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Volume 136
Number 270
2 Sections of 16 Pages
$1.25
Home of Royce May
and Sylvia Austin
SALINE COUNTY’S NEWS SOURCE SINCE 1876
THE SALINE
INDEX
OBITUARIES ............................3A
EDITORIAL ...............................4A
SPORTS ............................. 6A,7A
BUSINESS ...............................8B
CLASSIFIEDS .................... 6A,7A
CROSSWORD .........................5B
www. bent oncouri er. com
Sunday, September 29, 2013
Join us on Facebook and Twitter
Seventh-graders at Benton
Middle School culminated a four-
week study of the Holocaust by
speaking, via Skype, with Sidney
Finkel, a Holocaust survivor.
Jacqueline Vergason, the school’s
media and instructional technology
specialist, who set up the presenta-
tion, told the students, “We made
history today.”
Finkel spoke for a few minutes
about his time in a concentration
camp and then answered questions
from the students.
Finkel, who was born in 1932 in
Piotrkow, Poland, entered the con-
centration camp at age 8. Four years
later, he was freed.
At the time he received the grim
news that both his parents had been
killed. He was the same age as the
students he was speaking with now.
“All I had to do was survive today,
and tomorrow would be better,”
Finkel said.
He told students of times when
he did not want to be Jewish, and
how he would cover his face with
his hands because the Germans
could tell he was Jewish by looking
at his face.
Because it is hard for Finkel not
to become emotional when talking
about his experience, he does not
specifically talk about certain parts,
Vergason said.
He told the students how he and
a friend would stick potatoes ino
their pants to smuggle them out of
the kitchen. Eventually they were
caught and were “punished badly.”
Finkel said. He did not explain the
details of the punishment.
Finkel’s traumatic experience still
affects his life, but he said telling his
story is helpful to him.
“When I gave my first talk to
students at Francis Parker School in
Chicago in 1993, I began a meaning-
ful journey that would prove to be
an exciting and rewarding second
career for me — a career that I love.
And as it turns out, the journey has
helped me heal from the emotional
wounds I had been living with for
decades,” Finkel said.
Before speaking with Finkel, the
students read The Diary of Anne
Frank and watched a documentary
about Finkel’s experience. Using
everything they have learned, the
students will write a research paper,
Vergason said.
Finkel is married and has five
children, nine grandchildren and a
great-grandchild. He and his wife
divide their time between Chicago
and Tucson, Ariz. He spoke with the
Benton students from Chicago.
Students get firsthand account of Holocaust history
By Sarah Derouen
sderouen@bentoncourier.com
Sarah Derouen/The Saline Courier
Seventh grade students at Benton Middle School wave at Sidney Finkel, Holocaust
survivor, via Skype. Finkel spoke with the students about his experience as a child in
a concentration camp.
Sarah Derouen/The Saline Courier
Gillian Henneberry addresses a question to Sidney Finkel, Holocaust survivor.
Caitlin Bennett hasn’t
found a job since she com-
pleted her degree in the
spring of 2012. Actually, she
hasn’t been looking. The
23-year-old decided to follow
her calling instead.
On Sept. 30, she returns
to Southeast Asia to help
victims of abuse, forced
labor, illegal detentions,
sexual violence and human
trafficking.
The idea to join an
organization called the
International Justice
Mission came to her from
an unlikely source — a pam-
phlet. Her sister, Lauren,
brought the information
home from a meeting at her
church where a representa-
tive from the organization
had conducted a presenta-
tion.
Caitlin searched the
group’s website and filled
out an application to volun-
teer. Within a short period,
her application was accepted
and she was on a plane for
the 27-hour trip to her des-
tination in Southeast Asia.
Arriving at midnight, people
were everywhere, a scene
that surprised Caitlin.
“I was an International
Relations major at the
University of Arkansas and
this seemed like a great way
to help others and see the
world at the same time,” she
said.
Her experience in India
has made her appreciative
of her life in America. One
of her first assignments was
what she described at a “vic-
tim rescue.”
She explained that in the
area where she worked in
India, bonded labor was not
declared illegal until 1976.
Up to that point, individuals
would agree to work for a
company in exchange for
their employer paying off
debts of the individual.
“While it may sound like
a good idea, the people
never reach a point where
the debt is paid. That’s
when we do a victim res-
cue to get them out of the
arrangement. Basically, it
is a situation of indentured
slavery,” she said.
The larger employers in
the area of India she serves
are brick kiln factories, rice
mills, embroidery shops and
other smaller operators. She
has seen people as young
as 3 rescued from the brick
kiln operations; the oldest
victims have been in their
70s.
“Children that young
have difficulty commu-
nicating, especially with
language barriers. We put
bricks in front of them and
had them demonstrate what
they did. When they go to
the bricks and flip them
over, we know they have
been working in the fac-
tory.”
She also recalls a case
in which she worked with
a young girl rescued from
a factory. The concept of
bonded labor has continued
across several generations
of families and this girl was
one of several from her
family to be held. Caitlin
describes sitting with her to
color, an activity young chil-
dren in America enjoy. She
handed the child a crayon,
but the girl did not know
what to do with it, having
never seen one before. After
being shown by Caitlin how
to hold and use the crayon,
the girl was coloring all over
the page with a smile on her
face.
“Most of the people we
rescue have no concept of
money or the daily things
we experience here,” she
said.
Once an individual has
been rescued, casework-
ers follow a case through a
process Caitlin describes as
“pushing water through the
pipe to see where the holes
are. The vast majority of
time the reason is because
overwhelming poverty of
the area.” Oftentimes, indi-
viduals do not receive the
help they need to survive
and this process helps iden-
tify where the flaws in the
system exist.
According to the website
for the International Justice
Mission, nearly 2 million
children are exploited in the
global commercial sex trade
and 27 million men, women
and children are held as
slaves.
“There are more slaves in
the world today than in any
other time in history.” says
Caitlin. This is a fact that
Caitlin feels is difficult to
comprehend.
She hasn’t been con-
cerned for her safety in the
past and doesn’t feel the
increased level of terror in
the world will be a factor for
her in India. The group’s
office in India is far from
the current instability in the
Middle East.
Human trafficking is
another problem that spans
from India to the United
States. Many young women
agree to leave their country,
believing they will be taking
jobs as maids, but end up in
the sex slave trade instead.
“Interstate 30 through
Saline County is a major
route in the human traffick-
ing slave trade, along with
drugs,” Caitlin said.
She is looking forward
to getting back to India.
She has seen and expe-
rienced more than most
young adults her age. Her
work with the International
Justice Mission ends in May
2014, at which time she may
pursue a law degree.
“In the meantime, I’m
very aware of how blessed
I am.”
Local woman helps slavery victims
By Brent Davis
bdavis@bentoncourier.com
Brent Davis/The Saline Courier
Caitlin Bennett plans to join the International Justice Mission.
Special to The Saline Courier
Members of the Beach Ball Volleyball Team pose for a picture in their new team T-shirts. The group
meets three times a week at Fitness Unlimited to play. Humana sponsors the team as a means to
encourage fitness activities for senior citizens. Players are seated on each side of the net. The game
helps build upper body strength and endurance. From left, back row: Bud Stoddard, Jerry Taylor, Bill
McMahan, Ritchie Haley, George Butler, Edith Holiman, Neil Williams, Joetta Bearden, Mary Cagle,
Gene Richards, Kathy Baker and Humana Rep Michael Shoemaker, front row; Betty Alexander, Reba
Stoddard, Susie Cody, Carmen Sanders, Olivia Braddock, Paulette Williams, Fairy McMahan, and Gail
Fisher. Not pictured are: Patsy Tarvin, Maxine Gwin, and Martha Bradshaw.Anyone interested in join-
ing the team may contact Barbara Kane at 501-778-2571.
THE SENIOR SQUAD!
SCRAPBOOK
Banquet award celebration
PAGE 8B
Jason Johnston lines up a putt
PAGE 2A
EXTRAORDINARY
HOGS vs AGGIES
Arkansas takes on A&M
PAGE 6A-7A
2A The Saline Courier
Sunday, September 29, 2013
Your Annual Election Period (Oct. 15-Dec. 7)
is your chance to add or change Medicare Coverage.
Roberson Insurance offers
Medicare products that are just right for you:
Medicare supplement plans
Medicare Advantage plans
Medicare Part D prescription drug plans
For plan information or to enroll, please call or stop by:
Medicare
are you eligible?
Ray Cooper
License No. 22336
Julie Roltsch
License No. 65900
315 N. Market, Benton, AR 72015
501-315-8011 or
Toll Free 1-866-315-8011
www.robersoninsurance.com
Check out our daily menu on facebook
We Cater
794-0329
Open Mon-Fri
5:30am-9:00pm
Sat & Sun
6:00am - 9:00 pm
4444 Hwy 5 So.
Benton
Homestyle Cooking like Grandma used to cook!
Breakfast and Lunch
Prepared Daily 7 days a week
Sunday Lunch Special
This week including:
Stufed Bell Peppers, Chicken & Dressing,
mashed or fried taters, sweet potato casserole,
pinto beans, corn, green beans, turnip
greens, fried okra, rolls or cornbread.
Bring your Church Bulletin for 15% off
sALINE cOUNTY fARM bUREAU
ANNUAL MEETINg
Monday, October 7th • 6:30pm
ALL fARM bUREAU MEMbER-fAMILIEs ONLY ARE cORDIALLY INVITED
TO ATTEND THIs IMPORTANT ANNUAL bUsINEss MEETINg!
Reserve Tickets
To confirm your reservation, please complete the form above and return it to
the Saline County Farm Bureau by September 25, 2013
Farm Bureau Annual Meeting Reservation
LIMITED TO fARM bUREAU IMMEDIATE fAMILY MEMbERs
Member Name Member #
Adults Kids
mail to: SALINE COUNTY FARM BUREAU • P.O. Box 625 • Benton, AR 72018
or bring to 1700 Hot Springs Road, Benton, 315-0676 • 119 Broadway Avenue, Bryant, 653-2283
Senior Adult Center, 210 Jefferson St., Benton
Light Refreshments will be Served
Saline Courier photo
Benton’s Jason Johnston lines up a putt on the 18th hole.
SALINE COURIER SCRAPBOOK 1987 COURT REPORTER
Divorces
•Debbie Kinney v.
Jeffery Kinney
•Amy Woods v. Steven
Woods
•Carrie Foster Newman
v. Daniel Newman
•Kimberly Travis v.
Jeffery Travis
•Dawn Cole v. Terry
Cole
•Channon Howell
Newman v. Kevin Howell
•Juston Steele v. Sara Jo
Steele
•Brittany McCoy v.
Danny McCoy
•Justin Fleeger v. Keitha
Fleeger
•Barbara Baer v. Philip
Webber
•Candice Lynn Stalpers
v. Chris D. Smith
•Michael Cothran v.
Suzanne Cothran
•Jamie Talbot v.
Jonathan Talbot
•Mark Oholendt v.
Arlene Oholendt
•Jacqueline Farque v.
Jacob Farque
•Vanessa Vardaman v.
Matthew Vardaman
•Brently Ballew v.
Jennifer Ballew
•Amy Cary v. Jacob
Cary
•Nicholas Outlaw v.
Lacey Outlaw
•Jennifer Fleming v.
Kyle Fleming
Marriages
•Zachary Taylor Davis
of Benton and Krystal
Noelle Threlkeld of Benton
•Christopher C. Geyer
of Redfield and Deserie
Starr Jasso of Redfield
•Stacey L. Kirkendoll Jr.
of Little Rock and Ambera
L. Parker of Little Rock
•Johnathan Daniel
Baker of Bauxite and
Ladana Michelle Day of
Bauxite
Felonies Filed
•Anthony Allen Jones
was charged with a Class
D felony for theft of scrap
metal.
•Charles Dee Hood
was charged with a Class
D felony for theft of scrap
metal.
•Ricky Darnell Higgs
was charged with a Class
D felony for aggravated
assault and a Class D
felony for terroristic threat-
ening.
•Bo Penick Mitcham
was charged with a Class D
felony for drug fraud.
•Brian Daniel Troy was
charged with two Class D
felonies for hot checks.
•Cody Aaron Pinson
was charged with a Class D
felony for theft of property.
•Francisco Reyes
Medley was charged with a
Class D felony for posses-
sion of firearms by certain
persons and a Class D
felony for fleeing.
•Brittney Elizabeth
Williams was charged with
a Class D felony for theft of
property.
•William E. Bollin was
charged with a Class D fel-
ony for failing to register as
a sex offender and a Class
D felony for living near a
school or daycare.
•Dan Edward Cook was
charged with a Class D fel-
ony for aggravated assault.
•Ronnie Lynn Rylie was
charged with a Class D
felony for possession a con-
trolled substance.
•Arthur John Luke
Melser was charged with
two Class Y felonies for
Rape.
•Michelle Anne Ogden
was charged with a Class C
felony for forgery.
•Timothy Aaron Perry
was charged with a Class
D felony for second degree
battery.
•Thomas Trevor Perry
was charged with a Class
D felony for second degree
battery.
•Harold Lee Mastin was
charged with a Class D
felony for theft of property.
September 19 - September 25
LITTLE ROCK — A
former Little Rock police
officer accused of recklessly
killing a 15-year-old boy he
caught breaking into cars
will be tried a third time,
prosecutors said Friday.
A jury deadlocked on
Thursday, the second time
this year jurors couldn't
agree whether Josh
Hastings acted properly
when he fired three shots
into a car at a Little Rock
apartment complex.
Bobby Moore III was
killed Aug. 12, 2012, when
Hastings responded to a call
that someone was breaking
into cars at the apartments
in west Little Rock.
Prosecutors charged
Hastings with a felony after
investigators said evidence
from the scene didn't match
Hastings' account of events.
Police Chief Stuart Thomas
fired Hastings after conclud-
ing the officer used deadly
force without justification.
Hastings claimed the
car Moore was driving
was heading toward him,
prompting him to fire
through its windshield,
but Thomas said evidence
shows the car was either
moving in reverse or
stopped several feet away
from Hastings when he
fired.
Two other youths were
in the car with Moore and
they testified at both tri-
als. Hastings' attorney,
Bill James said Friday that
inconsistencies in the boys'
stories should help win
Hastings an acquittal.
The judge set the next
trial start May 5.
Prosecutor Larry Jegley
said Friday the case has
weighed on his office.
"That's all we can do.
We've taken third shots (at
trial) before," Jegley said.
"We're going to decompress
a little, hitch back up and
take a look next week."
James said he didn't fore-
see a change in strategy for
the next retrial.
"We're going to try to
sharpen our arguments up
a little bit," James said. "I
think we brought to light the
veracity of those two guys
(the juveniles who were in
the car)."
In the first trial, both
sides used expert witnesses
and Hastings testified in his
own defense.
In the second trial, the
sides couldn't schedule their
experts and James rested
without calling any wit-
nesses.
When Circuit Judge
Wendell Griffen declared a
mistrial on Thursday, the
jurors didn't indicate which
way they were leaning, other
than to say they were dead-
locked.
A pretrial hearing is set
for April 7.
Prosecutors are aiming for a third trial
for ex-LR officer accused of killing kid
Associated Press
JONESBORO — A
December trial date has
been scheduled for a
Brookland man charged with
killing his 1-month-old son.
The Jonesboro Sun
reports that a Dec. 16 trial
date was set Friday for
36-year-old Sidney Campbell.
Campbell has not yet
entered a plea in the case
and is jailed on $250,000
bond.
Brookland police say
officers called to Campbell's
home in July were told by
Campbell that he had found
his son dead. An autopsy
later determined that the
infant died of blunt force
trauma to the head and had
skull fractures.
Trial set for
man charged
with killing
1-month-old
Associated Press
An Alexander man who
pleaded guilty to driving
while intoxicated and two
counts of battery has been
sentenced to 12 years with
the Arkansas Department
of Correction to be followed
by eight years’ suspended
imposition of sentence.
The plea for Logan
Knight, 24, of Alexander,
was entered in Saline
County Circuit Court.
On March 10, 2013,
Knight was driving on Sardis
Road when he was involved
in an accident. The driver
and a passenger in the
other vehicle were severely
injured, said Deputy
Prosecuting Attorney Brian
Clary, who represented the
state in the case.
Knight admitted to offi-
cers at the scene that he was
under the influence on meth-
amphetamine and had been
awake for two days.
Knight reportedly tested
positive for methamphet-
amine.
In the court proceeding,
Knight apologized to the vic-
tims who were present and
who accepted his apology,
the deputy prosecutor said.
“The victims referenced
Knight’s young age, that he
was just a few years older
that their own child, and that
they hoped he would receive
the help he needed,” Clary
said.
Knight was represented
by Benton attorney Clay
Ford.
12-year
sentence
for driving
while
intoxicated
By Sarah Derouen
sderouen@bentoncourier.com
Following are some of the
committees' economic goals
for the county by 2023:
-- The perception of resi-
dents of Mississippi County
has shifted from apathy
and indifference to per-
sonal pride and ambition for
change.
-- Entry level workforce
from Mississippi County
with the requisite soft and
hard skills is available to
meet staffing needs of all
county employers, even for
hospitality and retail.
--Perception of cities, both
from visitors and residents,
is that roads are clean and
well-maintained and few
dilapidated or vacant com-
mercial properties exist.
-- Better education and
more employment oppor-
tunities have raised the per
capita income to the national
average.
-- Financial institutions are
providing access to capital to
small businesses.
-- Workforce development
and training institutions in
Mississippi County have
built a regional talent pool of
occupations most in demand
by existing and future indus-
try.
-- Cities in Mississippi
County have become an
entertainment and retail cen-
ter for the region, offering a
range of restaurants, retail
stores and entertainment
venues. The retail develop-
ment has created a variety
of new jobs for citizens of all
levels of educational attain-
ment.
-- Mississippi County has
become an automotive sales
destination for car shopper
within a 30 mile radius.
-- The downtowns in
Mississippi County cities are
centers of activity through-
out the day and evening,
offering retail, entertain-
ment, and residential space.
Delta Bridge envision community in 2023
Associated Press
Sunday, September 29, 2013
The Saline Courier 3A
620 W. South St. • Benton • 778-3151 or 778-1166
MON. - SAT. 8am - 9pm & SUN. 12pm - 9pm
Western Union Services • Pay Phone Bills Here • Accept Insurance Plans & Part D Plans
Your Hometown Pharmacy Since 1953
FREE DELIVERY
Our Pharmacists Would Love
to Serve You and Your Family.
Let Us Price
Your Prescriptions
Open 7 Days A Week
Jeremy Duane Lawson
Jeremy Duane Lawson, 19, of Alexander passed away Sept.
25, 2013, in Oklahoma as a result of injuries suffered in a
motorcycle accident.
He was born Feb. 11, 1994, in Little Rock
to Douglas Lawson Jr. and Melanie Johnson
Travis.
Jeremy was a traveler. He traveled across
country by foot and by motorcycle, enjoying
whatever life dealt him along the way. His pass-
ing will leave a huge void in the hearts of those
who loved him.
He was preceded in death by his grandfather,
Buddy Lawson.
Survivors include his mother, Melanie Travis of
Alexander; his father, Douglas Lawson Jr. of Hot Springs;
two brothers, Jesse Lawson of Hot Springs and Dakota
Lawson of Alexander; a sister, Megan Irwin of Bryant; his
grandparents, Duane and Leda Johnson of Alexander and
Cloy and Carol Ross of Perryville; and his uncle, Diggit
Johnson. .
Funeral service is scheduled for 2 p.m. Thursday at Ashby
Funeral Home.
Visitation will follow at the family home in Alexander.
Online guestbook: www.ashbyfuneralhome.com.
OBITUARIES
Lawson
PAID OBITUARY
Auditions for the Young
Players Second Stage produc-
tion of “Footloose” will be
held at 6 p.m. Sunday and
Monday, Oct. 20 and 21, at
the historic Royal Theatre in
Downtown Benton.
The auditions are open to
individuals between the ages
of 13 and 23.
Production dates are Jan.
16-19, 2014.
Any questions about the
show may be directed to bea-
conlightbiscuit@gmail.com.
“Come cut loose this winter
at the Royal Theatre,” urged
the show’s director, Justin A.
Pike.
Jo Murry is music director
and Jenny Johnston is chore-
ographer.
All interested in audition-
ing need only prepare 32
bars (a verse and a chorus)
of a song of their choos-
ing, in a style appropriate to
“Footloose.”
Daphne Shoppach, artistic
director of the Young Players
organization, said the group
is seeking young persons
interested in learning areas
of technical theatre, such as
directing, costuming, light-
ing, props, set building and
publicity.
Shoppach noted that
Young Players Second Stage
has been created to provide
educational opportunities
to older members of Young
Players (high school/college)
in a setting more focused to
their needs as adolescent and
young adult performers.
“Footloose” is the first pro-
duction for the older group of
young people.
By Lynda Hollenbeck
lyndahol@yahoo.com
Auditions set
for ‘Footloose’
at the Royal
LITTLE ROCK —
Arkansas Gov. Mike Beebe
and lawmakers agree that
they need to fix the state's
teacher insurance system
before rate hikes of up to
50 percent hit next year.
Turning that consensus into
a plan they can pass during
a special session is another
matter.
Though Beebe seems to
be moving closer to call law-
makers back to the Capitol
in the coming weeks,
the agreement he says is
required first on both the
short and long-term solu-
tions needed for the state's
teacher insurance program
are far from a certainty.
The situation Beebe
faces is not that different
than 2008, when he called a
special session to consider
raising the severance tax on
natural gas to pay for road
improvements. Then, as
now, the session was pre-
ceded by a series of closed-
door meeting between
Beebe and other groups as
he tried to build support for
a plan.
But instead of trying to
build support with natural
gas executives, Beebe's now
trying to win over teach-
ers, superintendents and
lawmakers on a plan that he
says will require some pain
and sacrifice from every-
body. And instead of the
threat of a ballot measure,
such as the one he could
point to in 2008 that would
have led to an even higher
tax increase, Beebe can
point to the Jan. 1 increase
in rates as a motivator in
trying to come together.
"Whatever solution is
going to hurt somebody and
probably all of us in equal
shares in terms of costing
money or sacrifice or all the
above," Beebe told report-
ers last week.
Beebe's announcement
that the signup for the
teacher insurance pro-
gram would be delayed a
month, with open enroll-
ment moved from Oct. 1
to Nov. 1, was a signal that
he believes lawmakers are
on their way toward a plan
to address the premium
increases. Legislative lead-
ers have also said they want
to have drafts of bills that
they can begin shopping to
members of the House and
Senate by the end of this
week.
The ideas Beebe and law-
makers are eyeing include
changes in the teacher
insurance program to cut
down on its costs, one-time
money to at least lower the
premium hikes expected to
hit in January and ongoing
additional funding from the
state, districts or a combina-
tion of both for future years.
Agreement on the short-
term fix is the easiest of
the three tasks, lawmakers
say, with many willing to
tap into the state's surplus
to alleviate the hikes com-
ing next year. State officials
have said an additional $53
million would be needed to
keep the premium rates at
their current levels.
"The big question is
where do we find the money
on a per year basis to keep
this situation from occur-
ring again?" said Rep. James
McLean, D-Batesville, chair-
man of the House Education
Committee. "That's where
the real hard negotiating is
going to have to happen."
