Dairy Road. American raised cat-
fish, homemade hushpuppies,
beans with ham, river bank fried
taters and more. $12 for adults,
$5 for children 9 to 12, 8 and
under free. Last Saturday of the
month, April through October, 3
- 7 pm. Money raised goes to
area charities. Public invited.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5
THIRD ANNUAL HOME IS WERE
THE HEART IS AUCTION will
be Saturday, October 5 at 6:30
p.m. and tickets are $35 and all
proceeds will go toward eradi-
cating poverty housing in Saline
County. Live entertainment will
be musical guest Josh Green.
SHERIDAN FAMILY AND
FRIENDS REUNION will be held
at the Gene Moss Building
at Tyndall Park in Benton on
Saturday, Oct. 5 from 10 a.m. to
3 p.m. Guests are asked to bring
a covered dish. For more infor-
mation call 501-778-6406.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26
ALL YOU CAN EAT FISH FRY: 3 to
7 p.m. Saturday, October 26, at
Congo Masonic Lodge. Corner
of Steel Bridge and Thompson
Dairy Road. American raised cat-
fish, homemade hushpuppies,
beans with ham, river bank fried
taters and more. $12 for adults,
$5 for children 9 to 12, 8 and
under free. Money raised goes to
area charities. Public invited.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11
BENTON CLASS OF 1988
REUNION: Benton High School
Class of 1988 will celebrate its
25th reunion on Oct. 11 and 12.
ONGOING EVENTS
ART DISPLAY: During the
months of June and July the
Saline County Library will feature
the works of Benton resident
and art teacher Tane Steed at
Herzfeld Library in Benton. The
display is located in the meeting
room and is open for viewing
during regular library hours.
BRYANT HISTORICAL SOCIETY:
meets 6:30 p.m. every third
Tuesday in the Heritage Room
at the Mabel Boswell Memorial
Library in Bryant on Prickett
Road. We encourage students
and others to join us in preserv-
ing the history and heritage of
Bryant. Annual dues are $25 for
adults and $15 for students.
HEAD START ENROLLMENT:
CADC Head Start Centers in
Saline County are accepting
applications, through the end of
May, for enrollment for the 2013-
2014 school year. Applications
are accepted during regular
business hours at the following
locations: Benton Head Start
Center, 321 Edison Avenue. Call
501-315-6456. Harmony Grove
Head Start Center, 115 School
Road (Haskell). Call 501-776-
1697. Paron Head Start Center,
16494 W. 12th Street. Call 501-
594-5668. and Shannon Hills
Head Start Center, 11925 County
Line Road. Call 501-455-4932. To
be eligible to enroll in the Head
Start program, a child must
be three or four years old. The
family must also meet income
guidelines. Verification of family
income, child’s birth certificate
and immunization records are
required to complete an applica-
tion.
Miss America cheers
pageant diversity
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. —
Moments after winning the
2014 Miss America crown,
Nina Davuluri described
how delighted she is that the
nearly century-old pageant
sees beauty and talent of all
kinds.
The 24-year-old Miss New
York is the first contestant
of Indian heritage to become
Miss America; her talent
routine was a Bollywood
fusion dance.
“I’m so happy this organi-
zation has embraced diver-
sity,” she said in her first
press conference after win-
ning the crown in Atlantic
City, N.J.’s Boardwalk Hall.
“I’m thankful there are chil-
dren watching at home who
can finally relate to a new
Miss America.”
Her pageant platform
was “celebrating diversity
through cultural compe-
tency.”
The native of Syracuse,
N.Y. wants to be a doctor,
and is applying to medical
school, with the help of a
$50,000 scholarship she won
as part of the pageant title.
She is the second con-
secutive Miss New York to
win the Miss America crown,
succeeding Mallory Hagan,
who was selected in January
when the pageant was still
held in Las Vegas. The Miss
America Organization will
compensate Hagan for her
shortened reign.
Davuluri’s victory led to
some negative comments on
Twitter from users upset that
someone of Indian heritage
had won the pageant. She
brushed those aside.
“I have to rise above that,”
she said. “I always viewed
myself as first and foremost
American.”
Her grandmother told
The Associated Press that
she cried when she saw the
news on television.
I am very, very, happy for
the girl. It was her dream
and it was fulfilled,” 89-year-
old V. Koteshwaramma said
by phone from her home
in the city of Vijaywada, in
the southern Indian state of
Andhra Pradesh.
She said there are numer-
ous doctors in the family,
both in the U.S. and India,
and that if her granddaugh-
ter wants to become one “I
am sure she will do it.”
She will still make the tra-
ditional frolic in the Atlantic
City surf Monday morning.
Her first runner-up was
Miss California, Crystal
Lee. Other top 5 finalists
included Miss Minnesota,
Rebecca Yeh; Miss Florida,
Myrrhanda Jones, and Miss
Oklahoma, Kelsey Griswold.
Associated Press
Walter E. Collatt
Walter E. Collatt, 84, of Haskell died Sunday, Sept. 15,
2013.
Funeral service will be held at 11 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 17,
in the chapel of Roller-Ballard Funeral Home.
Visitation will be held Monday, Sept.16, 2013, from 6 to 8
p.m. at Roller-Ballard Funeral Home.(501)315-4047.
State Sen. Jeremy Hutchinson, District 33,
201 E. North St., Benton, AR 72015, (501) 773-
3760, jeremy.hutchinson@senate.ar.gov.
State Sen. David Sanders, District 27 Room
320 State Capitol, Little Rock, AR 72201, (501)
682-6107, davidjamessanders@gmail.com.
State Sen. Alan Clark, District 13 P.O. Box
211, Lonsdale, AR 72087, (501) 262-3360, alan.
clark@senate.ar.gov.
State Rep. Ann Clemmer, District 23, 7415
Camille Drive, Benton, AR 72015, (501) 316-
0364, avclemmer@sbcglobal.net.
State Rep. Andy Davis, District 31 P.O. Box
30248, Little Rock, AR 72260, (501) 837-5109,
andy.davis@arkansashouse.org.
State Rep. Andy Mayberry, District 27 3022
E. Woodson Lateral Road, Hensley, AR 72065,
(501) 888-3522, andymayberry@windstream.net.
State Rep. Kim Hammer, District 28, 1411
Edgehill Dr., Benton, AR 72015, (501) 840-3841,
kimdhammer@yahoo.com.
Circuit Judge Bobby McCallister, 22nd
Judicial District, Division 1, Saline County
Courthouse, 200 N. Main St., Benton, AR 72015,
(501) 303-5635.
Circuit Judge Gary Arnold, 22nd Judicial
District, Division 2, Saline County Courthouse,
200 N. Main St., Benton, AR 72015, (501) 303-
5664.
Circuit Judge Grisham Phillips, 22nd
Judicial District, Division 3, Saline County
Courthouse, 200 N. Main St., Benton, AR 72015,
(501) 303-5628.
Circuit Judge Robert Herzfeld, 22nd
Judicial District, Division 4, Saline County Annex,
321 N. Main St., Benton, AR 72015, (501) 303-
1584.
District Judge Michael Robinson, Benton
District, 1605 Edison Ave., Benton, AR 72019,
(501) 303-5670.
District Judge Stephanie Casady, Bryant
District (Bryant, Alexander, Bauxite, Haskell,
Shannon Hills), Boswell Municipal Complex, 210
SW Third St., Bryant, AR 72022, (501) 847-5223.
Saline County Judge Lanny Fite,
Courthouse 200 N. Main St., Benton, AR 72015,
(501) 303-5640.
Prosecuting Attorney Ken Casady, 22nd
Juicial District, 102 S. Main St., Benton, AR
72015, (501) 315-7767.
HOW TO REACH YOUR ELECTED OFFICIALS
“Congress shall make no law ... abridging the freedom
of speech, or of the press ... .”
— From the First Amendment to Constitution
T
hose first few steps in the morning are sur-
prisingly painful. It feels as if someone has
hammered a 10-pound nail into the middle of
your heel. Usually, it goes away quickly, and as long
as you keep moving, everything’s fine. If you sit down
to watch a little TV and suddenly get up to answer
the phone, you will fall flat on your face. Again, for
about three steps your feet feel as if someone has
beaten them with a club.
The diagnosis is usually plantar fasciitis, meaning
the ligament along the bottom of the foot is no longer
doing its job correctly. Treatment is all over the map.
Surgery, rest, massage, orthotics, cortisone injec-
tions, stretching, arch supports, acupuncture, aspirin,
ibuprofen, cold therapy, heat therapy,
always go barefoot, never go bare-
foot, sleep with a splint, ad infinitum.
