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September 4, 2013

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Courier
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Volume 136
Number 246
1 Section 10 Pages
50¢
Home of Tina Jones
and Walker Harrell
The Saline
www. bent oncouri er. com
Wednesday, September 4, 2013
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Recipes for Life
G
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&
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Saline County’S newS SourCe SinCe 1876
PENNINGTON A NO-SHOW
Special meeting draws big crowd
BRENT DAVIS/The Saline Courier
Amy Burnett questions Saline County Attorney Jonathan Greer, left, regarding criteria for removing
a public official from office.
Even with Saline County
Attorney Jonathan Greer
telling the Saline County
Quorum Court that it has
no authority to remove
Saline County Sheriff Bruce
Pennington from office, the
13 justices of the peace unan-
imously approved a resolu-
tion calling for the sheriff’s
immediate resignation.
In addition to the resolu-
tion, County Judge Lanny
Fite sent Pennington a letter
requesting his immediate
resignation.
Pennington, who had said
he would attend Tuesday
night’s special court meet-
ing, was a no-show. He could
not be reached for com-
ment this morning, but said
Tuesday he has no intention
of retiring, as he had previ-
ously indicated, and that
he intends instead to seek
another term.
He said he was “respond-
ing to the wishes of my con-
stituents,” noting that he had
received numerous calls of
support.
Greer had been asked to
research state statutes gov-
erning removal of public offi-
cials from office and deter-
mined that Pennington’s
situation does not meet the
criteria for “infamous crime,”
which might constitute his
removal.
Pennington was arrested
June 29 for misdemeanor
public intoxication and
resisting arrest in conjunc-
tion with an incident at a
local restaurant and bar.
He pleaded guilty to both
charges, was fined $3,000
and placed on a year of unsu-
pervised probation.
Referring to the “infamous
By Lynda Hollenbeck
lyndahol@yahoo.com
KALI’S KREW TAKES PARADE TITLE
LYNDA HOLLENBECK/The Saline Courier
Friends of Kali Hardig show their support for their friend as well as their support for the Saline County Fair by tak-
ing part in the county fair parade Tuesday in Downtown Benton. The Kali’s Krew won the first prize in the float
division, according to fair board spokesman Tom Wallace. In the meantime, 12-year-old Kali Hardig continues to
show improvement at Arkansas Children’s Hospital, where she has been hospitalized since July 19 after contracting
amoebic parasitic meningitis. Other fair parade pictures and photos from the fair will appear in later editions of The
Saline Courier.
Man injured after
deputy crashes into
ATV near Congo
While responding to a call at 7:30 p.m.
Monday , a Saline County sheriff’s deputy
hit an all-terrain vehicle.
Sgt. Harold Marable had his siren and
lights on and was traveling the same
direction as the ATV when the accident
occurred.
Marable then tried to pass the ATV in
the left lane, but the ATV driver made a
sharp left turn and the deputy’s vehicle
struck the ATV at the corner of Congo
Road and West Lawson roads, said Lt. Scott
Courtney, Saline County Sheriff’s Office
spokesperson.
The ATV driver suffered injuries but
none that were life-threatening, Courtney
said. He added that alcohol is not suspected
to be involved in the incident.
Arkansas State Police troopers are
Butler seeks return to
Benton School Board
Peggy Butler
is announcing
her candidacy for
Position 6 on the
Benton School
Board.
Butler, a former
school board mem-
ber, is challenging incumbent
Jeff Morrow, who is seeking
re-election.
The election will take place
Sept. 17.
“I have been a part of the
maroon and gray of Benton
Public Schools forever,” said
Butler.
“Since I started to school
here in the first grade, gradu-
ated from BHS, and spent most
of my teaching career here,
I know our schools from the
inside out. I have invested my
career in Benton’s students and
it has been a rewarding expe-
rience. Benton schools have
been my life.”
Butler and husband John
together have devoted a total of
55 years to the Benton School
System.
Both of their daughters
graduated from Benton High
School and now their 11-year-
old grandson, who finished
By Lynda Hollenbeck
lyndahol@yahoo.com
Butler
BUTLER, page 7
Bryant district set to
build 2 new schools
worth $14.2 million
The Bryant School District has been noti-
fied that it will receive an additional $14.2
million dollars from the Commission for
Arkansas Public School Academic Facilities
and Transportation to build two new
schools.
Bryant will add a new elementary school
costing about $5 million and a new middle
school costing about $9.2 million, said Devin
Sherrill, Bryant School District spokesper-
son.
The Bryant School Board still is trying to
decide an exact plan for these schools, she
said.
The commission approves Academic
Facilities Partnership Program projects
By Sarah Derouen
sderouen@bentoncourier.com
ATV, page 3
By Sarah Derouen
sderouen@bentoncourier.com
BRYANT, page 3
PENNINGTON, page 3
Rabid skunks
prompts need
for pet owners’
awareness
The recent discovery of
two rabid skunks in Haskell
is something officials are
taking seriously, said Mayor
Jeff Arey.
“Because of this, we’re
encouraging people to get
their pets vaccinated against
rabies,” he said. “Previously
we’ve partnered with the
Humane Society to hold
rabies clinics, but we’re put-
ting more emphasis on this
year’s clinic.”
The drive-through, low-
cost clinic is scheduled from
noon to 4 p.m. Saturday,
Sept. 21, on the parking lot
of Harmony Grove High
School, 2621 Arkansas 229
in Haskell.
“Every year Haskell
partners with the Humane
Society and puts this on,”
Arey said. “This year it’s just
more important than ever
considering that rabies has
been found in our area.”
The cost for each animal
— dog or cat — will be $10
for the rabies vaccine; $10
for the annual shots; plus an
additional $10 for dogs for
bordetella (kennel cough).
All payments must be
made in cash, Arey noted.
Dr. Eric Jayne, a licensed
veterinarian, will be adminis-
tering all vaccinations.
Local and state Health
Department officials have
encouraged pet owners to
make certain that their pets
are up to date with their vac-
cinations.
Dr. Sue Weinstein, state
public health veterinarian,
said the two skunks were
out during the daytime and
displayed abnormal behav-
ior. “The animals were not
By Lynda Hollenbeck
lyndahol@yahoo.com
MISSED PAPERS
CALL
(501) 317-6013
DURING THESE HOURS
5-7 p.m. Monday-Friday
7-9 a.m. Saturday-Sunday
CONTACT US
Phone: (501) 315-8228
Fax: (501) 315-1920
Email: news@bentoncourier.com
Write: P.O. Box 207,
Benton, AR 72018
INDEX
OBITUARIES .............................. 3
OPINIONS .................................. 4
SPORTS .................................. 5,6
CLASSIFIEDS ............................ 8
COMICS......................................9
RABIES, page 3
2 The Saline Courier
Wednesday, September 4, 2013
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September 19, 20, 21 ,23,
and 24 at 7:00 pm
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Tickets are $8.
Call the box office
1pm-5pm
in the afternoons
870 245-5555
or on-line at:
www.obu.edu/boxoffice.
S H OWS S PECI AL EVENTS
1304 Military Rd, Benton—501-778-0934
Family Practice Associates
Monday, August 5 at 5:30pm and 6:00pm
Saturday, August 17 at 10am
Thursday, August 22 at 5:30pm and 6:00pm
Tuesday, August 27 at noon
We now offer a medically managed meal replacement
weight loss program! Designed for patients with 30 or
more pounds to lose. Current patients or new patients
are welcome. High protein, low calorie diet with proven
results! Come to one of our interest meetings held at our
office; upcoming meetings are scheduled for:
Visit www.FPABenton.com for more information!
1304 Military Rd, Benton—501-778-0934
Family Practice Associates
Monday, August 5 at 5:30pm and 6:00pm
Saturday, August 17 at 10am
Thursday, August 22 at 5:30pm and 6:00pm
Tuesday, August 27 at noon
We now offer a medically managed meal replacement
weight loss program! Designed for patients with 30 or
more pounds to lose. Current patients or new patients
are welcome. High protein, low calorie diet with proven
results! Come to one of our interest meetings held at our
office; upcoming meetings are scheduled for:
Visit www.FPABenton.com for more information!
1304 Military Rd, Benton—501-778-0934
Family Practice Associates
Monday, August 5 at 5:30pm and 6:00pm
Saturday, August 17 at 10am
Thursday, August 22 at 5:30pm and 6:00pm
Tuesday, August 27 at noon
We now offer a medically managed meal replacement
weight loss program! Designed for patients with 30 or
more pounds to lose. Current patients or new patients
are welcome. High protein, low calorie diet with proven
results! Come to one of our interest meetings held at our
office; upcoming meetings are scheduled for:
Visit www.FPABenton.com for more information!
Weight Loss Program
Thursday, September 5 at noon
Sunday, September 8 at 2pm
Tuesday, September 17 at 5:30pm and 6pm
Thursday, September 26 at noon
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TODAY
CLASS OF 1973 Bryant High
School 40th Class Reunion
will be held Oct. 5 at the
Embassy Suites in Little
Rock at 6 p.m. until mid-
night. Cost is $35 per person. 
Checks due no later than
Oct. 1.  Make checks pay-
able to BHS Class of 73.  Mail
it to Class of 73, PO Box 73,
Bryant, AR  72089.  In order
to get the negotiated rate
at Embassy Suites, your
Hotel Reservations need to
be made by September 4.
For more information e-mail 
peglew55@gmail.com or call
501-920-8188.
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 5
SALINE COUNTY LIBRARY: A
program on the Genealogy
Databases and Microfilm
Collection at the Saline
County Library will be held
at the Herzfeld Library,
Thursday, September 5
from 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Attendees will learn how to
use the genealogy databases
to help you find your ances-
tors. The program will also
show what is available in the
vast microfilm collection of
the Saline County Library to
help do research. The pro-
gram is open to the public.
THEATER THURSDAY: All ages
are invited to enjoy a family-
friendly movie selected for
ages 12 and under at 4 p.m.
Thursday, Sept. 5 at Boswell
Library in Bryant. Call 847-
2166 for more information.
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 7
MABELVALE HIGH SCHOOL
All Years Reunion will be
Saturday, Sept. 7,  from 10
a.m. to 3 p.m. at Mabelvale
United Methodist Church. 
Those who attended but may
not have graduated are also
invited.  There will be a fee of
$4 at the door.  Please bring
finger foods, dip and chips
pr can drinks.  Also bring
photos to share or display. 
Class photos will be taken
starting at 11a.m.  They will
be mailed for $7 if deci-
red. Call Billie at 501- 316-
2876 if you need more infor-
mation. Visit mabelvalehigh-
schoolalumnireunion.com for
more information.