Ideas being floated have
included transferring funds
that schools receive for
the number of students on
the school lunch program
and requiring more of a
contribution from school
districts into the teacher
insurance system. Teachers
are offered insurance on
separate plans from state
employees. The health
insurance plans offered
to state employees are
identical, but have lower
premiums because the state
contributes more money for
each budgeted position.
The toughest task for
lawmakers will be the
structural changes that they
say need to be made to the
teacher insurance program.
Sen. Johnny Key, chairman
of the Senate Education
Committee, compared the
challenge of trying to bal-
ance the need to make the
system sustainable while
keeping it affordable for
teachers to the challenge
national policymakers face
when it comes to health
care.
"Where is that balance?
We're trying to tackle it for
a segment of employees
within our state," said Key,
R-Mountain Home. "The
whole national debate for
years is where is that bal-
ance and now we find our-
selves right in the middle of
it for school employees."
Analysis: Insurance issue
tests to Beebe, lawmakers
Associated Press
UN Security Council
votes unanimously to
secure and destroy Syria's
chemical weapons
UNITED NATIONS —
The U.N. Security Council
voted unanimously Friday
night to secure and destroy
Syria's chemical weapons
stockpile, a landmark deci-
sion aimed at taking poison
gas off the battlefield in the
escalating 2 1/2-year conflict.
The vote after two weeks
of intense negotiations
marked a major break-
through in the paralysis that
has gripped the council since
the Syrian uprising began.
Russia and China previously
vetoed three Western-backed
resolutions pressuring
President Bashar Assad's
regime to end the violence.
"Today's historic resolu-
tion is the first hopeful news
on Syria in a long time,"
U.N. Secretary-General Ban
Ki-moon told the council
immediately after the vote,
but he and others stressed
that much more needs to be
done to stop the fighting that
has left more 100,000 dead.
"A red light for one form
of weapons does not mean a
green light for others," the
U.N. chief said. "This is not
a license to kill with conven-
tional weapons."
U.S. Secretary of State
John Kerry said the "strong,
enforceable, precedent-set-
ting" resolution shows that
diplomacy can be so power-
ful "that it can peacefully
defuse the worst weapons of
war."
Historic phone call,
then optimism as US
and Iran work to resolve
nuclear dispute
WASHINGTON — The
Iranian president, his visit
to the U.S. nearing its end,
makes contact with the
White House. As his car
inches through New York's
snarled traffic, he hears
Barack Obama's voice on the
phone as the U.S. president
sits at his desk in the Oval
Office.
Fifteen minutes later, the
two men say goodbye in
each other's language.
And with that, a gener-
ation-long rift between the
U.S. and Iran is that much
closer to being bridged.
Iranians awoke Saturday
to learn that their president,
Hassan Rouhani, had spoken
directly to Obama, breaking
through a barrier that had
left American and Iranian
presidents divorced from
such contact for 34 years.
The two presidents pledged
to resolve concerns about
Iran's nuclear ambitions,
which have isolated Iranians
from the global community
and led to crippling econom-
ic sanctions.
The appetite for serious
talks having been tested
at a presidential level, the
focus turns to negotiations
among foreign ministers and
other officials from the five
permanent members of the
U.N. Security Council plus
Germany, who together will
chart a path forward, a senior
Obama administration official
said. The group wants Iran to
present a more detailed pro-
posal before or at the next
round of negotiations, sched-
uled in Geneva on Oct. 15-16,
another U.S. official said.
Top Kenyan official says
military caused mall col-
lapse, government urges
patience with probe
NAIROBI, Kenya —
Kenya's military caused the
collapse of three floors of the
Westgate Mall in the deadly
terrorist siege, a top-ranking
official disclosed Friday,
while the government urged
patience with the pace of an
investigation that has left key
questions unanswered.
Seven days after 67 people
were killed in the attack on
the upscale shopping center,
there is still no clear word on
the fate of dozens who have
been reported missing and
no details on the terrorists
who carried it out.
The account of the roof
collapse raises the possibility
that the military may have
caused the death of hostages
in its rescue attempt. An
undisclosed number of peo-
ple are feared to be buried in
the rubble.
The official said autopsies
will be conducted on any
bodies found to determine
the cause of death — from
the militants or the structural
collapse. The high-ranking
government official spoke to
The Associated Press on con-
dition of anonymity because
he was not authorized to
divulge sensitive information.
The official also confirmed
that Kenyan troops fired
rocket-propelled grenades
inside the mall, but would
not say what caused the
floors to collapse, if the
action was intentional, or if it
was an accident.
WASHINGTON (AP) —
Ask top Democrats, and
they’ll say Republicans are
acting like terrorists, arson-
ists and people with bombs
strapped to their chests.
Ask some Republicans
about President Barack
Obama’s health care law,
and they’ll draw com-
parisons to the Nazis or the
return of runaway slaves
and declare that the law will
cause the untimely death of
vulnerable Americans.
Even for a town accus-
tomed to hyperbole, the
spat over spending, borrow-
ing and health-care reform
has attracted more than its
share of over-the-top rheto-
ric.
While most Americans
may tune it out, it’s a good
bet the violence-tinged
accusations won’t make it
any easier for the two sides
to come together on critical
issues of spending and bor-
rowing.
Take Rep. Michelle
Bachmann, a Minnesota
Republican, who warned
on the House floor earlier
this year what can happen if
Republicans don’t overturn
“Obamacare,” the presi-
dent’s health care law.
“Let’s repeal this fail-
ure before it literally kills
women, kills children, kills
senior citizens,” Bachmann
said.
Rhetoric in budget fights
Associated Press
A news briefing from around the world
Associated Press
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LETTER TO THE EDITOR POLICY
State Sen. Jeremy Hutchinson, District 33,
201 E. North St., Benton, AR 72015, (501) 773-
3760, jeremy.hutchinson@senate.ar.gov.
State Sen. David Sanders, District 27 Room
320 State Capitol, Little Rock, AR 72201, (501)
682-6107, davidjamessanders@gmail.com.
State Sen. Alan Clark, District 13 P.O. Box
211, Lonsdale, AR 72087, (501) 262-3360, alan.
clark@senate.ar.gov.
State Rep. Ann Clemmer, District 23, 7415
Camille Drive, Benton, AR 72015, (501) 316-
0364, avclemmer@sbcglobal.net.
State Rep. Andy Davis, District 31 P.O. Box
30248, Little Rock, AR 72260, (501) 837-5109,
andy.davis@arkansashouse.org.
State Rep. Andy Mayberry, District 27 3022
E. Woodson Lateral Road, Hensley, AR 72065,
(501) 888-3522, andymayberry@windstream.net.
State Rep. Kim Hammer, District 28, 1411
Edgehill Dr., Benton, AR 72015, (501) 840-3841,
kimdhammer@yahoo.com.
Circuit Judge Bobby McCallister, 22nd
Judicial District, Division 1, Saline County
Courthouse, 200 N. Main St., Benton, AR 72015,
(501) 303-5635.
Circuit Judge Gary Arnold, 22nd Judicial
District, Division 2, Saline County Courthouse,
200 N. Main St., Benton, AR 72015, (501) 303-
5664.
Circuit Judge Grisham Phillips, 22nd
Judicial District, Division 3, Saline County
Courthouse, 200 N. Main St., Benton, AR 72015,
(501) 303-5628.
Circuit Judge Robert Herzfeld, 22nd
Judicial District, Division 4, Saline County Annex,
321 N. Main St., Benton, AR 72015, (501) 303-
1584.
District Judge Michael Robinson, Benton
District, 1605 Edison Ave., Benton, AR 72019,
(501) 303-5670.
District Judge Stephanie Casady, Bryant
District (Bryant, Alexander, Bauxite, Haskell,
Shannon Hills), Boswell Municipal Complex, 210
SW Third St., Bryant, AR 72022, (501) 847-5223.
Saline County Judge Lanny Fite,
Courthouse 200 N. Main St., Benton, AR 72015,
(501) 303-5640.
Prosecuting Attorney Ken Casady, 22nd
Juicial District, 102 S. Main St., Benton, AR
72015, (501) 315-7767.
Saline County Sheriff Bruce Pennington,
Saline County Detention Center, 735 S. Neeley
St., Benton, AR 72015; (501) 303-5609.
news@bentoncourier.com
HOW TO REACH YOUR ELECTED OFFICIALS
“Congress shall make no law ... abridging the freedom
of speech, or of the press ... .”
— From the First Amendment to Constitution
I
f you happened to be driving along Military
Road near Burger King Friday morning, you
found yourself in yet another traffic jam. Traffic
backed up in both directions near the intersection of
Military Road and Congo Road.
But this one was different.
City leaders, project coordinators, construction
officials and other community leaders created one
last traffic jam on Friday to officially dedicate the
new Lower Military Road. One more delay, one more
headache.
There was visible frustration from
motorists in the area Friday morning,
who probably had no idea what this
particular traffic jam was all about.
We’ve all become somewhat accus-
tomed to life without construction
cones in front of Sonic over the past
few weeks. That’s because construc-
tion on the mega project has been
finished for a while now, and we all
thought the roadway was ours for the
driving.
So why create one last traffic jam?
After more than two years of con-
struction, it seemed fitting to mark
the occasion for posterity. The Lower
Military Road construction project is complete, and
the finished product will let a lot of people sleep
easier in the coming months.
It took about $8 million to widen the 1.5 mile
stretch. During the construction phase there were
countless delays and changes to the design, many
brought about by unforeseen soil and drainage
issues. The project cost businesses along the route a
ton of money, and angered motorists across the area.
It began in one mayoral administration, and finished
in another.
It was necessary, costly and mind-numbingly slow.
In other words, it was progress.
The new roadway is a gem. It is both aestheti-
cally pleasing and highly functional. It makes traffic
on Military Road continuous, and controlled by stop
lights all the way out to Interstate 30. The new traffic
flow patterns will help relieve congestion at Congo
Road, and more importantly, create a new business
corridor with interstate access.
Access to Congo Road and businesses near that
intersection from the northbound lanes of Military is
still a challenge, but it’s much easier than it used to
be. Quite frankly, there’s no real answer to solving
the problems of a Y intersection in an urban traffic
zone.
Now city leaders will focus their attention to widen-
ing Alcoa Road. This, too, will be a monster project
on a roadway almost as busy as Military. Money from
the quarter-cent dedicated sales tax approved by
voters is what’s funding these projects, and now we
have one major stretch of new roadway to enjoy while
another project begins to gear up.
There’s no way to recoup the lost business on
Lower Military Road, or fully measure the economic
costs of the effort to widen the road. It was a project
that simply had to be done. But now that the pain of
that project is done, it’s time to enjoy the gain.
Most importantly, this investment will pay divi-
dends in future growth for many years to come.
Steve Boggs is pubisher of The Saline Courier. He
can be reached at publisher@bentoncourier.com.
A
sk most people on Capitol
Hill and they’ll say: 50-50.
Those are the odds they
give for a government shutdown.
An alternative to the shutdown
would be a proposed delay of the
individual mandate, the most painful
part of Obamacare, which may seem
like a Republican victory but upon
closer inspection would be a win for
President Obama and Democrats.
Historians -- or commentators
in the meantime
-- might view either
of these possible
outcomes as yet
another “Putinesca”
victory for the presi-
dent: Saved by the
enemy.
Just as Russian
President Vladimir
Putin emerged at
the brink of the U.S.
bombing of Syria
to orchestrate an
alternative solution, Republicans may
have provided a rip cord for Obama.
Postponement of the individual
mandate is part of the GOP bargain-
ing package on raising the debt
ceiling. Delay it for a year, say
Republican leaders, and they’ll raise
the debt limit for a year to keep the
government operating.
At least one Democrat, Joe
Manchin, has conceded that this
would be a pretty good idea since the
health care overhaul obviously isn’t
ready. The many flaws have been
fully vetted for months, though new
ones continue to reveal themselves
as we approach the insurance-
exchange shopping spree scheduled
to begin in a few days.
Latest to the fraying Affordable
(now “Adorable”) Care Act is a tech-
nological glitch in online applications
for small businesses. It isn’t ready
yet and will be delayed.
What is ready, and adorable, is a
sampler of new ads aimed at children
who are still fretful about the new
plan. Oh, wait, no. The ads, featur-
ing baby ducks and kittens -- purring
and feeling ducky about Obamacare
-- are aimed at adults. They’re certifi-
ably cute, but one can’t escape the
thought that the federal government
has skipped all pretense at treating
Americans as adults. Naptime, any-
one?
To be fair, Sen. Ted Cruz read Dr.
Seuss’ “Green Eggs and Ham” to
his children during his 21-hour un-
filibuster. The muse whispers: “Ted
Cruz would send Ronald Reagan
back to the Democratic Party.”
Here’s the problem for
Republicans, which will not be news
to those with a view of the long
game. The short game is to stall
Obamacare, but to what end ulti-
mately? Until Republicans can seize
the Senate in 2014 and the White
House in 2016, at which point they
can repeal the whole thing?
Skinny chance, that.
More likely, whether the govern-
ment shuts down or, should Tinker
Bell suddenly materialize and con-
vince Obama to cave and postpone
his personal dream act, Republicans
will be viewed by a greater majority
than previously as having no talent
for leadership.
And if the debt ceiling isn’t raised
and the United States defaults,
threatening our full faith and credit
around the world and sending coun-
tries looking favorably for other cur-
rencies, not to mention the financial
fallout here, then blame will fall at
the feet of the Republican Party. No
surprise there.
Now consider the alternative sce-
nario: Suppose Republicans succeed
in getting the individual mandate
delayed for a year -- right up to the
2014 midterm elections. Bravo, right?
Not necessarily. If voters don’t have
to experience the uncertainty and
discomfort of being forced to buy
insurance in an unwieldy, dysfunc-
tional system -- all the while noticing
that millions are still without cover-
age -- who benefits?
Surely not the Republicans, who,
on the one hand, can be blamed for
depriving insurance coverage to
those poor sick kittens and duck-
lings. On the other, they accrue no
benefit from having prevented the
pain of implementing Obamacare.
Republicans lose either way, but
they may lose biggest if they win.
Alternatives to present circum-
stances do not abound. Republicans
have drawn their red line in the
sand. Democrats have drawn theirs.
Obama says no negotiating over the
debt ceiling, period.
There is one alternative that is
both perhaps best for the country
and hardest for Obama. He could
relent not to Republicans but to
the greater good. He could delay
full implementation past the 2014
elections, which would accomplish
two things: One, he could iron out
the wrinkles that are now apparent.
Two, Democrats would get to slide
through another election cycle with-
out the most visibly painful part of
Obamacare -- the individual mandate.
What, really, does Obama have
to lose? Only face, the pain of which
passes. What he would gain is the
legacy that escapes so many these
days -- proof that he is a leader who
does the right thing, even if it hurts
his pride just a little.
Republicans, who will have ban-
ished themselves to wander a while
longer in the desert, may have drawn
a line too far.
Kathleen Parker’s email address is
kathleenparker@washpost.com.
The GOP’s lose-lose
proposition
EDITORIAL CARTOON
E
nrollment at the 33 publicly sup-
ported colleges and universities
in Arkansas is 170,056 this fall,
according to the head count that is tradi-
tionally taken on the 11th day of classes.
The total is slightly down from last
year, mainly because of a drop in the
number of students attending Arkansas’
two-year colleges. Enrollment at the 22
two-year colleges fell 6 percent, from
almost 60,000 to about 56,000.
The number of stu-
dents enrolled in four-year
universities rose from
97,365 to 97,725, which is
an increase of 0.4 percent.
In all, enrollment at
Arkansas’ institutions
of higher education fell
2 percent from the fall
semester of 2012 to that
of 2013.
Higher education
officials say it’s too early
to be certain about the
reasons for the decline,
but they have a couple of theories. One
is that the economy is improving slightly,
therefore more young people are working
rather than going to college. Enrollment
tends to increase when jobs get scarce.
The enrollment statistics show that the
fewer students are taking more hours.
Another possibility is that changes in
federal laws have made it harder to qual-
ify for financial aid such as a Pell grants
and loans, so fewer students can afford
tuition and textbooks.
Arkansas Tech at Russellville had the
higher percentage gain. Its enrollment
went up 4 percent, to 11,385. Enrollment
at the University of Central Arkansas at
Conway went up 3.8 percent to 11,534
and at the University of Arkansas at
Fayetteville it went up 3.3 percent to
25,341. Southern Arkansas University at
Magnolia had an increase in enrollment
of 2.2 percent, to 3,404.
The University of Arkansas at Pine
Bluff had a 7.5 percent decline in enroll-
ment, to 2,615, while Henderson State
University at Arkadelphia had a decline of
5 percent, to 3,583.
The University of Arkansas at Little
Rock also had a decrease in enrollment,
of 3.6 percent to 12,403. Arkansas State
University at Jonesboro had a decrease
of 2.4 percent, to 13,538. The University
of Arkansas at Fort Smith saw enrollment
drop by 2.4 percent, to 7,158 and enroll-
ment at the University of Arkansas at
Monticello fell 1.2 percent to 3,897.
A few two-year colleges had increases
in enrollment, led by College of the
Ouachitas at Malvern, which had a 6.1
percent increase to 1,498.
Three colleges associated with the
University of Arkansas system had
increases. They are Phillips Community
College, with campuses at DeWitt,
Stuttgart and Helena-West Helena, which
had an increase of 3 percent, to 2,039;
Cossatot Community College, which saw
enrollment go up 2.6 percent to 1,575;
and the Community College at Morrilton,
which had an increase of five students,
bringing its total enrollment to 2,144.
ASU - Mountain Home also had an
increase of 2.3 percent, to 1,446, and ASU-
Newport grew by 1 percent, to 2,064.
The state Higher Education
Department estimates that 35,500 to
37,500 students will receive an Academic
Challenge Scholarship this year, com-
pared to almost 33,000 last year. The
value of this year’s scholarships will be
from $113 million to $117 million, com-
pared to about $133 million last year.
Revenue for the scholarships comes
from the state lottery. Ticket sales have
slumped, so amounts were restructured
this year to ensure the long-term finan-
cial health of the Academic Challenge
Scholarship Program.
Alan Clark represents District 13, which
includes portions of Saline County.
State Capitol
week in review
After a lot of pain,
it’s time to enjoy
the gain
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Page 4A – The Saline Courier
news@bentoncourier.com Sunday, September 29, 2013
OpiniOn
Steve
BoggS
Sen. Allen
ClArk
kAthleen
PArker
Today in history
Today is the 272nd day of 2013 and the
eighth day of autumn.
TODAY’S HISTORY: In 1789, the U.S.
Department of War established a regular
army, maintaining several hundred troops.
In 1916, The New York Times reported
that John D. Rockefeller, the head of
Standard Oil, was almost certainly a billion-
aire, the world’s first.
In 2005, John G. Roberts Jr. was sworn
in as chief justice of the United States.
TODAY’S FACT: Miguel de Cervantes’
“Don Quixote” is widely considered to be
the first modern novel. It was initially pub-
lished in two volumes in 1605 and 1615.
TODAY’S SPORTS: In 1951, NBC
broadcast a college football game between
Duke University and the University of
Pittsburgh. It was the first live sporting
event to be televised nationwide.
TODAY’S QUOTE: “Never stand beg-
ging for that which you have the power to
earn.” -- Miguel de Cervantes
Sunday, September 29, 2013
The Saline Courier 5A
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Family Practice Associates
Monday, August 5 at 5:30pm and 6:00pm
Saturday, August 17 at 10am
Thursday, August 22 at 5:30pm and 6:00pm
Tuesday, August 27 at noon
We now offer a medically managed meal replacement
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are welcome. High protein, low calorie diet with proven
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office; upcoming meetings are scheduled for:
Visit www.FPABenton.com for more information!
1304 Military Rd, Benton—501-778-0934
Family Practice Associates
Monday, August 5 at 5:30pm and 6:00pm
Saturday, August 17 at 10am
Thursday, August 22 at 5:30pm and 6:00pm
Tuesday, August 27 at noon
We now offer a medically managed meal replacement
weight loss program! Designed for patients with 30 or
more pounds to lose. Current patients or new patients
are welcome. High protein, low calorie diet with proven
results! Come to one of our interest meetings held at our
office; upcoming meetings are scheduled for:
Visit www.FPABenton.com for more information!
1304 Military Rd, Benton—501-778-0934
Family Practice Associates
Monday, August 5 at 5:30pm and 6:00pm
Saturday, August 17 at 10am
Thursday, August 22 at 5:30pm and 6:00pm
Tuesday, August 27 at noon
We now offer a medically managed meal replacement
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more pounds to lose. Current patients or new patients
are welcome. High protein, low calorie diet with proven
results! Come to one of our interest meetings held at our
office; upcoming meetings are scheduled for:
Visit www.FPABenton.com for more information!
Weight Loss Program
Thursday, September 5 at noon
Sunday, September 8 at 2pm
Tuesday, September 17 at 5:30pm and 6pm
Thursday, September 26 at noon
Steve Boggs
Brent Davis The Saline Courier
Students at Ringgold Elementary were issued a recent challenge by their principal, Beverly Overturf, who agreed to dress as a jar of Jif
if they collected more than 200 pounds of peanut butter during the school’s annual food drive. The students collected 450 pounds and
Overturf was true to her word. From left are Michelle, Ty, Enrique, Beverly Overturf, Mohammod, Caleb, Pamela and Ximena.
BUT WHEREʼS THE JELLY?
LITTLE ROCK — The
director of the Arkansas
Department of Finance and
Administration says a fed-
eral government shutdown
could mean more than 2,000
state employees being fur-
loughed starting Tuesday.
Richard Weiss told state
agency directors in a memo
Friday that a shutdown
would mean funding for
some state programs expire
and would not be supple-
mented with state funds.
DFA spokesman Amy
Webb told the Arkansas
Democrat-Gazette that
many furloughs would be
in the Children and Family
Services Division, includ-
ing employees who provide
foster-care services and who
perform child abuse investi-
gations. She says employees
who perform eligibility and
enrollment services for pub-
lic assistance also could be
furloughed.
Spokesman Matt
DeCample for Gov. Mike
Beebe said the situation is
"fluid," but that it's impor-
tant to prepare the more
than 2,000 people who might
be affected.
Shutdown could mean
2,000 or more furloughs
Associated Press
Arizona — A highly
anticipated report examining
weather conditions, radio
traffic and fire behavior,
among other things, is
expected to help explain
how 19 members of an elite
firefighting crew died while
battling an Arizona wildfire.
Officials, however, said it
won't assign blame.
The Arizona State
Forestry Division was set
to present the roughly
120-page report to the
men's families ahead of a
news conference planned
for Saturday morning in
Prescott.
All but one member of the
Granite Mountain Hotshots
crew died June 30 while
protecting the small former
gold rush town of Yarnell,
about 80 miles northwest
of Phoenix, from an erratic
lightning-sparked wildfire.
Early reports showed the
fire caused little immedi-
ate concern because of its
remote location and small
size when it began June 28.
But the blaze quickly grew
into an inferno, burning
swiftly across pine, juniper
and scrub oak and through
an area that hadn't experi-
enced a significant wildfire
in nearly 50 years.
The 20-member Granite
Mountain Hotshots team
arrived early on the morning
of June 30 and headed into
the boulder-strewn moun-
tains. About nine hours
later, the crew radioed that
they were trapped by flames
and deploying emergency
shelters. Only one crew
member who was assigned
as the lookout survived.
The fire ended up
destroying more than 100
homes and burned 13
square miles before it was
fully contained on July 10.