Everyone I know seems to have had it
or has it, and they all have different rec-
ommendations.
I decided to go with the simplest
plan first: to buy some shoes with
better arch support than the loafers I
usually wear. Sue always told me they
were bad for my feet but I always had
the same answer: “If you play tennis,
you wear tennis shoes. If you golf, you
wear golf shoes. If you run, you wear
running shoes. If you bowl, you wear
bowling shoes. So you can see why I
wear loafers.”
But it was time for a change. I hobbled down to the
shoe store to invest in a pair of trainers that would
offer my foot all the love and support it needed. From
now on, my aching feet would be caressed all day
long by the finest combination of science and the
shoemaker’s art. Shoes that would magically make all
my problems disappear and let me dance the fandan-
go once again. OK, so I never danced the fandango. I
don’t even know what a fandango is, but you get my
drift.
But the shoe store didn’t. They seemed to
think I was auditioning for a part in “SpongeBob
SquarePants.” Each pair of sports shoes was more
cartoonish than the last. It’s bad enough that the
heel on one had visible springs, but it was also in
lime Jell-O green with orange DayGlo stripes. I’m
sure they will look swell on the villain in the next
Superman movie, but I plan to wear them around the
house, not with my matching superhero cape.
Here was a nice pair, for only $168, with good arch
support, a soft heel and room for my toes. If only it
came in black or white or brown and not in “safety
orange” with fluorescent white stripes and a blinking
light on the back. The soles were 3 inches thick in
Hulk green. As I recall, the Hulk goes barefoot most
of the time. It seems even he wouldn’t be caught
dead in these things.
There was one pair of all-white trainers that caught
my eye. Literally, it caught my eye because it was so
big it hit me in the face. This thing was the size of a
snow shoe. Instead of laces, it had Velcro straps, one
of which was undone and flapping out of the eye-level
display. Not only do my feet hurt, now I think I have
a detached retina. I would normally like an all-white
trainer, but the only thing you could wear with these
that would make sense at all would be giant, white,
four-fingered Mickey Mouse gloves.
Surgery is starting to look better and better. Is
there some good reason that modern sports shoes
look so silly? Is there no room for something that
doesn’t make you look like you were the life model
for Homer Simpson? I finally settled for some over-
the-counter inserts in my loafers and they seem to
help a bit, especially in the daytime. But if they made
non-cartoon shoes, I’d have bought them.
Contact Jim Mullen at JimMullenBooks.com.
A
s I read Vlad’s op-ed in The
New York Times, a Judy
Collins tune kept replay-
ing in my head: “Isn’t it rich? Isn’t it
queer?”
The song, actually written by
Stephen Sondheim, although it is
Collins’ signature
hit, is “Send in the
Clowns” and seems
an apt soundtrack
for current events.
As we’ve stalled in
making a decision
about how to handle
Syria (two years and
counting), Russian
President Vladimir
Putin and Syrian
President Bashar al-
Assad have been allowed to emerge
as reasonable heads of state, talking
down to the U.S., lecturing us about
our misplaced belief in exceptional-
ism, and making demands that mock
our president.
Nice work.
Putin hasn’t had this much fun
since he rode shotgun in George W.
Bush’s truck. Thanks to President
Obama, the good times keep on roll-
ing. We now have a catalog of blun-
ders we can attach to Putin-related
(Putinesca?) “diplomacy,” a term that
becomes more farcical by the day.
Recall that Bush, whose inter-
national outreach often included a
ride around his Crawford, Texas,
ranch, once said he looked into
Putin’s eyes and saw his soul. I have
a photograph from the day in Texas
that captures the two men grinning.
Putin, it must be said, looks like he’s
having the time of his life and Bush
looks, as he always did, confident
and oblivious to the menace seated
beside him.
Next we have Obama, who, in an
intimate moment with then-outgoing
Russian President Dmitry Medvedev,
conveyed a message to incoming
President Putin. Thinking the micro-
phones were off, Obama asked for a
little space until after his re-election
when he would have more wiggle
room on missile defense.
“Wiggle room,” now there’s a
foreign policy. As the red line has
moved, then blurred, then moved
again until now it is nearly invisible,
Putin has approached the American
people directly via the Times, while
Assad issues orders to Washington:
He’ll sign the chemical weapons
agreement if the U.S. promises to
bug off.
Brilliant.
We can’t quite seem to get it quite
right at the helm. Either we’re sad-
dled with a cocksure “decidinator”
who is feared for his lack of pause
-- or we’re stuck with an over-thinker
so afraid of making the wrong deci-
sion that he paralyzes himself into a
pose of ineptitude.
Both profiles can be equally dan-
gerous, depending on circumstances,
though inarguably it is better to
be feared than pitied. It is painful
to watch as Obama is increasingly
diminished by his inability to com-
mit to a position that he himself has
staked out.
Certitude isn’t always an admirable
trait. In fact, in political discourse, it
is most often annoying if not down-
right wrong. Life is not, as it turns
out, black and white. Diplomacy is all
about exploring the shades of gray.
But it is also true that the president
of the United States doesn’t get
to suffer the usual flaws of human
comport. He doesn’t get to promise
grave consequences for unacceptable
behavior and then, failing to follow
through, act as though everyone
else’s perception is somehow at fault.
“I didn’t set a red line,” Obama has
said. “The world set a red line.”
This not only is false but sounds
petulant. The president’s speech to
the nation Tuesday night struck a
better tone, but it was consistently
inconsistent in content. Obama
conveyed the sense that he really
doesn’t know what he intends to do
-- or why.
Recognizing this, Putin now has
taken the high road, scolding the
U.S. for its “commonplace” interven-
tions in countries not its own.
“Is it in America’s long-term inter-
est? I doubt it,” Putin wrote -- and
we know that Putin cares deeply
about America’s long-term interest.
“Millions around the world increas-
ingly see America not as a model
of democracy but as relying solely
on brute force, cobbling coalitions
together under the slogan ‘you’re
either with us or against us.’”
And, it is “extremely dangerous to
encourage people to see themselves
as exceptional, whatever the motiva-
tion.”
Actually, Vlad, millions around
the world do see the U.S. not only
as a model of democracy but also as
exceptional because, among other
things, we let everybody talk. Even
clowns. Sing it, Judy.
Whatever the outcome of these
fire-hydrant gymnastics, a positive
result (no U.S. military engagement
and an enforceable chemical weap-
ons agreement with Syria) likely will
have been accidental. So be it and
pass the champagne. But the larger
lesson should not get lost in events:
Never draw a line unless you are pre-
pared to fight. Erasers make lousy
weapons.
Kathleen Parker’s email address is
kathleenparker@washpost.com.
Shocker: KGB colonel
outmaneuvers the
community organizer
EDITORIAL CARTOON
A
looming hike in premiums for
47,000 teachers and a lawsuit
pending before the state’s highest
court are reminders that six years after
the end of the Lake View case, Arkansas
may not be finished with its school funding
battles.
After a legislative session that was domi-
nated by health care, tax cuts and social
issues, lawmakers are facing the possibility
of returning to the state Capitol for the first
school-related special session since 2006
— this time dealing with teacher insur-
ance.
Though Arkansas is
required to fund educa-
tion first, school issues
haven’t dominated the
Legislature’s attention as
much as they did during
sessions when lawmak-
ers enacted reforms in
response to the Lake View
school funding case. The
tiny Lake View School
District sued the state in
1992, challenging the con-
stitutionality of a system
that allowed wide funding
disparities between wealthy districts and
poor ones. The case ended in 2007 after
justices ruled that Arkansas had finally
funded its schools adequately.
A special session on teacher insurance
is far from a certainty, but calls are grow-
ing among lawmakers to move quickly on
the rate increases for teachers before they
take effect in January. A state board last
month approved increasing premiums by
as much as 50 percent for the 47,000 teach-
ers on the state plan starting Jan. 1. For
example, the premium for family coverage
under the most popular plan will increase
from $1,029 to $1,528 a month.
Teachers are offered insurance on
separate plans from state employees. The
health insurance plans offered to state
employees are identical, but have lower
premiums because the state contributes
more money for each budgeted position.
That disparity, and the fear that the
premiums could prevent the state from
attracting quality teachers, is raising con-
cern among lawmakers that the problem
could eventually be used as an argument
that Arkansas isn’t adequately funding its
schools.