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 9
HUNTER EDUCATION
CLASSES will be given
September 9-10, 12, 23-24,
26, October 7-8, 10, and
November 4-6 at the Gene
Moss Building in Tyndall Park
located at 913 East Sevier
Street in Benton. All classes
start at 6:30 p.m. and end
at 10 p.m. No preregistra-
tion required. Student must
attend all three nights.
BENTON BOOK CLUB: The
Benton Book Club will meet
at 5 p.m. Monday, Sept. 9 at
Herzfeld Library to discuss
its chosen title. The group is
open to adults 18 and older.
Call 778-4766 for more infor-
mation.
 
MONDAY WITH THE MASTER
GARDENERS: The Saline
County Master Gardeners
and presenter Julie Tucker
will discuss “Propagating
Plants for Winter” at 6:30 p.m.
Monday, Sept. 9 at Herzfeld
Library. The program is open
to all ages. Call 778-4766 for
more information.
DR. RUTH HAWKINS: The
Saline County Library’s
Monday Afternoon Book Club
will host guest speaker Dr.
Ruth Hawkins of Arkansas
State University for its next
meeting at 1 p.m. Monday,
Sept. 9 at Boswell Library in
Bryant. The meeting is open
to the public on a first-come,
first-served basis. Call 847-
2166 or 778-4766 for more
information.
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10
DOWN ON THE FARM STORY
TIME AND CRAFTS: Kids ages
3-5 are invited to enjoy a
farm-themed story time at
10:30 a.m. Tuesday, Sept.
10 at Boswell Library. Make-
and-take farm crafts will be
available for all ages from
3- 8 p.m. (same day). Call 847-
2166 for more information.
 
WEDNESDAY,
SEPTEMBER 11
DOWN ON THE FARM STORY
TIME AND CRAFTS: Kids ages
3-5 are invited to enjoy a
farm-themed story time at
10:30 a.m. Wednesday, Sept.
11 and Thursday, Sept. 12 at
Herzfeld Library. Make-and-
take farm crafts will be avail-
able for all ages from 3-8 p.m.
(same dates). Call 778-4766
for more information.
NATIONAL DAY OF SERVICE
and Remembrance will be
held Wednesday, Sept. 11
at 11 a.m. for AR REALTORS.
The ceremony will be at
1520 Glory Cove in Habitat
for Humanity’s Partnership
Village. Lunch will be served
by Hot Dog Mike.
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 14
APOSTLES BUILD: Habitat
for Humanity and local
churches across Saline
County will break ground on
the 8th Apostle Build home
September 14-20. Please join
Habitat and local churches
on the construction site. Visit
www.habitatsalinecountyar.
org for more information.
RAPER FAMILY REUNION will
be held at 10 a.m., Saturday,
September 14 at Mary
McKennley Park on Hwy. 229
in Haskell. The reunion will
begin at 10 a.m., with a pot
luck luncheon at noon. For
more information call Barbara
Hilborn at 501-778-8733 or
Betty Blair 501-778-3923.
13TH ANNUAL LAKE NORRELL
Fire Department Fish Fry is
set for Saturday, Sept. 14 at 5
p.m. at the lake’s community
center and will be catered
by Riverside Grocery. It will
be all you can eat and there
will also be a live action. For
more information call Fire
Chief Ronnie Forsyth at 560-
4456 or Barbara Howell at
681-7577.
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16
BOOK SIGNING: Local award-
winning author Carla Killough
McClafferty will discuss and
sign copies of her latest non-
fiction work “Fourth Down
and Inches: Concussions and
Football’s Make-or-Break
Moment” at 6 p.m. Monday,
Sept. 16 at Herzfeld Library in
Benton. The program is open
to all ages on a first-come
basis. Copies of her work will
be available for purchase at
the event. Call 778-4766 for
more information.
GAME ON!:Tweens and teens
are invited to play video and/
or board games from 3:30
p.m.- 5 p.m. Monday, Sept. 16
at both Saline County Library
locations. The program is for
ages 8-18 at Boswell Library
and ages 13-18 at Herzfeld
Library. Call 778-4766 or 847-
2166 for more information.
 
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17
PUPPET SHOW: All ages are
invited to a family-friendly
puppet show at 4 p.m.
Tuesday, Sept. 17 at Herzfeld
Library. Call 778-4766 for
more information.
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 23
CIVIL WAR dances of the time
period will be held Monday,
Sept. 23. The Historic
Washington Dancers from
Old Washington, Ark. will
be at Herzfeld Library, 1800
Smithers Drive in Benton
to perform such dances as
the Virginia Reel and other
Civil War period dances.  The
program will begin at 6:30
p.m. The dancers will be
dressed in Civil War period
costume and perform these
dances.  Make plans now to
attend. 
Saline county eventS
Email calendar items to news@bentoncourier.com or call 501-315-8228 ext. 234.
Calendar items are intended for nonprofit organizations.
Saline Courier photo
Bauxite High School students Keith Bates and Bonnie Ashcraft have been selected for the Arkansas
High School Coaches Association All-Star game in August in Little Rock. Bates helped the Miners to a
9-1 season and was voted the outstanding back in 5A-South while Ashcraft will be a cheerleader.
Saline courier ScraPBook 1987
Benton Police
Department:
Monday
•A man was arrested
and charged with resisting
arrest after he got into an
argument with his wife on
Second Street.
Tuesday
•A woman reported an
individual stole her debit
card and has used it at two
automatic teller machines in
Benton.
•A woman was arrested
for a warrant because she
failed to appear on charges
of maintaining a drug prem-
ises. This violation is a Class
C felony.
Saline County
Sheriff’s Office:
Monday
•A woman reported an
individual harassed her as
she tried to move out of
her house on Slade Road in
Paron.
•An individual reported
his lawnmower was stolen
on Lorance Drive.
•A man reported his
12-year-old granddaughter
ran away from Pointview
Road in Benton.
•A man reported a
woman slashed his tires on
Centark Cove in Alexander.
•A man reported his
ex-wife threatened him
on Scotch Pine Lane in
Hensley.
•A man reported his
father assaulted him on
Arkansas 5 in Lonsdale.
Tuesday
•A man reported a suspi-
cious man was at his house
and his vehicle was bro-
ken into on Kling Road in
Mabelvale.
•An individual reported
a large amount of tools and
welding equipment were
stolen on Myna Drive in
Mabelvale.
•A man reported an indi-
vidual has stolen his cable
TV on U.S. 67 in Benton.
•A man reported some-
one broke into his home on
South Avilla Heights Drive
in Alexander while he was
on vacation.
•A man reported his wal-
let stolen on Arkansas 5 in
Benton.
Benton Fire
Department:
Last weekend Benton
firefighters responded to a
vehicle fire, a grass fire, an
outside storage fire, a medi-
cal incident, five vehicle
accidents with injuries, a
gas leak, two false alarms
and two detector activations
caused by malfunctions.
Tuesday, Benton firefight-
ers responded to two medi-
cal incidents.
Bryant Fire
Department:
Monday, Bryant firefight-
ers responded to two medi-
cal calls and two fires.
Tuesday, Bryant firefight-
ers responded to seven
medical calls, a fire call and
three business inspections.
Daily DiSPatcH
Daily Dispatch is published daily in The Saline Courier as
reports are received from local law enforcement agencies. Daily
Dispatch articles are edited for brevity and relevancy, and con-
tain only information provided by law enforcement. Content
written by Sarah Derouen, a reporter for The Saline Courier.
Sheriff’s Office
investigating
series of thefts
Deputies from the
Saline County Sheriff’s
Office are investigating
a series of crimes that
occurred Thursday night
and Friday morning on
Pear Orchard Road.
Five burglaries and a
break-in were reported .
It is suspected that the
same person or group of
people are responsible
for the crimes because
they were all completed
within a small time
frame and area, but no
one has been charged or
arrested, said Lt. Scott
Courtney, Saline County
Sheriff’s Office spokes-
person.
Deputies do have
several leads for the inci-
dents, Courtney said.
By Sarah Derouen
sderouen@bentoncourier.com
Sundays
in the Courier
Business
Wednesday, September 4, 2013
The Saline Courier 3
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his elementary education
at Caldwell Elementary, is
in the sixth grade at the
middle school.
Butler often says she
thinks she has “been to
more ballgames, band and
choir concerts, plays and all
other extracurricular activi-
ties than most people.”
Her daughters were Pep
Steppers in high school and
on the drill team in junior
high and now her grandson
plays in the middle school
band.
She pointed out that
her children were raised
by parents very active and
involved in the school fam-
ily and community.
“Yes, I am retired from
teaching now, but I am not
retired from caring deeply
about our schools and how
they meet the needs of
every child,” Butler said.
“Some mistakenly think
that it is only my precious
grandson that I am now
interested in as he makes
his way through our school
system; nothing could be
further from the truth. I
have an abiding interest in
the success of every child.
“As an educator I know
the importance that school,
both academic studies and
extracurricular activities,
play in preparing children
for the world ahead,” she
said. “I used to tell my
students that if they were
happy and productive after
they left school, I would
take part of the credit for
it. Whether it is the actual
studies or band, school-
sponsored clubs, sports,
choir or any others, all
parts of the school experi-
ence play a role in helping
children find a place where
they feel comfortable and
capable.
“The school must be a
complete experience; all
aspects allow a student to
expand their talents and
feel a sense of belonging,”
she said.
Butler said her entire
family feels “blessed to have
such a great group of teach-
ers committed to bringing
to the table the best educa-
tion that can be offered our
youth.”
“That being said, I will
always feel that education,
especially the academic
side, is of such great impor-
tance for our children that
we must put it first on our
list; it is of highest impor-
tance.
“I look forward to, once
again, being a part of the
decision making concerning
the so important business
of growing happy, produc-
tive and successful adults,”
Butler said. “I will take very
seriously, as a board mem-
ber, the decisions regarding
the use of taxpayers’ dollars
to build the best possible
foundation for the future of
our youth.”
Butler
From page 1
walking properly and their
behavior was clearly not
normal for a skunk,”
Weinstein said.
The two were less than a
mile from one another and
one was seen near Harmony
Grove School, she said.
“We want to get to the
point that we’re not alarm-
ing people unnecessarily,
but want to inform them
that this is real and that
they should have their pets
vaccinated by a veterinar-
ian.
“Children should be
reminded not to touch wild
animals and to stay away
from stray pets,” she said.
“It’s incredible how few
people are vaccinating their
pets,” Weinstein added.
Of the animals requir-
ing quarantine statewide
because of exposure to
rabid skunks, she noted
that 50 percent not only
were not current on their
vaccinations, but had never
been vaccinated; another 32
percent had had a vaccina-
tion at some point, but were
not current; and only 18
percent were current.