No other wildfire had
claimed more firefighters
in 80 years, and it was the
deadliest single day for
fire crews since the terror
attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.
The Granite Mountain
team was unique among
the nation's roughly 110
Hotshot crews as the first
and only such unit attached
to a municipal fire depart-
ment.
It wasn't clear why the
firefighters left the relative
safety of a ridge top or if
they had received warnings
of the erratically changing
weather that whipped the
blaze into an unpredictable
inferno when they dropped
down into a bowl surround-
ed by mountains on three
sides.
At one point, officials
asked for half of the avail-
able western U.S. heavy air
tanker fleet — six planes
— to try to control the
blaze. Five weren't deployed
because of the limited num-
ber in the nation's aerial
firefighting fleet and the
dangerous weather condi-
tions at the time. One plane
was heading to Arizona from
California but engine prob-
lems forced it to turn back.
Forestry officials have
said that even if the planes
had been available, winds
were so strong they couldn't
have been used to save the
firefighters' lives.
Some family members
hope the investigation will
explain why their loved ones
died. Others say it will do
nothing to ease their pain.
"No matter what the
report says, it won't bring
him back," Colleen Turbyfill
said of her son, Travis. "I
miss him, and it's unbear-
able pain. It doesn't go
away. Sometimes I can't
breathe, but this report isn't
going to help that one way
or another."
Report to detail blaze,
deaths of 19 firefighters
Associated Press
Page 6A – The Saline Courier
sports@bentoncourier.com Sunday, September 29, 2013
SportS
saline
scoreboard
FRIDAY
Football
Bryant def. Benton 42-28 (Salt
Bowl at War Memorial Stadium)
Glen Rose def. BHG 55-12
Malvern def. Bauxite 49-22
L. Hamilton def. Sheridan 51-7
sec football
schedule
SATURDAY
10 Texas A&M def. Ark. 45-33
12 S. Carolina def. UCF 28-25
Tenn. def. S. Alabama 31-24
9 Georgia def. 6 LSU 44-41
1 Alabama def. 23 Miss. 25-0
20 Florida def. Kentucky 24-7
Missouri def. Ark. St. 41-19
Vandy def. UAB 52-24
Bryant dominates
BRYANT – The Bryant
Hornets boys and girls swept
their competition on Thursday
afternoon for a par-36, nine
holes at The Greens at
Hurricane Creek in Bryant.
The boys, playing against
rival Benton and Sheridan,
shot a 156 for first place, and
the girls, playing Benton and
Mount Saint Mary, shot a 129
to pick up the win.
Sophomore Drew
Castleberry shot a 1-under
35 for the top medalist spot,
and senior Peyton Weaver
shot a 3-over 39 as the top
medalist for the girls. Senior
Chase Thornton came in
second place with a 37, while
juniors Luke Brantley and
Logan Moore each shot a 42
to round out the scoring. For
Benton, which finished third
with a 172, sophomore Sam
Eddington and senior Matthew
Perry each shot a 42, sopho-
more Joe Adams had a 43 and
freshman Cole Treece shot a
45.
After Weaver’s 39, sopho-
TONY LENAHAN/The Saline Courier
Bryant sophomore golfer Drew Castleberry takes a tee shot at The
Greens at Hurricane Lake in a golf match on Thursday. Castleberry
shot a 1-under 35 to take top medalist honors in Bryants’ dominat-
ing victory.
by tony lenahan
tlenahan@bentoncourier.com
GOLF, page 7A
Hogs hang in, but fall short
Benton competing hard
EL DORADO – The
Benton Panther tennis
team had a good outing
on Thursday, competing
against host El Dorado and
Camden. The Panthers
swept Camden in every
match, while singles play
against El Dorado was suc-
cessful.
Against Camden in
singles action, Jax Hopkins
swept Jacob Yarbro 8-0,
Adam Wilson took down
Mahamad Hajen 8-3, Abby
McAtee beat Hannah Taylor
8-0, Ashley Callison defeated
Nikki Blank 8-2, and Anna
Harcourt played two match-
es against Camden’s Taylor
King and Cassidy Kendall,
with Harcourt winning 8-1
and 8-0, respectively.
In doubles, Nathan
Daugherty and Bryce
Jefferson defeated Yarbro
and Hajen 8-4, Brianna
Polner and Natalie Penn
beat Shawnacee McRae
and Daizha Mitchell 8-6,
and Brianna Hampel and
Hannah Smothers picked up
an 8-2 win over Alana Arnold
and Julianna Demaree 8-2.
Benton would pick up sin-
gles wins against El Dorado
when Hopkins beat Blake
Thornton 6-3, McAtee won
8-1 vs. Lauren Massanelli,
and Callison won 8-0
against Abigail Snelson.
Hopkins would lose 8-4 to
Ty Blackburn, while Clay
Johnston was shut out 8-0 by
Lawson Smith.
The Panthers would
get shut out in doubles
play against the Wildcats.
Johnston and Wilson would
lose a close one to Jonah
Haney and Grant Thornton
9-7, while Daugherty and
Jefferson lost 8-2 to Nathan
Oliver and Gabe Pinkerton.
For the girls, Polner and
Penn fell 8-1 to Laura Rogers
and Morgan Eddleman, and
Hampel and Smothers lost
8-1 to Tiffany McMahan and
Leslie Rogers.
Benton returns home
to face Lake Hamilton on
Monday at Tyndall Park.
by tony lenahan
tlenahan@bentoncourier.com
Lady Hornets take title
Melinda
Murdock
runs during
the Cyclone
Invitational in
Russellville
on Saturday.
Murdock took
the individual
victory with a
time of 20:04
helping the
Lady Hornets
to a dominat-
ing perfor-
mance.
JULIE SHELBY/Special to
The Saline Courier
RUSSELLVILLE – At
the Russellville Cyclone
cross country invitational
Saturday, the Bryant Lady
Hornets put six runners in
the top 15 places, includ-
ing Melinda Murdock’s
individual victory, to win the
team championship. Bryant
scored 35 points to dominate
the field of 13 teams. Mt. St.
Mary took runner-up with
63 points followed by LR
Christian (87), Heber Springs
(120), Conway (144), and
Russellville (166). There
were 143 indivdual finishers
in the race. This makes two
team championships on the
year for Bryant who took
the OBU title earlier in the
season.
“With her victory today,
Melinda served notice that
she is one of the top female
cross country runners in the
state,” Bryant Coach Danny
Westbrook said. “ Her time is
FAYETTEVILLE
— Johnny "Football"
Manziel and the rest of
the Texas A&M Aggies
(4-1, 1-1) made the trek to
Fayetteville to battle the
Arkansas Razorbacks (3-2,
0-1) on Saturday night in
Southeastern Conference
play.
But what many said
would be a blowout
turned into a dog fight on
"The Hill" with the Hogs
answering the Aggies with
touchdowns and field goals
all night. But with the
ability to escape anything
running his direction,
Manziel was able to keep
his Aggies in front, beating
the Hogs 45-33.
The contest was defi-
nitely no blowout on the
scoreboard or the stat
sheet with A&M outgain-
ing Arkansas by less than
50 yards, 523 to 483.
"We tried to take
advantage in the third
and fourth quarter, but
obviously just ran out of
steam," Head Coach Bret
Bielema said. "Give credit
to A&M, they are a great
team and [Manziel] is a
great player and great
competitor. He made some
things happen."
Manziel jumpstarted the
game with a 49-yard bomb
to wide receiver Mike
Evans on the first play of
the game.
The Aggies capitalized
on the big play, scoring
five plays later on another
reception from Evans, this
time a 9-yarder for the
touchdown to put A&M up
7-0 early in the first.
Arkansas quar-
terback Brandon
Allen throws a
pass earlier in
the season. In
Saturday’s 45-33
loss to Texas
A&M, Allen
threw for 282
yards and three
TDs on 17 of 36
passing.
GARETH PATTERSON/Special
to The Saline Courier
XC, page 7A
HOGS, page 7A
by Josh briggs
jbriggs@bentoncourier.com
Chargers hoping to prevent
another buzzer beater
NFC EAST
Dallas
Philadelphia
New York
2-1
1-2
0-3
SAN DIEGO — The last
thing the San Diego Chargers
want to give Tony Romo and
the Dallas Cowboys is one last
chance to score.
The Chargers’ two losses
this season have come after
allowing an opponent to jump
ahead on its final possession.
The Tennessee Titans did
it last Sunday with a 34-yard
touchdown pass from Jake
Locker to rookie Justin Hunter
with 15 seconds left for a 20-17
win.
On opening night, the
Chargers blew a 21-point sec-
ond half lead and lost 31-28 to
Houston on Randy Bullock’s
41-yard field goal as time
expired.
San Diego had the Titans
pinned on their own 7-yard
line with more than 2 minutes
left and no timeouts.
“I’ll take my chances any
day of making a team go 94
yards in a two-minute situa-
tion on our defense to make
a stop,” rookie coach Mike
McCoy said Monday. “But
like I told our team, ‘Don’t
get to that point. Don’t put it
on the defense. Convert that
four-minute situation, pick up
first downs at end of the game
and the game is over.’ But we
didn’t get it done.”
The Chargers (1-2) led
most of the game but in the
end, couldn’t collect enough
first downs to kill the clock.
“It’s all about winning,”
McCoy said, “and we didn’t
get it done at the end.”
So here come Romo and
the Cowboys (2-1), who will
try to win three of their first
four games for the first time
since 2008.
The Cowboys beat the St.
Louis Rams 31-7, with Romo
throwing for three touch-
downs and DeMarco Murray
rushing for 175 yards and a
touchdown.
Here are five things to
watch when the Cowboys play
the Chargers:
MAKING IT EASY ON
ROMO: DeMarco Murray
had his first 100-yard game
in more than a year against
the Rams, the same team he
torched for a franchise-record
253 yards rushing as a rookie
two years ago. He went 14
yards on Dallas’ first offensive
play and set up two other scor-
ing drives with runs of 41 and
36 yards. As a result, Romo
had his fewest pass attempts
since the last time Murray ran
over the Rams, and threw for
three touchdowns on just 210
yards passing. It also helps
that the Cowboys haven’t
trailed in their two wins. Romo
has one interception after
tying for the league lead last
year with 19. “If you’re throw-
ing 50 balls and 25 of them are
under duress, it’s just bound
to have a negative effect
throughout the football game,”
Romo said.
by bernie Wilson
AP Writer
special to the courier
Sunday, September 29, 2013
The Saline Courier 7A
School Overall Conf.
Bryant 2-2 1-0
Lake Hamilton 3-1 1-0
Pine Bluff 2-1-1 1-0
El Dorado 1-3 1-0
Benton 2-2 0-1
Texarkana 1-2 0-1
Sheridan 1-3 0-1
LR Fair 1-3 0-1
7A/6A South Standings
School Overall Conf.
Arkadelphia 4-0 1-0
Ashdown 4-0 1-0
Malvern 3-1 1-0
CAC 3-1 1-0
Robinson 3-1 0-1
Nashville 2-2 0-1
Bauxite 1-3 0-1
Ark. Bapt. 1-3 0-1
5-3A Standings
School Overall Conf.
Glen Rose 3-1 1-0
Two Rivers 3-1 1-0
Fountain Lake 2-2 1-0
Bismarck 1-3 1-0
BHG 2-2 0-1
Horatio 2-2 0-1
Centerpoint 1-2-1 0-1
Jessieville 1-3 0-1
7-4A Standings
7A/6A South (Friday)
Bryant def. Benton 42-28 (Salt
Bowl at War Memorial Stadium)
El Dorado def. Fair 44-6
L. Hamilton def. Sheridan 51-7
Pine Bluff def. Texarkana 28-13
7-4A
Malvern def. Bauxite 49-22
Ashdown def. Robinson 35-0
Arkadelphia def. Nashville 28-19
CAC def. Ark. Bapt. 43-32
5-3A
Glen Rose def. BHG 55-12
Bismarck def. Jessieville 31-0
F. Lake def. Centerpoint 47-7
Two rivers def. Horatio 25-12
Passing:
C/A Yards Yds/A TD/I
ARK
Brandon Allen 17/36 282 7.8 3/2
TEX A&M
Johnny Manziel 23/30 261 8.7 2/0
Rushing:
Att Yards Yds/A TD
ARK
Alex Collins 14 116 8.3 1
Jonathan Williams 10 53 5.3 0
Korliss Marshall 1 16 16.0 0
Keon Hatcher 1 9 9.0 0
Kiero Small 1 3 3.0 0
Brandon Allen 2 2 1.0 0
Javontee Herndon 1 2 2.0 0
TEX A&M
Trey Williams 9 83 9.2 1
T. Carson 9 64 7.1 0
J. Manziel 9 59 6.6 0
Ben Malena 12 40 3.3 2
B. Williams 4 18 4.5 0
Receiving
Rec. Yards Yds/C TD
ARK
Hunter Henry 4 109 27.3 0
Jonathan Williams 4 67 16.8 2
Javontee Herndon 2 36 18.0 0
Keon Hatcher 2 27 13.5 1
Eric Hawkins 2 21 10.5 0
Kiero Small 2 18 9.0 0
Alex Collins 1 4 4.0 0
TEX A&M
Mike Evans 6 116 19.3 2
D. Walker 7 81 11.6 0
M. Kennedy 4 24 6.0 0
S. Holmes 3 24 8.0 0
Trey Williams 2 12 6.0 0
Ben Malena 1 4 4.0 0
Razorbacks/Aggies Stats
more Abigail McGee shot a
43 to tie for second place, and
senior Savanna Cathey shot a
47 to finish the scoring. The
Benton girls (finished third
with a 170) were led by junior
Jenna Jameson and sopho-
more Savanna Simpson’s 56,
and senior Karli Lipinski shot
a 58.
Bryant’s next competi-
tion will come in the 7A
State Tournament, which
begins on Monday at Rogers.
The Benton boys will go to
Mountain Home for the 6A
State Tourney, while the girls
go to Marion on Monday.
Golf
From page 6A
very impressive considering
how hard this course is. She
ran a great race. I was also
extremely proud of Caitlyn
Bell. She ran really close to
Melinda most of the race.”
Murdock, a senior, went
to the lead soon after the
start of the race and never
looked back. She finished
with a time of 20:04, 18 sec-
onds ahead of second-place
finisher Erin Woodward of LR
Christian. Junior Caitlyn Bell
also took top-5 honors with
her third-place finish with a
time of 20:30. Sophomore
Hannah Shelby took eighth
place with a time of 21:38.
The rest of Bryant’s scorers
included Hunter Delaney
(11th, 21:55), Talyn Billins
(13th, 21:57), and Gabby
Crabtree (14th, 22:07). All of
Bryant’s top 6 received a top
20 medal.
Sophomore Reagan Smith
(30th, 23:53) and junior
Lauren Ackley (36th, 24:12)
finished out the top eight for
Bryant.
“I thought as a team we
ran awesome,” Westbrook
said. “ Anytime you put six
runners in the top 14 places
in a field of 143 runners, you
are going to have an excellent
opportunity to win. We really
did a great job of pack run-
ning with our second wave of
runners.” \
Jr. Girls
Behind the individual
victory of freshman Sydney
Wilson, the Bryant Jr.
Lady Hornets took fourth
place in the team competi-
tion at the Russellville
Cyclone Invitational
Saturday. Russellville won
the title with a score of 85
points followed by Heber
Springs (94), Caddo Hills
(105), Bryant (111), and
Pulaski Academy (145).
There were 11 teams and 175
indivdual finishers in the race.
“Sydney did a great job of
not giving up and tracking
down the girl from Heber
Springs in the last few meters
of the race,” Westbrook
said. “She ran a great race.
I thought as a team we ran
better today, but we still
have some huge time gaps
between our scoring runners
that we have to correct in
order to be in contention for a
team title.”
Wilson stayed in second
behind Ali Jones of Heber
Springs for most of the race.
With a strong surge in the
last 50 meters, she passed
Jones and took the victory by
a mere 2 seconds. Wilson’s
time was 13:38 with Jones
taking second in 13:40.
Freshman Rachel Curtis also
received a top-20 medal by
taking 19th with a time of
14:40.
Eighth-grader Camryn
Bolton finished 26th in a time
of 15:02. The rest of Bryant’s
scorers were Anne Cockmon
(35th, 15:33) and Lauren Hart
(39th, 15:44).
Carissa Colclsure (44th,
15:59) and Jasmine Reeves
(47th, 16:05) finished out the
top seven.
Next up for the Bryant
Cross Country program is the
Chile Pepper Invitational in
Fayetteville next Saturday.
But Arkansas was just as
pumped and ready to get
on the field as well. With
newly added offensive
threat Korliss Marshall
switching from defense,
he gave the Hogs good
starting field position after
returning the ensuing kick-
off to Arkansas' 38-yard
line after taking some early
hits on the return.
Brandon Allen, who
was just cleared to play
on Friday after missing
a week and a half, used
his version of a big play,
hitting Jevontee Herndon
for a 29-yard gain to set
the Hogs up nicely on the
Aggies 30 on the Hogs
opening series.
After a couple of small
runs from his backs, Allen
found Keon Hatcher for a
12-yard completion for the
touchdown to answer A&M
and tie the game 7-7 with
7:43 left in the opening
quarter.
But Manziel being
Manziel, he led his team
down the field for a sec-
ond straight scoring drive,
taking back the lead on
a 2-yard scrum by Ben
Malena to go up 14-7 with
just over 5 minutes left to
play in the quarter.
The Hogs couldn't
answer back and were
forced to punt for the first
time in the game, giving
Manziel and company a
chance to take a big lead
early. Instead, the Hogs
defense held up, limiting
the Aggies to a field goal
and a 17-7 lead at the end
of the first quarter.
Arkansas was able to
answer the next time out,
but only for three on a
28-yard field goal from
kicker Zach Hocker to cut
the Aggies lead to 17-10
with 14:44 left in the first
half.
Despite moving the ball
well on offense, the Hogs
defense continued to strug-
gle trying to stop Johnny
Football, much like every
team that plays against
him.
With the ball on their
own 25-yard line, the
Aggies went 75 yards on
nine plays, capping the
drive with another TD pass
complete to Evans to put
A&M up 24-10 in the sec-
ond quarter.
But the Hogs weren't
going anywhere. Faced
with a third-and-6 on their
own 40, the Hogs convert-
ed on a pass from Allen to
receiver Eric Hawkins for
a 9-yard gain into Aggies
territory to keep the drive
alive. Four plays later and
the Hogs were in the end
zone on a 19-yard comple-
tion to running back
Jonathan Williams to cut
the deficit to 24-17 with
6:02 remaining in the half.
Arkansas finally forced
the Aggies to punt on their
next drive, capitalizing on
the stop and ending the
half with a 39-yard field
goal by Hocker to trail by
just four at the half, 24-20.
Freshman running back
Alex Collins sparked the
drive with a 38-yard run
to put the Hogs deep into
A&M territory.
With all of the momen-
tum heading into the
locker room and receiving
the ball after the break,
things quickly went south
for the Hogs when A&M
defensive back Deshazor
Everett broke on a pass
from Allen, intercepting
it and returning it for a
touchdown, giving A&M
the 31-20 advantage early
in the second half.
Despite being punched
in the mouth, the Hogs
quickly responded with a
touchdown of their own,
scoring on a 9-yard run
from Collins to cut the
score back to a four-point
lead for the Aggies, 31-27.
"We have responded to
adversity well all season,"
Allen said. "We knew we
needed a big drive [after
the interception]."
But A&M was just too
much to handle in front of
a crowd of 72,000-plus at
Razorback Stadium.
Both teams continued to
match each other punt for
punt and touchdown for
touchdown throughout the
second half, but Manziel
and the Aggies were too
much, ending with a 45-33
victory over the Hogs.
Allen found Williams
again for a second touch-
down in the game in the
third quarter for the Hogs
final score of the game.
Aggies running back
Trey Williams found the
end zone from 17-yards
out, and Malena also
crossed the goal line again
in the win to end the ball
game in an Aggies win.
Allen finished with 282
yards through the air on
17 for 36 passing and three
TDs. He also tossed two
interceptions.
"Allen did no throwing
whatsoever on Tuesday,"
Bielema said. "He had
no issues Wednesday, he
practiced for half the prac-
tice. He was a little sore
on Thursday and better on
Friday. We needed to see
how [his shoulder] react-
ed. The doctors were really
concerned that after he
did all the things a normal
quarterback does, how he
would feel the next day."
Hunter Henry had a big,
but rather quiet game as
far as the score was con-
cerned, bringing in four
catches for 109 yards.
Collins went over the
100-yard mark once again,
finishing with 116 on seven
carries and a TD.
Manziel totaled 261
passing yards, completing
23 of 30 pass attempts in
the win. Evan ended with
116 yards receiving and
two scores for the Aggies.
Manziel did hit the
canvas once on a sack by
Deatrich Wise.
The Razorbacks will
be on the road to Florida
next week to take on the
Gators. A&M will be at Ole
Miss.
"Obviously, the schedule
doesn't get any easier with
Florida coming up but I
think they understand how
much they have to give,"
Bielema said.
After Florida, the Hogs
play South Carolina at
home and then No. 1
Alabama on the road.
JULIE SHELBY/Special to The Saline Courier
The Bryant girls cross country team poses after dominating the Cyclone Invitational on Saturday.
XC
From page 6A
Hogs
From page 6A
BUSINESS
Page 8A – The Saline Courier
news@bentoncourier.com Sunday, September 29, 2013
FAYETTEVILLE —
Officials have begun an
investigation regarding
allegations that University
of Arkansas Chancellor G.
David Gearhart ordered the
destruction of public docu-
ments to keep them from
being released.
Washington County
deputy prosecutor David
Bercaw told the Arkansas
Democrat-Gazette he has
issued subpoenas for docu-
ments from the Legislative
Audit Division and the UA
System, which have each
investigated a more than $4
million deficit in the univer-
sity's advancement division.
Bercaw said Friday the
audit division provided its
papers more than a week
ago but he's still waiting for
papers from UA auditors.
He said he expects the UA
documents to arrive next
week and that the investiga-
tion will likely take several
weeks.
"There's just a tremen-
dous amount of informa-
tion," he said.
Former UA spokesman
John Diamond testified Sept.
13 before the Legislative
Joint Auditing Committee
that Gearhart in January
ordered the destruction of
documents related to the
advancement division's
spending to avoid releasing
them through Freedom of
Information Act requests.
"The chancellor got very
upset, got angry, and made
several statements which
concluded with an instruc-
tion to all of us to get rid
of those documents and
not to produce any more,"
Diamond told legislators.
Gearhart denied
Diamond's accusation,
saying UA complies with
FOIA requests and said that
Diamond is a "disgruntled"
former employee.
Diamond has said he was
fired in August because
of disagreements with
Gearhart and others involv-
ing public-records laws.
Chris Wyrick, vice chancel-
lor for Advancement, said
Diamond was fired for insub-
ordination.
"I categorically deny that
we have ever said to any-
one to destroy documents,"
Gearhart told the committee
in September. He said the
university doesn't retain all
"working papers."
The Legislative Audit
investigation determined
that the Advancement
Division had a cumulative
deficit of $4.19 million as of
June 30, 2012. UA said that
deficit was reduced to $3.21
million as of June 30.
UA officials have repeat-
edly said the deficit, discov-
ered in 2012, was the result
of hiring people whose
salaries were unfunded, in
preparation for a fundraising
drive.