“Compensation is a part of adequacy,
being able to attract quality teachers
is a part of adequacy,” said Rep. James
McLean, chairman of the House Education
Committee. “Teachers, I believe, is where
it all begins when it comes to adequacy
and if you have a benefit that swallows
up take-home pay to such a degree that
it’s unaffordable for teachers to teach, I
believe that’s an adequacy question.”
Absent a special session, the earliest
lawmakers could deal with the issue is in
the fiscal session that begins in February.
Sen. Jason Rapert, who chairs the Senate
Insurance Committee, is urging Gov. Mike
Beebe to call lawmakers back before then
and says lawmakers could tap into the
state’s surplus to provide some short-term
relief to teachers. State employee benefits
division officials said an additional $53 mil-
lion would be needed to keep the premium
rates at their current levels.
“There’s no reason why we can’t come
to some consensus on what we want to
do, call a session for five days, seven days,
whatever that might be, come down here
and do what needs to be done for the
teachers,” Rapert told reporters. “We’re
sent here to take care of the state’s busi-
ness. We realize at this point this situation
is going to cause a lot of turmoil for these
teachers and their families.”
Beebe has said he doesn’t have plans
yet to call a special session, but has left it
open as a possibility if lawmakers can find
consensus on both the short-term prob-
lem of the premium hikes and the long-
term problem of the insurance program’s
sustainability. Beebe has only called one
special session since taking office in 2007
and only did so after getting commitments
from enough lawmakers to pass the mea-
sure.
Another complication for lawmakers
may come from the state Supreme Court,
which is considering whether to revive a
lawsuit by the Deer-Mount Judea School
District that accuses the state of not liv-
ing up to its Lake View school funding
reforms.
The state has argued that the district’s
lawsuit is trying to resurrect issues that
had already been resolved during the
15-year-long Lake View case. But at least
one justice questioned if that closes the
door on ever reviewing school funding
problems.
“Wouldn’t that lead to a situation where
nobody could ever challenge the fund-
ing system under your theory?” Justice
Paul Danielson asked Assistant Attorney
General Scott Richardson during a hearing
earlier this month.
Richardson responded: “Our argument
is they can’t do that by going back into
the Lake View period and trying to show,
‘Well, all these facts and evidence that
were at issue in the Lake View period
show that the state is unconstitutional
now.’ The Lake View ruling in 2007 set the
floor for what is a constitutional system.”
The next few weeks could determine
whether that floor is about to be reset.
Andrew DeMillo is a writer for AP.
School funding
issues return
Shoes wisely,
grasshopper
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ARKANSAS
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THE VILLAGE
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news@bentoncourier.com Monday, September 16, 2013
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UN: ‘Convincing evidence’ of Syria chemical attack
UNITED NATIONS —
U.N. inspectors said in a
report Monday there is
“clear and convincing evi-
dence” that chemical weap-
ons were used on a relatively
large scale in an attack last
month in Syria that killed
hundreds of people.
The findings represent
the first official confirma-
tion by scientific experts
that chemical weapons
were used in the Syrian
conflict, but the first page
of the report, seen by
The Associated Press, left
the key question of who
launched the attack unan-
swered.
The report came as the
chairman of a U.N. war
crimes panel said it is
investigating 14 suspected
chemical attacks in Syria,
dramatically escalating
the stakes after diplomatic
breakthroughs that saw the
Syrian government agree to
dismantle its chemical weap-
ons program.
Secretary-General Ban
Ki-moon was scheduled to
present the U.N. inspectors’
report to the U.N. Security
Council later Monday morn-
ing.
The inspectors said “the
environmental, chemical and
medical samples we have
collected provide clear and
convincing evidence that
surface-to-surface rockets
containing the nerve agent
sarin were used ... in the
Ghouta area of Damascus”
on Aug. 21.
“The conclusion is that
chemical weapons have
been used in the ongoing
conflict between the parties
in the Syrian Arab Republic,
also against civilians, includ-
ing children, on a relatively
large scale,” the inspectors
said in their report to Ban.
“This result leaves us with
the deepest concern,” the
inspectors said.
The inspectors were man-
dated to report on whether
chemical weapons were
used and if so which ones —
not on who was responsible.
The rebels and their
Western and Arab support-
ers blame President Bashar
Assad’s regime for the
attack in the rebel-controlled
area of Ghouta. The Assad
regime insists that the attack
was carried out by rebels.
The U.N. report mentions
the Ghouta areas of Ein
Tarma, Moadamiyeh and
Zamalka, all of which were
featured in the videos of
victims that emerged shortly
after the attack.
The Aug. 21 chemical
attack unfolded as the U.N.
inspection team was in Syria
to investigate earlier report-
ed attacks. After days of
delays, the inspectors were
allowed access to victims,
doctors and others in the
Damascus suburbs.
Chief weapons inspector
Ake Sellstrom handed over
the report to the secretary-
general on Sunday amid a
flurry of diplomatic activity
aimed at getting Syria to put
its just-acknowledged stock-
pile of chemical weapons
and chemical precursors
under international control
for destruction.
In the report, Sellstrom
said the team was issuing
the findings on the Ghouta
attacks “without prejudice”
to its continuing investiga-
tion and final report on the
alleged use of chemical
weapons in three other
areas. The letter said it
hoped to produce that report
as soon as possible.
Under an Aug. 13 agree-
ment between the U.N.
and the Syrian govern-
ment, Sellstrom’s team was
scheduled to investigate an
alleged chemical weapons
attack on March 19 on the
village of Khan al Assal
outside Aleppo and alleged
attacks on two other sites
which were kept secret for
security reasons.
The letter for the first
time identified the two
sites still to be investigated
as Sheik Maqsood and
Saraqueb.
It also thanked the four
laboratories designated by
the Office for the Prohibition
of Chemical Weapons
(OPCW) to examine the
samples from Syria, disclos-
ing their locations for the
first time — in Finland,
Germany, Sweden and
Switzerland.
In Geneva, the chairman
of a U.N. war crimes panel,
Paulo Sergio Pinheiro, said
his panel has not pinpointed
the chemical used in the 14
suspected chemical attacks
it said Monday it was inves-
tigating.
Pinheiro also said the
panel believes Assad’s gov-
ernment has been respon-
sible for war crimes and
crimes against humanity,
while rebel groups have
perpetrated war crimes but
not crimes against humanity
“because there is not a clear
chain of command.”
U.S. Secretary of State
John Kerry ended a week-
long diplomacy tour in Paris
on Monday after laying out
with his French and British
counterparts a two-pronged
approach in Syria. They
called for enforceable U.N.
benchmarks for eradicating
the chemical weapons pro-
gram and an international
conference bolstering the
moderate opposition.
Kerry was pressing for
support for the ambitious
agreement that averted
threatened U.S. military
strikes. It calls for an inven-
tory of Syria’s chemical
weapons program within
one week, with all compo-
nents of the program out of
the country or destroyed by
mid-2014.
France and the U.S. insist-
ed that a military response
to the Aug. 21 attack
remained on the table, and
were pressing for a U.N.
resolution reflecting that in
coming days.
“If Assad fails to comply
... we are all agreed, and
that includes Russia, that
there will be consequences,”
Kerry said.
But Russia’s foreign min-
ister, Sergey Lavrov, said
ongoing attempts to threaten
the use of force against Syria
would provoke the opposi-
tion and disrupt a chance for
negotiations.
Meanwhile, invitations
were going out Monday to
top members of the Syrian
National Coalition — the
main umbrella opposition
group — for an interna-
tional conference in New
York timed to coincide with
next week’s U.N. General
Assembly meeting, French
officials said.
Bolstering the Western-
backed SNC is just as
crucial to Syria’s future as
Assad’s agreement to give
up chemical arms, said
French Foreign Minister
Laurent Fabius.
“He must understand that
there is no military victory,
no possible military victory
for him,” Fabius said. He
acknowledged that broad
popular support for the reb-
els has been hampered by
fears that Islamic militants
are now playing a major role
in the 2 ½-year-old upris-
ing that has left more than
100,000 dead.
Those who blame Assad
for the chemical attack and
supported military strikes
say it is up to Assad to
uphold his end of any deal.
In Geneva, Pinheiro said
the “vast majority” of casual-
ties in Syria’s civil war came
from conventional weapons
like guns and mortars.
Associated Press
Shipwrecked Concordia wrested off Italian reef
GIGLIO ISLAND, Italy
(AP) — Engineers on
Monday succeeded in wrest-
ing the hull of the ship-
wrecked Costa Concordia
from the Italian reef where
it has been stuck since it
capsized in January 2012,
leaving them cautiously
optimistic they can rotate
the luxury liner upright and
eventually tow it away.