Weinstein said Harmony
Grove School officials were
given handouts to inform
the students about the dan-
gers that rabies poses and
the importance of vaccinat-
ing pets.
According to the Health
Department, rabies is a
virus that attacks the brain
and spinal cord and is a
fatal disease. It is most
often seen in Arkansas in
skunks and bats. However,
cats, dogs, ferrets and
livestock also can develop
rabies, especially if they are
not vaccinated. The rabies
virus lives in the saliva
(spit) and nervous tissues
of infected animals and is
spread when they bite or
scratch. The virus also may
be spread if saliva from an
infected animal touches
broken skin, open wounds
or the lining of the mouth,
eyes or nose.
All dogs and cats in
Arkansas are required to be
vaccinated against rabies
by a licensed veterinarian.
This not only protects the
animal, but also acts as a
barrier between the wildlife
exposures of rabies and
people, as pets are more
likely to be exposed to a
rabid skunk directly than
are humans.
Rabies
From page 1
OBITUARIES
Lillie Mae Summers Bacus
Lillie Mae Summers Bacus, 86, went to be with her Lord
on Saturday, Aug. 31, 2013, surrounded by her family at
Saline Memorial Hospice House in Bryant. Lillie was born
Dec. 15, 1926, to the late James D. and Ruby Summers.
She was preceded in death by her husband
of 49 years, Charles F. Bacus, Sr.; her parents;
a sister, Helen Bush; and two brothers, Cecil
and Jackie Long.
She leaves to cherish her memories, her
daughters, Mary Ruth East and husband
Jerrell, Charlene Beck, Linda Pike and hus-
band Dale, Maude Caudle and husband, Gary;
a son, Charles Franklin “Frank” Bacus Jr. and wife Lee;
14 grandchildren, Sheryl Bradford, Jerry East and wife
Tammy, Jeff East and wife Jessica, Phillip Pike, Sabrina
Wright, Keith Pike and wife Bethany, Rebecca Sipes and
husband Jason, Melissa Baxley and husband Russ, Ashley
Clancy and husband Shane, Shaun Coppock and wife Stacy,
achary Coppock and wife Sharon, Dylan Coppock and
wife Brooke, Charles “Chaz” Franklin Bacus III and wife
Jamie and Lillian Bacus; 25 great-grandchildren and one
great-great grandchild. She is also survived by one brother,
James “Buddy” Summers; two sisters, Carolyn Rich and
Riggie Toddy; and many nieces, nephews and friends.
A celebration of her life will be held at 1 p.m. Thursday,
Sept. 5, in the chapel of Roller-Drummond Funeral Home,
10900 Interstate 30 in Little Rock. Michael Knappier will
officiate. Burial will be at Pinecrest Memorial Park.
Visitation will be held from 11 a.m to 1 p.m. Thursday,
Sept. 5, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m at the funeral home.Online
guestbook: www.rollerfuneralhomes.com/drummond.
Imogene ‘Jean’ Rounds
Imogene “Jean” Rounds, 85, of Alexander, born April 28,
1928, passed away Aug. 31, 2013.
She was preceded in death by her husband,
Harold Rounds; her parents, David and Cleo
(Shrader) Muckelroy; her sisters, Nettie
Onasch, Colleen Hudspeth, Lois Keith, Marie
Muckelroy; anda brother, Herman Muckelroy.
Jean is survived by a daughter, Janet Caton;
and a grandson, Jeffery Caton.
Graveside service will be held at 3 p.m. Friday, Sept. 6,
at Pleasant Hills United Methodist Church in Alexander.
Arrangements are by Arkansas Funeral Care
Online guestbook: www.arkansasfuneralcare.com
Melanie Yvonne McElrath
Melanie vonne McElrath, 25, passed away Sept. 2, 2013.
Melanie was born Aug. 12, 1988, in Little Rock. Melanie
was a certified nursing assistant and was a student at
Pulaski Technical College.
Melanie was preceded in death by her father, George
Melton McElrath Jr.; and her grandfathers, Jerry Lee
McGuire and George Melton McElrath Sr.
Melanie is survived by one son, Riley John
Williamson of McGehee; her mother. Tammie
McElrath and husband Marvin of Hot Springs;,
one sister, Christina Amerson and husband Jon
of McGehee; one half-brother, Curt McElrath
of Havana; grandparents, Judy McCallister of
Benton and Peggy McElrath of North Little
Rock; a niece and nephew, Jace and Jordan Amerson; three
aunts, one uncle, and many other friends and relatives who
loved her dearly and will miss her always.
Funeral service will be held at 10 a.m. Friday, Sept.
6, at Smith Family Funeral Home Benton Chapel, 322
N. Market St. in Benton. burial will follow at Fairplay
Cemetery. Serving as pallbearers are Matt Owens, Tyler
Henry, Jeremy McGuire, Dion McGuire, Curt McElrath,
and Jeremy Dick assisting. Honorary pallbearers are Ricky
Thornton, Josh McGuire, Jon David Amerson, and Terry
Hinton.1
Visitation is set from 6 to 9 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 5, at the
funeral home.
Online guestbook: www.smithfamilycares.com.
Bacus
Rounds
McElrath
PAID OBITUARIES
HAPPY 80tH BIRtHDAY
Special to the Saline Courier
Elizabeth McPherson of Benton will be celebrating her 80th birthday
from 2 to 4 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 8. Friends and family are invited to
a party to be held at Sharon Missionary Baptist Church fellowship
hall, 402 Shenandoah Drive in Benton. Guests are asked not to
bring gifts.
based on a ranking system
to decide how to allocate the
money available.
Projects are ranked based
on the facility condition
index, academic facilities
wealth index and the dis-
trict’s prior 10-year percent-
age of student enrollment
growth, said Charles Stein,
director of Arkansas Division
of Public School Academic
Facilities and Transportation.
The Bryant School Board
received the additional funds
because several project costs
were less than anticipated,
and the two Bryant projects
were among the next high-
est ranked projects, Stein
said.
The commission distrib-
utes money starting with the
highest ranked projects and
continuing until all the funds
are gone.
On April 24, the Bryant
district received money to
upgrade electrical services at
Bryant High School, replace
the roof at various schools,
convert classroom space in
Building 2 and build a new
cafeteria at the high school.
This year, the Bryant
school district reported an
increase of 114 more stu-
dents on the first day than
last year.
Bryant
From page 1
reviewing this case.
A trooper was dispatched
to the accident, but no
report has been turned
in yet, so no information
can be given as this time,
said Bill Sadler, Arkansas
State Police spokesperson.
Troopers have three busi-
ness days to submit their
reports to the supervisor.
The Arkansas State police
troopers will determine
if anyone should be cited
as a result of the incident,
Courtney said.
At this time,Marable has
not been suspended for the
incident, Courtney said.
ATVs are not suppose
to be driven on the road,
Courtney added. The only
time this is allowed is if driv-
ers are crossing the road
to get from one grassy area
to another, and then they
are supposed to cross at a
90-degree angle, he said.
AtV
From page 1
Investigation nearly done
in Faulkner Co. escape
CONWAY — The
Faulkner County sheriff
says the investigation is
nearly complete into how
three inmates escaped from
the jail last month.
Sheriff Andy Shock says
he expects the probe to be
finished this week.
The Log Cabin Democrat
reports the inmates got
out the afternoon of Aug.
17 when they peeled back
a recreation yard fence,
jumped a barbed wire fence
and then stole a vehicle
from a nearby business.
The inmates were all
caught within several days,
one of them in Oklahoma
City. They’d been facing
drug and theft charges.
Shock said the day of
the escape that policies and
procedures hadn’t been fol-
lowed by staff members. But
the sheriff said no detention
staff members were placed
on leave as part of the inves-
tigation.
Associated Press
“Congress shall make no law ... abridging the freedom
of speech, or of the press ... .”
— From the First Amendment to Constitution
I
was reading one of the national news web sites
the other day and clicked into the entertain-
ment section. There was an article on Miley
Cyrus’ performance at the Video Music Awards, and
I wanted to see what all the fuss was about. It was a
difficult read (“Get the Look,” “Miley Through The
Years,” “Memorable VMA Performances”), and the
site kept asking me unprompted questions. It wanted
to know more about me, and I was determined not to
divulge one blasted thing.
Everywhere you go online these days, there are
questions. Can we send you push notifications? If you
click here, we’ll litter your email box with coupons
and special offerings! One site seemed to know I was
in Benton, Ark. It offered me a free
oil change with any purchase of $500
or more. (Still not sure what I would
have purchased to get the oil change.)
Advertisers, you’re wasting your
time trying to figure me out. I have no
inherent shopping trends. Big Data
can try all it wants, but it will never
codify me. I am a marketing enigma,
and it takes a lot of effort to maintain
that status.
I have no favorite stores, follow no
trends and rarely visit the same web
site often enough to establish a sta-
tistical pattern. My Facebook account
was de-activated as soon as my daugh-
ter put it up there many years ago, and I’m one those
people who will spend half a day “unsubscribing” to
unsolicited emails in my personal account.
Demographically, I don’t fit anywhere, either.
Some say I’m a Baby Boomer. Some say I’m
Generation X. If you were born in 1964, you know
exactly what I’m talking about. We’re the original
“tweeners.”
There is a ton of research done each day online
for the sole purpose of trying to pigeonhole shopping
habits. They want to know everything they can about
you, and they do it with innocuous sounding terms
such as “like” or “follow.” Click one of those little jew-
els, and you’re stuck with a brand or item for the rest
of your online life.
Suggestive selling does not factor into my buying
decisions very often. I like Land’s End shirts, but
send me one unsolicited e-mail about them, and I
won’t wear them again. I enjoy shopping at Sears,
Best Buy, JC Penney or Kohl’s, but have no use for
a “rewards” card. It’s just another password I won’t
remember. The last time I had one of those cards
where you buy nine and get the 10th one free, the
store went out of business before I could claim my
free cup of coffee. It was tragic!
I decided some time ago to make shopping ambi-
guity into a sport. I now go out of my way to throw
the digital hounds off my scent whenever possible.
Instead of coupons and other garbage littering my
email box, I now get messages like “please update
your profile.” Music to my ears. Catch me if you can,
Big Data!
To my mind, these advertisers are trying too hard.
The ads I pay attention to are old school – newspa-
pers (not just ours), magazines and brochures are my
format of choice. Thanks to the Dish Hopper, I don’t
have to watch TV ads anymore. (We start every show
20 minutes late just so we can skip ads.)
If you want my business, sell a good product at a
reasonable price, and send someone out to talk to
me, in case I have any questions. It’s a pretty simple
formula that’s worked for a very long time.