Gearhart has said for-
mer Vice Chancellor for
Advancement Brad Choate
and Joy Sharp, a budget
officer in the division, were
overspending without
requesting additional money
to cover the cost of the new
hires. Choate and Sharp are
no longer employed at UA.
Diamond's statements
prompted the Legislative
Joint Auditing Committee to
keep open its investigation
of the advancement division,
and more hearings may be
held.
Investigation under way
into University of Ark.
records allegations
Associated Press
Acxiom Corp.
America's Car Mart
Arkansas Best Corp.
Bank of the Ozarks
Deltic Timber
Dillard's
Home Bancshares
J.B. Hunt Transport
Murphy Oil
P.A.M. Transport
Simmons First
Tyson Foods
USA Truck
Wal-Mart Stores
Windstream
ARKANSAS STOCKS
ACXM 27.86 -0.28
CRMT 45.00 +0.03
ABFS 25.73 -0.09
OZRK 47.44 -0.15
DEL 64.88 -0.14
DDS 79.12 -0.08
HOMB 29.92 -0.05
JBHT 72.34 +0.44
MUR 61.27 -0.27
PTSI 17.30 -0.05
SFNC 31.09 -0.15
TSN 28.60 +0.06
USAK 8.59 -0.21
WMT 74.36 -0.26
WIN 8.12 -0.07
Stocks listed as of close of previous business day
DETROIT — The federal
fingerprint in efforts to fix
Detroit is growing larger as
the Obama administration
has found millions of dol-
lars in grant money to help
the bankrupt city hire more
police and firefighters, and
clear out blighted neighbor-
hoods.
But considering the Motor
City is at least $18 billion in
debt, it will take a far larger
infusion of cash or historic
deals with bond holders,
insurance companies and
other creditors to correct the
problem.
Four high-ranking White
House officials will discuss
federal efforts and other
opportunities Friday dur-
ing a closed-door meeting
at Wayne State University
with Gov. Rick Snyder, state-
appointed emergency man-
ager Kevyn Orr, Mayor Dave
Bing and community and
business leaders.
The federal money being
directed Detroit's way by the
U.S. government totals more
than $100 million and will
be augmented by millions
of dollars more in resources
from foundations and Detroit
businesses, but it falls far
short of a the wider bailout
some in the city had sought.
"Something is better than
nothing," said Bridgette
Shephard, 47, a social
worker who lives in Detroit.
"A bailout would have been
better, but if we can sustain
some of our needs with
grants that would be a start.
Let's take it. Whatever kind
of money it is to benefit the
city, I'm all for it."
Gene Sperling, chief eco-
nomic adviser to President
Barack Obama, said the
administration scrounged
through the federal budget
and found untapped money
that "either had not flowed
or had not gotten out or not
directed to the top priorities
for Detroit."
Sperling and three other
top Obama aides — U.S.
Attorney General Eric
Holder, Transportation
Secretary Anthony Foxx
and HUD Secretary Shaun
Donovan — will meet with
state and local officials
Friday.
The Obama administra-
tion repeatedly had signaled
it would not offer a massive
federal bailout like the one
credited with helping res-
cue Chrysler and General
Motors.
"There is not going to
be a bailout," Democratic
U.S. Sen. Carl Levin told
The Associated Press on
Wednesday. "We have
enough problems with the
federal deficit. We need to
be creative and look at exist-
ing programs. There are still
some funds there."
The funding announced
by Sperling will include
$65 million in Community
Development Block Grants
for blight eradication, $25
million in a public-private
collaboration for commercial
building demolition and
nearly $11 million in funds to
ensure working families can
live in safe neighborhoods.
Holder will announce $3
million that, in part, will be
used to hire new police offi-
cers. About $25 million also
will be expedited to Detroit
to hire about 140 firefighters
and buy new gear.
"It wasn't enough to try
and free the resources,"
Sperling said. "We had to
make sure they are well-
used and targeted."
In addition, Orr, the city's
emergency manager, has
told the city's two municipal
retirement systems he wants
to freeze Detroit's pension
plans and move to a 401(k)-
style system.
The gathering Friday fol-
lows a series of meetings
with the White House to plot
ways to pull Detroit from a
fiscal pit that this summer
made it the largest U.S. city
to file for bankruptcy protec-
tion.
Detroit has had a poor
record in making sure grant
money is used properly and
even spent at all.
In 2011, Mayor Dave Bing
fired the director of the city's
Human Services Department
after an internal investigation
revealed $200,000 intended
for poor residents was spent
on office furniture for staff
members.
The following year, his
office had to scramble to use
about $20 million in grants
that had been left sitting for
demolitions of thousands
of vacant houses. The city's
Police Department also
allowed a $400,000 grant
to lapse for a new armored
vehicle.
The grant troubles have
rankled Orr, the emergency
manager Gov. Rick Snyder
appointed to lead the city out
of its financial mess.
Orr has said Detroit is so
poor that it can't afford to
lose out on any resources.
In July, he made Detroit the
largest U.S. city to file for
bankruptcy protection.
Grants only can pay for
things the city otherwise
couldn't afford. Several busi-
nesses even pitched in $8
million earlier this year to
help pay for a new fleet of
emergency vehicles, includ-
ing 23 EMS units and 100
police cars, to boost public
safety and reduce response
times.
Police Chief James Craig
said Thursday that he was in
Washington a few weeks ago
in search of federal resourc-
es for his department.
"Our work together is
critical in achieving our
goals of making Detroit a
safe city and providing the
necessary resources in rais-
ing the morale of our most
valuable asset, our people,"
Craig said.
The Obama administra-
tion is trying to show its sup-
port without trying to send
any message about a bailout,
said Peter Henning, a Wayne
State Law School professor.
Officials, especially
those from HUD and
Transportation, can com-
mit funds for infrastructure
projects, while Holder can
chip in resources for fight
Detroit's high violent crime
rate, Henning said.
Feds find $100M for broke Detroit
Associated Press
NEW YORK— The boom
in sales of new cars in the
U.S. has been fueled by con-
sumers replacing vehicles
they kept through the reces-
sion.
But a top auto industry
executive says that the pent-
up demand likely will be sat-
isfied by late next year.
Jim Lentz, Toyota's North
American CEO, told The
Associated Press in an inter-
view Thursday that demand
for new cars from owners of
older models could dry up
sometime late in 2014. If the
economy isn't creating jobs
at a faster pace when that
happens, the boom could
screech to a halt.
"The market then has
to work off a much better
economy, an improving
economy," Lentz said. "If we
don't have that, I think the
market may flatten out."
New car and truck sales
hit a three-decade low of 10.4
million in 2009 as the finan-
cial crisis dried up money for
car loans and U.S.-based auto
companies nearly went out of
business. Consumers, many
who feared they could lose
their jobs, refused to buy
new cars and instead kept
their old ones on the road.
Sales, though, gradu-
ally rebounded and now are
running at an annual rate
of around 15.6 million, just
below pre-recession levels.
Lentz, speaking at the
AP's New York headquar-
ters, said the average car
and truck in the U.S. is now
more than 11 years old. At
the same time, the supply of
coveted used cars that are
one-to-five years old is down
to levels not seen since the
1980s. Used car prices have
jumped, making their month-
ly payments as high as those
for new cars, Lentz said.
That's brought more buyers
into new-car showrooms, he
said.
But as people replace
their cars at a faster rate, the
used-car supply increases.
Eventually, prices will drop
and lure buyers out of the
new-car market, he said.
"So in time, as that one- to
five-year base builds its way
back up, I think we're going
to reach that equilibrium,
probably sometime near the
end of 2014," he said.
Jesse Toprak, senior
analyst for the TrueCar.com
auto pricing site, disagrees,
saying pent-up demand isn't
close to tapering off.
If auto sales do slow, that
could be bad news for the
U.S. economic recovery. The
auto industry has created
thousands of jobs as sales
have recovered, helping to
keep the economy afloat for
the past two years.
New car
demand
will end
Associated Press
The Central Arkansas
Development Council
Benton Senior Wellness
and Activity Center recently
received $625 from the J.A.
Riggs Tractor Co. Employee
Fund in Little Rock.
The donation will support
the center’s senior home
meal delivery service.
Larry Cogburn, CADC
executive director, noted
that “CADC is grateful for
the funding, which will sup-
port repairs to a home meal
delivery program vehicle.”
“The vehicle was recently
vandalized,” he said.
“Funding comes at a critical
time in the program, ensur-
ing ongoing delivery of
services to our most vulner-
able.”
Presenting the award
were Becky James and Gary
Holland from the J.A. Riggs
Tractor Co. in Little Rock.
The Benton Senior
Wellness and Activity Center
is located at 210 Jefferson St.
in Benton.
The program gives older
adults support and encour-
agement to reach new levels
of independence, fostering
educational and emotional
wellness for persons 60 and
older. Activities include
exercise, social interaction,
nutrition, transportation
services, recreational events,
book clubs, computer train-
ing and more.
CADC is a private non-
profit community action
agency formed in 1965. The
mission of CADC reportedly
is to improve the quality of
life and to build strong com-
munities in Arkansas.
For more information,
contact Cogburn at 501-778-
1133 or visit www.cadc.com.
Special to The Saline Courier
Becky James and Gary Holland from J.A. Riggs Tractor Co. present a check in the amount of $625 to
CADC Executive Director Larry Cogburn and Senior Activity Center Assistant Rita Spainhour.
Center gets boost from J.A. Riggs Tractor Co.
By Lynda Hollenbeck
lyndahol@yahoo.com
Sunday, September 29, 2013
news@bentoncourier.com The Saline Courier – Page1B
Living
Lynda
HoLLenbeck
SenSe &
nonSenSe
The Ralph Bunche
Neighborhood Association
recently presented the theat-
rical work “Voices From the
Past For the Future.”
Robin Freeman, repre-
senting the association,
explained that the produc-
tion was “a black history
play that walks you through
history, recounting the
stories of men and women
who understood that their
race was not born slaves,
but were at one point kings
and queens; therefore, they
refused to accept it when
society said they were
three/fifths of a person and
treated like they were not
human at all.”
Freeman said the play
focused on African American
history and featured re-
enactments from key figures
throughout history — from
Sojourner Truth to Martin
Luther King Jr. to a por-
trayal of the late Elder Willie
Barnes Jr., a prominent
Benton minister and commu-
nity leader.
“The special portrayal
of Willie Barnes Jr. by his
son, Ferryl Barnesm was
added to the original play,”
Freeman said.
She pointed out that the
late minister initiated the
community’s “We are Better
Together” theme and served
as a champion for change.
Farisha Brown directed
the play, which featured a
cast of Benton youth in each
of the roles.
Comprising the cast and
crew of “Voices From the
Past For the Future” were
Varn Brown Jr., Dominique
Cunningkin, Jeremiah
Hill, Kanaviye Pointer,
Kiearen Hicks, Hakeem
Noble, Josiah Hill, Keya
Williams, Amaya Barnes,
Jakobe Jackson, Cameron
Hill, Jakerara Jackson,
Gabe Williams, Katherine
Summerville, Elder Ferryl
Barnes and Pam Maisen.
Choir members included
Sam Brazell, Bobbie Brazell,
April Williams and Susie
Hill.
Assistance for the project
was provided by Pam and
Robbie Maisen of the Royal
Players.
Freeman expressed
appreciation to the Maisens
“for their generous support
in helping bring the play to
life.”
The event was a ben-
efit for the Ralph Bunche
Community Center and
Neighborhood Association.
A dessert reception accom-
panied each of the two per-
formances.
By Lynda Hollenbeck
lyndahol@yahoo.com
Bringing history to life in Ralph Bunche
Robin Freeman/Special to The Saline Courier
Above, Kanaviye Pointer portrays Harriet Tubman, the “Moses” of the Underground Railroad. Below, Comprising the cast and crew of “A
Voice From the Past for the Future” are Varn Brown Jr., Dominique Cunningkin, Jeremiah Hill, Kanaviye Pointer, Kiearen Hicks, Hakeem
Noble, Josiah Hill, Keya Williams, Amaya Barnes, Jakobe Jackson, Cameron Hill, Jakerara Jackson, Gabe Williams, Katherine Summerville,
Elder Ferryl Barnes and Pam Maisen. Farisha Brown directed the production.
Robin Freeman/Special to The Saline Courier
Left, from left are Cameron Hill, stage manager; Hakeem Noble, who portrayed Booker T. Washington; and Gabe Williams, whoit portrayed
Martin Luther King Jr. Right, from left are Varn Brown Jr., narrator; Farisha Brown, director; and Elder Ferryl Barnes, who portrayed his
father, the late Willie Barnes Jr.
Robin Freeman/Special to The Saline Courier
Above, Kiearen Hicks portrays Ida B. Wells, an African American
journalist, newspaper editor, suffragist, and early leader of the civil
rights movement. Below, Tabitha Williams’ family and members of
the cast celebrate after a performance.
A
trip to an old cemetery can provide some delight-
ful commentary — some intentional, some obvi-
ously not.
Much humor is found in the messages left by past gen-
erations, which most planned as serious
memorials, but instead provide priceless
tributes years later.
Epitaphs, once the norm, are practi-
cally non-existent now. I find them fasci-
nating.
My late spouse once told me that his
choice for the eulogy on my final resting
place should be: “She was an enigma,
but I loved her.”
I responded that this would be OK
except for the conjunction. “It should be
‘AND I loved her,’ not ‘but,’” I argued.
“You don’t love me in spite of my crazi-
ness, but because ... .”
In typical Ed fashion, he just grinned.
Suggested epitaphs that never were actually chiseled
into stone have been shared through various sources and
are good for more than an occasional chuckle.
Ogden Nash, being straight to the point, suggested this
pertinent gem for his tombstone: “Nash’s Ashes.”
Then a man named Thorpe offered for his gravesite:
“Thorpe’s Corpse.”
These are much more appealing than the oft-used in
earlier days “Rest in Peace” or “Asleep in Jesus” variety.
When a beloved country doctor’s earthly life ended, his
gravestone was inscribed with his professional shingle:
“Dr. J.B. Jenkins. Office Upstairs.”
The humor may have been unintentional in some
instances, as recounted in “The Last Laugh,” a collec-
tion of epitaphs by Hallmark. This publication included
a “Lord, She Is Thin,” because of the stonecarver’s omis-
sion of the final “e” in the last word.
(That one makes me want to start eating my Wheaties.
Who wants to be immortalized for thinness?)
Another in this anthology reads: “Here lies Bernard
Lightfoot who was accidentally killed in the forty-fifth year
of his age. Erected by his grateful family.”
Also included in the book is: “Born 15 September 1822.
Accidentally shot 4th April 1844 as a mark of affection
from his brother.”
A tribute to the joys of marriage in a New Haven,
Conn., cemetery states: “Here lies the body of Obadiah
Wilkinson and Ruth, his wife. Their warfare is accom-
plished.”
This theme of marital bliss appears in this permanent
tribute: “Within this grave do lie back to back my wife
and I. When the last trump the air shall fill, if she gets up,
I’ll just lie still.”
The monument for a blind wood sawyer’s grave is
marked with these words: “While none ever saw him see,
thousands have seen him saw.”
The Hallmark edition quotes the following as Benjamin
Franklln’s own epitaph:
“The body of Benjamin Franklin, printer,
Like the covering of an old book,
It’s contents torn out
And stripped of its lettering
and gilding lies here.
Food for worms:
But the work shall not be lost,
It will (as he believed)
Appear once more, In a new and more
beautiful edition,
Corrected and Amended
by the Author.”
From a burial spot in Saratoga, N.Y., comes:
“Farewell, dear wife, my life is past. I loved you whilst
my life did last. Weep not for me nor sorrow take. But
love my brother for my sake.”
And this tribute to marital bliss: “Beneath this stone my
wife doth lie. Now she’s at rest and so am I.”
Four graves in New London County, Conn., contain
these inscriptions beneath the names of the deceased:
“My I Wife,” “My II Wife,” “My III Wife” and “My IIII
Wife.”
In the center of the four plots is a fifth marked “Our
Husband.”
A final tribute to a fisherman in Block Island, N.Y.,
includes these cryptic comments: “He’s done a-catching
cod. And gone to meet his God.”
Above a locksmith’s grave appear these words: “A zeal-
ous locksmith died of late. And did not enter heaven’s
gate. But stood without and would not knock because he
meant to pick the lock.”
Some sage advice is imparted in: “Don’t attempt to
climb up in a tree. That’s what caused the death of me!”
This one from Lincoln, Maine, comes close to a special
kind of advertising: “Sacred to the memory of Mr. Jared
Bates who died Aug. the 6th, 1800. His widow aged 24
who mourns as one who can be comforted lives at 7 Elm
Street this village and possesses every qualification for a
good wife.”
What would one guess the surviving husband’s senti-
ments to be in this one? “She was more to me than I
expected.”
But there’s hope for the future, as this indicates: “1890
- The light of my life has gone out. 1891 - I have struck
another match.”
The tombstone of a man named Arthur Haines reads;
“Haines’ Haint.”
Short and to the point are these two, which state sim-
ply: “Out of Business” and “Next to Last Judgment.”
Somehow appropriate for a deceased gardener
buried in Eastport, Maine, is this one-word tribute:
“Transplanted.”
A dentist’s epitaph reads: “View this gravestone with
gravity. He is filling his last cavity.”
Among my favorites would be the following words
comedian W.C. Fields — who for reasons unknown to
me despised Philadelphia — stated he wanted to appear
over his final resting place: “I’d rather be here than in
Philadelphia.”
Lynda Hollenbeck is senior editor
of The Saline Courier.
lyndahol@yahoo.com
Humor, revelation
abound in tributes
left on gravestones
2B The Saline Courier
Sunday, September 29, 2013
501-315-7700
414 North MaiN
smithcaldwell.com
SMITH CALDWELL
BABY REGISTRY
DeaNNa McGrew
LaureN roseberry
stephaNie Livers
brittaNi Moffett
Mandi HaltoM &
derek StokeS
kacie Gober &
HeatH Gober
Vittoria Hunter &
corey Hunter
JeSSica SanderS
& MorGan blair
MeaGan bullock
& JudSon deere
Sara branSford
& tyler blair
cHarlotte SanderS
& ryan clark
rHianna ricHardS
& derick HaMpel
brooke lance
& andrew MoSeley
cHelSy lewiS
& cHaSe robertS
501-315-7700
414 nortH Main
smithcaldwell.com
SMITH CALDWELL
BRIDAL REGISTRY
1300 Military, Benton
776-1314
Jessica Sanders
.... Morgan Blair
Sara Bransford
.... Tyler Blair
Mallory Cabe
.... Glen Loyd
Brooke Lance
.... Andrew Moseley
Carrie Camp
....Zach Thomas
Summer Sanders
....Derrick Marshall
Jenna Woodall
....John-David Haire
Charolotte Sanders
....Ryan Clark
Meagan Bullock
....
Judd Deere
BRIDAL REGISTRY
Fall & Halloween
arriving daily!!
Across from Walgreens
701 Military Rd.
Benton
501-315-5130
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S
helly and Adam
Ritter of Russellville
announce the birth of
their son, Brooks Matthew
Ritter, born September 20
at St. Mary’s Hospital in the
city of Russellville.
Brooks is the grandson
of Stan and Donna Brooks
of Bryant, Kiah and Diane
Gardner and Steve and Toni
Ritter of Russellville.
Brooks weighed 7 pounds,
9 ounces at birth and was 20
1/2 inches long.
SALINE ENGAGEMENTS
V
icky Keathley and
Don Williams of
Mabelvale announce
the engagement and forth-
coming marriage of their
daughter, Lana Williams, to
Vincent Baker.
Lana is a 2010 graduate
of Bryant High School and
a 2012 graduate of Pulaski
Technical College, where
she studied to become a
dental assistant. She is cur-
rently employed at James A.
Penney III D.D.S., P.A.
The prospective bride-
groom is the son of Franklin
and Melissa Baker of
Benton. He is a 2005 gradu-
ate of Benton High School
and a 2009 graduate of
Arkansas Construction
Education Foundation. He
currently works for Brazil
Electric Co.
The couple plans to
exchange vows on Oct. 26 at
Hidden Chapel.
SALINE BIRTHS
Lana Williams
And
Vincent Baker
Williams - Baker
Brooks Matthew Ritter
In 1991, President Bush
endorsed September as
National Rice Month, cel-
ebrating the harvest and rec-
ognizing the contributions
the U.S. rice industry makes
to America’s
economy.
While there
are many
observances
of months for
a particular
food, rice is
important
to our area
and our state.
Over 49 per-
cent of the
nation’s rice
is grown by Arkansas rice
farmers on more than 1.5
million acres of land.
Rice is very versatile and
is a perfect accompaniment
to vegetables, seafood, soy
foods, beans and lean pro-
tein. It can also be enjoyed
by all ages and can help
meet a broad range of
dietary needs.
Rice is also very economi-
cal and can help stretch your
food dollars. A half cup
serving of white or brown
rice costs about 10 cents,
and one pound of uncooked
rice will make two pounds
of cooked rice. Add rice
to burgers, meatballs, and
other main dishes can help
save at the checkout and
improve dietary quality.
In fact, cooked rice may
be stored in the refrigerator
for 3 to 5 days or frozen for
up to six months. So prepare
big batches or rice ahead
of time to use with meals
throughout the week. Just
simply reheat small quanti-
ties in the microwave by
adding 2 tablespoons of liq-
uid for each cup of cooked
rice. Cover and heat about
5 minutes, or microwave on
high for 1 minute, then fluff
with a fork.
Properly storing rice in
the pantry depends upon the
variety you chose. Enriched
white rice, when stored
tightly covered, will keep
almost indefinitely on the
pantry shelf. Because brown
rice contains natural oils in
the bran layer, it will stay
fresh in the pantry for about
6 months. Refrigerate or
freeze for longer shelf life.
According to the USDA
nutrient database, rice is low
in calories, providing about
100 calories per one half
cup cooked serving. It is the
least allergenic of all grains
and contains 2.5 grams of
digestible protein. It is fat
free, and contains no choles-
terol-raising trans-fat or satu-
rated fat. It also provides 15
necessary vitamins and min-
erals, including B-vitamins,
iron & zinc; just one cup of
enriched white rice contains
nearly 25% of your daily folic
acid requirement. Plus rice
is naturally and completely
gluten free.
The Dietary Guidelines
for Americans and MyPlate
recommend 6 one-ounce
servings of grain daily
(based on a 2,000 calorie
diet), with half the serv-
ings coming from whole
grains, such as brown rice,
and the other half from
whole or enriched grains
like enriched white rice.
Research has also shown
that whole grains, such as
brown rice, help reduce
the risk of chronic illness,
including heart disease, and
certain cancers.
For more information
about Dietary Guidelines for
Americans, contact me at
the University of Arkansas
Division of Agriculture in
Saline County located at
1605 Edison Avenue, Suite
15, call 501-303-5672, email
kelliott@uaex.edu or fol-
low me on Facebook at
UAEX Saline County Family
& Family & Consumer
Sciences.
This Tasty Taco Rice
Salad is so easy to make and
so good. It goes great with
Black Bean and Corn Salsa
that has been shared here
before. It can be made for
around $1.10 per serving,
and with its low carbohy-
drate count, even a diabetic
can enjoy it.