Never before has such an
enormous cruise ship been
righted, and the crippled
Concordia didn’t budge for
the first three hours after
the operation began, engi-
neer Sergio Girotto told
reporters. But after some
6,000 tons of force were
applied using a complex
system of pulleys and coun-
terweights, “we saw the
detachment” from the reef
thanks to undersea cameras,
he said.
Girotto said the cameras
did not immediately reveal
any sign of the two bodies
that were never recovered
from among the 32 who
died Jan. 13, 2012 when the
Concordia slammed into a
reef and capsized after the
ship’s captain steered the
luxury liner too close to
Giglio Island.
Images transmitted by
robotic diving vehicles indi-
cated that the submerged
side of the hull had suffered
“great deformation” from
all its time on the granite
seabed, battered by waves
and compressed under the
weight of the ship’s 115,000
tons, Girotto said.
The initial operation to
lift the Concordia from the
reef moved the ship just
3 degrees toward vertical,
leaving the vessel some 62
degrees shy of being pulled
upright. While a seemingly
small shift, the movement
was significant enough to be
visible: A few feet of slime-
covered hull that had been
underwater became visible
above the waterline.
Engineers were waiting
for the operation’s comple-
tion before declaring suc-
cess: The entire rotation
was expected to last as long
as 12 hours, with crews pre-
pared to work into the night
if need be.
So far, “rotation has gone
according to predictions,”
and no appreciable pollu-
tion from inside the ship
has spewed out, said Franco
Gabrielli, chief of Italy’s
Civil Protection agency,
which is overseeing the
operation.
Giglio is part of a Tuscan
archipelago in a marine
sanctuary where dolphins
romp and fish are plentiful.
The operation, known
in nautical parlance as par-
buckling, is a proven meth-
od to raise capsized vessels.
The USS Oklahoma was par-
buckled by the U.S. military
in 1943 after the Japanese
attack on Pearl Harbor.
But the 300-meter (1,000-
foot), 115,000-ton Concordia
has been described as the
largest cruise ship ever to
capsize and subsequently
require the complex rota-
tion.
The operation involves
engineers using remote con-
trols to guide
a synchro-
nized leverage
system of
pulleys, coun-
terweights
and huge
chains looped
under the
Concordia’s
carcass to del-
icately nudge
the ship free
from its rocky
seabed and
rotate it upright.
During the rotation pro-
cess, a series of tanks fixed
on the exposed side of the
hull will be filled with water
to help pull it down.
Once the ship is upright,
engineers hope to attach an
equal number of tanks filled
with water on the other side
to balance the ship, anchor
it and stabilize it during
the winter months. The
flat-keeled hull itself will be
resting on a false seabed
some 30 meters (100 feet)
underwater, made out of a
platform and cement-filled
sandbags that fill in the gaps
of the sloping, jagged reef.
When it comes time to
tow the ship in spring, the
tanks will gradually be emp-
tied of the water so the ship
becomes buoyant enough to
float off the seabed, work-
ing like a giant pair of water
wings.
For over a year, resi-
dents of the fishing island
have watched from shore
as cranes and barges have
moved into place to try to
remove the hulk from their
port. A few dozen gathered
Monday morning on a
breakwater to witness the
operation getting underway,
while others glimpsed it
from shore as they went
about their daily business.
One woman walking her
dog near the harbor sported
a T-shirt with “Keep Calm
and Watch the Parbuckling
Project” written across it in
English. A variation on other
T-shirts read: “Keep calm
and think of Giglio Island.”
Gigliese, as locals call them-
selves, had raced to the aid
of the survivors who stag-
gered shivering from the
sea that wintry night, bring-
ing them blankets, warm
clothing and invitations into
their homes.
“There is a little tension
now. The operation is very
complex,” said Giovanni
Andolfi, a 63-year-old resi-
dent who spent his career at
sea working on tankers and
cruise ships and watched
the operation from port.
Engineers have dismissed
as “remote” the possibility
that the Concordia might
break apart and no longer
be sound enough to be
towed to the mainland to be
turned into scrap. Should
the Concordia break apart
during the rotation, or spew
out toxic materials as it is
raised, absorbent barriers
were set in place to catch
any leaks.
Rouhani: Iran will accept
any elected Syria ruler
TEHRAN, Iran (AP)
— Iran’s President Hasan
Rouhani says his country
will accept anyone as ruler
of Syria who is elected by
the Syrian people, the offi-
cial news agency reported
Monday.
His remarks carried by
IRNA do not signal any
change of policy on Syria
but mark a shift of emphasis
from comments by other
Iranian leaders, which have
often stressed Iran’s support
for its ally, Syrian President
Bashar Assad, and blamed
the West and Israel for the
rebellion against him.
“Whoever Syrian citizens
vote for to rule their country,
we’ll agree with it,” Rouhani
was quoted as telling com-
manders of the powerful
Revolutionary Guard.
Syria plans a presidential
election in 2014, but few in
the opposition take the vote
seriously or believe it can be
held amid the country’s civil
war.
Opposition groups say
they oppose all negotiation
with Assad’s government
unless it is aimed at his giv-
ing up power.
Rouhani was elected
in June promising a more
diplomatic approach to the
West in negotiations over
its nuclear program, which
the U.S. and its allies say is
aimed at weapons develop-
ment. Iran says the program
is for peaceful purposes.
The new president has
stated however that Iran
will not give up its right to
disputed nuclear activities,
nor has he suggested any
major rethinking of Iran’s
alliance with Damascus. Key
nuclear and security matters
are under the control of the
country’s Supreme Leader
Ayatollah Ali Khamenei
and institutions that answer
directly to him, including the
Revolutionary Guard.
Syria’s opposition says the
Guard is directly involved in
the war on Assad’s side. Iran
denies this.
“The Guards do not seek
military domination over the
region,” Rouhani said. “It is a
mistake by the West, which
thinks Iran is after military
domination over the region.”
He called on the U.S. mili-
tary, which has bases in the
Persian Gulf, to pull out of
the region. “You, the unso-
licited guest in our region,
leave the region and then
you will see that it becomes
heaven.”
On Monday Iran’s Foreign
Minister Mohammad Javad
Zarif said his country is
ready to “resolve the nuclear
issue, if the West is seri-
ous.” He said Tehran was
willing to “build trust” with
Washington.
“We are suffering from
lack of mutual trust,” Zarif
told Lebanese news TV
channel al-Mayadeen.
Rouhani and Zarif plan
to attend the U.N. General
Assembly in New York later
in September. Rouhani has
suggested it may be an
opportunity to move forward
in nuclear talks.
In the same meeting,
Guard commander Gen.
Mohammad Ali Jafari said,
“So far, the enemies’ plot for
military intervention in Syria
has failed. We are hopeful
this will continue until the
end.”
Associated Press
Filipino troops retake most
of rebel-held villages
ZAMBOANGA,
Philippines (AP) —
Philippine troops have
recaptured 70 percent of the
coastal areas by a southern
city that were occupied by
Muslim rebels, the military
said, adding helicopter gun-
ships were deployed for the
first time Monday as a hos-
tage standoff dragged to its
second week.
Troops and special
police forces have killed or
arrested more than 100 Moro
National Liberation Front
rebels, who occupied five
coastal villages, after govern-
ment forces foiled what offi-
cials said was an attempt by
the heavily armed insurgents
to take control of Zamboanga
city hall on Sept. 8.
But about 100 rebels
remained holed up with
more than 100 hostages.
Government troops were
continuing a push against
the insurgents
but were wary
of causing any
harm to the
captives, mili-
tary spokesman
Lt. Col. Ramon
Zagala said, adding it was dif-
ficult to say when the fight-
ing will end.
Troops have tried to con-
tain the clashes in the coastal
outskirts of Zamboanga,
a largely Christian city of
nearly 1 million people,
but suspected rebel mortar
fire destroyed a car near
the city’s downtown area
Monday, raising fears the
gunmen were attempting to
divert the military’s attention.
Nearly 82,000 residents
have fled the fighting into
several emergency shelters,
including the city’s main
sports complex.
Interior Secretary Mar
Roxas said about 850 houses
had been destroyed amid
fierce exchanges of gunfire
and occasional bursts of
mortar rounds and grenades.
Police said some fires may
have been deliberately set by
rebels to cover their escapes.