Big Data is watching you with every swipe of the
debit card. They’re tracking your digital footprints
in hopes of luring you into the Marketing Matrix,
where you’re only escape is to live outside the dome,
off-grid.
Movie puns aside, Skynet may one day become
self-aware, but it won’t have a clue where I shop.
Steve Boggs is pubisher of The Saline Courier. He
can be reached at publisher@bentoncourier.com.
O
n a Monday night in late
August, Sen. Lindsey
Graham was traveling with
a congressional delegation in Africa
when the three Republicans who are
challenging him in the 2014 GOP pri-
mary joined a large and strongly con-
servative crowd at Rep. Jeff Duncan’s
annual Faith and Freedom Barbecue.
To listen to Graham’s opponents
tell it, that situation -- a lawmaker
who is far away and out-of-touch -- is
emblematic of the
senator’s relationship
with his constituents.
“The people in
South Carolina are
very conservative,
and he’s been work-
ing with Obama and
acting as if he’s the
Secretary of State,
when he should be
representing the
people of South
Carolina,” said one
of the challengers,
Lee Bright, a state senator from the
Greenville/Spartanburg area.
“He just doesn’t represent South
Carolina very well,” said challenger
Richard Cash, a businessman who
nearly won a House seat in 2010.
“He voted for Justice Sotomayor ...
and then he did the same thing with
Justice Kagan. We don’t like his lead-
ership on immigration -- we believe
it’s another Grahamnesty. He’s not
just on the wrong side of the issue,
he’s a leader on the wrong side.”
“I see conservatives in Washington
who stood up for the Constitution,
who stood for border security, who
stood against amnesty, who have
stood up against reckless spending
and the bailouts, who have stood
against liberal Supreme Court jus-
tices -- and almost always you can
find Sen. Graham on the other side,”
said challenger Nancy Mace, a
Charleston PR executive best known
for being the first woman to graduate
from the Citadel.
There’s no doubt Graham is vul-
nerable in 2014. Immigration reform,
two Supreme Court votes, a per-
ceived closeness to Barack Obama
and a flirtation with liberal initiatives
like cap and trade: None of that sits
well with the state party’s most loyal
conservative voters.
The problem for Graham’s oppo-
nents is that he’s been vulnerable
before, and won handily. In 2008,
Graham had recently backed another
immigration reform measure that
critics called amnesty. And yet he
had minimal opposition and won re-
election with 58 percent of the vote.
Now Graham has a lot of money
in the bank, a track record of win-
ning, and a well-deserved reputation
as a smart campaigner. Add to those
strengths the fact that it appears nei-
ther Bright, Mace, nor Cash has the
stature, depth, or money to mount
a real statewide challenge. Of the
three, some experts see Bright, who
in his 2010 near-victory rated highly
with evangelicals, homeschoolers,
and some Tea Partiers, as the most
serious threat. But not a really seri-
ous threat.
Despite all those problems, there’s
still real hope for Graham’s oppo-
nents. One new factor is conservative
hero Jim DeMint’s decision to leave
his Senate seat to head the Heritage
Foundation.
“I think the standard of Jim
DeMint has whetted (Republican vot-
ers’) appetite to have a senator who
is more what they want,” says David
Woodard, a Clemson University polit-
ical scientist who runs the respected
Palmetto Poll. “Tim Scott (DeMint’s
replacement) is fine, but he hasn’t
been there long enough. Lindsey has
been there 20 years, and people are
starting to think he’s never going to
change.”
At the barbecue, a crowd of about
900 paid $35 each for dinner and a
chance to hear Duncan and the eve-
ning’s big guest, 2016 GOP hopeful
Sen. Rand Paul. Speaking to report-
ers before the event, Paul declined
to endorse his colleague Graham,
choosing to leave that to the voters of
South Carolina. “At this time, I think
it’s unlikely that I’ll be involved,”
Paul said, “but I haven’t completely
closed the door.”
As in the past, Graham’s critics
hope someone of significant stature
will jump in. “Trey Gowdy could
beat him. Mick Mulvaney could beat
him,” says a strategist who’s been
involved in several Senate races
nationwide. He was referring to two
popular conservative House mem-
bers from South Carolina, neither
of whom has expressed interest in
running.
Still, any big-foot challenger has
time to consider the race; the can-
didate filing deadline is next spring.
And the system provides for a runoff
if Graham can’t crack 50 percent of
the primary vote.
“If he gets into a runoff, Graham
will be in deep, deep trouble,” says
the strategist.
Given that, it would not be sur-
prising if some conservative group
runs ads against Graham in coming
months. The idea would not be to
promote any other candidate, but to
push down Graham’s approval num-
bers and hopefully entice a big-name
candidate into the race.
The bottom line is that the odds
favor Graham. But if a few factors
line up for his opponents, this might
be his toughest race yet.
Byron York is chief political cor-
respondent for The Washington
Examiner.
Conservatives ready
another try to unseat
Lindsey Graham
EDITORIAL CARTOON
F
or more than a week Americans
have been discussing how
shocked they were at Miley
Cyrus’ performance at 2013 MTV
Awards Show.
The 20-year-old entertainer gave an
uninhibited performance that was very
different from her
“Hannah Montana” per-
sona.
I’m not very shocked
at her lewd display.
That award show is
known for pushing the
limits of sexual conduct.
Those who can’t
believe that Hannah
Montana has changed
so much should realize
that she is an enter-
tainer. Hannah Montana
was a television char-
acter, not what Miley
Cyrus is really like.
The MTV perfor-
mance was just that — a performance
that was done to shock people.
Next year, there will be another per-
formance that will be even more shock-
ing.
While this grabbed our national atten-
tion, it distracted most people from
another event that took place on the
other side of the world.
A 15-year-old Kyrgyzstani herder died.
Keep reading because this is much more
important than a Miley Cyrus in her
skin-colored underwear.
Kyrgyzstan is bordered by Kazakhstan
to the north, Uzbekistan to the west and
Tajikistan to the southwest. In other
words, it is totally unimportant to the
world at large.
So why should we care that one boy
died in the Kyrgyz Republic? It is not
that he died. It is what caused his death.
Temir Issakunov died after being bit-
ten by an infected flea while he herded
livestock in a remote village. He died of
bubonic plague.
That would be the disease known as
the Black Death that wiped out more
than half of Europe’s population between
1348–50. It was one of the most devastat-
ing pandemics in human history.
So many people died that it was only
in the second-half of the last century that
the population of Europe returned to the
pre-plague numbers.
Without treatment, the bubonic plague
kills about two-thirds of infected humans
within four days.
Early treatment is important.
Antibiotic treatment must be started
within the first 24-hours or the mortal-
ity rate jumps from about 15 percent
(that can’t be cured with antibiotics) to
between 40 and 60 percent.
In the case of Temir Issakunov, at first
it appeared that the strain of bubonic
plague might be resistant to antibiotics.
Fortunately, it wasn’t the case, but the
right treatment could not be adminis-
tered before he died.
The most common way for the Black
Death to be transmitted is from a bite of
an infected flea.
However, once bubonic plague starts
spreading, pneumonic plague soon fol-
lows.
Pneumonic plague results from inha-
lation of fine droplets with the bubonic
bacteria. It is transmitted from human
to human. Untreated, pneumonic plague
has a very high fatality rate. It is a very
aggressive infection.
All it would take to start a world-wide
pandemic is for one bubonic plague
infected person to get on a commercial
airline and spread pneumonic plague
to the other passengers. Those passen-
gers would make connecting flights and
spread it around the world.
The human reaction to being in an
area with plague is to get as far away as
possible. If that person is already infect-
ed, it just spreads it.
The World Health organization has
been on top of this outbreak.
About 2,000 local people are being
tested for bubonic plague. Antibiotics are
being prescribed for anyone who might
have symptoms.
Checkpoints have been established to
contain the movement of livestock and
people in the region.
It appears the infection has been con-
tained. A potential pandemic has been
avoided – this time. Antibiotics worked
-- this time -- but more and more diseases
are becoming resistant to antibiotics
because they are over prescribed.
One day that magic medical bullet
won’t work and there will be a pandemic
that will kill millions of people.
Most people are blissfully unaware of
Temir Issakunov and the Black Death
outbreak in a country they’ve never
heard of nor care about.
They were too busy on Facebook
and Twitter talking about Miley Cyrus’
twerking.
Jim Harris is the chief of staff for the
Saline County Circuit Clerk and is the
former Bio-Terrorism Coordinator for the
state of Arkansas.
Which did you
notice? Miley
or the plague
Striving to be a
marketing enigma
• The Saline Courier (USPS 050-660) is published daily by Horizon Publishing Co., 321
N. Market St., Benton, AR. Periodical mailing privileges paid in Benton, AR.
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AR 72018.
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without liability. Publisher’s liability for error is limited to amount paid for advertising.
©Copyright 2006 Horizon Publishing Co.
Columns and cartoons on the opinion page do not necessarily reflect
opinions of The Saline Courier. Weekend delivery times are no later than
7 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. The circulation department has re-delivery
scheduled from 5 to 7 p.m. Monday-Friday and from 7 to 9 a.m. Saturday
and Sunday. Call 501-317-6013 or 501-315-8228 during business hours.
The Saline Courier
Founded in 1876
Phone: (501) 315-8228 • Fax: (501) 315-1230 • Email: news@bentoncourier.com
Vicki J. Dorsch
Business Manager
vdorsch@bentoncourier.com
DaViD Wills
advertising director
dwills@bentoncourier.com
anDreW stoVall
circulation director
astovall@bentoncourier.com
Patricia stuckey
coMposing director
composing@bentoncourier.com
ricky Walters
press ForeMan
rwalters@bentoncourier.com
steVe Boggs • Publisher
publisher@bentoncourier.com
Brent DaVis • editor
bdavis@bentoncourier.com
Byron
york
Steve
BoggS
Page 4 – The Saline Courier
news@bentoncourier.com Wednesday, September 4, 2013
OpiniOn
Jim
HarriS
Conservative
Corner
Breaking
news
www.bentoncourier.com
SportS
Wednesday, September 4, 2013
news@bentoncourier.com The Saline Courier – Page 5
saline
scoreboard
sec football
schedule
SATURDAY
Kentucky vs. Miami (OH), 11 am
10 Florida at Miami (FL), 11 am
Tenn. vs. W. Kent, 11:21 am
Missouri vs. Toledo, 2:30 p.m.
Miss. St. vs Alcorn St., 2:30 p.m.
6 S. Car. at 5 Georgia, 3:30 pm
Arkansas vs. Samford, 6 p.m.