Tasty Taco Rice Salad
1 pound lean ground beef,
rinsed and drained
1 and one half cups
uncooked instant brown rice
2 cups water
1 cup onion, chopped
(about 1 medium)
1 Tablespoon chili powder
3 cups tomatoes, chopped
1 seeded jalapeño,
chopped finely
2 cups spinach or romaine
lettuce
1 cup 2%-fat shredded
cheese
Cook ground meat in a
large skillet until brown
(160°F). Drain off fat. Rinse
meat with warm water to
remove more fat. Add rice,
water, onion, and chili pow-
der to meat in skillet. Cover.
Simmer over low heat about
15 minutes to cook rice.
Add tomatoes and jalapeño.
Heat for 2-3 minutes. Place
layers of spinach or romaine
lettuce, rice mixture, and
cheese on plates. Serve at
once.
Nutrition Facts Per one
and one half cup serving:
220 Calories; 9 g Total Fat
(3.5 g saturated fat, 0 g trans
fat); 45 mg Cholesterol;
55 mg Sodium; 19 g Total
Carbohydrate; 3 g Dietary
Fiber; 3 g Sugars; 17 g
Protein. Serves 8.
Tried and true tips: 2
(14.5 ounce) cans Mexican-
style tomatoes can be used
in place of fresh tomatoes
and jalapeño, but this will
increase the sodium. Also
white rice can be used in
place of brown but will lower
the dietary fiber in the serv-
ing.
The Cooperative
Extension Service is
part of the University of
Arkansas System Division
of Agriculture and offers its
programs to all eligible per-
sons regardless of race, color,
national origin, religion, gen-
der, age, disability, marital or
veteran status, or any other
legally protected status, and is
an Affirmative Action/Equal
Opportunity Employer.
Make rice part of your healthy lifestyle
KRIS
ELLIOTT
SALINE ANNIVERSARIES
C
harles and Gale
Burks of Benton
will celebrate their
50th wedding anniversary
on Oct. 4 with a private cel-
ebration including family in
Benton.
The couple married Oct.
4, 1963, in Ward, Ark.
The Burkses have three
children, Dennis Burks and
wife Nancy of Jonesboro,
David Burks and wife
Scarlett of Little Rock and
Robin Burks Garrett and
husband James of Benton.
They have eight grandchil-
dren, Hope, Luke and Becca
Burks of Jonesboro; Noah,
Jackson and Lilly Burks of
Little Rock; and Matthew
and Ryan Garrett of Benton.
The Burkses are mem-
bers of Sharon Missionary
Baptist Church. They say
they hope to share many
more years togather.
Couple celebrates 65th
Wedding Anniversary
MR. AND MRS. CHARLES BURKS
SALINE COUNTY EVENTS
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2
MICROSOFT EXCEL CLASS:
Ages 18 and older are invited
to attend a free beginning
computer class regarding
Microsoft Excel at 4 p.m.
Wednesday, Oct. 2 at Boswell
Library in Bryant. Attendance
is first come, first served. Call
778-4766 or 847-2166 for
more information.
NATIONAL ACTIVE RETIRED
FEDERAL EMPLOYEES will
me on Wednesday, Oct. 2 for
lunch at Western Sizzlin in
Benton at 11 a.m. The pro-
gram will start at noon and a
short business meeting will
follow. Becky Griffith from
Blue Cross will be the special
guest. A nominating commit-
tee will also be chosen.
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3
WATERCOLOR: Instructor
Carolyn Voss will teach a free
watercolor class for adults 18
and older at 6 p.m. Thursday,
Oct. 3 at Herzfeld Library. The
theme is “Tree Top” water-
color with pastel. Space is
limited and on a first-come,
first-served basis. Call 847-
2166 or 778-4766 for more
information.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5
THIRD ANNUAL HOME IS
WERE THE HEART IS AUCTION
will be Saturday, October 5
at 6:30 p.m. and tickets are
$35 and all proceeds will go
toward eradicating poverty
housing in Saline County. Live
entertainment will be musical
guest Josh Green.
SHERIDAN FAMILY AND
FRIENDS REUNION will be held
at the Gene Moss Building
at Tyndall Park in Benton on
Saturday, Oct. 5 from 10 a.m.
to 3 p.m. Guests are asked to
bring a covered dish. For more
information call 501-778-6406.
ART EXHIBIT: The Saline
County Library will feature the
works of local artist Amber
Chastain throughout October
at Herzfeld Library in Benton.
A reception in her honor will
be held Saturday, Oct. 5 from
1-3 p.m. at the same location
and is open to the public. Call
778-4766 for more informa-
tion.
PET ADOPTION DAY: The
Saline County Library will
host a Pet Adoption Day from
1-3 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 5 at
Herzfeld Library in Benton in
partnership with the Humane
Society of Saline County. Dogs
will be featured for adoption
and will be available to take
home on-the-spot at a cost
of $75 each. Call 778-4766 for
more information.
HALLOWEEN COSTUME
CLOSET: The Saline County
Library Halloween Costume
Closet will open at 9 a.m.
Saturday, Oct. 5 at both library
locations. Costumes are avail-
able for checkout in a variety
of children’s sizes through
Halloween or while supplies
last. Call 778-4766 or 847-2166
for more information.
MONDAY, OCTOBER 7
MONDAY AFTERNOON BOOK
CLUB: The Monday Afternoon
Book Club will meet at 1 p.m.
Monday, Oct. 7 at Boswell
Library to discuss its chosen
title. The group is open to
adults 18 and older. Call 847-
2166 for more information.
MONDAY WITH THE MASTER
GARDENERS: The Saline
County Master Gardeners
and presenter Mary Wells
will discuss “Native Plants” at
6:30 p.m. Monday, Oct. 7 at
Herzfeld Library. The program
is open to all ages. Call 778-
4766 for more information.
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8
THEOS, A SUPPORT
GROUP FOR WIDOWS AND
WIDOWERS: 5 p.m. Oct. 8 for
its regular monthly meeting,
entertainment provided by
Felix and Marilyn Childress.
Sunday, September 29, 2013
The Saline Courier 3B
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G
rowing up on East
Street just about a
“long block” from
Crank’s Grocery on Edison
Avenue, one of the chores
I was sometimes “asked”
(grin) to do by my parents
was “… go to the store and
get me some things.”
Usually, it was cigarettes
or rolling papers (NOT that
KIND), or sometimes but-
ter. You know – the kind of
stuff a small boy can carry
and (usually) not drop it.
One time I can remember
Mom asked me to go get
a dozen eggs … Well, that
was the one and only time
because by the time I got
home that dozen had some-
how turned into four!
But if I hadn’t been too
much of a hellion, mom
would utter the magic words
of … “if there is any change,
get a drink or something if
you want.”
This was especially spe-
cial because if she said “put
it on the ticket,” there was
no change and young David
got nothin’ for his dusty trip
to the store.
Nine times
out of ten
there WAS
a little jinglin’
money left
in my
hand
and
the
question of what
to do with it required
a great deal of thought.
Cranks had an excellent
selection of all kinds of
candy, gum, jawbreakers,
wax bottle drinks and even
coooold “Co-Colas” in either
the box with tons of ice in
it or the newfangled one
with just cold water and the
bottles all aligned in steel
rows.
Thinking back, I am sure
it was during those impres-
sionable days as a wee child
that I became addicted to
soft drinks – usually afore-
mentioned Coke.
But the candy also beck-
oned and sometimes I would
barter with Johnny to see if
I could get say a – smaller –
candy bar AND a Coke.
Sometimes it worked and
sometimes not, but I always
left with a smile on my face
… and usually a chocolate
smear, too.
Those memories got me
to thinking about how much
candy and soft drinks have
changed through the years
and I wondered if it was just
me, or did those great old
small bottles taste better
than their larger brothers?
Like my favorite pod-
caster, Leo LaPorte, says –
“let’s go to the chatroom.”
I don’t have a podcast or
a chatroom, so I posed the
question online in Facebook
to see what my friends had
to say on the subject.
It was a landslide, dear
readers … everyone felt
the small green bottles with
the bottling city embossed
on the bottom tasted better
than the usurping larger
version.
Some said they could
tell what city the drink was
bottled it, and when younger
would make bets with each
other. They would imbibe
the nectar and speculate
from whence it came.
While on the subject of
liquid refreshment, one of
my favorite summertime
time beverages was root
beer – with a dollop of ice
cream if I was celebrating or
had an extra quarter. Plus, if
it wasn’t in one of the frosty
mugs like
they served
at Whopper
Burger #2,
then the
entire expe-
rience was
tainted.
Well, it
turns out my
memories
were not
exclusive:
Steve
Hurst’s vote
was for the
RB float, but Judy Love
Drennan said, “I’ll take the
frosty root beer.”
Rachel Sturm confessed
she has never had either
delight. “I will have to try
a root beer float sometime.
It sounds good! I love root
beer in a frosty mug, but
there is a problem ... they
aren’t big enough. I am one
of those people who have a
big thirst year round! “
Kathy Richards Blue cast
her vote for a Frosty root
beer, as did Linda McAdoo.
Brenda Melvin voted for
a root beer float at Whopper
Burger 2. Our Sonic does
OK. Yesterday at Sonic on
Cantrell in LR my float had
very little root beer. I sent it
back, still was all ice cream.
I’m hoping it was a new
employee that didn’t realize
when the foam goes down,
you add a little more root
beer.”
While today’s candy aisles
in supermarkets can seem-
ingly fill any sweet tooth,
one thing I have noticed is
the prices are astronomi-
cal while the portions are
almost minuscule. That
Hershey bar I paid a nickel
for in the 1950s now hits
the register at more than a
buck.
T’ain’t fair.
I asked some of my
friends on Facebook what
childhood candy treats they
miss and can’t seem to find.
The list is interesting, but
some had a place where
many of the “lost” brands
can be found.
Mike Mikey Don Woodall
said Valomilk.
Jarrod Hambric said he
remembers Reed’s cin-
namons. His dad got him
hooked on them.
Linda McAdoo said
“Banana Beichs(?). Laffy
Taffy’s banana is as close as
it gets!”
Brenda Melvin said
“Chick-o-sticks almost disap-
peared. Now they’re back.
Love Laffy Taffys.”
Valomilks have a large
fan base. Theresa Key said
she has loved them since
junior high. “Sometime I can
still find them at Cracker
Barrel.”
Mike Mikey Don Woodall
said, “I’m gonna check; I
haven’t had one in at least
20 years.” He also professed
a craving for Big Daddy’s.
Waynell Harrison Lewis
remembered Corn Suckers
at the Royal Theatre back
in the mid-’60s. “Yellow
and shaped like an ear of
corn, they actually had real
coins in them. They weren’t
around long, perhaps
because of the obvious chok-
ing hazard. Ha!”
Pam Puckett Harcrow
reminisced that “my granny
used to have those little
golden-colored puffed hard
candies with peanut but-
ter inside them! And very
soft sticks of all flavors of
peppermint sticks. Yellows,
pinks, reds. If we had a sore
throat, we got a stick of pep-
permint candy stuck inside
a hole cut into a lemon. You
could eventually suck the
lemon juice up through the
peppermint stick. Just fixed
that sore throat right up!”
Brenda Melvin recollected
that Cranks had a barrel of
peppermint sticks bundled
together. “They were lemon,
cloves or peppermints all
bundled together. I always
ate the cloves first. Cracker
Barrel sells the closest to
these. “
Shirley Eidson loved her
candies, too. “Gotta say
Valo. We used to get Fizzies,
too”
Glenda Henry Jenkins
was also on the same train:
“I loved Valomilk, too. I find
them sometimes at Fred’s. I
have looked the world over
for Reed’s cinnamons and
can’t find them.”
Alma Joyce Hahn asked,
“Are Baby Ruth bars still
around? I haven’t seen one
in ages. Back in the 1930s
they were much bigger than
the ones I saw a few years
back.”
Merle Johnson said Baby
Ruths are at Walmart in the
main food candy aisles.
Janet Riley Johnston said,
“I liked those red cinnamon
square suckers -- every once
in a while, I’ll stop at a gas
station in a small town and
they will have them but
don’t see them very often.”
Next week will be a spe-
cial column. I spent some
great one-on-one time in an
interview with Benton High
School’s longest-serving
principal, John Henry Butler.
He had some great memo-
ries and also “schooled” me
on the status of teaching his-
tory today.
Tasty ‘Colas’ and candy of yesteryear make for sweet memories
DaviD
HugHes
GET THE
POINT
4B The Saline Courier
Sunday, September 29, 2013
Saline County’S newS SourCe SinCe 1876
Courier
The Saline
321 N. Market St.,
Benton, AR 72015
email:
Cathy at
class@bentoncourier.com
or
Kim at
class2@bentoncourier.com
The autumn event
in Downtown Benton,
will be held October 12
The Saline Courier will produce a special
promotion for the annual event and distribute the special on Oct. 12th
Whether you are a vendor or a Downtown Business, this is a great
opportunity to promote yourself or services.
Advertising spaces start at only $35
Advertising Deadline is October 9
Distribution Date is October 12th
Contact your advertising
representative today!
315-8228
Saline County’S newS SourCe SinCe 1876
Courier
The Saline
Have a legal that you need
to have published? WE CAN HELP YOU!
Fax your information to: 501.315.1920
or you can email it to:
legals@bentoncourier.com
If you have any questions,
feel free to speak to us: 501.315.8228
321 North Market Street
Benton, AR 72015
Classifieds
Employment THE SALINE COURIER has an immediate opening for a part-time page designer/reporter. Experience with In-Design a must. This position will assist our primary page designer on Thursday, Friday and Saturday and will also cover a limited beat. Send resume and clips to Steve Boggs, publisher, at 321 N. Market Street, Benton, AR. 72015 or email to publisher@bentoncourier.com
SALINE COUNTY’S NEWS SOURCE SINCE 1876 COURIER THE SALINE
Legal Notices SALINE COUNTY PROPERTY OWNERS' MULTIPURPOSE
IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT NO. 72 – STONEHILL SUBDIVISION PROJECT, PHASE 7 NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE BOARD OF COMMISSION-
ERS FOR SALINE COUNTY PROPERTY OWNERS! MULTIPUR-
POSE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT NO. 72 – STONEHILL SUBDIVI-
SION PROJECT, PHASE 7, HAS ENTERED INTO ITS RECORDS
THE FOLLOWING ORDER LEVYING UPON THE REAL PROP-
ERTY OF THE DISTRICT A SUFFICIENT TAX TO PAY THE ESTI-
MATED COST OF THE IMPROVEMENTS WITH TEN (10%) PER-
CENT ADDED FOR UNFORESEEN CONTINGENCIES. ALL PER-
SONS AFFECTED BY THE ORDER ARE HEREBY WARNED THAT
THE ORDER SHALL BECOME FINAL UNLESS SUIT IS BROUGHT
TO CONTEST THE ORDER WITHIN THIRTY (30) DAYS OF THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
AN ORDER ASSESSING THE VALUE OF BENEFITS TO BE RE-
CEIVED BY THE OWNERS OF EACH OF THE SEVERAL BLOCKS,
LOTS AND PARCELS OF LAND WITHIN SALINE COUNTY PROP-
ERTY OWNERS' MULTIPURPOSE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT NO.
72 – STONEHILL SUBDIVISION PROJECT, PHASE 7; ASSESSING
TAXES THEREON, AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES WHEREAS, all of the property holders owning property situated in
Saline County Property Owners' Multipurpose Improvement District
No. 72 – Stonehill Subdivision Project, Phase 7 (the "District"), have
petitioned the Saline County County Court to form a property owners'
improvement district to be organized for the purpose of constructing
within the district waterworks, recreation, drainage, gas pipelines,
underground trenches and excavations necessary for the installation
of electric and telephone distribution systems, sanitary sewers,
streets including curbs and gutters and sidewalks, together with facili-
ties related to any of the foregoing within said District, to serve the
inhabitants of the District; said purposes to be accomplished in the
manner and of the materials that the Commissioners of the District
shall deem to be in the best interest of the District, and the cost
thereon to be assessed upon the real property of the District accord-
ing to the benefits received; and WHEREAS, the County Court of Saline County, Arkansas has estab-
lished the District to accomplish the above purposes by passing an
Order on October 5, 2006; and WHEREAS, the assessments have been duly made by the Assessor
of the District, who was appointed by the Board of Commissioners of
the District, and filed in the office of the County Clerk pursuant to law,
and notice of such filing was duly published in the Saline Courier, a
newspaper published in and of general circulation in Saline County,
Arkansas, on July 26, 2013 and August 2, 2013; and WHEREAS, on August 5, 2013, the Commissioners and Assessor for
the District met at the place and at the time named in said notice as a
board of equalization and heard all complaints against the assess-
ments filed with the County Clerk, and equalized the same; and
WHEREAS, no protest of the assessments was received; and
WHEREAS, the benefit received by each and every block, lot and
parcel of real estate situated in the District equal or exceed the local
assessments thereon; and WHEREAS, the estimated cost of the improvements to Phase 7 of
the District is $275,000 exclusive of capitalized interest and costs of
financing; and WHEREAS, the assessed benefits (the "Assessed Benefits") amount
to $565,156. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDERED by the Board of Commission-
ers of Saline County Property Owners' Multipurpose Improvement
District No. 72 – Stonehill Subdivision Project, Phase 7:
Section 1. That each of the blocks, lots and parcels of real property
in the District be assessed according to the assessment list of the
District, as equalized, as the same now is of record in the office of the
County Clerk as reflected on Exhibit "A" attached hereto, and the As-
sessment of Benefits on each of the blocks, lots and parcels shall be
collected by the County Collector with general taxes becoming due in
the year 2014 and annually thereafter at the rate per annum of
5.435% until the whole of the local assessment, with interest thereon
at a rate equal to the lesser of the maximum rate permitted by law or
the rate of 10% per annum, shall be paid. Section 2. This Order shall have all the force of a judgment to be
paid by the real property in the District in proportion to the amount of
the Assessed Benefits as established herein and to be paid in annual
installments as set forth in Section 1 hereof and the taxes so levied
shall be a lien upon the real property in the District from the time of
the date of this Order and shall be entitled to preference over all de-
mands, executions, encumbrances or liens whatsoever created, and
continue until all such assessments, with any penalty or cost that may
accrue thereon, shall have been paid. Section 3. This Order shall be in full force and effect from and after
its entry.IT IS SO ORDERED this 5th day of August, 2013.
SALINE COUNTY PROPERTY OWNERS' MULTIPURPOSE
IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT NO. 72 /s/ Travis P. Bull • Commissioner /s/ Mickey D. Cunningham • Commissioner /s/ Jerry Cunningham • Commissioner
Legal Notices IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF SALINE COUNTY, ARKANSAS
SUMMIT BANK PLAINTIFF v. NO. 63CV-12-591 JOHN BEDWELL AND SANDRA L. BEDWELL, THE ARKANSAS DEPT. OF FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION
AND PAULINE W. MYERS DEFENDANTS NOTICE OF COMMISSIONER'S SALE Notice is hereby given that the undersigned Commissioner, pursu-
ant to the Decree and Order of the Circuit Court of Saline County, Ar-
kansas, which was rendered on the 25th day of July, 2013 in a case
in which Summit Bank is Plaintiff and John Bedwell, Sandra L.
Bedwell. The Arkansas Dept. of Finance & Administration and
Pauline W. Myers are the Defendant will on the 20th day of August,
2013 offer for sale on a credit of three (3) months at public auction at
the front door of the County Courthouse in Benton, Saline County,
Arkansas to the highest and best bidder the following land situated
in the County of Saline, State of Arkansas, to wit: ALL THAT PART OF THE NW 1/4 OF THE NW 1/4 OF SECTION
19, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 13 WEST; THAT PART OF
THE NE1/4 OF THE NE1/4 OF SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 1
SOUTH, RANGE 14 WEST; ALSO PART OF THE SE 1/4 OF THE
SE 1/4 OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 14
WEST, MORE FULLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: Commenc-
ing at the Northeast corner of said Section 24 and run thence
S45˚37!15”W for 466.34 feet to the point of beginning of land
herein described; run thence N45˚37!15”E for 205.14 feet;
thence S44˚54!E for 559.87 feet to the Northwest right of way
line of Arkansas State Highway No. 111; thence S40˚44!W
along Highway Line for 313.31 feet; thence S24˚48!W along
highway line for 111.12 feet; thence N69˚37!W for 10.55 feet to
the intersection with the East line of Section 24 at a point that
is 405.65 feet North of the Southeast corner of the NE1/4 of NE
1/4 of said Section; thence N69˚37!W for 687.8 feet; thence
N22˚43!E for 132 feet; thence N45˚08!W for 602.2 feet to the
Southeast line of the Union Pacific Railroad; run thence
N45˚34!E along railroad right of way for 239 feet to a point that
is N54˚17!24”W of the point of beginning; run thence
S54˚17!24”E for 671.04 feet to the point of beginning
Said sale will be held at 11:00 A.M. on the date stated. The
purchaser at said sale will be required to give bond with approved
security to secure the payment of the purchase price together with
interest from the date of sale at the highest rate allowable by law,
and a lien will be retained on said land to secure further said
purchase price. WITNESS my hand this 17th day of June, 2013. Dennis Milligan, Commissioner, by Lana Davis, D.C.
Prepared by:Donald M. Spears, Attorney at Law 113 So. Market Street, Benton, Arkansas 72015 501-315-0092 fax 888-748-5786
Legal Notices NOTICE OF SALE Of an amount not to exceed $2,840,000 BAUXITE SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 14 SALINE COUNTY, ARKANSAS CONSTRUCTION BONDS DATED SEPTEMBER 1, 2013 Sealed bids will be received until 10:00 a.m. local time on August 20, 2013 For the above bonds, which mature serially on February 1 of each of the years 2014 through 2040 inclusive. All bids must be on the Official Bid Form or through PARITY. Copies of the Preliminary Official Statement, Official Notice of Sale and Official Bid Form may be obtained from Stephens Inc., 111 Center Street, Suite 2300, Little Rock, Ar- kansas 72201, Telephone No. (501) 377-6315, the District!s fiscal agent. Mr. Jerrod Williams, Superintendent
Garage Sales EARLY BIRD SANITATION Once a week pick up + Rolloff Dumpsters 332-7202 • 840-6758 • 778-3969 I BUY JUNK CARS Announcements 28TH BOOK & PA- PER SHOW – Aug. 10th & 11th, Sat 9 to 5 & Sun 10 to 4, Col- lectible Books - Books of Interest and.or Value/ Rare, Collecti- ble Ephemera, Jack- sonville Community Center, 5 Municipal DrJacksonville, AR Free Parking, Car- peted & Air Condi- tioned $5 Admission Adoption ADOPT HOPING to share our hearts and home with a newborn baby. Loving, nurtur- ing home for your baby. Expenses paid. Mar r i ed coupl e, Walt/Gina 1-800-315-6957. Happily Married Couple yearning to love a child in a secure home. Expenses paid-private Legal. Kim & Werner 1-888-416-5056 Classifieds Work!
Adoption UNPLANNED PREG- NANCY? THINKING OF ADOPTI ON? Open or closed adop- tion. YOU choose the family LIVING EX- PENSES PAID. Ab- by!s One True Gift Adoptions Call 24/7. 1-866-459-3371 Personal MEET SINGLES right now! No paid opera- tors, just real people l i ke you. Browse greetings, exchange messages and con- nect live. Try it free. C a l l n o w 1-877-939-9299 Health Services CANADA DRUG CENTER Safe and af- fordable medications. Save up to 75% on your medi cat i on n e e d s C a l l 1-800-304-6217 $10.00 off first pre- scription and FREE Shipping Employment A KID!S Place Pre- school /Daycare i s now hiring. Apply at 825 N. Main, Benton. Classifieds Work!