Associated Press
Associated Press
Page 6 – The Saline Courier
sports@bentoncourier.com Monday, September 16, 2013
SportS
saline
scoreboard
FRIDAY (the 13th)
Football
Benton 31, Jacksonville 21
Bryant 28, LR Central 14
Glen Rose 45, Bauxite 20
Gurdon 27, BHG 16
Arkadelphia 56, Sheridan 6
MONDAY
Football
Benton JV at Conway, 6 p.m.
Volleyball
Benton JH at Cabot S, 4:30 p.m.
Golf
Benton and Bryant at Robinson
(Emerald Park), 3:30 p.m.
Tennis
Benton at Russellville, 3:30 p.m.
TUESDAY
Volleyball
Benton at Texarkana, 5 p.m.
Bryant at Sheridan, 5 p.m.
Tennis
Benton vs. El Dorado 3:30 p.m.
Bryant at Rogers Her., 3:30 pm
THURSDAY
Volleyball
Benton at Lake Hamilton, 5 p.m.
Benton JH vs. Bryant, 4:30 p.m.
Bryant vs. Texarkana, 5 p.m.
Football
Benton JH at Cabot N, 5:30 p.m.
Bryant JH at lake Hamilton, 7
p.m.
Golf
Benton at Central, 3:30 p.m.
(War Memorial LR)
Bryant at Sheridan, 3:30 p.m.
FRIDAY
Football
Benton at Greenbrier, 7 p.m.
Bryant vs. LR Catholic, 7 p.m.
BHG at Magnet Cove, 7 p.m.
Bauxite at Jessieville, 7 p.m.
Glen Rose vs. Min. Spgs, 7 pm
Sheridan at White Hall, 7 p.m.
SATURDAY
Volleyball
Benton at HSU Tourney
Benton JH at NLR (8th grade)
Cross Country
Benton CC at Caddo Hills Inv.
(Norman, Ark.)
sec football
schedule
SATURDAY
7 Louisville def. Kentucky 27-13
Arkansas def. So. Miss. 24-3
1 Bama def. 6 Texas A&M 49-42
2 Oregon def. Tenn. 59-14
Auburn def. Miss. St. 24-20
8 LSU def. Kent State 45-13
13 S. Carolina def. Vandy 35-25
25 Ole Miss def. Texas 44-23
NFC EAST
Dallas
Philadelphia
New York
Washington
1-1
1-1
0-2
0-2
Cowboys settle for field goals, lose 17-16
KANSAS CITY, Mo. —
The Dallas Cowboys didn’t
have any trouble marching
deep into Kansas City terri-
tory. It was finishing drives
with a touchdown that proved
problematic.
That was especially true
in the fourth quarter Sunday,
when they had moved across
midfield in search of the go-
ahead score. Tony Romo was
pressured into three straight
misfires, and the Cowboys
had to settle for Dan Bailey’s
third field goal.
That got the Cowboys
within 17-16 with 3:55 left,
but their defense couldn’t get
off the field quick enough.
Morris Claiborne was called
for pass interference on third
down, allowing Kansas City to
melt more time off the clock,
and the Chiefs held on for the
narrow victory.
“We had a good plan and
did some things that gave
us a chance to win this foot-
ball game,” said Romo, who
played with bruised ribs.
“We put ourselves in posi-
tion (to win), but we didn’t.
Ultimately, that’s all that mat-
ters.”
Romo finished 30 of 42 for
298 yards. His favorite target
was Dez Bryant, who had 100
yards receiving in the first
quarter and finished with nine
catches for 141 yards and a
touchdown.
Still, the Cowboys (1-1)
struggled to run the ball for
the second straight week.
DeMarco Murray had just 25
yards on 12 carries, and the
team finished with 37 yards
rushing.
“We haven’t run the ball
well enough and we haven’t
run it enough,” coach Jason
Garrett said.
Alex Smith threw for 223
yards and two touchdowns
for Kansas City (2-0), which
didn’t commit a turnover for
the second straight week
— and against a Cowboys
defense that forced six against
the New York Giants. Dwayne
Bowe and Jamaal Charles
each had a touchdown catch.
“When you’re trying to
build something, you need to
win games like this,” Smith
said. “These are the games
you look at in November and
December. You need these
types of wins, not only the
caliber of the win but the style
of win.”
The Chiefs, who already
have matched last year’s win
total, were amped for Andy
Reid’s first game as their
coach at Arrowhead Stadium.
A capacity crowd roared when
they rolled onto the field in
all-red uniforms, departing
from traditional white pants to
signify the start of a new era.
They kept rolling, too.
Kansas City marched 77
yards on the opening series,
the highlight coming when
Smith scrambled 17 yards on
third-and-15 and executed a
Fosbury Flop over a defender
for a first down.
“He did it with grace,” Reid
quipped.
Smith capped the drive
with a short TD toss to
Charles, zipping the ball into
tight coverage.
That’s when the Romo-
to-Bryant connection got on
track.
Bryant outwrestled cor-
nerback Brandon Flowers
for a 53-yard catch down the
Dallas sideline that helped set
up Bailey’s 51-yard field goal.
Later in the quarter, Bryant
beat Flowers for a 38-yard
reception that set up his own
2-yard TD catch and gave
Dallas a 10-7 lead.
The Cowboys blocked
Ryan Succop’s 57-yard field-
goal try to carry their lead
into halftime, and then Bryant
caught three more passes
on the first drive of the third
quarter to get Dallas in scor-
ing position again. This time,
Bailey knocked through a
30-yarder to pad the lead.
The Chiefs answered with
their best drive of the game.
Smith hit Donnie Avery for
31 yards to convert a third-
and-10, and then hit Dwayne
Bowe on a 12-yard slant
through blown coverage to
give Kansas City a 14-13 lead
late in the third quarter.
Dallas fumbled on its next
two possessions — Lance
Dunbar coughed it up first
and then Romo was strip-
sacked by Ron Parker. But
the Cowboys defense stiff-
ened each time, first forcing
a field goal and then getting
a sack from Bruce Carter to
push the Chiefs out of field-
goal range.
The Cowboys marched
deep into Chiefs territory, but
again Dallas couldn’t find the
end zone. By the time Romo
got the ball back in his hands,
there was hardly any time left.
“We lost the game at the
end,” Cowboys defensive
tackle Jason Hatcher said.
“We let them pound the ball
down the field. So defense lost
the game. We’ll take it. That’s
on us.”
Notes: Cowboys TE Jason
Witten had three catches to
pass Shannon Sharpe for sec-
ond-most among tight ends.
Witten has 817 in his career.
... Cowboys DE DeMarcus
Ware and Chiefs DT Dontari
Poe each had two sacks.
by dave skretta
AP Writer
RUSSELLVILLE – The
Bryant Lady Hornets went
2-4 in the Cyclone Invitational
in Russellville on Saturday.
Starting out with a familiar
7A/6A South conference foe
J.A. Fair, Bryant swept them
25-8 and 25-5 before running
into fellow 7A school Mount
Saint Mary in the next
match, falling to the Belles
18-25 and 13-25.
“We beat J.A. Fair in our
first game of the day,” Bryant
Coach Beth Solomon said.
“We knew what to expect
coming straight from playing
them Thursday night. It was
a good warm up game for
the girls to start the day. We
went straight into our next
pool play game with Mount
Saint Mary. The girls fought
hard but we couldn’t pull of
a victory with them. We did
play fairly consistently and
hard against them.”
The Lady Hornets
would fall to 7A opponent
Springdale Har Ber, but it
prepared Bryant with 7A
play, as the Lady Hornets
are the only 7A team in the
South. They lost to Har Ber
15-25 and 19-25.
“We picked up an extra
match with Springdale Har
Ber as well,”Solomon said.
“This didn’t count for or
against us in pool play and
getting seeded into the
bracket, but it did count for
Har Ber. Our girls played
“OK” the first game and the
score reflected that. For the
second game, we came out
on fire and really stepped
it up. I volunteered for us
to take on this extra game
so that we could play some
more 7A volleyball. It’s hard
to go into state tournament
after having no 7A schools in
your conference.”
Bryant split with
Morrilton, winning 25-21
and losing 17-25, before
opening up tournament play
with Alma. After winning
the first set 25-20, the Lady
Airedales edged the Lady
Hornets 25-23 and forced a
third game, which Bryant
took 15-12. For their victory,
the Lady Hornets went up
against 6A State Champ and
host Russellville. Bryant
played hard in a 25-20 loss
the first set before being
overpowered in the last set
13-25.
“The girls played hard
against Russellville,”
Solomon said. “Russellville
was the 6A State Champion
last year and lost few players.