12 LSU vs. UAB, 6 p.m.
Ole Miss vs. SE Mo. St., 6 pm
7 Texas A&M vs. Sam HS, 6 pm
Auburn vs. Arkansas St., 6:30 pm
Vanderbilt vs. Austin Peay, 6:30
TUESDAY
Volleyball
Benton def. Mena 3-1
TODAY
Volleyball
BJHS at Mount St. Mary, 5 p.m.
Golf
Benton (G) vs. MSM, 3:30 p.m.
THURSDAY
Football
BJHS vs. Sheridan, 5:30 p.m.
Bryant JH at Lakeside, 7 p.m.
Volleyball
Bryant at Benton, 5 p.m.
Tennis
Bryant vs.Conway, 3:30 p.m.
FRIDAY
Football
Benton vs. Arkadelphia, 7 p.m.
Bryant at Conway, 7 p.m.
BHG at Poyen, 7 p.m.
Bauxite vs. Harding Acad., 7
p.m.
Glen Rose at Malvern, 7 p.m.
Sheridan vs. LR Hall, 7 p.m.
batting for
wishes tourney
Bryant Softball
Association is hosting its
First Annual Batting for
Wishes Tournament on
Sept. 27 and 28.
There will be a ceremony
on Saturday, Sept. 28, dur-
ing the tournament, where
the BSA will grant a wish
to a very special child at 2
p.m.
His wish is to go to
Disney and BSA is very
excited to say that Sunday
after the tournament he will
get to leave to go to Disney
World.
The first place team
in every age bracket will
receive a bat donated by
Sport Shop.
Please call Rob at 501-
317-7646 to register your
team or email bryantsoft-
ballassociation@yahoo.
com. There will be blow
up inflatables for the little
ones, great food, a silent
auction and much more. If
anyone would like to donate
funds or services to help
us with this exciting event
please contact Ashley Mills
at 501-251-5353 or you can
email at bryantsoftballasso-
ciation@yahoo.com.
aP toP 25
Team Points W-L
1. Alabama 1497 1-0
2. Oregon 1355 1-0
3. Ohio St. 1330 1-0
4. Clemson 1304 1-0
5. Stanford 1277 0-0
6. S. Carolina 1181 1-0
7. Texas A&M 1085 1-0
8. Louisville 1073 1-0
9. LSU 971 1-0
10. Fla. St. 953 1-0
11. Georgia 894 0-1
12. Florida 875 1-0
13. OK State 780 1-0
14. Notre Dame 707 1-0
15. Texas 674 1-0
16. Oklahoma 612 1-0
17. Michigan 583 1-0
18. UCLA 387 1-0
19. Northwestern 320 1-0
20. Washington 315 1-0
21. Wisconsin 287 1-0
22. Nebraska 219 1-0
23. Baylor 150 1-0
24. TCU 148 0-1
25. USC 135 1-0
STEVEN LOVELL/Special to The Saline Courier
Junior Lady Panther Taylor Lindberg, 17, pushes the ball in a game earlier in the year, with teammate
Braxton Chumley, 22, watching. Benton defeated Mena 3-2 after being down 0-2 on Tuesday.
Lady Panthers roar back
MENA – Losing their
first two sets by a combined
six points, the Benton Lady
Panthers came back against
the Mena Lady Bearcats to
take a 3-2 win on Tuesday
night in Mena before open-
ing the 7A/6A South con-
ference play against rival
Bryant. Benton lost the first
two sets 26-24 and 25-21
to Mena before rallying
the last three games 25-20,
25-23 and 15-8.
“They just came out
and we made too many
mistakes,” Benton Coach
Brandy Chumley said of the
Lady Panthers’ start. “That
normally means you’re not
going to win, but they came
back and started keeping
the ball in play.
“We were hitting it out,
giving them the (court) and
we just started covering
those areas. The biggest
thing is we just kept the
ball in play and didn’t beat
ourselves.”
The Lady Panthers (3-1),
with their only loss coming
against Conway on the road,
will face conference and
county rival Bryant Lady
Hornets (1-2) on Thursday.
“We played them in our
benefit game and won,”
Chumleys said. “They’re
young and inexperienced,
but their effort is going
to be there. We’re going
to have to play smart and
come out strong, being the
first game of conference
play. We have good senior
leadership, so we should
come out and take care of
business.”
Benton and Bryant
will play at Benton Arena
Thursday, with junior var-
sity beginning at 5 p.m.
by tony lenahan
tlenahan@bentoncourier.com
JAY MANNING/jaysphotodesign.com
Glen Rose running back Carlo Burton runs past a defender during
a game last season. Burton led the county with 1,862 yards on the
ground and 24 touchdowns, finishing with 10.3 yards per carry for
the year. The Beavers open this season Friday against Malvern on
the road. Kickoff is set for 7 p.m.
Glen Rose hoping for more success in 2013
GLEN ROSE — After a
foot of snow in December,
followed by blistering
heat in July, the 2013
football season is here in
September. As for Saline
County teams, all of the
hard practice and hard
work gets a chance to pay
off on the gridiron this
Friday.
Playing a week later
than usual, the Glen Rose
Beavers kick things off
against newly acquired
rival Malvern. After losing
a 38-35 heartbreaker in
Week 1 last year against
the Leopards, the Beavers
put together nine straight
wins to end the regular
season and finished with
a 13-2 overall record and a
3A State Runner-up trophy.
“You have to look back
and appreciate what the
kids accomplished (last
year,)” Head Coach Mark
Kehner said. “It is some-
times hard when it ended
the way it did. But when
you look back, it was really
a phenomenal team that
did a phenomenal job to
put themselves in that posi-
tion.”
Malvern finished its 2012
campaign with a 9-3 record,
losing to Warren 32-28 in
the second round of the 4A
state playoffs.
Despite losing some key
offensive and defensive fig-
ures from last year’s team,
the Beavers are primed
and ready to get back at it
this year, opening the sea-
son on the road.
One of the biggest losses
came with the graduation
of Collin Hunter. The all-
state quarterback led Glen
Rose with 2,462 yards pass-
ing with 25 touchdowns
to just eight interceptions,
leading the county as well.
He also rushed for 466
yards and nine scores on
the year.
“The one plus about los-
ing Hunter is that we have
Clay Holicer starting there
now,” Kehner said. “He
has played there since he
was a sophomore so he has
plenty of game experience
under his belt and feels
comfortable.”
The key to Glen Rose’s
success this season weighs
on the shoulders of run-
ning back Carlos Burton.
With only 180 carries a
season ago, Burton led the
county with 1,862 yards
and 24 touchdowns while
playing backup to Dillon
Coney. Now a full-time
starter, Burton is looking
to have another great sea-
son.
“(Having Burton) helps
a lot and will help settle
Holicer down,” Kehner
said. “There will be mul-
tiple times that we will
have to go to him 25 to 30
times in a game and he is
prepared to do that. He has
really gone to work and
has gotten a little bit big-
ger and faster.”
As for what Malvern will
bring to the table in Week
1, that is still yet to be seen
since some transfer in and
outs have been happening
since the end of last sea-
son.
“With the depth that
Malvern has, that is going
Samford
coordinator
has a lot on
his plate
FAYETTEVILLE - As the
defensive coordinator and
so-far acting head coach of
the Samford Bulldogs, Bill
D’Ottavio says he approach-
es Saturday’s game with
Arkansas riveted on the
Razorbacks’ offense.
Arkansas, 1-0, and
Samford, of the Southern
Conference and 1-0 off a
31-21 victory at Georgia
State, meet in Saturday’s 6
p.m. nonconference game
at War Memorial Stadium
in Little Rock.
The game is available
on pay-per-view television
upon consulting your local
cable or satellite provider.
Those 522 yards of total
offense that Arkansas
amassed running 292 yards,
and passing for 230, in last
Saturday’s 34-14 season
opening victory over the
University of Louisiana at
Lafayette Ragin’ Cajuns in
Fayetteville, compel defen-
sive coordinator D’Ottavio
to eschew the normal head
coach’s role of at least look-
ing into the opposition from
both sides of the ball.
D’Ottavio has physi-
cally had to act as coach
while Samford Coach
Pat Sullivan, the former
Heisman Trophy winning
Auburn quarterback, recov-
ers from major back sur-
gery.
“I really leave that
(analyzing Arkansas’
defense) to the offense,”
by Josh briggs
jbriggs@bentoncourier.com
BEAVERS, page 6
by nate allen
Razorback Report
SAMFORD, page 6
O-Line communicating better
FAYETTEVILLE
- In their first game
together, Arkansas
Razorbacks third-year
sophomore right tackle
Grady Ollison of Malvern
and junior right guard Brey
Cook of Springdale Har-
Ber seemed like they had
played beside each other
since elementary school.
It’s only been since last
spring since Ollison was
advanced from backup to
starting tackle, and Cook
was moved from starting
right tackle to starting
right guard, but they were
the pillars Arkansas ran
behind on the game-open-
ing 11-play 75-yard drive
starting Arkansas’ 34-14
season-opening victory
over Louisiana-Lafayette
last Saturday at Reynolds
Razorback Stadium.
“I think they’re starting
to play a little better togeth-
er,” Arkansas offensive line
coach Sam Pittman said
after Tuesday’s practice.
“They’re starting to commu-
nicate a little better.”
Communicate a little
better? There may be old
married couples that don’t
communicate so well.
“You go through a whole
camp right beside the
guy,” Ollison said. “You go
through the ups and you
go through the downs, 90
percent of the plays me and
Brey don’t even have to
make a call. We just look at
each other and know what
we are doing.”
Cook concurred.
“Absolutely,” Cook
said. “We have been work-
ing together all spring,
this summer and fall and
I believe Saturday really
showed we work well
together. It definitely
clicked kind of quick. I
know where he’s at and
can depend on him and I
hope he can trust me. We
definitely have done well
there, especially with Travis
(Swanson, the Preseason
All-SEC first-teamer) at
center.”
They especially loved
the right-handed start with
running backs Jonathan
Williams and Alex Collins
running right behind them.
“It’s definitely the way
you want to start the sea-
son,” Cook said, “when
they know what you are
doing and you know what
you are the doing, and the
HOGS, page 6
by nate allen
Razorback Report
6 The Saline Courier
Wednesday, September 4, 2013
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to be a tough one but a
good one,” Kehner said.
The 2013 Leopards will
be led by their running
backs, juniors Montae
Hernandez and Dale
Shaw. Shaw runs a 4.6
second 40-yard dash while
Hernandez packs a lot of
speed as well. Also help-
ing in the backfield will be
juniors Traic Smith and
Zach Frazier.
Glen Rose will make the
short road trip to Malvern
this Friday with kickoff
set for 7 p.m.
Beavers
From page 5
D’Ottavio said on Tuesday’s
Southern Conference
media conference call. “We
kind of discuss as a staff
the overall impression of
what we see and we know
what a great football team
we’re up against this week.