Employment CLASS A CDL Driv- ers Great Home Ti me! Benefi ts & Safety Bonus Avail- able. Must have 1 year OTR in the last 3 years. Call Dancor T r a n s i t I n c . @866-677-4333 www.dancortransit.com DIETARY COOK with experience needed at Mt. Carmel Commu- ni ty Center. Cal l 501-315-1555 DRI VERS New Trucks Arriving Exp Pays up to 50 cpm, Full Benefits + Quality Homet i me CDL-A Req 877-258-8782 www.ad-drivers.com ENTERPRISE LANES Hiring Part-Time weekend help, me- chanical ability a plus. Starts at $8/hr. Apply at 1515 Military Rd. EXPERIENCED COOK/WAITSTAFF CALL HOME PLATE DINER ASK FOR RICK 813-4423 THE BAUXITE Police Department in cooperation with the Bauxite School Sys- tem is accepting applications for a full time School Re- source Officer for the 2013-2014 school year.! Applications will be accepted until Thursday, August 8, 2013.! Download an application at: www.bauxiteminers.org click on: District, Human Resources, Employment Opportunities or bit.ly/applybauxite TRUCK DRIVERS Wanted Best Pay and Home Time! Apply Online Today over 750 Companies! One Application, Hundreds of Offers! www.HammerLaneJobs.com
Employment Grams House Now Hiring TEACHERS Health & Life Insurance, Retirement Call Melba 501-794-4726 HELP WANTED! Make up to $1000 a week mailing brochures from home! Genuine Opportunity! NO experience Required. Start Immediately! www.BrochureWorkers.com HELP WANTED!!! Make $1000 weekly mai l i ng brochures from HOME! NO ex- perience required- Start Immediately! www.TheMailingHub.com PART TIME Ground- skeeper/Handyman for 30 acre property $10 per hour Call 501-607-0179 EARLY CHILDHOOD Education Parapro- fessional The Dawson Education Coopera- tive Early Childhood Speci al Educati on Paraprofessional. The application process is open until the position is filled. Interested ap- plicants should send a resume to Sandra Francis, Early Child- hood Speical Educa- tion Coordinator, 711 Clinton Street, Ar- kadelphia, AR. 71923, An Equal Opportunity Employer. R.N. – Direct patient care w/sleep clinic. NO LPN!s, APN!s, MA! s. 7:15am to 5-6pm generally, 9am to 1pm sometimes. Ov er t i me av ai l In-state travel 2 - 3 times per mo. requ.. Full benefits. Hrly rate DOE. NO weekends, holidays, or on-call. Fax resumes t o 501-661-1991 Cleo’s Furniture SALES ASSOCIATE Arkansas’ fastest growing furniture company with over 25 years in the business is looking to fi ll a sales position in our Benton location. LIFTING AND MOVING FURNITURE IS REQUIRED Health and Life Insurance, Retirement, Vacations, No Sundays, Excellent Pay, Advancement Available Must apply in person Monday thru Friday 10:00 am to 6:00pm 201 N. Main St. Benton, AR SUBSTITUTE BUS DRIVERS The Bauxite Public School District is seeking qualified applicants for substi- tute bus driving positions for the 2013 - 2014 school year. Applicants must have a CDL and experi- ence as a school bus driver. If interested, please apply for future bus driver positions at: bit.ly/applybauxite WANTED FULLTIME Dental Asst. for practice in Benton, Exp. required. Send Resume to Blind Box 600, Saline Courier P.O. Box 207, Benton, AR. 72018
Instruction AIRLINE CAREERS begin here - Become an Aviation Mainte- nance Tech. FAA ap- proved training. Fi- nancial aid if qualified Housing available. Job placement assis- t ance. Cal l AI M 877-424-4177. CAN YOU DIG IT? – Heavy Equipment Op- erator Career! 3wk Hands On Training School. Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excava- tors. National Certifi- cations. Lifetime Job Pl acement Assi s- tance. VA Benefits Eligible 866-362-6497 Child Care IN-HOME DAYCARE Spotless - Non-smoking Drop-ins Welcome! 778-2920 LICENSED CHILDCARE Infants to 8 B •L• S Vouchers • Drop-Ins 562-0691 • 951-2923 Services *REDUCE YOUR CA- BLE BILL! Get a 4-Room Al l -Di gi tal Satellite system in- stalled FREE Pro- gramming starting at $24.99/mo. FREE HD/DVR Upgrade to new callers, SO CALL NOW (800) 799-4935 *REDUCE YOUR CA- BLE BILL! * Get a whole-home Satellite system installed at NO COST and pro- gramming starting at $19.99/mo. FREE HD/DVR Upgrade. C A L L N O W 1-800-474-0423. DISH TV Retailer - SAVE! St ar t i ng $19.99/month (for 12 months.) FREE Pre- mium Movie Chan- nels. FREE Equip- ment, Installation & Act i vat i on. CALL, COMPARE LOCAL DEALS! 1-800-278-8081 Apartments Unfurnished 2 BR Apts, kit. appl., W&D conn., $500 & up. Handicap access. 317-5190 / 317-5192 2 BR, 1 BA, $500 mo., No Pets, 6 mo. l ease @ 204 N. Fourth St. Benton, Call 501-778-3324 2 BR, 1 BA, kitch. appl., W/D conn., $500 mo., $250 dep. Call between 9am- 8pm, (501)315-9337
Need to publish a Legal Notice in Saline County? We can help...accurate and published 7 days a week... 501-315-8228
Apartments Unfurnished
CAMRY COURT Now Open in Bryant New Construction 2 BR, 2 BA or 2.5 BA off Wilkerson Rd. on Sadie Dr. (By Hill Farm Elem.) Call Terri the on-site manager for appt. 501-804-0125 Bldg. 1225 #2 or call Dale King 501-539-1935 Visit our web-site www.arkansas apartments.net Want to Downsize Your Gas Guzzler? Sell it in the Courier Classifieds. Call to place your ad today! 315-8228
Apartments Unfurnished NOTICE: All real es- tate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it il- legal to advertise any preference, limitation or di scr i mi nat i on based on race, color, religion, sex, handi- cap, familial status or national origin, or in- tention to make any such preference. We will not knowingly ac- cept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings adver- tised in this newspa- per are available on an equal opportunity basis. Houses for Rent 3 & 4 BEDROOM $825 -$1400 mo., Haskell, Benton & Bryant. 315-9370 3 BR, 2 BA, Bryant Schools, $1250 mo., $1,000 dep.. Avail August 1st Please Call 501-840-7626 3BR 1.5 BA Newly Remodeled Bryant School Di st r i ct $900mo + $900 Dep Call 501-317-0422 3BR 1BA House, $595 mo., 6mo. lease No Pet s, Cal l 501-778-3324 Eagle Properties LLC 315–2075 Nice 2 & 3 BR Homes from $500 to $925 Apartments 1 BR’s from $415 2 BR’s from $475 *based on availability Deposit & References Required eaglepropsaline.com FOR LEASE/SALE New 3 & 4 BR, 2 BA, brick, FP, ceiling fans, carpet, 2 car garage, patio. Go to: www. catalyst-residential.com or 501-697-6342 Low Rents GINGLES RENTALS 501-778-2516 unfurnished 2 BR Duplex Apts $280 per mth. 2 BR Homes from $400 per mth for qualified renters References & Deposit Required HASKELL 204 GLENN OAK 3BR, 2 BA, 2 car garage. Nice. $790 mo. $600 dep. 501-847-5377 LRG. 3 BR, 1 BA in Bauxite, on 1 acre, absolutely no pets, $800 mo., $600 dep., (501)332-4073 NEW 4BR 2Ba 2 Car garage Fenced yard 1750sq.ft. $1200mo Benton Schools Call 326-8000 Business Property For Rent BUSINESS PROP- ERTY For Lease 608 S. East Street Office with large parking area Call 315-9337 between 9a&8p Musical Merchandise Cushing Piano Service Tune • Repair Player Pianos & Pump Organs 778-6584 Pets & Supplies BENTON ANIMAL Control & Adoption 501-776-5972 benton.petfinder.com Looking for a good deal? Search the Courier Classifieds!!
Pets & Supplies BRYANT ANIMAL Control & Adoption www.bryant.petfinder.com www.1-800-save-a-pet.com www.1888pets911.org Produce Produce 840-4076 Home Grown Tomatoes, Purple hull Peas shelled & unshelled, AR Peaches, Squash, & Okra TOMATOES Peaches,Watermelons, Cantaloupes 501-672-2248 Heavy Equip- SURPLUS EQUIP- MENT. Online auc- tions HUGE selection. BIG savi ngs. NO Buyer fees Low Seller f ees BARGAI NS! Register FREE Use Promo Code cnhi313. LIVE support. www.SurplusOnThe.NET 334-215-3019 Autos For Sale 80 CJ7 Jeep Hard Top Doors & Bikini Top $3500 OBO Call 501-454-0551 Autos Wanted DONATE A CAR Humane Society of the United States FREE Next-DAY TOWING! Running or Not. Tax Deductible. Call Before Tax Year Ends! 1-800-418-1562 I Buy Junk Cars free pick-up & Haul all types of scrap metal Call Jerry Toland 332-7202 • 840-6756 Motorcycles
2007 HONDA VTX 1300C Cruiser Like new! Only 10K miles, Removable Windshield, Sissy Bar w/rack $4,600 Pics Available Call 501-993-6284 Houses For Sale NEWER home for lease or lease option. 4 BR, 2 BA, open floor plan. $1,200 mo. Cal l t o s ee. 501-804-4400 Mobile Homes For Sale $$$ 0 DOWN $$$ with your Land! Call 501-653-3201 14X50 3BR 2BA $3500 Down Owner Financed No Credit Needed $600mo Lot Rent Included Newly Remodeled Must Stay in Sherwood Park Call 501-541-6855 FORECLOSED DOUBLEWIDE on Private Lot. Great Schools, Great Location, must sell! 501-653-3201 NEW 4 BR 2 BA Home $39K includes delivery to your prop- erty. Call for Quick Approval 653-3202 Ready to take the Real Estate Plunge? Check out the Homes for Sale in the Classi- fieds daily. Classifieds Work!
Mobile Homes For Sale RENT TO OWN REMODEL/RECONDTION CLEAN/GOOD SHAPE ‘00 16x80 3BR $570-6yrs ‘97 16x80 3BR $570-6yrs ‘95 16x72 2BR $550-6yrs ‘99 16x80 3BR $550-6yrs Includes lot Rent & Ins Lake • Fish • Walk Trail Sunset Lake • 951-2842 Lots & Acreage 20 ACRES FREE! Buy 40 – Get 60 Acr es. $0- Down $198/ mo. Money Back Guarantee, NO CREDIT CHECKS. Beaut i f ul Vi ews. Roads/Surveyed. Near El Paso, Texas. 1-800-843-7537 www.Texaslandbuys. com 33.5 WOODED Acres 5 minutes North of Lake Degray on Hwy 347 Pl ease cal l 501-580-0358 for de- tails Priced for Quick Sale Business Property For Sale
Turn Key ready restaurant business in Downtown Benton includes like new equipment motivated seller leaveittoliz@aol.com, Real Estate CANCEL YOUR TI MESHARE. NO Risk Program STOP Mortgage & Mainte- nance Payments To- day. 100% Money Back Guarant ee. FREE Consultation. Call Us NOW. We C a n H e l p 1-888-356-5248 Professional Services STOP MORTGAGE & Mai ntenance Pay- ments TODAY! CAN- CEL YOUR TIME- SHARE. NO Risk Pr ogr am 100% Money Back Guaran- tee. FREE Consulta- tion. Call Us NOW. We Can Hel p! 1-800-282-3206 Legal Notices THE OWNERS of the following vehicles must bring proof of ownership to Jones Wrecker Service, Inc., 4315 Alcoa Rd, Benton, AR! 72015, (501) 778-1440, No later than 45 days, Sept. 20, 2013, or ownership will be forfeited. 1994 Ford Probe VIN# 1ZVLT22B6R5122101 NOTICE OF SALE On August 15, 2013 at Jones Wrecker Service, Inc., 4315 Alcoa Road, Benton, A R 7 2 0 1 5 , 501-778-1440 at 9 AM, the following vehicle(s): 1995 Dodge 1500 VIN# 1B7HF16Y5SS195525 1999 Chev Cavalier VIN# 1G1JC5247X7142316 2000 Chev Cavalier VIN# 1G1JC1246Y7383391
Give them a little bit of home... Have your hometown newspaper mailed to your favorite student.
Call Today to fnd out how, 315-8228
Page 8 – The Saline Courier
class@bentoncourier.com
Tuesday, August 6, 2013
I
guess by now most
of you have heard
that the Little Rock
School Board decreed in its
September
official meet-
ing that
all school
personnel
SHALL
(emphasis
mine) wear
underwear.
The story
has been
widely cir-
culated via
newspapers
and televi-
sion across
the nation.
Now, I am
in perfect
agreement
with a state-
ment that teachers should
dress appropriately, but
gracious goodness, how
much of “appropriately” do
you have to spell out? And
who is going to check to
see that everyone is follow-
ing orders? Are teachers
all going to go to the office
each morning, check their
mailboxes, read the bulletin
board, then pull up their
skirts or drop their pants
before going to class?
School boards and admin-
istrators are often ridiculed
for some of the outlandish
rules that they make in their
efforts to provide appropri-
ate role models for their
charges. I remember when
we first came to Benton to
teach. Before school opened
for classes, we had meetings
of all the faculties and other
school personnel. We were
welcomed to the community
and reminded of the respon-
sibilities we were undertak-
ing.
We were given a hand-
book which outlined what
was expected of us. It
included the statement that
all school personnel were
expected to attend Sunday
School and church each
Sunday. Also teachers were
expected to spend “most” of
their weekends in Benton.
Nothing was said about
how teachers were expected
to dress; it was not neces-
sary because new employees
were carefully scrutinized
before they were offered
a contract. If any problem
arose, it was dealt with then.
The handbook did note,
however, that if a teacher
became pregnant, she
should notify her principal
immediately.
My first year of teach-
ing was in Van Buren. Van
Buren is just across the river
from Fort Smith. At the first
faculty meeting, the super-
intendent verbally admon-
ished us to spend most of
our evenings making lesson
plans and grading papers,
and, because many former
servicemen would be enroll-
ing to take advantage of the
G.I. bill allowing them free
educational opportunities,
he jokingly reminded us not
to date any of the returning
servicemen who might be in
our classes.
I thought that was a prob-
lem that would not come up
in my case, as I would be
teaching ninth-grade classes;
however, I had three young
men that year who were sev-
eral years older than I was.
One of them wore a white
starched shirt and a suit and
tie daily. I had no problems
with them; they were good
students.
Today times are not so
easy. It is inconceivable
that it should be necessary
to make rules governing
personal aspects of student-
teacher relationships, but
unfortunately, that is not the
case. Individuals who take
on the job of working with
immature minds must have
strong moral character. If
not, they should seek other
employment.
A teacher’s work has
never been easy. Back in the
1800s sexual problems did
not arise, but problems we
no longer have were com-
mon. For instance, all teach-
ers were required to fill the
coal oil lamps and clean the
lamp chimneys daily.
Classrooms back then
often needed to be shuttered
to keep out the bugs. Since
running water was not avail-
able, the teacher also had
to draw a large pail of well
water every morning, and
in cold weather, she also
brought in a scuttle of coal/
Students then did not
start out by learning to print
and then move to cursive
writing, as they do today.
They had penmanship in the
first grade, and they needed
pens to write with. It was
the teacher’s job to supply
those points, so she had to
whittle enough pens so that
each student always had a
sharp point to work with.
(Do students today still have
penmanship in elementary
school?)
Courting (and does any-
one ever use that term these
days?) for unmarried teach-
ers was carefully spelled out
when they were hired. Men
teachers could have at least
one evening a week to court
a young lady. If he attended
church faithfully, he could,
on occasion have two eve-
nings.
Women teachers were
expected to remain unmar-
ried; if they wed, they were
dismissed. Any free time she
might find was to be spent
studying the Bible.
All teachers were
required to lay aside a por-
tion of their salaries for their
“golden” years. Their sala-
ries might increase every
five years by 25 cents each
two weeks if they performed
all their duties well. This
was, of course, subject to the
school board’s approval.
Strict huh? But even then
it wasn’t necessary to check
on their underwear.
Checking the mail, the bulletin board, unmentionables
ALMA JOYCE
HAHN
THIS,
THAT &
THE OTHER
The Bryant Class of 1953
is making plans for its 60th
class reunion.
A weekend celebration
will get under way with a
wiener roast on Friday, Oct.
4, and conclude Sunday
morning with a breakfast
at Home Plate Diner in
Bryant.
Scheduled events on
Saturday include a light
breakfast at Bishop Park,
a tour, pictures at noon
and visiting. A dinner is
planned Saturday evening at
Western Sizzlin in Benton.
Anyone ever attending
class with J.W. Bray is invit-
ed to attend the event. Also
invited are members of the
Class of 1954, which was
considered a “sister class”
to the 1953 students.
For more details, call
members of the reunion
planning committee: Jim
Vandergrift at 247-2661;
Wesley Cady at 778-
8388; Carol Wesley Cady
at 778-8388; Carol Ann
Schumacher Boone at 847-
3341; Jo Faisst at 847-0321;
Maxine McGinley Wine
at 847-0383; Sue Evans
Grabler at 316-9379; Alan
Zoellner at 455-0282; or
Anne Shelby Beyers at 316-
8316.
If you’ve ever tried to
write a limerick, you know
how difficult it is. Although
the meter is challenging, the
rhyme scheme of A,A,B,B,A
becomes more challenging
when placed precisely fitted
with the meter. Does it say
something?
Our Saline County Branch
of Poets Roundtable of
Arkansas has one of the best
limerick writers in the state,
and some of us have written
some limericks to honor
our friend Howard Nobles.
He has been in the hospital
several weeks, and we write
these to let him know that
he is still the best limerick
writer.
OUR FRIEND
Our friend is a limerick
writer
Who works till his poems
are brighter
This limerick letter
Should make him feel bet-
ter
Cause we know that he is
a fighter
--FAYE BOYETTE WISE,
BENTON
There once was a man
from Kent
who was broke and without
a cent.
His wife had bought shoes
in pairs of twos
until their money was
spent.
--DENNIS PATTON,
ALEXANDER
There once was a man
named Ken
who drove from the tee to
the pin.
He putted the green
like a golfing machine,
but couldn’t get the ball to
fall in.
--DENNIS PATTON,
ALEXANDER
There once was a man
named Dennis
who was good as a singles
in tennis,
but in doubles play
it just wouldn’t pay.
He said we didn’t have it
in us.
--DENNIS PATTON,
ALEXANDER
There was an old doctor
named Groat
whose specialty was of the
throat.
Your throat is okay
he often would say,
but your tongue has devel-
oped a coat
--DENNIS PATTON,
ALEXANDER
The general practitioner
was rude
and visited the patients
while nude.
He’d grumble and frown
about their thin gown
but it seemed to lighten the
mood.
--DENNIS PATTON,
ALEXANDER
THE COMPETION
A politician, ready to vote,
knew our country’s in a
sinking boat.
Thought about it a lot,
then he marked the right
spot,
by voting for the other old
goat.
--CATHY PARKER,
ALEXANDER
BATS IN THE BELFRY
There once was a brilliant
musician,
who went to a lady beauti-
cian.
He asked for a haircut
for his little dog, Mutt.
When bounced out, heard
bells for his action.
--CATHY PARKER,
ALEXANDER
There once was a poet
named Howard
Who said, If any man calls
me a coward
I’ll lash him with rhymes
For thirty-nine times
Or until he falls down
overpowered.
--DON CROWSON,
BENTON
Get well, Howard.
Send poems of 16 or fewer
lines to Don Crowson, 131
S. First St., Benton, AR
72015. Please enclose a self-
addressed, stamped envelope
if a clipping or response is
desired.