Our girls put up a great fight
and finished the day playing
well. Overall, we did what
we needed to do Saturday.
We got better. That’s what
our goal was. Saturday also
helped us get ready for this
week. We have two confer-
ence games this week in
Sheridan and Texarkana.”
Sophomore Allie
Anderson led the team in
kills for the tournament,
finishing with 21 and add-
ing eight aces, junior Nikki
Clay had 19 kills and 11 digs,
sophomore Sierra Jones had
16 kills, and sophomore set-
ter Britney Sahlmann had
71 assists, 13 aces and eight
digs. Sophomores Shayla
McKissock and Whitney
Brown each had 12 digs.
Lady Hornets compete well
by tony lenahan
tlenahan@bentoncourier.com
FAYETTEVILLE - One
great defensive end alone
can be avoided, Arkansas
Coach Bret Bielema says
often.
Two great defensive ends
pose an offense problems end
to end.
In the two games they
played together for the 3-0
Razorbacks, Trey Flowers
missed the 31-21 middle
game victory over Samford
with an injury, Flowers and
Preseason All-SEC first-
teamer Chris Smith bedev-
iled Louisiana-Lafayette and
Southern Mississippi end to
end.
For the season-opening
34-14 victory over Louisiana-
Lafayette on Aug. 31 in
Fayetteville, senior Smith
registered a sack among his
three tackles and was cred-
ited with a quarterback hurry
for forcing an incomplete pass
and also broke up a pass.
A good day for Smith,
but still Louisiana-Lafayette
so avoided Arkansas’ most
heralded defender that junior
Flowers capitalized with
all the action to his side.
Flowers was voted SEC
Defensive Lineman of the
Week for his three lost-yard-
age tackles among five stops,
including two quarterback
sacks, plus forcing a fumble
and was credited with two
quarterback hurries.
Flowers cast his presence
early with a first-quarter inter-
ception during last Saturday’s
24-3 victory over Southern
Mississippi in Fayetteville.
Then it was Smith’s turn.
The North Carolinian from
Mount Ulla sacked Southern
Miss quarterback Allan
Bridgford three times for
minus-22 yards among his
five tackles plus hurried him
twice into throwing passes
away incomplete.
“With Trey and (senior
tackles) Robert Thomas (five
tackles versus Southern Miss
including a half-sack) and
Byran (Jones of Junction City
with four tackles and half a
sack versus Southern Miss)
you can’t double team one
of us,” Smith said. “At the
beginning of the game I felt a
little double team and things
of that nature, but it started
opening up. Especially
with Trey with that pick,
that opened things up more.”
The defense felt urgently
compelled to step Saturday
because of its offense.
Starting quarterback
Brandon Allen injured his
shoulder and did not return
upon scoring an Arkansas
touchdown for a 7-0 lead with
3:52 left in the first quarter.
The burden immediately
fell upon backup quarterback
AJ Derby and the defense
immediately felt compelled to
ease it.
“We knew we had to make
some plays for him and try to
get some turnovers for him,”
Flowers said. “That’s a tough
thing to see your quarterback
go down. We felt it was all
on us to step and make some
big-time plays.”
Smith and Thomas
addressed picking the
defense up when Allen went
down.
“We put it on us as a
defense that they won’t score
no more,” Smith said. That’s
one thing that me and Robert
Thomas as captains told the
defense, we put it all on the
shoulders.”
Thomas and Byran
Jones may have made the
play of the day combining
on first-and-goal from the 2
to throw running back Kevin
Hardy for a 3-yard loss that
two pass breakups later by
safety Alan Turner of Junction
City and freshman D.J. Dean,
forced Southern Miss to settle
for a field goal after a touch-
down had seemed inevitable.
“That brought a lot of
energy,” Smith said. “That
was a main difference that
they were that close and we
stopped them. That’s one
thing we had to do was stop
them.”
Flowers said of the goal-
line stand: “That’s one thing
we take pride in is the end
zone. I think they got a field
goal, but it was bend and
don’t break. To hold them to
a field goal for the game, I
think we did pretty good.”
A far bigger chal-
lenge awaits Saturday in
Piscataway, N.J., with Rutgers
Scarlet Knights quarterback
Gary Nova.
Nova torched Arkansas
last year completing 25 of 35
for 397 yards and five touch-
downs in Rutgers’ 35-26 vic-
tory in Fayetteville.
Last year the Hogs sacked
Nova once and hurried him
three times.
Obviously that wasn’t
enough. They’ll need a lot
more end to end on Saturday.
Defense steps up big time vs. S. Miss
by nate allen
Razorback Report
Bryant Lady
Hornet
sophomore
setter Britney
Sahlmann sets
the ball in a
match earlier
in the season.
Sahlmann had
71 assists
for Bryant in
the Cyclone
Invitional
Tournament in
Russellville on
Saturday. She
also had 13
aces and eight
digs as the
Lady Hornets
went 2-4 in the
tournament.
RICK NATION/Special to
The Saline Courier
Classifieds
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}
}
}
}
}
*Price doesn’t include charge for graphic, TMC
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Monday, September 16, 2013
class@bentoncourier.com The Saline Courier – Page 7
Announcements
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CLASSIFIEDS
Page 8 – The Saline Courier
class@bentoncourier.com Monday, September 16, 2013
BUSINESS & SERVICE DIRECTORY
Air Conditioning
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Insulation
Southern
Southern
INSULATION &
GUTTERS, Inc.
INSULATION &
GUTTERS, Inc.
INSULATION &
GUTTERS, Inc.
INSULATION &
GUTTERS, Inc.
Family Owned & Operated
for 33 Years
ª Residential & Commercial
ª Seamless ßutters
ª Leal Frool System
ª Fiberqlass, Batts & Blown
ª Stabili/ed Cellulose
ª ínsulation Removal
FREE ESTIMATES
Licensed - ínsured - Bonded
FINANCING AVAILABLE
315-2306
Toll Free. 888·278·7GOG
Landscaping
L.W. Lawn &
Landscaping
Services, LLC
www.lwlawnandlandscaping.com
lwlawnandlandscaping@yahoo.com
501-350-9137
870-942-9641
fax 501-847-6683
Lawn Maintenance, Trimming,
Sprinkler Installation, French
Drains, Shrub & Tree Pruning,
Leaf Removal, Landscaping,
Gutter Maintenance and more
But my God shall supply all your
needs according to his riches in
glory by Christ Jesus.
Phil. 4:19
Lawn Care
Richard
May’s
Lawn Care
10 years Local
Experience
Average yard:
Cut & Weed
Eat $25-$30
317-8966
316-6655
Lawn Care
Flawless
Lawns
Flawless
Lawns
`,·¡ ´`·u,
Leaves, Beds & Mulch
Mowing, Trimming, Edging
Odd Jobs and Light Hauling
Ryan Harmon 860-8789
MaRK 8:36
GK Lawncare &
Landscaping, Inc.
· Maintenance Pkg. (mowing,
edging, trimming, cleaning up)
· Complete Landscape & Revamp
· Leaf Cleanup · Tree Trimming
· Sodding · Mulch
· Shrub Maintenance
· Irrigation Installation/Repair
100% SATISFACTION
GUARANTEED
* Insured *
Contact for an estimate:
Joey Gregory 501-249-8223
Chuck Knox 501-317-9808
joeygregory@sbcglobal.net
Painting
SUPERIOR
PAINTING
3al|slacl|or 0uararleed
· 0ryWa|| F|r|s|
& Repa|r
· lrler|or & Exler|or
· Texlure
· Pressure was||rç
FREE E8T|HATE8
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501.840.1470
501.316.3328
Bull Painting Co.
“Where Quality
Meets Afordability”
Darrel Bull, Owner
Quality Work GUARANTEED
Interior/Exterior
Painting
Cabinet Painting
& Refnishing
Wallpaper & Popcorn
Removal
Deck & Fence Restoration
Wood Repair
Pressure Washing
2nd Generation Painter
.
Insured
.
References Available
.
Free Estimates
AR Lic #307430813
501.860.2442
SCHAY PAINTING CO
Interior/Exterior
20 Years Experience
References Provided
Steve Schay
501-425-4492
Pressure Wash-Chimney
Royal
Flush
Servicing
Central Arkansas
since 1988
316-1536
Chimney Cleaning
Insured for
Your Protection
Rusty “Rooster”
Pelton - Owner
10.