But no sir, I’m really on the
other side of the focusing
on that.”
It seemed Razorbacks
running backs Alex Collins,
21 carries for 131 yards,
and Jonathan Williams, 18
carries for 151 net yards
including a 75-yard touch-
down, ran too fast for the
ULL Ragin’ Cajuns to focus.
D’Ottavio chuckled in
awe when queried about
Williams and Collins.
“Aw, they are very
good,” D’Ottavio
said. “Very talented backs.
They run hard, they read
blocks well. They make
things happen. They get
more than what’s blocked
and that’s always scary
from a defensive stand-
point. That’s two excellent
running backs. Really, I
thought their whole run-
ning back corps did very
well the whole ballgame.”
He also lauded the
Arkansas offensive line led
by senior Preseason All-
SEC and Rimington Trophy
watch list center Travis
Swanson.
“Their offensive line is
very big and very athletic,”
D’Ottavio said. “Obviously
Swanson I think is as good
as it gets at that position,
and they have got a lot of
big guys right there. They
move really well and I
thought their O-line kind
of controlled that football
game in the first game.”
The odds indicate it’s
difficult for a Football
Championship Subdivision
team, the NCAA euphe-
mism for the old Division
1-AA which was a division
down from Division 1,
now called the Football
Bowl Subdivision which
Arkansas and other SEC
schools and Pac 12, Big 12,
Big Ten, ACC and Notre
Dame are a part, to step up
in class and win more than
the big day monetary guar-
antee that helps keep the
small programs afloat.
“All programs at this
level play one of these
football games,” D’Ottavio
said. “It’s just part of all
the things that you do. It
brings exposure to your
football team, it’s good for
recruiting.”
“I think as a competitor
you look forward to big
challenges and great chal-
lenges as both athletes and
coaches,” D’Ottavio said.
“These kind of games are
that type of situation. It’s
fun to play in these big
venues in a historic place
like Little Rock. We look
forward to these kind of
games.”
Eight of those FBS vs.
FCS games, most notably
Eastern Washington over
No. 25 Oregon State and
North Dakota State over
Big 12 co-champion Kansas
State, were won by the
lower division team.
In fact, Samford’s
Birmingham, Ala., based
Bulldogs were one of them.
Georgia State is no
SEC school but it is in the
FBS. The Bulldogs sprung
their upset with usually
the greatest of underdogs’
equalizers, special teams.
“They did a good job
against Georgia State,
Arkansas Coach Bret
Bielema said. “They had a
kickoff return that went the
distance, they had a nice,
big punt return and they
blocked a punt.”
D’Ottavio was asked
about the special teams’
special play against
Georgia State.
“Yeah, our kids did a
nice job in that phase,”
D’Ottavio said. “All the
way around from our kick-
ers to our coverage units
to the people that are
blocking. I thought our
special teams had a real
good football game in the
opener and executed the
plan well and went out and
competed.”
Although Sullivan hasn’t
been physically up to
supervising practices or
coaching last weekend,
D’Ottavio said, “We talk to
Coach as much as possible.
He is still involved in all we
do.”
It has not yet been
announced whether
Sullivan is physically up to
coaching Saturday’s game.
whole stadium knows what
you are doing and you are
going to do it anyway.”
Tuesday’s practice in full
pads marked the hardest
workout of the week as the
Razorbacks gear to play
Samford, 1-0, in Saturday’s 6
p.m. game at Reynolds
Razorback Stadium.
“I felt like today’s prac-
tice was physical and their
mind was in the right spot,”
offensive coordinator Jim
Chaney said Tuesday eve-
ning. “Our effort level was
fine. We’re trying to empha-
size finishing plays better
and I felt like we did that.”
Samford is from the
lower division Football
Championship Subdivision,
formerly Division 1-AA
before NCAA lingo attempt-
ed to blur distinctions,
but defeated a Football
Bowl Subdivision team,
formerly Division 1, of
which Arkansas is a part, in
defeating Georgia State last
Saturday.
The Bulldogs were
not alone as eight FCS
teams beat FBS teams last
week including Eastern
Washington over No. 25
Oregon State and North
Dakota State over Kansas
State.
“I think our players know
that,” Chaney said. “I’m
interested in our level
of play and all about us.
Whoever we’re playing,
we’ve got to know the
personalities, we’ve got to
know the schemes. But I’m
interested how we’re going
to perform, how we’re going
to prepare. More interested
in how we did today and
how we’re going to do
tomorrow and what we’re
going to do Thursday than
I am anything that’s taking
place on Saturday. It will
take care of itself if we take
care of business.”
Although coming off a
sensational 18 carries for
151 yards with a 75-yard
touchdown effort against
Louisiana-Lafayette comple-
mented by freshman run-
ning back Alex Collins’ 131
yards on 21 carries, sopho-
more Jonathan Williams
ruefully recalls last year’s
4-8 season including an
overtime loss in Little
Rock to 30-point underdog
Louisiana-Monroe to over-
look Samford.
“They are a good team,”
Williams said. “We can’t
take anybody lightly after
the season we had last year.
We have that 1-0 mentality
and take that one week at
a time and give it our best
shot.”
Williams was asked about
the shoulder injury that
took him out of Saturday’s
first half though he
returned for a big second
half including the 75-yard
touchdown.
“It’s good,” Williams said
Tuesday. “It feels like a run-
ning back’s shoulder.”
Hogs
From page 5
Samford
From page 5
Mistake sends Wood,
Cubs to 4-3 loss
CHICAGO —
Travis Wood knows all about
pitchers who can swing the
bat. After all, the left-hander
is batting a respectable .246
with three homers this year
for the Chicago Cubs.
He just plain made a
mistake against Henderson
Alvarez on Monday, and his
fellow pitcher made him pay
for it.
Alvarez hit a three-run
homer on Wood’s first pitch
to him in the second inning,
leading the Miami Marlins
to a 4-3 victory. The right-
hander went 2 for 2, raising
his average to .368 (7 for 19)
on the season.
“I saw his average com-
ing up and I knew he was
going to be swinging and I
just missed with the pitch,”
Wood said. “He did what he
needed to do with it.”
Wood (8-11) left a fastball
over the middle of the plate
and Alvarez drove it over
the wall in left for his first
career home run. Wood also
yielded Christian Yelich’s
third homer in the first.
“It was kind of a funny
outing,” Cubs manager Dale
Sveum said. “He couldn’t get
the left-handed hitter in their
lineup out and couldn’t get
the pitcher out. Other than
that, he dominated the rest
of the lineup.”
Wood allowed nine hits
in seven innings while fall-
ing to 1-3 with a 9.00 ERA in
four career starts against the
Marlins.
“It’s early in the ballgame,
there’s a lot of game left so
I just tried to go out there
every inning and keep it
right there, keep it close and
give us a chance,” Wood
said. “Unfortunately we
weren’t able to pull it out.”
Alvarez (3-3) allowed
three runs and seven hits in
six innings before departing
his first career appearance
against the Cubs with a
tight right hamstring. Steve
Cishek got three outs for his
29th save in 31 chances.
Miami has won two in a
row after a six-game slide.
The Cubs were trying to
win three straight at Wrigley
Field for the first time since
July 6-9. They fell to 27-43 at
home.
By Meghan Montemurro
AP Writer
Wednesday, September 4, 2013
The Saline Courier 7
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2
crime” criteria, Greer said
the Quorum Court still
would not have the power
to remove the sheriff even if
this criteria were met. That
action would have to come
from the Circuit Court,
upon the court’s response
to an information or indict-
ment seeking removal.
Greer explained this
several times in the meet-
ing, but his opinion was not
acceptable to some audi-
ence members.
The justices of the peace
expressed their frustration
with the situation, noting
that in a resignation let-
ter — which Pennington
ultimately withdrew — that
he publicly admitted he
engaged in “inexcusable
conduct” on June 29.
The resolution accused
the sheriff of failing the
community and it stated
that he has “tarnished the
office of Saline County
sheriff.”
In Tuesday night’s spe-
cial meeting, the first two
audience members to speak
— James Mashburn and
David Brewer — supported
the sheriff.
Mashburn acknowledged
that the sheriff had “done
wrong,” but pointed out
that he was “man enough to
stand up and be punished.”
“He wouldn’t back down
on me when I needed him
and I won’t back away from
him,” Mashburn said. “I feel
he ought to at least make it
to Jan. 1.”
Brewer, offering similar
support, said, “I don’t think
Bruce should be thrown
out ... He’s done a pretty
good job of keeping Saline
County clean.”
Gene Gentry and Amy
Burnett were the most vocal
critics of the sheriff.
Gentry contended that he
has had “friends from both
coasts who are making fun
of us” because of the sher-
iff’s actions.
“He needs to be removed
immediately,” Gentry said.
Greer outlined applicable
state statutes and Supreme
Court rulings governing the
situation, but Gentry said
he couldn’t understand why
the sheriff’s actions did not
constitute “infamous crime.”
He also questioned why
the sheriff’s retirement was
not accepted when he sub-
mitted the first letter to that
effect, but it was explained
that the court did not meet
to accept that action, so the
resignation was considered
moot.
Burnett said she would
not have received the same
degree of “favorable treat-
ment” if she had committed
actions similar to those of
Pennington.
“How can children of this
community have confidence
in the sheriff” in this kind of
situation, Burnett asked.
She said she could not
see why his behavior did
not constitute “infamous
crimes.”
At one point when ques-
tions were being raised
about allegations indicating
Pennington may have been
involved in more recent
incidents that would not
be considered acceptable
for a sheriff, Fite explained
that the Quorum Court is
“a legislative body, not an
investigative body.”
JP Josh Curtis recom-
mended that the court vote
to take away the county
vehicle assigned to the
sheriff.
This issue was referred
to the court’s Finance
Committee.
JP Buster Warrick had
another suggestion. He
requested that the court call
for an Arkansas State Police
investigation of the sheriff’s
office and the county jail.
Prosecuting Attorney
Ken Casady did not attend
the meeting Tuesday, but
said today that he respects
the Quorum Court and
the county judge “and the
action they have been tak-
ing.”
“During the course of
the Quorum Court meeting,
County Attorney Jonathan
Greer made it clear that
what the prosecutor in this
situation, whether it be me
or a special prosecutor,
would have to prove for
removal of the sheriff under
Article 5, Section 9 of the
Constitution, would be that
the sheriff would have com-
mitted an infamous crime.
“The infamous crimes
that are referred to in the
recently codified Act 724
referred to embezzlement,
bribery, forgery,” he said.