Bryant Class of 1953 is making
plans for its 60 year reunion
By Lynda Hollenbeck
lyndahol@yahoo.com
Sunday, September 29, 2013
The Saline Courier 5B
Bauxite School
District
Breakfast
Monday: French Toast or
Cereal, Toast, Fruit, Juice
and Milk
Tuesday: Sausage and
Egg Biscuit, Fruit Juice,
Milk
Wednesday: Breakfast
Burrito, Salsa, Fruit Juice,
Milk
Thursday: Cheesy Ham
Biscuit, Fruit, Juice, Milk
Friday: Breakfast Pizza,
Fruit, Juice, Milk
Lunch
Monday: Chicken
Tenders, Quick Baked
Potatoes, Carrots, Celery
Sticks, Grapes, Roll, Ranch
Dressing, Milk
Tuesday: Nachos, Ground
Beef, Lettuce, Tomatoes,
Pinto Beans, Salsa, Orange,
Milk
Wednesday: Beef Fingers,
Mashed Potatoes, Black
eyed Peas, Pears, Roll, Milk
Thursday: Chicken
Sandwich, Baked Cheetos,
Lettuce, Tomatoes, Apple
Slices, Carrot Sticks, Ranch
Dressing, Mayo, Milk
Friday: Pepperoni Pizza,
Salad, Ranch Dressing,
Broccoli, Apple Slices, Milk
Benton School
District
Breakfast
Elementary, BJH
Monday: Cereal with WG
toast or String cheese and
toast, Fruit Juice, Milk
Tuesday: Cereal with WG
toast or Breakfast bites,
Fruit Juice, Milk
Wednesday: Cereal with
toast or pancakes/syrup,
Fruit Juice, Milk
Thursday: Cereal with
toast or Chicken biscuit,
Fruit Juice, Milk
Friday: Cereal with toast
or Breakfast Sunrise Flat
bread, Fruit Juice, Milk
High School
Monday: Cereal or String
cheese and Graham crack-
ers, Fruit Juice, Milk
Tuesday: Cereal or Whole
grain cinnamon bun, Fruit
Juice, Milk
Wednesday: Cereal or
WG pancakes/syrup, Fruit
Juice, Milk
Thursday: Cereal or
Chicken biscuit, Fruit Juice,
Milk
Friday: Cereal or
Breakfast Sunrise Flat bread,
Fruit Juice, Milk
Lunch
Monday: Cheese pizza,
Mixed green Salad, ranch
dressing, Green peas,
Applesauce, Milk
Tuesday: Chicken fajitas,
salsa, Corn, Shredded let-
tuce, tomato, Black beans,
Orange wedges, Milk
Wednesday: Lasagna,
California blend vegetables,
Romaine Salad, ranch
dressing, Bread Stick, Fruit
Cocktail, Milk
Thursday: Roasted chick-
en, Seasoned carrots, Green
beans, Brown Rice, Fresh
Grapes, Milk
Friday: Sloppy Joe, Baked
Beans, Corn on cob, Chilled
pears, Milk
Bryant School
District
Breakfast
Monday: Pancake on
Stick, Syrup, Fruit, Juice,
Milk
Tuesday: Frudel, Chopped
Fruit, Juice, Milk
Wednesday: Cereal,
Teddy Grahams, Chopped
Fruit, Juice, Milk
Thursday: Sausage
Biscuit, Juice, Milk
Friday: Blueberry Waffle
Bites, Chopped Fruit, Juice,
Milk
Lunch
Monday: Turkey Corndog,
Pickle Spears, Tater Tots,
Fruit, Milk
Tuesday: Cheese Pizza,
Broccoli, Cauliflower,
Celery, Ranch Dressing,
Orange Slices, Milk
Wednesday: Deli Ham
and Cheese on Bread,
Romaine Lettuce, Sliced
Tomato, Mustard, Salad
Dressing, Ketchup, Fresh
Grapes, Milk
Thursday: BBQ Pork
on Bun, Ranch Beans
Carrots, Cucumbers, Ranch
Dressing, Fresh Apples,
Milk
Friday: Chicken Taco
Salad, Shredded Cheese,
Shredded Romaine Lettuce,
Diced Tomatoes, Homemade
Salsa, Pinto Beans, Diced
Peaches, Milk
Glen Rose
School District
Breakfast
Monday: Biscuit and
Chicken or Cereal and
Toast, Fruit Juice, Milk
Tuesday: Egg and Cheese
Biscuit or Cereal and Toast,
Fruit Juice, Milk
Wednesday: Biscuit and
Sausage or Cereal and
Toast, Fruit Juice, Milk
Thursday: Blueberry
Muffin or Cereal and Toast,
Fruit Juice, Milk
Friday: Biscuit and Gravy
or Cereal and Toast, Fruit
Juice, Milk
Lunch
Elementary, Middle
Monday: Hamburger on
Bun, Oven Fries, Lettuce,
Tom., Pickles, Pears, Mayo,
Mustard, Ketchup, Milk
Tuesday: Chicken
Fajitas, Lettuce, Tomatoes,
Salsa, Pinto Beans, Orange
Wedges, Spice Cake, Milk
Wednesday: Breaded Beef
Sticks,Mashed Potatoes/
Gravy, Blackeyed Peas,
Tossed Salad, Ranch
Dressing, Assorted Fresh
Fruit, Milk
Thursday: Sub Sandwich,
Lettuce,Tom., Pickles,
Whole Kernel Corn, Sweet
Potato Wedges,Fresh Fruit,
Mayo, Mustard, Ketchup,
Milk
Friday: Vegetable Beef
Soup, Cheese Toast,
Crackers, Tossed Salad,
Ranch Dressing, Pineapple,
Milk
High School
Monday: Hamburger on
Bun, Oven Fries, Lettuce,
Tom., Pickles, Pears, Mayo,
Mustard, Ketchup, Milk
Tuesday: Chicken
Fajitas, Lettuce, Tomatoes,
Salsa, Pinto Beans, Orange
Wedges, Spice Cake, Apples,
Fruit Juice, Choc. Chip
Cookie, Milk
Wednesday: Breaded
Beef Sticks,Mashed
Potatoes, Gravy, Blackeyed
Peas, Tossed Salad, Ranch
Dressing,Assorted Fresh
Fruit, Peaches, Roll, Milk
Thursday: Sub Sandwich,
Lettuce,Tom., Pickles,
Whole Kernel Corn, Sweet
Potato Wedges, Fresh Fruit,
Mayo, Mustard, Ketchup,
Fruit Juice, Milk
Friday: Vegetable Beef
Soup, Cheese Toast,
Crackers, Tossed Salad,
Ranch Dressing, Pineapple,
Fresh Fruit, Milk
Harmony Grove
School District
Breakfast
Monday: No school
Tuesday: Cereal, Graham
Cracker, Fruit, Juice, Milk
Wednesday: Pancake-
Sausage on a Stick, Fruit,
Juice, Milk
Thursday: Super Bun,
Fruit, Juice, Milk
Friday: Pancake, Fruit,
Juice, Milk
Lunch
Monday: No School
Tuesday: Lasagne, Green
Beans, Salad with Ranch
Dressing, Garlic Bread,
Fruit, Milk
Wednesday: Chicken
Patty, Broccoli, Rice,
Cheese, Cake, Fruit, Milk
Thursday: Corn Dog
Nuggets, Macaroni &
Cheese, Pinto Beans, Fruit,
Milk
Friday: Chili, Cornbread,
Cracker, Corn, Fruit, Milk
Sept. 30 - Oct. 4
Classifieds
PLACE AN AD
FIND AN AD
Listings are divided by category.
To get your ad in the Courier,
call 501-315-8228 Monday
through Friday, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.,
online at bentoncourier.com,
come by the offce at 321 N.
Market St. in Benton or mail
to: PO Box 207, Benton,AR
72018. We accept Visa,
MasterCard, Discover, and
American Express.
WHEN TO CALL
FOR ADS APPEARING | CALL BEFORE
Tuesday –––––––––––– Mon Noon
Wednesday –––––––––– Tues. Noon
Thursday ––––––––––– Weds. Noon
Friday –––––––––––––– Thurs. Noon
Saturday –––––––––––– Thurs. Noon
Sunday ––––––––––––– Fri. Noon
Monday –––––––––––– Fri. Noon
GET ONLINE
WHAT
IT
COSTS
YARD
SALES
4 lines – 3 days – $18.68*
4 lines – 7 days – $29.28*
4 lines – 14 days – $ 45.44*
Extra lines available
4 lines – 2 days – $15.64*
4 lines – 3 days – $18.48*
Extra lines available
Cost includes ad and yard
sale packet including signs.
You can place your ad
on our website....
bentoncourier.com
Just go to website and
follow the steps.
Email us at:
class@bentoncourier.
com
}
}
}
}
}
*Price doesn’t include charge for graphic, TMC
rate, or internet. Price is subject to change.
Page 6B – The Saline Courier
class@bentoncourier.com Sunday, September 29, 2013
Auctions
Auctions
Investors – Landlords – First Time Home Buyers
ABSOLUTE REAL ESTATE AUCTION
715 Watson Lane – Benton, AR
Tuesday – October 1st @ NOON
Great income producing property or First Time Home
Buyers, 1,476+/ square feet, 3 BR/2BA on just over
half an acre to be offered at public auction, MB has
jacuzzi tub, Central Heat & Air, Lots of Storage,
Property includes a 20 X 50 Shop, Check it out today!
For more info & photos go to
www.arkansasauctiongroup.com
HOME SELLS TO THE HIGHEST
BIDDER ON AUCTION DAY!
TERMS: 10% Down day of auction as deposit,
$2,500.00 Certified Funds and Balance by personal
check, Balance Due at Closing, Title Insurance &
Warranty Deed Provided at Closing, Closing within
30 Days, 10% Buyer's Premium DIRECTIONS: From
Walgreen’s on Military Road in Benton, go North
1 block to Watson Lane, Turn Right to 715 on Rt,
Watch for Auction Signs. INSPECTION: Day of
auction at 11 am, or call our office for an
appointment. Drive by anytime.
ARKANSAS AUCTION GROUP & REALTY
P.O. Box 3136 – Hot Springs, AR 71914
Steve Thacker, CAI, Broker & Auctioneer AL#1394
501-767-9777 • Toll Free: 888-767-9771
steve@arkansasauctiongroup.com
www.arkansasauctiongroup.com
“Announcements made day of auction
take!precedence!over all printed materials”
Employment
Maintenance Mechanic
Almatis, Inc., formerly known as Alcoa, a chemical
manufacturing facility located in Bauxite, Arkansas is
seeking experienced General Mechanics. The com-
pany is offering a wide range of benefits such as
medical, dental, vision, 401k, pension, and bonus
pay known as pay for performance. The successful
applicants will have at least 3 years of verifiable
maintenance experience. A multicraft background is
preferred. Applicants should be willing to work all
shifts, weekends and overtime when required. Ability
to work in a fast paced environment. EEO/AA Employer
Send Resume to:
Almatis, Inc. • P.O. Box 300
Bauxite, AR. 72011 • Attn: HR Manager
Email: employment.bauxite@almatis.com
Employment
“Making differences through quality care. ”
DIRECT SUPPORT PROFESSIONAL
Friendship Community Care is seeking
an organized self-starter to work with
individuals, who have developmental
disabilities, in a day treatment program.
Candidates need to be able to work well
with others and have good interpersonal
professional skills. Must be able to assist
with consumer's total care and behavioral
issues. Will also assist with van routes as
needed. Candidates must have a valid
driver's license, HSD/GED, and be able to
pass drug/background screenings.
If interested, please apply online at
www.fccare.org or call Tanna @
501-653-2255 ext 27 EOE
Employment
REGISTERED NURSE
3-11 SHIFT MONDAY-FRIDAY ARKANSAS
REGISTERED NURSED LICENSED REQUIRED
The Registered Nurse has overall responsibility and
accountability for assigned patient care. Maintains
and assures safe and therapeutic environment.
Applications may be made at
www.rivendellofarkansas.com
We offer competitive compensation, benefits, great
working environment and an opportunity of make
a difference in the lives of families in Arkansas.
RIVENDELL BEHAVIORAL HEALTH SERVICES
100 RIVENDELL DRIVE, BENTON, AR 72019
Equal Opportunity Employer
Employment
“Making differences through quality care.”
Direct Support Professional
Friendship Community Care is seeking full
time and part time employees to work with
individuals who have developmental disabili-
ties. The ideal candidate must have a valid
AR driver!s license, liability car insurance,
HSD/GED, and a good driving record with
reliable transportation. Must be able to pass
drug and background screenings
If interested, please apply online at
www.fccare.org EOE
STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS
Call Eva or Linda at 1-800-569-8762 to place your ad here!
Week of 9-30-13
HELP WANTED
Heavy Equipment Operator
Training! Bulldozers, Back-
hoes, Excavators. 3 Weeks
Hands On Program. Local Job
Placement Assistance. National
Certifications. GI Bill Benefits
Eligible. 1-866-362-6497.
HELP WANTED -
TRUCK DRIVERS
DRIVERS- Arkansas Regional
Drivers Needed immediately!
Paid Weekly. Up to .40¢/Mile.
Average 1800-2500 miles per
week. Limited Spaces Available!
Call Now! 877.BIG.PAYDAY.
www.SouthernRef.com
DRIVERS- ATTENTION DEDI-
CATED & REGIONAL DRIV-
ERS! Averitt offers Excellent
Benefits and Hometime. CDL-
A req. 888-362-8608, Recent
Grads w/a CDL-A 1-6/wks Paid
Training. Apply online at
Averittcareers.com
Equal opportunity Employer
MISCELLANEOUS
LIVE LINKS- Meet singles right
now! No paid operator, just real
people like you. Browse greet-
ings, exchange message and
connect live Try it free. Call
1-877-939-9299.
$19.99/mo! TV SIMPLY COST
LESS with DISH! Free Pre-
mium Channels*! TV and High
Speed internet Pckgs starting At
$19.99/mo each! Call to find out
more 1-888-827-3019.
DIVORCE WITH OR WITH-
OUT children $125.00. Includes
name change and property
settlement agreement. SAVE
hundreds. Fast and easy. Call
1-888-733-7165, 24/7.
TRAINING/EDUCATION
MOBILE/
MANUFACTURED
HOMES
Highspeed Internet
EVERYWHERE By Satellite!
Speeds up to 12mbps!
(200x faster than dial-up.)
Starting at $49.95/mo.
CALL NOW & GO FAST!
1-866-759-0701
ATTENTION SLEEP APNEA
SUFFERERS with Medicare.
Get CPAP Replacement
Supplies at little or NO COST,
plus FREE home delivery!
Best of all, prevent red skin
sores and bacterial infection!
Call 1-888-722-3974
Dish TV Retailer - SAVE!
Starting $19.99/month (for
12 months.) FREE Premium
Movie Channels. FREE
Equipment, Installation &
Activation. CALL, COMPARE
LOCAL DEALS!
1-800-278-8081
REDUCE YOUR CABLE BILL!
Get a whole-home Satellite
system installed at NO COST
and programming starting
at $19.99/mo.
FREE HD/DVR Upgrade.
CALL NOW 1-800-474-0423
COMPANY DRIVERS & OWNER
OPERATORS WANTED! No touch
freight, 90% drop & hook, dedicated op-
portunities available. Call 888-710-8707
Applyonline: www.driveforpamtransport.com
Also seeking Recent Grads
Call Lavonna 877-440-7890
NEW TRUCKS
ARRIVING!
Exp Pays – up
to 50 cpm. Full
Benefits + Quality
Hometime.
CDL-A Req.
877-258-8782
www.ad-drivers.com
ROUTE DRIVERS - In State de-
liveries, No nights. Req. CDL A &
clean record. Call Carol (501)801-
8061 or Apply online:www.cssar.
com
Become a TRUCK
DRIVER IN LESS THAN
30 DAYS!!
Tuition Reimbursement
Available if Qualified!
Classes Start
Every Monday!
• Financing Avail.
• Lodging Provided!
PINE BLUFF TRUCK DRIVING
SCHOOL, INC.
CALL TODAY!
1-800-954-4981
www.pbtds.net
The RIGHT TRAINING for today’s trucking industry
lic. by ASBPCE
S U MME R S P E C I A L
Bermuda $.99sq yd*
Meyers Z-52 Zoysia
$1.99/sq yd*
Prices are COD on full truck
loads in the LR area.
Call 800-458-4756
25 DRIVER TRAINEES NEED-
ED NOW! Become a driver for
TMC Transportation! Earn $700
per week! No CDL? No Problem!
Training is available! 1-888-248-
1948.
****BUYING****
GOLD & SILVER
• Rare/foreign coins
• Diamonds/fine jewelry, fine
watches
• Paper Money, precious
metals/bullion
• Franklin/US Mint Products
7 Days a Week by appt. only!
Call 501-529-3826
www.agcoinbullion.com
CDL TRAINEES NEEDED
NOW! Become a driver for
US XPRESS! Earn $800
per week! NO EXPERI-
ENCE NEEDED! Some
routes home nightly! Call
for details! 1-888-747-3068.
COME CHECK OUT UNCLE SI’S
PAD - Luv Homes of Bryant Oct 3rd-
5th. Call for more info Jack / 501-407-
9500.
LUV HOMES FALL CLEARANCE
- $$ Save Thousands Now. Oct 3rd
- 5th Huge Sale. Call for info 501-407-
9500
CUSTOMER
APPRECIATION DAY
Games, Prizes, Food, and Fun
Luv Homes of Bryant
26244 I-30 Bryant AR
501-407-9500
October 5th 2013
BECOME A HOME INSPECTOR
IN 30 DAYS OR LESS! NEXT CLASS
STARTS SOON! : Courses offered:
• HOME INSPECTION
• COMMERCIAL INSPECTIONS
• Home Inspection Continuing
Education Courses
TO BE A HOME INSPECTOR YOU MUST:
• have 80 Hours of Classroom Training
•Take 2 Exams• Provide proof insurance
Call 501-796-3627
or e-mail abc@tcworks.net for
details or visit www.abchii.com
ArkansasonlyHomeInspectionTrainingFacility
DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED!
Become a driver for Roehl Trans-
port! New Drivers can earn $700/
week! No CDL? Ask about local
training!! Roehl can help cover the
costs! 1-888-528-7112.
"Partners in Excellence"- OTR
Drivers APU Equipped. Pre-Pass,
EZ-pass, passenger policy. 2012 &
Newer equipment. 100% NO touch.
1-800-528-7825.
CDL DRIVER TRAINEES! Become
a new driver for Roehl Transport!
Roehl is a Certified "Top Pay Car-
rier"! NEW Drivers can earn $750/
week! No CDL? Roehl can help you
get trained! 1-888-528-7112.
Garage Sales
ANOTHER
MAN'S TREASURE
Wed-Sat/ 10am-6pm
Sunday/ 1pm-6pm
Across from
Old Reynolds Plant
Bauxite
501-557-5565
ESTATE SALE 1098
WEST Lawson Road
8a-? 9/19-9/29
Adoption
UNPLANNED PREG-
NANCY? THINKING
OF ADOPTI ON?
Open or closed adop-
tion. YOU choose the
family LIVING EX-
PENSES PAID. Ab-
by!s One True Gift
Adoptions Call 24/7.
1-866-459-3371
Classifieds Work!
Health & Beauty
30-80% OFF Pre-
scription Drugs! Wide
range of Products &
Services. Licensed
Pharmacists Avail.
For Consult. Able to
fulfill ALL of your Pre-
scr i pt i ons. CALL
1-800-267-2688 NOW
for info
www.TotalCareMart.com
Health Services
CANADA DRUG
CENTER Safe and af-
fordable medications.
Save up to 75% on
your medi cat i on
n e e d s C a l l
1-800-304-6217
$10.00 off first pre-
scription and FREE
Shipping
Buy • Sell • Trade
in the Classifieds
Health Services
POWERCHAIR
SHOPRIDER Sport
1Yr old, like new
$2500 OBO Cal l
249-9552
Employment
APARTMENT MAIN-
TENANCE including
painting, electrical
repairs, plumbing
repairs and tenant
make-readies, must
have own tools and a
dependable vehicle.
HVAC Experience
with EPA certification
a plus.! Fax resume"
or work history to
501-778-9301 or
apply in person at 151
Summerwood Drive
Benton, AR! M-F
12noon-6pm EOE
DRI VERS: MAKE
$63,000.00yr or more!
$2,500.00 Driver Re-
f er r al Bonus &
$1,200.00 Orientation
Completion Bonus!
CDL-A OTR Exp.
Req. Cal l Now:
1-888-993-0972
Employment
AUTOMOTIVE/ TIRE
SERVICE WRITER/
SALES PERSON
with automotive and tire
experience preferred.
Apply in person at
Ramsey Tire & Auto
at 3120 N. Reynolds
Road, Bryant
or fax resume' to
(501) 847-4477
TELEMARKETING
AGENTS NEEDED
Position is part-time.
Starting at $9.00/hour
Plus Bonus! Looking
for dependable &
professional appli-
cants. We are a drug
and smoke free com-
pany located in Bry-
ant. Hours: Mon-Fri
4:30pm to 8:30pm
and Sat. 9am to 6pm.
Send resumes to:
clewis@wehco.com
or P.O. Box 384
Bryant, AR 72089
Employment
CALL CENTER
CUSTOMER
SERVICE AGENT
NEEDED!
Position is full time
with benefits start-
ing at $9.00/hr.
Must be flexible to
work any hours be-
tween 7:30 a.m.
and 9:00 p.m.!Ap-
plicant must be de-
pendable and pro-
fessional.! We are a
drug free and
smoke free com-
pany located in Bry-
ant, AR. EOE.
Only mail reumes
to: ACCOUNT AD-
VISOR POSITION,
PO Box 384, Bry-
ant, AR! 72089.
NOTE: Office is located
in Bryant, Arkansas
UTILITY
WORKERS
(Bryant, AR)
WorkSource Fort Smith
is accepting applica-
tions for Utility Workers
for the Bryant, AR area.
A representative will be
at the Benton, AR
Unemployment Office
located at 400 Edison
Ave, Benton, AR 72015
on Monday 9/30 from
10:00 a.m to 2 p.m
Employment
CUSTOMER SERVICE
CLERK/CASHIER
The City of Benton is
currently taking appli -
cations for Customer
Service Clerk/Cashier
in the Billing Depart-
ment. Primary func-
tion is collection of
receipts from monthly
utility billings & serv-
ice changes for Utility
customers. Equip-
ment used includes
computer terminal,
10-key calculator,
telephone, copy ma-
chine, & postage me-
ter. Required knowl-
edge includes High
School Diploma or
equivalent and at
least one year experi-
ence in office work.
Entry salary is $10.28
per hour. Interested
persons may obtain
applications at Benton
Municipal Complex,
114 S. East Street,
Benton, AR, Monday
through Friday, be-
tween the hours of
8:00 A.M. and 5:00
P.M. Complete Job
Description and Appli-
cation are also avail-
able from the City of
Benton website at
www.bentonar.org
Deadline for returning
applications is 5:00
P.M., Friday, October
4, 2013 EQUAL OPPOR-
TUNITY EMPLOYER
Employment
EXPERIENCED
COOK/WAITSTAFF
CALL HOME PLATE
DINER ASK FOR
RICK 813-4423
Experienced LPN!
with at least 2 yrs
long term care exp.
Also CNA for 6-2 &
2-10 shifts. Apply in
person at!Long-
meadow Nursing
Center,!912 Section
Line St., Malvern.
FINANCIAL SECRE-
TARY / PT (Benton)
Church in Benton, AR
looking for a part time
Financial Secretary
who will be responsi-
ble for the processing,
recording, organizing,
maintaining and care
of the church financial
records. Confidential -
ity of financial infor-
mation and safe-
guarding the financial
assets of the church
is priority. Applicants
must have a working
knowledge of ac-
counting principles for
churches and
non-profit entities as
well as payroll proc-
essing experience.
This person will work
with the pastoral staff
and appropriate com-
mittees to assure that
all records are accu-
rate and necessary
information is avail-
able and used in an
appropriate manner.
Only qualified appli-
cants need apply.!
Send your resume to:
Personnel Commit-
tee, 1421 Alcoa Rd,
Benton, AR 72015!
HELP WANTED!!!
Make $1000 weekly
mai l i ng brochures
from HOME! NO ex-
perience required-
Start Immediately!
www.TheMailingHub.com
MIAMI? NYC? DC?
Free To Travel ?
Wanna Get Pai d
Cash Daily? Trans-
portation, Accomoda-
tions, 2Wks Training
Provided. 18 & Older.
C a l l N o w :
1-877-223-3181
Employment
LPN’S
16 Hour Weekend
LPN”S Needed
Great Benefits
Apply in person:
Southern Trace
Rehab & Care Center
22515 I-30
Bryant, AR
MIG WELDERS
Must have a minimum
2 years MIG welding
exp.with references
and be able to pass a
welding test. Pay
package i ncl udes:
competitive starting
wage, 401-K, health &
dental insurance, paid
vacation. Apply in
person at DLM,
10912 Highway 270
East, Malvern. Take
exit 99 off I-30 right to
our door. DLM is an
EOE.
NOW HIRING AC-
TORS: Party Central
Haunted House. Must
be 18 or older.Apply
in person Thur & Fri
12-6
DRIVERS: CDL-A,
O/O and CO - solo
and t eam (New
Trucks for CO Team)
Speci al t y carri er.
Sign-On Bonus PAID
at Orientation. Must
qualify for Hazmat.
www.RandRtruck.com
1-866-204-8006
UTILITIES LOCATOR
Benton Utilities is cur-
rently taking applica-
tions for Locator. Pri-
mary function is to
correctly locate and
mark exact location of
underground power
lines and water and
sewer mains to allow
for repair or to pre-
vent damage during
construction. Re-
quired knowledge in-
cludes High School
Diploma or equivalent
and at least two years
related experience.
Entry salary is $12.36
per hour. Interested
persons may obtain
applications at Benton
Municipal Complex,
114 S. East Street,
Benton, AR, Monday
through Friday, be-
tween the hours of
8:00 A.M. and 5:00
P.M. Complete Job
Description and Appli-
cation are also avail-
able from the City of
Benton website at
www.bentonar.org
Deadline for returning
applications is 5:00
P.M., Friday, October
4, 2013 EQUAL OPPOR-
TUNITY EMPLOYER
WEEKEND SUPER-
VISOR for Nursing
Home Must be RN
Apply in person at
6907 Hwy 5 Call
501-213-0547
Instruction
AIRLINES ARE HIR-
ING – Train for hands
on Aviation Mainte-
nance Career. FAA
approved program.