Pressure Wosh & More
Deck Pepoir
Fences
0uffer CIeoning
Lown Service
ond More
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Roofing
ROOFING
Wagner
Residential
Commercial
&
VOTED
“Best of the Best”
2009
Free Estimates
847-6630
K & L
ROOFING
Don’t Wait For
Roofing Repair
All Insurance
Claims Welcome
40 years exp.
& Financing Avail.
w/approved credit
Upgrade to a metal roof with
a class 4 fire rating & you
may qualify for a discount on
your homeowners insurance
501-249-7735
501-778-7600
210 W. SEVIER
ST. BENTON
Looking for love in all
the wrong places????
Check out the Freebie
section in todays
classifieds. You will
fi nd uncondi ti onal
love there FREE!
Furry & Free!!
Roofing
ARKANSAS SERVICE CO.
Roofing & Waterproofing
YRS %XPERIENCEsFREE Estimates
501.425.2995
Toll Free 877.942.1977
Senior & Veteran Discounts
Tree Service
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501-778-8071
501-860-5911
28-Years
Experience
Insured &
Licensed
*Stump Grinding
*Take Downs
*Trimming
*Pruning
*Storm Cleanup
Parsons & Son
Tree Service LLC
“The Total Package”
Call us about
Tree Health Care
º 1rinning
º 1ake Lowns
º Pruning
º Renovals
º Stunp Renoval
º lirewood
º Oreen vaste lauling
Conplete
lnsuranoe Coverage
Owned 8 Operated
by an
lSA Lioensed Arborist
SO·L"PGA
840-1436
602-2959
SEEK AND YOU
SHALL FIND
Great deals in the
Courier Classifieds.
Yard Sales, Jobs,
Homes for Sale or
Rent. Check them out
daily. Call to sub-
scribe at 315-8228.
Tree Service
CRITES
& TACKETT
TREE SERVICE
~ Free Estimates ~
Workman's Comp
& Liability Insured
Stump Removal
501-337–1565
501-337-9094
501.317.6788
ROCKIN B
TREE SERVICE
B
TRIMMING
PRUNING
STUMP GRINDING
REMOVALS
large & small
FREE ESTIMATES
Insured for
Your Protection
Excellent Clean up
Senior and
Military Discounts
available
Looking for a good
deal? Search the
Courier Classifieds!!
Apartments
Unfurnished
CAMRY COURT
Now Open
in Bryant
New Construction
2 BR, 2 BA or 2.5 BA
off Wilkerson Rd.
on Sadie Dr.
(By Hill Farm Elem.)
Call Terri the on-site
manager for appt.
501-804-0125
Bldg. 1225 #2
or call Dale King
501-539-1935
Visit our web-site
www.arkansas
apartments.net
Buy • Sell • Trade
in the Classifieds
Apartments
Unfurnished
NOTICE: All real es-
tate advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to the Fair Housing
Act which makes it il-
legal to advertise any
preference, limitation
or di scri mi nat i on
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or in-
tention to make any
such preference. We
will not knowingly ac-
cept any advertising
for real estate which
is in violation of the
law. All persons are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis.
Houses for Rent
2 BR, 1 BA w/garage,
Orleans Court, Ben-
ton. 501-672-0407 or
affordablepropertiesar.com
2 BR, 1 BA, 515
Pearson, no pets.
$550. mo., $400 dep.,
Call 326-3907
3 & 4 BEDROOM
$825 -$1400 mo.,
Haskell, Benton &
Bryant. 315-9370
3 BR, 1.5 ba, nice, 1
car gar., 862 Church
St. $750 dep. $750
mth. No Pets Call
860-3740
3BR 1.5 BA Newly
Remodeled Bryant
School Di st r i ct
$900mo + $900 Dep
Call 501-317-0422
3BR 1BA 1 acre Sa-
l em Area Bryant
Schools $750 mo +
Dep. 501-326-8547
Houses for Rent
3BR 1BA House,
$595 mo., 6mo. lease
No Pet s, Cal l
501-778-3324
3BR 2BA Benton
Schools $950mo No
HUD Avail. 9/3 Call
501-840-7626
3BR 2BA near
Lances on Edison
Kit. appl. furn., Avail.
Sept . 21 $550mo
$400dep 860-7856
BRYANT - Nice
Townhome. 3 BR, 2
BA, 1300 sq. ft., $795
mo., 501-847-5377
Eagle Properties
LLC
315–2075
Nice 2 & 3 BR Homes
from $500 to $925
Apartments
1 BR’s from $415
2 BR’s from $475
*based on availability
Deposit & References
Required
eaglepropsaline.com
EXECUTIVE HOME
for lease in Longhills,
4 BR, 3.5 BA, approx.
3,000 sq ft. waterfall
& sprinklers NICE!
$2,500 call Steve @
SPR 501-590-6089 or
www.arkhouses.com
FOR LEASE/SALE
New 3 & 4 BR, 2 BA,
brick, FP, ceiling fans,
carpet, 2 car garage,
patio. Go to: www.
catalyst-residential.com
or 501-697-6342
HASKELL 204
GLENN OAK 3BR, 2
BA, 2 car garage.
Nice. $750 mo. $600
dep. 501-847-5377
Buy • Sell • Trade
in the Classifieds
Houses for Rent
LG 2BR 2BA brick
home, fenced by, No
Pets CH/A, W/D conn
$850mo. + $450dep
412 W. North, Benton
501-317-5095
NEW 4BR 2Ba 2 Car
garage Fenced yard
1750sq.ft. $1200mo
Benton Schools Call
326-8000
Mobile Homes
For Rent
SMALL 2BR, 1BA
mobile home, Bryant
(Davis school) $350
mo + $300 dep, Bob
501-416-2639
Business Property
For Rent
BUSINESS PROP-
ERTY For Lease 608
S. East Street Office
with large parking
area Call 315-9337
between 9a&8p
Miscellaneous
For Rent
SEE THE SATELLITE
TV Difference Pack-
ages as LOW as
$19.99/month! FREE
DVR Upgrade. FREE
HD Upgrade. FREE
Professional Installa-
tion! Call NOW and
Start SAVING!
1-866-795-9295
Miscellaneous
For Sale
SEE THE SATELLITE
TV Difference! Pack-
ages as LOW as
$19.99/month! FREE
DVR Upgrade. FREE
HD Upgrade. FREE
Professional Installa-
tion! Call NOW and
Start SAVING!
1-866-725-5125
Classifieds Work!
Musical
Merchandise
Cushing
Piano Service
Tune • Repair
Player Pianos & Pump Organs
778-6584
Pets & Supplies
BENTON ANIMAL
Control & Adoption
501-776-5972
benton.petfinder.com
BRYANT ANIMAL
Control & Adoption
www.bryant.petfinder.com
www.1-800-save-a-pet.com
www.1888pets911.org
Hay For Sale
HAY
FOR SALE
Mixed grass clean.
Fertilized. 4X5 net
wrapped. In the field
cutting now.
$
35.00 loaded
1 to 400 bales
available
Buy as many as you
need. Great horse hay.
501-840-1529 or
501-860-8080
Produce
Home grown
“OKRA”
501-794-2337
Looking for love in all
the wrong places????
Check out the Freebie
section in todays
classifieds. You will
fi nd uncondi ti onal
love there FREE!
Furry & Free!!
Looking for a good
deal? Search the
Courier Classifieds!!
Heavy Equip-
SURPLUS EQUIP-
MENT. Online auc-
tions HUGE selection.
BIG savi ngs. NO
Buyer fees Low Seller
f ees BARGAI NS!
Register FREE Use
Promo Code cnhi313.
LIVE support.
www.SurplusOnThe.NET
334-215-3019
Building Mate-
MOBILE HOME
Supplies, - Skirting,
Doors, Tubs, Water
Heaters, Windows,
Cabi net Door s,
Plumbing, Tires, Roof
Coati ng, Screens,
Showers, Carpet, An-
chors, Moulding, Bot-
t om board. Cal l
501-993-3144
Autos Wanted
C A $ H F O R
CARS/TRUCKS: Get
A Top Dollar IN-
STANT Offer! Run-
ning or Not. Dam-
aged? Wrecked? OK!
We Pay Up To
$20,000! Call Toll
Free: 1-800-871-9712
DONATE A CAR
Humane Society of
the United States
FREE Next-DAY
TOWING! Running or
Not. Tax Deductible.
Call Before Tax Year
Ends!
1-800-418-1562
Mobile Homes
For Sale
$0 DOWN with
your Land or
Family Land!!!
Call 501-653-3201
STOP RENTING !!!
1st time Home Buyers
Program avail. Call
501-407-9500
Mobile Homes
For Sale
FORECLOSED
DOUBLEWIDE on
Private Lot. Great
Schools, Great
Location, must sell!