“The special prosecu-
tor in the case, Mr. Cody
Hiland, who was duly
appointed to prosecute
the sheriff’s crimes, has
recently removed a Searcy
County sheriff for com-
mitting infamous crimes,”
Casady said. “The special
prosecutor, I believe,
does not believe that this
(Pennington’s case) rises to
the level of infamous crime,
but in his comments to the
media after the sheriff’s
guilty plea, he said he found
the sheriff’s violations to be
‘serious and embarrassing.’
“I think ultimately the
removal of the sheriff will
depend upon the people
that elected him and wheth-
er they will re-elect him or
not,” Casady said.
“However, I will forward
the concerns of the county
judge, the Quorum Court
and numerous citizens
that have contacted me to
the special prosecutor so
that he will know what the
Quorum Court decided last
night.”
That situation obviously
gave Hiland familiarity with
the statute, it was noted in
the meeting.
Pennington has said that
he not only intends to finish
out his current term, but
intends to run for an addi-
tional term.
Pennington
From page 1
JOSH BRIGGS/The Saline Courier
Saline County Attorney Jonathan Greer explains the process of
removing a public official from office to the public.
Classifieds
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Page 8 – The Saline Courier
class@bentoncourier.com Wednesday, September 4, 2013
Employment
“Making differences through quality care.”
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT
Friendship Community Care is seeking a highly or-
ganized and motivated candidate to work as an ad-
ministrative assistant in the Bryant FCC waiver/day
program office. Will perform various clerical duties
as assigned. Must have administrative assistant ex-
perience with exceptional communication skills,
both oral and written. Experience with individuals
who have developmental disabilities is preferred but
not required. Must be able to pass drug and back-
ground screenings. HSD/GED required.
If interested, please apply online at
www.fccare.org EOE
Employment Employment
“Making differences through quality care.”
LPN
Friendship Community Care is seeking a caring and
dependable LPN for the Benton/Bryant area. Will
work in a community setting with consumers who
have intellectual disabilities, overseeing basic health
and safety and monitoring chronic health issues. Must
be well organized, have basic computer skills and be
able to work independently. Some travel will be
required. Must be able to pass drug and background
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If interested, please apply online at
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NOTICE OF ANNUAL SCHOOL ELECTION IN BENTON SCHOOL
DISTRICT NO. 8 OF SALINE COUNTY, ARKANSAS
In accordance with the requirements of Ark. Code Ann. § 6-14-109,
notice is hereby given that the annual school election in the above
named school district will be held on September 17, 2013 for the
following purposes:
To elect two member to the Board of Directors for one term of
five (5) years each;
To submit the questions of voting a total school tax rate (state
and local) of 41.9 mills. This total tax levy includes the current uni-
form rate of tax of 25.0 mills to be collected on all taxable property in
the State and remitted to the State Treasurer pursuant to Amend-
ment No. 74 to the Arkansas Constitution to be used solely for main-
tenance and operation of schools in the State. The total proposed
school tax levy of 41.9 mills includes 25.0 mills specifically voted for
general maintenance and operation and 16.9 mills for debt service.
The 16.9 debt service mills will be a continuing levy pledged for the
retirement of existing bonded indebtedness. The surplus revenues
produced each year by debt service millage may be used by the Dis-
trict for other school purposes.
The total proposed school tax of 41.9 mills represents the same rate
presently being collected.
Early and Absentee voting will be available beginning Tuesday, Sep-
tember 10, 2013 through Friday, September 16, 2013 from 8:00 a.m.
- 4:30 p.m. at the Vote Here Center, 221 North Main Street, Benton,
Arkansas 72015.
The polls will open, Tuesday, September 17, 2013 at 7:30 a.m. and
will close at 7:30 p.m.
Board of Directors of Benton School District No. 8 Saline County,
Arkansas • Brad Bohannan, Secretary
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF SALINE COUNTY, ARKANSAS
2ND DIVISION
THERESA MATTHEWS-BOLEN AND ESTATE OF
CHARLES EDWARD MATTHEWS, DECEASED, PLAINTIFFS
v. CASE NO.: 63CV-2013-424-2
THE HEIRS OF CARROLL EDWARD MATTHEWS, DEFENDANTS
NOTICE OF QUIET TITLE
Notice is hereby given that a Petition has been filed in the office of
the Circuit Clerk of Saline County, Arkansas, to quiet and confirm title
in and to the following described property in the County of Saline,
State of Arkansas:
SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 01 S, RANGE 14 W, LOT 6, BIG OAK
SUBDIVISION SALINE COUNTY, ARKANSAS
More Commonly Known as: 208 Ethel Dr. Bryant, AR 72022
Any person claiming any title or interest of any kind to such prop-
erty is hereby notified to appear herein on or before thirty (30) days
from the first date of publication of this Notice, to assert his title or
interest in such property and to demonstrate why title to this property
should not be quieted and confirmed in Theresa Matthews-Bolen and
the Estate of Charles Edward Matthews, Plaintiffs herein.
WITNESS MY HAND AND SEAL OF THE COURT THIS 7th day of
August 2013, at 10:20 o!clock a.m.
Dennis Milligan, CLERK
Jennifer Davis, Depury Clerk
Legal Notices
NOTICE OF ANNUAL SCHOOL ELECTION IN SHERIDAN
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 37 OF GRANT COUNTY, ARKANSAS
In accordance with the requirements of AR. Code Ann. §!6-14-109.
notice is hereby given that:
The Annual School Election in the above named school district will
be held on September 17, 2013, for the following purposes:
The issues to be decided are as follows:
BOARD OF DIRECTORS POSITION #1, for a five year regular term,
Byron Hicks, unopposed.
BOARD OF DIRECTORS POSITION #7, for a five year regular term,
Charles Tadlock
Bryce Wade Lunday
32.2 MILLS SCHOOL TAX
This represents no change from the previous year. The total tax
levy proposed above includes 25.0 mills for maintenance and op-
eration of schools, 0.0 mills for dedicated maintenance and opera-
tion millage (Capital Outlay/Current Expenditures) dedicated for
specific purposes, and 7.2 mills for debt service previously voted as
a continuing debt service tax pledged for the retirement of existing
bonded indebtedness. This district may use surplus revenues pro-
duced each year by debt service millage for other purposes.
BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF SHERIDAN SCHOOL DISTRICT NO.
37 OF GRANT COUNTY, ARKANSAS • By Jeff Lisenbey, Secretary
We are seeking dynamic, aggressive
salespeople with a stable work history,
to be part of our team in a fast-paced
work environment. B2B or media sales
experience is a plus.
If you can. . .
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You may be the one we’re looking for!
We offer base account list in central Arkansas,
base salary, plus commission, frequent bonus
plans, 401k available, health insurance, vacation
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Saline County’S newS SourCe SinCe 1876
Courier
The Saline
Please forward resume to: The Saline Courier
P.O. Box 207, Benton, AR 72018
fax to 501-315-1920 or email to:
dwills@bentoncourier.com
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Employment
CALL CENTER
CUSTOMER
SERVICE AGENT
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Position is full time
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NOTE: Office is located
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CARPENTER
needed for Electrical
Contractor, must
have clean driving
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Apply in person @
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212 McClanahan
Dr. Bryant.
CASHIERS & COPY
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needed. Part-time.
Flexible hours. Apply
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COMPANY DRIVERS &
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TAX SCHOOL
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TEACHER I - CDA
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you want to be con-
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315-1121. “Equal Op-
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$900mo + $900 Dep
Call 501-317-0422
3BR 1BA House,
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No Pet s, Cal l
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Schools $950mo No
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Near Interstate
860-0279
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Benton Schools Call
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Gar., All applicances,
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Mobile Homes
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2BR 2BA 5624
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Includes lot Rent & Ins
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Mobile Homesites
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between 9a&8p
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Pets & Supplies
BENTON ANIMAL
Control & Adoption
501-776-5972
benton.petfinder.com
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BRYANT ANIMAL
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www.bryant.petfinder.com
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Moderately Confused Herman
Crossword Challenge
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Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken
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numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and
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already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you
name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!
Astro•graph
bernice bede osol
www.bernice4u.com.
Alley Oop
Big Nate
Born Loser
Thatababy
Frank and Ernest
Grizzwells
Monty
Arlo and Janis
Soup to Nutz
WEDNESDAY,
SEPTEMBER 4, 2013
Don’t hold back in the coming
months. Don’t mince words in letting
others know where you stand. Quality
partnerships are in the stars and can
make a favorable difference in your
life, personally and professionally.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
-- Mix business with pleasure and
socialize with people you like. If you
create your own opportunities, you
will gain respect. Your expertise will
be in demand.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- You
should keep something secret if
it will help you avoid opposition.
Taking on too much will work
against you. It’s better to offer less
and end up doing more.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) --
You’ve got all the right moves, and
Lady Luck will give you numerous
chances to use them. Take on any
challenge you face with confidence,
verve and the determination to come
out ahead.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) -- Not everyone will see things
your way. Make changes that will
improve your financial situation, but
make sure you have the facts and fig-
ures straight before you proceed.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) -- You’ll have the edge when it
comes to practical matters concerning
investments and medical concerns.
Your common sense and practicality
will lead to gains and added respect.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
-- Reflect upon and size up your situ-
ation and you will know exactly what
you must do regarding a difficult situ-
ation. Listen to your doubts concern-
ing certain associates.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20)
-- Interaction will be the name of the
game today. Deal with your partners
or colleagues fairly, and success will
smile upon you. Opportunity will
knock, and you must take advantage
of what’s offered.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
-- You would do well to take part
in activities that present a mental or
physical challenge. What you accom-
plish will make a lasting impression.
Don’t allow anyone to belittle your
successes.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
-- Now’s the time to put your nose to
the grindstone. You can make a dif-
ference if you offer solutions and are
passionate. Don’t hold back and don’t
run away from conflict. Play to win.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Not
everyone will agree with you, but
you should still follow your heart and
make the moves that you believe will
bring you the best return. You can
make a difference.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) --
You can go far as long as you craft a
detailed agenda and stick to it. Your
skills and experience will come in
handy. An interesting approach to an
old idea will pay off.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Do
whatever it takes to bring about posi-
tive change in your life. It may be
necessary to alter the scenery if you
hope to achieve a fresh perspective.
**
Wednesday, September 4, 2013
news@bentoncourier.com The Saline Courier – Page 9
ComiCs
Food
P
eople often ask how
the cooks featured
in Grits & Grace
are chosen.
Neighbors,
friends and
family offer
recom-
menda-
tions. Some
come from
churches
and groups
through-
out Saline
County.
This
week’s fea-
tured cook was found at the
meat counter of a local gro-
cery. Linda Taylor was trying
to decide what to take to a
potluck dinner at Hurricane
Lake Baptist Church and a
conversation was sparked
by her dilemma. She tried a
suggested recipe for a broc-
coli slaw dish that combined
potatoes, purple onions,
bacon and coleslaw dressing.
