Rutledge

Arkansas Attorney General Leslie Rutledge speaks at The Center at Bishop Park during the Business Education Conference.

Arkansas Attorney General Leslie Rutledge spoke during the Greater Bryant Chamber of Commerce Business Education Conference at The Center at Bishop Park on Friday. 

First Security Bank Saline County President Stuart Norton introduced Rutledge. 

"We are very honored to sponsor today's events," Norton said. 

Thanks to First Security, the conference and lunch were free. 

Norton told the crowd Rutledge is the 56th Attorney General for the State and both the first woman and first Republican to hold that post. She won a second term in 2018. He said Rutledge has increased arrests and convictions for those who exploit children and those who commit disability and Medicaid fraud, plus begun initiatives for those who serve in the military and veterans.

Rutledge said she travels to all 75 counties in the state each year to hold Rutledge Roundtables. 

"What these roundtables do is give me the opportunity to hear from all of you and to talk about issues that are important to me," she said. 

As she travels, people tell her they want government to get out of the way and want decisions to be made on science and data and not on politics. 

"I couldn't agree more," she said. 

She said is working to roll back "out of control" regulations she believes are hurting Arkansans and the state. She said she wants to be sure everyone has the opportunity to have a job to take care of themselves and their families. 

Her example of regulations she sees as too far include the Waters of the U.S. rule, which she said hurts farmers, ranchers and developers. Another was the Department of Labor overtime rule. 

"Those are big wins for businesses," Rutledge said. 

Also heard that when businesses look at moving to communities they look at cost of doing business and work force. She said she has worked to roll back regulations insuring low cost energy and ensure there is a workforce. She praised the training in Saline County. She explained college is not for everyone, so job training is important. 

Rutledge said her office handles all criminal appeals in the state and also proactively goes after "bad guys," such as cyber criminals. She encourages parents and grandparents to look at everything on their child's phones and every contact. 

She said it is important to remove those who exploit children online because they will eventually physically harm a child. 

Her office also goes after Social Security Administration and Medicaid fraud. 

"We must make sure social security benefits are there for those who need them for a long time," she said. 

She said in her first four years in office, she has convicted more for Medicaid fraud than the previous 16 years. 

Rutledge talked about how the robocalls not only drive people crazy, but have cost seniors a lot of money. She said her office always tell seniors not to send money. 

"Too many Arkansans are losing their life savings to robocalls," she said. 

She encouraged people to still be on the do not call list. She explained it still works for legitimate businesses, but unfortunately scammers don't follow laws and don't abide by the list. 

Rutledge said her office is working to protect people's constitutional rights. 

 

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