501-653-3201
NEW 4 BR 2 BA
Home $39K includes
delivery to your prop-
erty. Call for Quick
Approval 653-3202
Trade your Home,
Top Dollar Paid!!
Call 501.653.3204
Real Estate
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TI MESHARE. NO
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Legal Notices
The Harmony Grove
School District is ac-
cepting bids for soft-
ball field dugout and
backstop wall. For in-
formation and ap-
pointment to view
area with detailed
specs, please contact
David Donham at
501-860-0623 (office)
501-590-9850 (cell).
Give them a little bit
of home...
Have your hometown
newspaper mailed to
your favorite student.
Call Today to fnd out
how, 315-8228
Moderately Confused Herman
Crossword Challenge
Kit ‘n’ Carlyle
Celebrity Cipher
Here’s How It Works:
Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken
down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the
numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and
box. Each number can appear only once in each row,
column and box. You can figure out the order in which
the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues
already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you
name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!
Astro•graph
bernice bede osol
www.bernice4u.com.
Alley Oop
Big Nate
Born Loser
Thatababy
Frank and Ernest
Grizzwells
Monty
Arlo and Janis
Soup to Nutz
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2013
In the year ahead, look for
opportunities to get involved in
your community. Don’t allow emo-
tional matters to come between
you and the opportunity to grow
mentally, financially and spiritually.
Take note of your options and follow
through.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) --
Work with what you have to offer,
while also keeping an eye on oppor-
tunities for expansion. Your skills are
valuable and, if presented properly,
will bring top dollar. Put time aside
for romance.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- If
you want to avoid a potentially
harmful misunderstanding, com-
municate your thoughts and plans
honestly and in full detail. Accept the
inevitable.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
-- You may need to make a com-
promise in order to keep the peace
on the home front. Good fortune
is within reach if you are willing to
share.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) -- You can offer your services
or assistance, but don’t let anyone
take advantage of your good nature.
Focus on the positive changes you
can make at home and to your finan-
cial situation.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
-- Letting emotional issues interfere
with your ability to get things done
will cause delays. You should con-
centrate on what you can accom-
plish, not what you cannot change.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
-- Education will be key today. Try
to use your skills in diverse ways.
Changing the way you approach
your work will increase your earn-
ing potential.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20)
-- Take an innovative approach to
investments. Spend more money on
your image, developing your skills
or marketing them, and a new rev-
enue channel could open.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
-- Give everything you’ve got when
it comes to a situation that needs
improvement. Use your versatile
intelligence efficiently, and you’ll
command newfound respect.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) --
Refuse to let a minor problem turn
into a major conflict. Go about your
business and do whatever it takes
to reach your goals. In the end, you
will get your way.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
-- You will have to jump through
hoops to get help. Try to wrap up
what you can on your own, if you
want to avoid wasted time and dis-
appointment.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) --
An unusual subject, philosophy or
form of entertainment will capture
your attention. Prepare to debate as
well as begin interesting friendships.
Love and romance will enhance
your day.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Make
needed alterations that will relieve
you from unwanted responsibilities.
You know what to do to improve
your life -- you just have to do it.
Monday, September 16, 2013
news@bentoncourier.com The Saline Courier – Page 9
ComiCs
10 The Saline Courier
Monday, September 16, 2013
Are You Ready for
FOOTBALL?
Sign up and start playing today!
www.bentoncourier.com
You could win a
trip to Hawaii!
Easy as 1-2-3!
1
2
3
of $72 million in charity and
uncompensated care. Budget
sequestration will cut rough-
ly $11 billion in total spend-
ing from the Medicare pro-
gram, and about half of those
cuts will be to hospitals. That
means an automatic $650,000
loss to the SMH bottom line
this year, he said.
“Our goal as a board
is to support the hospital
and bring awareness to
its mission,” said Chris
Williams, chairman of the
SMH Foundation Board of
Directors. “I want this hospi-
tal to be around for my kids,
and I want to see it grow.
With the mounting fiscal
challenges we’re facing, the
Foundation and community
support has never been so
crucial.”
“We continue to have loyal
event sponsors that know
their dollars are not just
for a golf tournament, but
more importantly to support
those we serve and to make
a difference in their lives,”
Brumley said.
Event sponsors included:
Presenting: Everett Buick
GMC.
Gold: First Security Bank,
Mid-South Adjustment and
All Seasons Roofing.
Silver: META, East
Harding, Saline Memorial
Auxiliary, Black, Corley
Owens & Hughes, McCauley
Services and Hill Rom.
Bronze: Tropical
Smoothie Café, Newmark
Grubb Arkansas, Dr. John
and Kay Menard, Brooke
Andrews-State Farm,
Arvest Bank, Bancorp
South Insurance Services,
Rivendell Behavioral Health
Services of Arkansas,
BKD, Access Control
Devices Incorporated,
Standard Business Systems,
Professional Consulting
Services, PC Hardware,
The Health Law Firm,
Cardinal Health, Summit
Bank, Longhills Family
Dentistry, HealthSCOPE
Benefits, TransAmerica, ACE
Signs, Arkansas Anesthesia
Associates, Dr. John and
Sandy Baka, Radiology
Associates, Arkansas Heart
Hospital, Arkansas Bone and
Joint, Eric Rob and Isaac,
Environmental Management
Services, Smith-Caldwell,
Ashley’s Furniture, Hagan
Newkirk Financial Services
and Malvern National Bank,
Covenant Medical Benefits
and Triple S Alarm.
For more information
about supporting the Saline
Memorial Health Foundation,
call (501) 776-6746 or visit
www.salinememorial.org.
how much planning goes
into an event like this.
She said the groups also
received advice from parks
and recreation people in
Benton and Bryant, who
have worked on similar proj-
ects. “We were going to use
every resource we could find
and everyone was so helpful.
“We had parents that
stayed and helped with the
kids,” she said.
“Jasen Kelly (director
of the Boys & Girls Club
of Saline County) gave us
cones to use for markers and
he rode in the race,” Stilwell
said. “He always supports
the projects but he was a
sponsor long before I was.
He and Angela Ross, my pre-
decessor, have been wonder-
ful mentors to me.
“Angela’s daughter, Jill
Henley, oversees the Haskell
group and she was tremen-
dously helpful on this,” she
added.
Benton Mayor’s Youth
council members who par-
ticipated in the race Saturday
included Perry Mills, an
active member of the bike-
a-thon committee; Blake
Bowlin; and Luke Vincent.
Other students participat-
ed along with several adults.
Sponsors for Pedals for
People were:
•First Security Bank;
Jim Stilwell Insurance and
Financial Services’ Dance!
Laura Stilwell & Co.;
Roberson and Associates
Insurance; Everett Buick
GMC; Riverside Grocery and
Catering’ Tonya and Chris
Villines; Bank of the Ozarks;
Dan Billingsley Floors and
Moore; Rivendell Behavioral
health Services of Arkansas;
Dizzy’s Gypsy Bistro; Sport
Shop of Benton.
•Saline Memorial
Hospital; Saline County
Clerk Doug Curtis; Daniel
Orthodontics, John Daniel:
Saline County Collector
Joy Ballard; West Side
Pharmacy; Regions Bank,
Jim and Sue Shults; Baxley-
Penfield-Moudy Realtors’
Finley Pharmacy; The
Gunnery Shoppe LLC:
Saline County Assessor Jim
Crawford; John’s Lock and
Safe, Randy Smith’’ Benton
Veterinary Hospital; Dinner’s
Ready, Saline County Judge
Lanny Fite; Boss’s Barbecue,
Books and Baubles.
Councils
From page 1
SMH
From page 1
LYNDA HOLLENBECK/The Saline Courier
Riders take off in the first bicycle race sponsored by three local
mayor’s youth councils. The event served as a fundraiser for The
Care Center, an outreach ministry of Benton’s First Baptist Church.
Brenda Burton directs the program.
REBECCA JONES/Special to The Saline Courier
Visiting at the Gathering on the Greens are Kelea Duke, left, with son Max and Jen McCauley with son
Blaik.
REBECCA JONES/Special to The Saline Courier
Attending the event, from left, are Dr. Scott Walsh, Hilary Walsh, Sandy Baka and Lori Brumley.
REBECCA JONES/Special to The Saline Courier
Golf team includes, from left, Jonathan Greer, Kevin Barnham, Ken Casady and Gary Ballard.
This document is © 2013 by editor - all rights reserved.
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