That led to her feature today.
Linda has discovered
that quality baking spray is
not only wonderful to use
for cake pans, but she also
sprays her pie plates to pre-
vent sticking. She said she
turns even the simplest of
desserts into decadent ones
by making state Rep. Toni
Bradford’s chocolate sauce.
Simply combine 1 c.
sugar, 1 1/2 Tbsp. cocoa,
1 stick real butter that she
changed from margarine
and 1/2 c. Pet milk. Bring
to a boil and cook for 1
minute. This is wonderful
over brownies, ice cream, or
whatever comes to mind.
Please continue send-
ing recipes and sugges-
tions for Grits & Grace to
Merryofthemark@aol.com.
We’re looking for some sug-
gestions for tailgate cooks.
Tip of the
Week
Gail
NickersoN
Linda Taylor of Benton has
compiled a cookbook for her grand-
daughter, Amber DePriest, who
loves to cook.
In this collection she has included
recipes that linked her to a multitude
of folks who loved to entertain, cook
and share recipes.
“I love the stories behind all my
recipes,” she said. “They please me
as much as cooking them.”
Linda noted that one of her favor-
ites came from her cousin, Katherine
Ann Tucker.
“Her marinated corn salad is
excellent and she added two tricks to
her recipe. She makes the dressing
first to allow it to cool before pour-
ing over the vegetables. She also
said you could substitute sugar with
Splenda and make it acceptable for
diabetics.”
She noted that Patsy Bradshaw
Winningham’s crescent rolls appetiz-
ers recipe was acquired at a recep-
tion for state Rep. Toni Bradford
where the honoree willingly shared
it.
“The crescent roll base and the
fresh vegetables along with the
cream mixture were exceptional,”
she said. “The recipe was different
and pretty on a table.”
Paulette Christy’s chocolate cake
and Bradford’s chocolate sauce
recipes are two that she depends
on, she said. The rest of the cook-
book includes Linda’s own recipes
that have been either developed or
changed to make them her own.
“I’ve been making chocolate and
coconut pies for close to 50 years,”
she said. “I’ve altered both of them.
The chocolate pie is one that Sue
Reynolds has to have each week at
the church.
“When I first got the recipe, it
had twice as much cocoa. When we
gained our son-in-law, Don, DePriest,
he didn’t like the dark chocolate.
I revised it by reducing the cocoa.
Now he’s happy and so am I.”
Linda said she she changed the
measurement of the coconut in her
coconut pie by using a can of Angel
Flake coconut. However, it’s difficult
to find, she said.
“Now, I purchase the Angel Flake
coconut in a bag and use the entire
bag, which doubles the measure-
ment plus more. I fold in some of my
meringue in the filling and the filling
seems lighter.”
Reviewing her cookbooks and her
love for cooking often have Linda
reflecting on the extensive entertain-
ing she and her husband, Jerry, did
in the past. The Taylors’ lives cen-
tered on politics for the better part
of their 51 1/2 years of marriage.
She recalled, “When Jerry was
campaigning, my kitchen would be
closed; however, once the campaigns
were over, we started entertaining.
Our home has always been open
for our big family, victory parties,
brunches, leftover parties, showers
and all sorts of events that included
good foods and lots of decorations.
“I had lots of help through the
years and it was never a chore. I
want my dishes to be pretty, and I
take pictures.”
Jerry served as an alderman in
Pine Bluff, was mayor of Pine Bluff,
and was in the Arkansas House and
Senate for 32 years. This provided
Linda with “lots of notes at the bot-
tom of many of my recipes.”
“Knowing the story behind the
recipe is as important as the gift of a
recipe,” she said.
“Finding a recipe at the meat
counter was so sweet,” Linda said
about her recent encounter. “I was
able to get a new recipe, talk about
family, our church and our faith,
meet a new friend and get in the
newspaper.”
Recipes for Life
Grits
&
Grace
Entertaining
is way of life
for Benton
resident
1 9-inch baked pie crust
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 c. four
1/4 t. salt
1/4 c. cocoa
3 egg yolks
2 cups whole milk (don’t
substitute if you want a rich
flling)
2 Tbsp. real butter (butter
offers a richer favor to
enhance the flling)
1/2 t. vanilla favoring
Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
Sift together sugar, four,
salt and cocoa. Put in heavy
pan. Mix and add egg yolks
and 1/2 c. milk stirring until
it has a creamy texture.
Add 1 1/2 cups milk and stir
continuously over direct fame.
When the flling comes to the
right consistency for the pie,
remove from stove; add butter
and vanilla and blend well.
Pour into a baked 9-inch pie
crust and top with meringue.
Return pie to hot oven and
bake until golden brown.
Note: Use your favorite
meringue recipe.
3 cans crescent dinner rolls.
Press the dough together on
a cookie sheet. Cook dough
until lightly browned and allow
to cool.
Mix:
1 envelope Hidden Valley
Ranch mix
2 (8 oz.) pkgs. cream cheese
(softened)
Fresh broccoli (chopped)
Note: You can use all of the
listed vegetables or just a few
of them. You want to have a
good mix of colors for topping
the dough.
Black olives (buy them already
chopped)
Carrots (chopped)
Tomatoes (chopped)
Radishes (chopped)
Red or green bell peppers
Squash (chopped)
Top cooled dough with
vegetables that have been
chopped into very small
pieces. I chop these up the
day before and put each one
into a small zip-lock bag.
Step 1:
Dressing:
1/2 c. oil
3/4 c. white vinegar
1 c. sugar
1 t. salt
1/2 t. pepper
Combine all ingredients and
bring to a boil. Cook until
sugar dissolves. Cool and
pour over other ingredients
and chill overnight.
Step 2:
Combine:
1 (4 oz.) can English peas
1 (4 oz.) can French cut green
beans
1 (12 oz.) can Green Giant
Shoepeg corn
Combine peas, green beans
and corn and pour into a
colander and drain well.
Step 3:
Add:
1 (2 oz.) jar pimientos
1 c. celery (fnely chopped)
1 c. bell peppers (fnely
chopped)
1 c. onion (fnely chopped)
Stir right before serving.
Note: If someone is a diabetic,
simply substitute the sugar
with Splenda.
Taylor’s Always-
Called-For
Chocolate Pie
Patsy Bradshaw
Winningham’s
Appetizers
Cousin’s
Katherine Ann
Teer Tucker’s
Marinated Corn
Salad
Layer one:
1 c. four
1/2 c. butter (melted)
2 Tbsp. sugar
1/2 c. pecans (chopped)
Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Mix and pat into
an 8-by-8-inch pan. Bake for 15 to 20 minutes
until just beginning to turn golden. Don’t over-
bake. Allow to cool.
Layer two:
1 (8 oz.) pkg. cream cheese (softened)
1 c. powdered sugar
1 c. whipped topping
Beat together sugar and cream cheese. Fold
into whipped topping. Spread on cooled crust.
Layer three:
Note:( I use my coconut cream pie recipe)
1/4 c. four
1/2 c. sugar
1/4 t. salt
1 1/2 cups scalded milk
3 egg yolks
2 Tbsp. butter (Use real butter for a richer flling)
1/2 t. vanilla
Mix together in top of double boiler four, sugar
and salt. Slowly add the scalded milk. Cook until
it begins to thicken. Mix a little of the hot mixture
into the egg yolks before adding to pot and
continue cooking until thick. Add butter,
vanilla and coconut. Cool before putting on
cream cheese mixture. Mix until thickened.
Spread over cream cheese mixture and top with
remaining whipped topping. Toast 1 c. coconut
and sprinkle evenly over the dessert. Chill.
Note: You can enjoy the original recipe that calls
for 1 small pkg. coconut cream instant pudding
and use 1 1/2 cups whole milk instead of this
coconut flling.
“Recreated”
Layered
Coconut Dream Dessert
Cookbook tells
stories of many
friendships
3 bunches of fresh broccoli
(chopped into bite-sized
pieces and chilled)
2 med. purple onions
(chopped and chilled)
1 bag small potatoes (skin
on-washed-boiled-quartered-
chilled)
1 1/2 jars Marzetti Coleslaw
Dressing (chilled)
Several slices of fried bacon
(drained well and crumbled)
Wash and boil bag of small
potatoes with skins on in
salted water. Drain well, cut
into quarters and chill along
with broccoli and onions.
When you are prepared to
serve, add dressing, using
enough to coat the mixture.
Don’t over-dress or the
dish will be soggy. Serve
immediately.
Note: You could add boiled
eggs or ham for a change.
Nuts or raisins could also be
added.
1/4 c. four
1/2 c. sugar
1 1/2 cups scalded milk
(whole milk)
3 eggs (separated)
2 Tbsp. real butter
1/2 t. vanilla
1 bag Angel Flake coconut
Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
Mix sugar, four and salt in
top of double boiler; slowly
add scalded milk. Cook until
thickens; add egg yolks with
a small amount of the hot
mixture to temper yout egg
yolks. Add to remaining flling,
stirring well, smf continue
cooking until thick. Add butter,
vanilla and coconut and mix
well. Top with meringue and
sprinkle with coconut. Bake
until golden brown.
Note: It’s hard to fnd the
Angel Flake coconut in the
cans, so buy the packaged
Angel Flake and use the
whole package for the flling
because it enriches the
texture.
2 c. sugar
2 c. four
1 c. water
1/2 c. shortening
1 stick (real butter for a richer
taste)
3 1/2 Tbsp. cocoa
1/2 c. buttermilk
2 eggs
1 t. baking soda
1 t. salt
1 pkg. malted milk balls
Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
Mix together sugar and four;
set aside. In a pan, combine
water, shortening, butter and
cocoa. Bring to a boil and
pour over sugar and four
mixture. Mix well. In a bowl,
beat together buttermilk, eggs,
baking soda and salt. Blend
both mixtures together. Pour
into a cake pan. Bake for 20
minutes or until done.
Note: You can use a can of
chocolate icing and top the
cake with malted milk balls for
one more touch of chocolate.
If you are a decorator, simply
pipe the edges and you’ll have
a beautiful easy cake.
Gail’s Broccoli
Slaw
Taylor’s Coconut
and More
Coconut Pie
Paulette Christy’s
Chocolate
Fudge Cake
By Gail Nickerson
Staff Writer
Gail NickersoN /special to The saline courier
Linda Taylor enjoys cooking and entertaining. Desserts such as these
are some of her specialties.
Page 10 – The Saline Courier
sports@bentoncourier.com Wednesday, September 4, 2013
This document is © 2013 by editor - all rights reserved.
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