Housing and Finan-
cial aid for qualified
students –CALL Avia-
tion Institute
of Mai nt enance
1-800-335-9129
Child Care
CHILDCARE
Infants to 5 B •L• S
Vouchers
562-0691 • 951-2923
6:30a -5:30p
IN-HOME DAYCARE
Spotless - Non-smoking
Drop-ins Welcome!
778-2920
Services
CALL EMPIRE To-
day® to schedule a
FREE in-home esti-
mate on Carpeting &
Flooring.Call Today!
1-800-858-0126
DRESS MAKING, Al-
terations, & Repair
Please Call 847-8038
Classifieds Work!
Services
SEE THE SATELLITE
TV Difference Pack-
ages as LOW as
$19.99/month! FREE
DVR Upgrade. FREE
HD Upgrade. FREE
Professional Installa-
tion! Call NOW and
Start SAVING!
1-866-725-5135
Apartments
Unfurnished
2 BR Apts, kit. appl.,
W&D conn., $500 &
up. Handicap access.
317-5190 / 317-5192
2 BR, 1 BA, $500
mo., No Pets, 6 mo.
l ease @ 204 N.
Fourth St. Benton,
Call 501-778-3324
Courtyard Cottages Bry-
ant Senior Community,
55+, 1 & 2 BR Apts.
avail Now! 847-3002
CAMRY COURT
Now Open
in Bryant
New Construction
2 BR, 2 BA or 2.5 BA
off Wilkerson Rd.
on Sadie Dr.
(By Hill Farm Elem.)
Call Terri the on-site
manager for appt.
501-804-0125
Bldg. 1225 #2
or call Dale King
501-539-1935
Visit our web-site
www.arkansas
apartments.net
Buy • Sell • Trade
in the Classifieds
ABSOLUTE Residential
Real Estate AUCTION
Friday, Oct 11 @ 11 AM
314 Little John Trail, Hot Springs AR.
REAL ESTATE DESCRIPTION; Selling to the highest
bidder is a 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath, 1721± SF Brick Home
with a patio view of Lake Hamilton. This home has Cen-
tral Heat & Air with a Brick Wood Burning Fireplace,
natural gas Water Heater and Heat. Situated on a large
corner lot with a huge fenced back yard. Lake Hamilton
is just across the street. Don’t miss this opportunity!
Selling to the highest bidder regardless of price. For
more info. contact our office or visit our website at;
www.FowlerAuctioneers.com
TERMS FOR REAL ESTATE; $5,000 down on auction day in
certified funds, balance due at closing, closing within 30
days, title insurance and warranty deed furnished at closing,
10% buyer premium. Auction day announcements take prece-
dence over all print. Broker Darrel Cook Real Estate Service
INSPECTION; Contact our office for an appointment to view
this property. Realtor/Auctioneer Nick Fowler CAI ALB #162
AUCTIONEERS
Classifieds
Sunday, September 29, 2013
class@bentoncourier.com The Saline Courier – Page 7B
Legal Notice
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF SALINE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
In the matter of the Estate of Donald B. Sundby, deceased
No. 63PR-13-482-4
Last known address of decedent: 5814 Oak Meadows, Alexander,
AR 72002
Date of Death: 7-22-2013
On, Sept. 26, 2013, an affidavit for collection of small estate by dis-
tributee was filed with respect to estate of Donald B. Sundby, de-
ceased, with the clerk of the probate division of the circuit court of
Saline County, Arkansas, Under Ark Code Ann.§ 28-41-101.
THe Legal description of the real property listed in the affidavit is as
follows: 10-015-14W2006-76914 also as 5814 Oak Meadows
All persons having claims againts the estate must exhibit them, prop-
erly verified, to the distributee or his or her attorney within (3) months
from the date of the first publication of this notice or they shall be for-
ever barred and precluded from any benefit of the estate.
The name, mailing address, and telephone number of the distributee
or distributee!s attorney is:
Kim Larson-Bergmanis • 5814 Oak Meadows • Alexander, AR 72002
501-940-7902
This notice first published September 29, 2013
Legal Notice
PUBLIC NOTICE OF INTENT TO APPLY FOR GRANT FUNDS
The City of Benton will submit two separate grant applications to the
Arkansas Natural Resources Commission and FEMA for the purpose
of mitigating flooding in the Misty Circle Subdivision and in the Long-
hills Subdivision. The proposed projects include acquisition/demoli-
tion of a severe repetitive loss structure on Misty Circle, and drain-
age improvements in the Longhills Subdivision.
The Application may be viewed at the Central Arkansas Planning
and Development office at the address below. Written comments
may be sent to: Amanda Adaire, CAPDD, P. O. Box 300, 902 N.
Center St., Lonoke, AR 72086. Written comments will be accepted
from September 28, 2013 through October 11, 2013. Questions re-
garding the above may be directed to Amanda Adaire at
501-676-2721 or amanda.adaire@capdd.org.
Business & service Directory
Air Conditioning
HEATING AND
AIR CONDITIONING
Installation,
Maintenance and
24 Hour Service
501-425-3796
Residential &
Commerical
ELLIS
HEAT & AIR
Residential &
Commercial
Licsened, Bonded
& Insured
501-315-3999
Attorneys
David Heasley
attorney at law
Divorce &
Family Law
Free phone consultation
Payment Plan
681-4452
622 Alcoa Road,
in Benton
Backhoe & Dozer
315-2343
Peas
Gravel
Fill
SB-2
Topsoil
Sandy Loam
Sands
Donnafill
Pick-Up
or
Delivery
Build & Remodel
35 Years Experience
10% Sr.Citizens Discount
We Do It All!
Large or Small
Remodel • Add Ons
Roofs Metal/Shingles
References Provided
939-2217
Southfork
Construction
Parish 
Construction
BUILDING AND
REMODELING
*31 yrs experience
Small or Large
Jobs Done to
Your Satisfaction
tFree Estimates
tReasonable
Prices
Licensed
501-231-9230
501-316-2994
Carpentry
EXPERIENCED
CARPENTER
- Out of Work -
Home Maintenance
& Remodeling
of All Kinds
Vinyl Siding Installation
Call TIM
778-5171
OVER 30 YEARS
EXPERIENCE
- Free Estimates -
No job too LARGE
or small
Satisfaction Guaranteed!
DAVID BURTON, SR.
794-2563
Classifieds Work!
Chimney Cleaning
Royal
Flush
Servicing
Central Arkansas
since 1988
316-1536
Chimney Cleaning
Insured for
Your Protection
Rusty “Rooster”
Pelton - Owner
Computer Services
A-1 COMPUTER
REPAIR
A+
Certified
Repair
Technician
•Desktop /Laptop
Repairs & Cleanup
•Virus-Spyware Removal-
Starting at $80.
1200 Ferguson Dr.
Ste. 5 • Benton
501-776-7577
Drywall Repair
DRYWALL
REPAIR
SERVICE
• Cracks & Holes
• Discolored Ceilings
• Water Stains
• Small Remodels
Valid References
40 Yrs. Experience
!!!!!!
Steve Burrow - Owner
337–4525
Handgun Classes
CONCEALED
HANDGUN
CLASSES
Course completed
in one day.
All
paperwork
provided.
Tim Bragg, Instructor
#95-055
501-776-7419
Time to get your own
place? Check out the
Rental Section in to-
day!s Classifieds...
Handgun Classes
Arkansas
Concealed
Permit Class
George Brooks, Instructor
License No. 12-763
501.413.2393
email:
georgebrookstheshooter@gmail.com
website:
www.georgebrookstheshooter.com
3470 Quapaw Rd., Benton
Advanced Shooting instruction available
Handyman
W::: ur
Hz×nvmz×
Tree trimming
!""#$%&
Bush & garden
trim & clean up
Brick
Junk hauling
Decks
Flower Bed
clean out
Block
Stump Grinding
Leaf Blowing
Painting
Any Yard Work!
FREE
ESTIMATES!
Owner
Deanna Massey
O×r Cz:: Dors I1
A:: Lzw×cznrt
501-326-2839
and ask for
Damon Massey
Horses
Clinic’s Certified
HOLTZMAN
Riding Academy, LLC
BIRTHDAY PARTIES
10 & UNDER
FREE COLT STARTING CLINIC
316-1141
Landscaping
L.W. Lawn &
Landscaping
Services, LLC
www.lwlawnandlandscaping.com
lwlawnandlandscaping@yahoo.com
501-350-9137
870-942-9641
fax 501-847-6683
Lawn Maintenance, Trimming,
Sprinkler Installation, French
Drains, Shrub & Tree Pruning,
Leaf Removal, Landscaping,
Gutter Maintenance and more
But my God shall supply all your
needs according to his riches in
glory by Christ Jesus.
Phil. 4:19
Lawn Care
Richard
May’s
Lawn Care
10 years Local
Experience
Average yard:
Cut & Weed
Eat $25-$30
317-8966
316-6655
Flawless
Lawns
Flawless
Lawns
Spring Clean-Up
Leaves, Beds & Mulch
Mowing, Trimming, Edging
Odd Jobs and Light Hauling
Ryan Harmon 860-8789
MaRK 8:36
GK Lawncare &
Landscaping, Inc.
· Maintenance Pkg. (mowing,
edging, trimming, cleaning up)
· Complete Landscape & Revamp
· Leaf Cleanup · Tree Trimming
· Sodding · Mulch
· Shrub Maintenance
· Irrigation Installation/Repair
100% SATISFACTION
GUARANTEED
* Insured *
Contact for an estimate:
Joey Gregory 501-249-8223
Chuck Knox 501-317-9808
joeygregory@sbcglobal.net
Painting
SUPERIOR
PAINTING
Satisfaction Guaranteed
!"#$%&'((")*+*,-"
& Repair
!".+/0$*1$"2"34/0$*1$
!""504/6$0
!"7$0,,6$0"8',-*+9
FREE ESTIMATES
INSURED
Kelly Hill – Owner
501.840.1470
501.316.3328
Pressure Washing
!"#$
!"#$$%"#&'($)&*&+,"#
-#./&0#1(2"
3#4.#$
5%66#"&78#(4249
:(;4&<#"=2.#
(4>&+,"#
%&'()*+(*,'%
Roofng
ARKANSAS SERVICE CO.
Roofing & Waterproofing
YRS %XPERIENCEsFREE Estimates
501.425.2995
Toll Free 877.942.1977
Senior & Veteran Discounts
Roofng
ROOFING
Wagner
Residential
Commercial
&
VOTED
“Best of the Best”
2009
Free Estimates
847-6630
K & L
ROOFING
• Don’t Wait For
Roofing Repair
• All Insurance
Claims Welcome
• 40 years exp.
• Financing Avail.
w/approved credit
Upgrade to a metal roof with
a class 4 fire rating & you
may qualify for a discount on
your homeowners insurance
501-249-7735
501-778-7600
210 W. SEVIER
ST. • BENTON
Tree Service
M00ߣ
ñFF0ßßñ8l£
Tߣ£ 5£ß¥l8£
501-778-8071
501-860-5911
28-Years
Experience
Insured &
Licensed
*Stump Grinding
*Take Downs
*Trimming
*Pruning
*Storm Cleanup
Buy • Sell • Trade
in the Classifieds
Tree Service
Parsons & Son
Tree Service LLC
“The Total Package”
Call us about
Tree Health Care
º 1rinning
º 1ake Lowns
º Pruning
º Renovals
º Stunp Renoval
º lirewood
º Oreen vaste lauling
Conplete
lnsuranoe Coverage
Owned 8 Operated
by an
lSA Lioensed Arborist
SO·L"PGA
840-1436
602-2959
CRITES
& TACKETT
TREE SERVICE
~ Free Estimates ~
Workman's Comp
& Liability Insured
•Stump Removal
501-337–1565
501-337-9094
Let the
Courier Classifieds
work for you.
Call Cathy or Kim
to place your
Classified Ad.
Mon.-Fri. 8am-5pm
315-8228
or come by
321 N. Market St.
Need to publish a
Legal Notice in
Saline County? We
can help...published
7 days a week...
501-315-8228
Tree Service
501.317.6788
ROCKIN B
TREE SERVICE
B
TRIMMING
PRUNING
STUMP GRINDING
REMOVALS
large & small
FREE ESTIMATES
Insured for
Your Protection
Excellent Clean up
Senior and
Military Discounts
available
Happy Fall
Need help?
Check the
Service
Directory First!
Apartments
Unfurnished
NOTICE: All real es-
tate advertising in this
newspaper is subject
to the Fair Housing
Act which makes it il-
legal to advertise any
preference, limitation
or di scr i mi nat i on
based on race, color,
religion, sex, handi-
cap, familial status or
national origin, or in-
tention to make any
such preference. We
will not knowingly ac-
cept any advertising
for real estate which
is in violation of the
law. All persons are
hereby informed that
all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspa-
per are available on
an equal opportunity
basis.
Houses for Rent
1BR 1BA House
$450 mo + $200 dep
315-3002 / 303-8166
2 BR 1 BA, 1 car Ga-
rage 5 yrs. ol d
$750mo + Dep
607-3229 /414-6430
2 BR, 1 BA, 515
Pearson, no pets.
$550. mo., $400 dep.,
Call 326-3907
3 & 4 BEDROOM
$825 -$1400 mo.,
Haskell, Benton &
Bryant. 315-9370
3 BR, 1.5 ba, nice, 1
car gar., 862 Church
St. $750 dep. $750
mth. No Pets Call
860-3740
3BR 1BA House,
$595 mo., 6mo. lease
No Pet s, Cal l
501-778-3324
3BR 2BA Benton
Schools $915mo and
$800dep. Please call
840-7626
BRYANT - Nice
Townhome. 3 BR, 2
BA, 1300 sq. ft., $750
mo., 501-847-5377
Houses for Rent
3BR 2BA Brick
Fenced Backyard 2
Car Garage off Hwy 5
$1200mo +Dep.Call
501-860-1164
3BR 2BA Like New
New Appl. No Pets
8 6 4 Mo n t c l a i r
$850mo+Dep Please
Call 501-840-3694
Eagle Properties
LLC
315–2075
Nice 2 & 3 BR Homes
from $500 to $925
Apartments
1 BR’s from $415
2 BR’s from $475
*based on availability
Deposit & References
Required
eaglepropsaline.com
EXECUTIVE HOME -
Hurricane Lake Es-
tates very roomy,
$1,950 mth, $750
dep. Avail Oct. 1st.
Call for appointment
315-2075
FOR LEASE/SALE
New 3 & 4 BR, 2 BA,
brick, FP, ceiling fans,
carpet, 2 car garage,
patio. Go to: www.
catalyst-residential.com
or 501-697-6342
HASKELL 204
GLENN OAK 3BR, 2
BA, 2 car garage.
Nice. $750 mo. $600
dep. 501-847-5377
LEASE PURCHASE
4Br 2Ba Cedar Ridge
in Benton $950mo +
Dep, Call 944-4976
LG 2BR 2BA brick
home, fenced by, No
Pets CH/A, W/D conn
$850mo. + $450dep
412 W. North, Benton
501-317-5095
Nice 3Bd 2Ba 2 Car
Garage Nice Neigh-
borhoood CH/A Call
847-2602
Buy • Sell • Trade
in the Classifieds
Houses for Rent
NICE 3BR $925mo
and $925dep No Pets
1315 Hwy 35 Call
303-8717
RENT PURCHASE
3Br 2Ba Irish Spring
Est at e Mabel val e
Schools $795mo +
Dep. Call 944-4976
Mobile Homes
For Rent
2BR 1BA STOVE
REFRIG NO PETS
317-6426 778-1993
3 BR, 1.5 BA Bryant
School Di st r i ct
$500mo + $500dep.
accept Housi ngl
501-772-8381
RENT TO OWN
CLEAN/GOOD SHAPE
‘00 16x80 3BR $570
‘95 16x72 2BR $550
Includes lot Rent & Ins
Lake • Fish • Walk Trail
Sunset Lake • 951-2842
Miscellaneous
For Rent
SEE THE SATELLITE
TV Difference Pack-
ages as LOW as
$19.99/month! FREE
DVR Upgrade. FREE
HD Upgrade. FREE
Professional Installa-
tion! Call NOW and
Start SAVING!
1-866-795-9295
Miscellaneous
For Sale
2 Chest type Deep
Freezer $100 & $125,
both in good con, call
501-776-2457
ELECTRIC
WHEELCHAIR
Lightweight. Portable
Like new. Low $ or
perhaps FREE to
elderly. 888-442-3390
Need to publish a
Legal Notice in
Saline County? We
can help...published
7 days a week...
501-315-8228
Miscellaneous
For Sale
SEE THE SATELLITE
TV Difference! Pack-
ages as LOW as
$19.99/month! FREE
DVR Upgrade. FREE
HD Upgrade. FREE
Professional Installa-
tion! Call NOW and
Start SAVING!
1-866-725-5125
Musical
Merchandise
Cushing
Piano Service
Tune • Repair
Player Pianos & Pump Organs
778-6584
Pets & Supplies
BENTON ANIMAL
Control & Adoption
501-776-5972
benton.petfinder.com
BRYANT ANIMAL
Control & Adoption
www.bryant.petfinder.com
www.1-800-save-a-pet.com
www.1888pets911.org
Hay For Sale
HAY
FOR SALE
Mixed grass clean.
Fertilized. 4X5 net
wrapped. In the field
cutting now.
$
35.00 loaded
1 to 400 bales
available
Buy as many as you
need. Great horse hay.
501-840-1529 or
501-860-8080
Let the
Courier Classifieds
work for you.
Call Cathy or Kim
to place your
Classified Ad.
Mon.-Fri. 8am-5pm
315-8228
or come by
321 N. Market St.
Classifieds Work!
Heavy Equip-
SURPLUS EQUIP-
MENT. Online auc-
tions HUGE selection.
BIG savi ngs. NO
Buyer fees Low Seller
f ees BARGAI NS!
Register FREE Use
Promo Code cnhi313.
LIVE support.
www.SurplusOnThe.NET
334-215-3019
Sport Utility
Vehicles
1997 JEEP Cherokee
4 Wheel Dr. $1100
OBO 230K Mi l es
Runs but needs work
Bob 860-5570
Autos Wanted
DONATE A CAR
Humane Society of
the United States
FREE Next-DAY
TOWING! Running or
Not. Tax Deductible.
Call Before Tax Year
Ends!
1-800-418-1562
Recreational
Vehicles
06 FEMA Gulfstream
$3,995 8x32 set up in
Sunset Lake 951- 2842
Lake • Fish • Walk Trails
2008 FLEETWOOD
Jambore 29V Class C
motor home. 1 owner,
6300 miles. Onan genera-
tor, Queen island bed,
bed above the cab, booth
dinette & sofa both make
into beds. Full kitchen &
bath. Excellent condition.
No smokers or pets.
Priced to move at $38,900
RV CIty - Benton
800-578-2489
www.rvcity.biz
Open Sundays 12-5
Deer Hunters Special
selling due to health
18ft TT, 2 3/4 beds + 2
bunk beds, single
axle pulls good, no
leaks, $1000 or trade
f or equal val ue
672- 0053 l ocal l y
owned
Recreational
Vehicles
Coachman Class
C motor home 21QB
“New”. Chevy classis Fully
self contained. 4.0 Onan
generator, Fully equipped
kitchen, Sleeps 6. 32’
LCD TV with DVD player,
power patio awning. Large
exterior storage. MSRP
$70,417.00 On sale now
for only $48,800
RV City-Benton, AR
800-578-2489
www.rvcity.biz
Open Sunday!s 12-5
FIFTH WHEEL, 2010
Weekender 235. Sofa
slide out, booth dinette,
heat/AC, Full kitchen and
bath, Queen bed, patio
awning & more. Priced
to move at $11,850
Reduced Price
RV City-Benton
800-578-2489
www.rvcity.biz
Open Sundays 12-5
FLAGSTAFF 205
Pop Up Camper. New
2013. Electric lift,
toilet/shower combo,
awning, Queen bed &
double bed, 3 way fridge,
gas stove & gas grill, heat
& air. 2013 blow out
sale priced at $8,400!
Stk#FR0484
RV City-Benton
800-578-2489
www.rvcity.biz
Open Sundays 12-5
KEYSTON LAREDO
250RL Fifth wheel 2013,
3 slide outs. Rear living
room with 2 recliners, free
standing dinette w/ 4
chairs. Huge shower with
glass doors, 60x80 Queen
island bed. 12 gallon wa-
ter heater,15K A/C, 50
amp. service. 4 seasons
unit with heated & en-
closed underbelly. Power
patio awning. Electric
jacks & more. On sale
now for only $31,750!
RV City-Benton
800-578-2489
www.rvcity.biz
Open Sundays 12-5
Classifieds Work!
Houses For Sale
1119 CRYSTAL Dr.
Nice Neighborhood
Remodeled 3Br 11/2
Bath Screened in
back porch $103K For
Appoint. 317-8438
Mobile Homes
For Sale
RENT TO OWN
CLEAN/GOOD SHAPE
‘00 16x80 3BR $570
‘95 16x72 2BR $550
Includes lot Rent & Ins
Lake • Fish • Walk Trail
Sunset Lake • 951-2842
Lots & Acreage
FOR SALE
Lot 40 Miller Cove
Call 317-5408
Real Estate
CANCEL YOUR
TI MESHARE. NO
Risk Program STOP
Mortgage & Mainte-
nance Payments To-
day. 100% Money
Back Guarant ee.
FREE Consultation.
Call Us NOW. We
C a n H e l p
1-888-356-5248
Professional
Services
STOP MORTGAGE &
Mai ntenance Pay-
ments TODAY! CAN-
CEL YOUR TIME-
SHARE. NO Risk
Pr ogr am 100%
Money Back Guaran-
tee. FREE Consulta-
tion. Call Us NOW.
We Can Hel p!
1-800-282-3206
Classifeds - a
shopping center
delivered to your home
8B The Saline Courier
Sunday, September 29, 2013
S
e
e
S
a
l
i
n
e
M
A
G
A
Z
I
N
E
A U T U MN 2 0 1 3 I S S U E
They are the backbone to any community –
the next-door neighbor, your friend at church.
They are the people that give of themselves
selflessly.
MORE INSIDE ON: Honorable Mentions
Past Recipients
Extraordinary
People
E
P
The 2013
Extraordinary People
Shannon Moss Marilyn Schick Carolyn Patterson Merle King Angie Fulcher Lisa Thornton
Leroy Allen Wayne and Mary Smith Josh and Crystal Turner Mike Cook Wilma Grimmett Laura Stilwell
Ruth Hines Gail Fisher
Cordell Herring Joe Red
Photos by Lynda Hollenbeck & Maribeth Bueche
Saline Courier’s “Extraordinary People” for 2013 are Leroy Allen, Shannon Moss, Mike Cook, Josh and Crystal Turner, Marilyn Schick, Angie Fulcher, Wayne and Mary Smith, Wilma Grimmett, Carolyn Patterson,
Laura Stilwell, Lisa Thornton and Merle King.
Brent Davis, editor of The Saline Courier, serves as emcee for the
Extraordinary People banquet.
Guests go through the buffet line at the banquet. The meal was
catered by Rick Bellinger of Riverside Grocery and Catering.
Decorations provided by Bill’s Flower Shop.
Honorable Mention
Not pictured is Kathy Smith, who also received honorable mention.
This document is © 2013 by editor - all rights reserved.
AttachmentSize
E-edition September 29, 2013.pdf41.88 MB
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